35 Burst results for "Z. Schreiber"

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

04:00 min | Last month

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

"Thank you substrate yes. Thanks kids.

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

03:48 min | Last month

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

"We were.

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

07:46 min | Last month

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

"Diversity group. And i love that allowed the how you phrased. It may try. There's nothing to fix because they're not able Nothing ruins them. They are just their brain is just wide differently. Correct what i what left. Also an impression is earlier when you said that most your child is a gifted one your child is a should be in the program rather than you because she is talented and yet. I'm highly from the brief risk videos. The also have watched them bye. Bye bye bye retreats daughter. I guess that she's very eloquent in very smart also. So that's not very surprising. There are some are articles about people with a of descent. They're really down this being there when he He flew once on a helicopter overseas. If you're aware of that he he oversaw the skyline of new york city and after alighting he drove the whole metropolis from memory. So i i'm not sure if i'm not sure if you have watched the dead queen's gambit. It's still on netflix. Because i think. I'm not sure if she has. Adhd but at ready sure she is also one neuro diverse individuals in some of these individuals. they are What they call samba right wants on want so. They are gifted in a different way extras themselves differently from us. Nerdy all. Yeah they they certainly do and they have gifts they have gifts on your right jennifer The best description i heard was actually from when we enrolled autre in a program Locally called brain balance and bring balance takes a different approach instead of looking at the diagnostic kind of approach toward dealing with autism. It looked at it from more of a neurological. You know what what are the physical aspects. that in terms of left brain right brain functions that can be accentuated and restored through activities through proper diet through a lot of Exercises and activities and so we enrolled our daughter in that it was. You know a complete. You know wild card if you will but it produced significant results It better her hand coordination it helped develop her emotionally and and in other ways. And you know we. We took a chance. I'll miss five six years ago and then more recently there was a harvard business. School study that showed that the principle of what brain balanced does is just as effective as a pharmaceutical or pharmacological option. So that kind of confirm to us We were relatively early adopters but again it underscores what i said earlier that the is there is avid. There are avenues of innovation and and technology out there That can really provide alternatives and also realistic opportunities ballistic options to we took our daughter off admiral and put her on essential oils and it was a remarkable transformation of our daughter The side effects of course went away. She gained weight but she gained back who she is and now she's so probably more expressed than i'd like you to be as you can imagine. She's a teenager on top of everything else so most teenagers don't have don't have a good evidence of having the filters of knowing anyway but my daughter has it in spades but so yeah that that's that kind of brings her up to where we are today. So your your experience with your daughter. Six years ago when she graduated lead and I i found that. It must really be heartbreaking to realize that after those using Been with the teachers and other students nor what to be friends with her. I would assume that she was a mainstream school or was it a special school. She was in a public school but but again she was in a gifted and talented program. But that really focused more on academia because she was so bright particularly in math and science. You know the so-called stem the field You know she did well. I think early on when she was really young. Kids were really nice and accommodated the her but something happens in a child's evolution when they get to row fourth or fifth grade. You know they gain a little bit more maturity and then you know when they see something that's different or that they don't understand they tend to feel more repelled by that than than drawn towards it and i think that's what happened to my my daughter that last school year You know up until that point she you know pretty much was able to enjoy her schooling but i think that last year a couple of the kids that she felt she befriended earlier on started to move away from her. I just got older. I guess things changed and and again because my daughter wasn't really able to social to socialize with them. that's that's that kind of was ultimately what happened. I'm happy to say that subsequently my daughter has really taught herself how to make small talk. she's very conversant And she can hold her own in a conversation and she's been blessed because she's also come she also has four or five cousins My wife has a pretty big family and they've always embraced her and loved her and totally Make her feel comfortable and and and really that. That's i think one of the one of the real heart warming aspects is to see her with her cousins. You just get that. Unconditional love and support. And and they they carry on. You would even know that my daughter is. has any kind of socialization challenges. You try this as kind of a story about good knowledge. You know Did she ever find out. What did she ever learned that she has you know disdained of. Should we say on some..

samba netflix new york city autism jennifer harvard
"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

TNCnow

01:51 min | Last month

"z. schreiber" Discussed on TNCnow

"News channel The new channel hashtag. Tnc now the views opinions insights expressed into following shows are those of the hosts producers guests and viewers. They do not necessarily reflect the position of the chattel question. visit vice..

Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

Judaism Unbound

09:22 min | 10 months ago

Canaan Unconquered - Rachel Havrelock

"And kinda interested in talking about the person joshua. He's the title character of this book and he himself from my understanding of scholarly work on biblical criticism or otherwise. He himself has a story like an origin story. That some people think is kind of a retrospection where like after the fact. He's put into the torah in a way that he may not have always been there. And what i'm referring to is specifically. His glory story is that he's one of the two folks in the twelve spies story that goes into the promised land and says This is great all the other ten folks. All land is terrible. Joshua caleb are on the good side that god likes and because it's the land that they're supposed to go to am. I right in my understanding of that. How scholars look at that person joshua and to what extent to we learn more about him in talking about the book that's named after him. Joshua indeed has a book named after him but is one of the flatter hand more hollow biblical characters. I mean for readers. Go in sequence so you know redo romney in which moses in vary tragic psychological terms wrestles with his impending death. And you know even with the existential reality of death itself. so we're going through it moses psyche and when we can turn out of the penza out of the five books of moses when we opened the book of joshua we have an entirely flat character. You know joshua is really characterized by his obedience and interestingly enough has no title right once called the servant of god is not labeled a profit is not labeled a judge is not labeled a king. I mean we get the news of general because he leads these battles but he doesn't even have a title biblical literature does have great literature and just have complex characters. Josh was not one of them. And you can't really do. A lot of psychological depth with an icon in joshua right becomes an icon of this army of this ancient near right to really kind of like a strobe of what i would call. Ancient national is now. I believe that the book of joshua is ultimately synthesized by a group of editors that we call the or novelists they are the ones that are also very smart editors so joshua ends up becoming a kind of a tool that the nommik editors really use to kinda. We've eras together and also to contain a kind of perfect model right. They wanna leader in their language. Who neither the left nor the right right who keeps torah. You know kind of the cuff at all times. And so they give joshua authority by putting him back the times of most read someone who experienced the whole exodus and even while being a member of this desert generation right the generation of the liberated slaves joshua and his spy buddy caleb right are portrayed is the only two who believe in going to war in this land. So i think that's right. I think the shooter anonymous create joshua to be an icon of the kind of unity to which they aspire and one more piece that all add to your question about joshua and caleb who again are depicted is these faithful spies who go against the will of their generation. I love it kinda that the liberated slaves don't want to go to war. I feel like we haven't done enough to really like reclaim that biblical antiwar position expressed by that generation. But you know. John lewis show like i said he's a. He's a tutoring nommik creation. But there's a lot of northern stuff going on with joshua and caleb is a southern figure just as these editors could really say we've always been at war with canaanites. Their system could also absorb later alliances. So kayla who. This southern figure is a canoe. He's a kennedy and the candidates are ultimately a group that gets absorbed under the tribe of judah the twelve tribes structure is very good at pointing to those people who are on the outside who jumped. Don't join the alliance and saying those e mites those canaanites those jebusites there are enemies. But it's also good at absorbing groups that might join the alliance at their own pace and saying. Oh well that's caleb. He's the head of the kennedy clan and that's a sub family of judah so so both things are possible for trying to account for political alliances. Can we situated some of what you're talking about in some sense of historical time to understand sort of when the actual events that are being responded to her happening versus the time where the story is set. What's going on geopolitically. And the time of the israelites when they are making all these alliances. And then if i understand the approximate timeframe here they're basically writing and rewriting these stories that are functionally taking place around five hundred years earlier. Right i mean the so. It almost becomes like their writing and rewriting and massaging this almost like mythic prehistory. It's not just like they're telling a story from fifty years ago differently. They're telling a story from five hundred years ago differently. I'm just curious if you could give us some sense of what was actually going on in in their world at that time that was motivating them to do all this so yes. Speaking about time wine this is the kind of thing. Bible scholars go to conferences to fight of out. So let me kind of breakdown this picture together with a time line let me start somewhere with is a very important piece of poetry and it's important because because of how it serves as a historical in and that's song of deborah and the song of jabra with we believe based on its grammar and syntax is one of the oldest texts in the bible and some people even speak about the year twelve hundred bc. Jabra sings about a war and she sings that some tribes came and fought in the war in some sat home so she disparages the tribes who sat home and she sings the praises of the tribes who k. That's very important to me because it shows that the success or failure of a given tribe in war depended upon their allies. Were so we see major major motivation for these processes of consolidation. Many scholars have shown how end the nine eight century. B c e you've got these policies of consolidating clans in schreiber's into something that looks like a pro donation. This is happening in the region. And it's about war you know. Because if you're national formation right if or if you're a bunch of tribes and you've got a consolidated federation of people's you're gonna lose but then we get you know eighth century b. c. e. the rise of empires in particular syria and the threat of assyria marching. You know or the egyptian empire has its second wind around this time. It's that process. That i think gets people thinking we've got come up. You know with a larger scale organization in army. And so josh. Shaw gives this army which is kind of being configured in real time it gives this army kind of heroic prehistory behind which people can march. And so it means you know that it works and doesn't work because the syrian army takes out the northern kingdom the kingdom of israel in seven twenty two but ends up sparing the kingdom of

Joshua Joshua Caleb Caleb Joshua Authority Romney Kennedy Josh John Lewis Kayla Jabra Deborah Schreiber Syria Army Shaw Syrian Army Israel
Anti-Oedipus 2021 Chapter 1, Section 1 - Desiring Production - burst 02

Deleuze and Guattari Quarantine Collective

02:17 min | 11 months ago

Anti-Oedipus 2021 Chapter 1, Section 1 - Desiring Production - burst 02

"It is at work everywhere functioning smoothly at times at other times in fits and start it breathes. It eats it heats it shits and fucks what a mistake to have ever said the ad everywhere it is machines real ones out figured of one's machines driving other machines machines being driven by other machines with all the necessary couplings and connections. An oregon machine is plugged into an energy source machine. The one produces flow that the other interrupts the breast is a machine that produces milk in the mouth is machine coupled to it. The mouth of the anorexic wavers between several functions its possessor is uncertain as to whether it is an eating machine and anal machina talking machine or a breathing machine. Asthma attacks since we are all handyman. Each with his own little machines for every organ machine and energy machine all time lows in interruption doug schreiber has sunbeam's into that a solar anus rest assured that it works judge strieber feels something produces something and is capable of explaining the process theoretically something is produced the effects of a machine not mere metaphors. It is so fun to reread this after reading the entire book. Yeah and then you know there's little things that we can actually notice that we probably didn't notice before for example when they start in they say what a mistake to ever said to it everywhere it is machine. There's like three levels into fruit in Analysis the the. I'd it'd be it. The s you know person there like the ego and the superego is the it and then there's the it which is unconscious So you know what a mistake to ever said it. so basically. It's what they're arguing for is a passage from the superego to the understanding of the as the pre individual Machine that produces a subject so even in the first sentence. We miss this. I thought we read it. But i you know it becomes pleaded pretty clear because it's it's just not a play on words.

Fifty Two Recordings One Hundred And Forty Hours Each ONE Coups Day Weeks Forty Hurley My Favorite Sections Organ Doug Schreiber Judge Strieber Sunbeam Oregon Asthma
Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

"Announcement of the retirement of a man who's probably one of the biggest figures in current day journalism. Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron. He is retiring from the Washington Post after eight years on the job. No, no to a staff today. Baron says he'll leave at the end of next month. Caps of 45 year career in journalism, the post 1 10 Pulitzer prizes under his leadership. Baron calls the entire experience deeply meaningful, but it's 66. He feels he's ready to move on. You may remember Baron also edited The Miami Herald and the Boston Globe is working the Globe. Was portrayed by actor Liev Schreiber in the Oscar winning film spotlight about the Catholic Church sex

Marty Baron Washington Post Baron Pulitzer Boston Globe The Miami Herald Liev Schreiber Oscar Catholic Church
The Truth Behind Launching Companies with Vinnie Tortorich

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:35 min | 1 year ago

The Truth Behind Launching Companies with Vinnie Tortorich

"Vinnie ceo. What's up to fire nation and sheer something interesting about yourself. That most people don't know hello fire. Nation graft to be back john. Thanks for having me on. Wow something most people don't know. Well here's a deal. I'm health and fitness expert and most people have been into ultra cycling ultra vents in holding. So oddly enough. I love to exercise and of course i eat right and take care of my health. So people would think. Oh well fitness is the most important thing to this guy and fitness may be well. It's number one bay but it may have a rival Financial health has always been as important to me. You know just watching my money watching where goes protecting it. Investing it myself not needing it in the hands of other people. So i look at at financial fitness as long as much or more than i do my own physical fitness. I love hearing that for sure. And i mean we actually had a really fun chat before i hit the record button here where both myself and vinnie fire nation. We escaped california. We're not talking about the fires we're talking about the insane taxes which by the way vinnie. I don't know if you're so tracking this but they're raising state taxes to sixteen point five percent there that's just state taxes which is absolutely mind blowing. The only problem. I have with vinny to be honest with you. Fire nation is that he stopped about twelve hundred miles to short he. He needs to get into a boat even a canoe paddle out into the atlantic. Come a little self from virginia vinnie. Angle yourself down towards the equator. Don't stop to you. Hit puerto rico and come join the world of four percent my man come on you know what we actually talk about because you know my wife is european so i could be anywhere in the world. That has a computer. If i can run a computer could be anywhere in the world and it felt so good leaving california and going to a quote unquote normal state. But we've talked about it. You know. I keep going buddy. John says that guy's killing. Okay let me just let me just say this. This is what i want to happen. I want you and your wife to come down. Visit me for a weekend. And i will blow your minds with beauty. Amazingness of the islands and by the way from saint joe from from san juan international airport. We have direct flights to germany to portugal. Talking five hours in the air. You're in europe. It's absolutely unbelievable. So that's for another time but the invitations always there have any i would love to host here love to. I wanna talk right now about you and starting companies because a lot of people a lot of people in fire nation included. They think that they need to go directly to outside investors to go to venture capital to raise all of this money before they even think about starting a company but you started a very successful. Vitamin company was zero outside investors. Talk to us about that. How did you pull that off. Yeah i think you have my partner. Andy schreiber the vitamin business on the show at some point and what had happened was the whole time. I was in california to reason i went. There was to start up businesses. And every time i had a great idea it turned out. Man made like two or three pennies on a dollar. Because when you're borrowing someone else's money are you have these investors. They're taking the big financial. Had a big chance. Even though you ll invented something they walked lion's share out it and when you go to a bank and beg a bank for money first off you have to have a like a whole business plan written out in the whole thing. And i every time i went to a bank and a wanted to start a vitamin company. There were like who are you. And why should we trust you with my with my plan in place. They were like yeah. We don't think so. And so that's how that whole thing started I got lucky that that was a lucky move in my life. I wrote book. And i it. The book is called fitness confidential. And the book a year. How they say you should dance like no one is looking yeah. I wrote a book as if no one was going to have anything and everything that i wanted to put it in a book went into that buck and it turned out that it was this weird colossal success

Vinnie Ceo Virginia Vinnie San Juan International Airport California Vinnie Vinny Andy Schreiber Puerto Rico John Portugal Germany Europe
How to take awesome photos while surfing

Talking Tech

03:50 min | 1 year ago

How to take awesome photos while surfing

"Offer for our listeners. So stay tuned after the show to find out more. So. We've all seen these awesome surfing shots and. To get them so well while they're certainly while I've got the original surfer girl she's. Jan Schreiber. The photographer from the beach who also is an awesome surfer and takes Mason surfing shots. So Jan how do you focus on your surfing? While, you're taking pictures on Yudo pro. Yes. So I when I'm searching, there's two different ways that I use. The GOPRO one is on one sir forward I have a little clip on the front of the board guys have all seen that but then that shot is just of me and I don't really need a million shots at myself. Then I also have on that same clip, it's called Bite Mouth Bite Mount, and you you know it's does what you think does he stick the thing in your mouth and you can hold it and you can paddle. The wage really vague I leave it in my mouth and I use my arms to balance, and if I feel like I have a good command of the wave I pull it out of my mouth and point the camera people or wherever I want. And get an amazing video and then from that video I a lot of times we'll just pull stills out. Does it break your focus when I mean it looks to me I'm a novice watch people. But when you've got that wave, it seems to last for five ten seconds if that. If you're focusing on taking the shot while you're trying to keep your balance isn't that rather hard? Yeah. Sometimes, it doesn't work out so well and I you know I wipe out. sometimes I just point the camera and hope for the best Yeah I I like. It doesn't always work, and then sometimes I'm just paddling and catching people as they come and then the wave crashes on me and I'm you know tumbled a bit but That's all the fun. So that's the bite now. But when you put it in a in amount on the surfboard, does that behind you or in front of you? You can put it behind you, but I have it on the front of my board. So generally catches just me. I could turn it around and catch whatever's in front of the word, but I don't generally do that. Most of the photos that I ended up posting I'm usually holding the camera. So like I said I, use that bite mount all the time I mean that thing is awesome. I look like the total door with it in my mouth is big orange thing but I don't really care and. Why not the chest mount because Gopro has something you can just attached to your chest press record and never touch the thing that's true. you could do that but you're laying down on the board I. think that would be kind of awkward and then you would get wax on the Lens. So to me that would be kind of a problem tell us about some of your favorite shots, the gun. Yeah. A couple of weeks ago at it was sunrise and it was just incredible sunrise. As you know, we've had all these fires in the pollution in the sky makes beautiful sunrises sunsets. And it was. It was just an amazing morning where the water was calm. It was we call it classy conditions where there's no wind in the water looks class moving class. And it was just this. Sky And it was just a gorgeous morning and the one of my other favorite places is my little local beach break here Laguna the ocean is so clear exceeded the bottom as you're writing wave and the other day I did catch the wave. Before it broke while I was writing and you could just see down to the bottom. You can see the finish the rocks is just it's an incredible experience, right? So you can see John's work at at Adventure Muse on instagram. Is Is there an underscore ther- there is it's adventure amused with underscored the end. Did over twitter.

Jan Schreiber Yudo Adventure Muse Twitter Mason Gopro John
Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
Liev Schreiber says 'there will be more' Ray Donovan

Jason and Alexis

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Liev Schreiber says 'there will be more' Ray Donovan

"Fans writers and actors were caught off guard by Showtime sudden cancellation of ray Donovan that is show star Liam Schreiber said it's not over yet kind of a cryptic post on Instagram last night or Wednesday night rather he wrote it seems like your voices have been heard too soon to say how or when but with a little luck and your on going support there will be more ray Donovan maybe they'll pick it up again on another network another streaming yeah he's in talks to put that on just on Netflix or something you know what I mean yeah and the fans will follow sure that seems like a Netflix show yeah I've always been interested in watching it I love him he's a fantastic actor so that was the first full season at first season it's great I just need to go back yeah so many things out there to watch how you gonna keep up right

Ray Donovan Liam Schreiber Netflix
First poster for Wes Anderson's 'The French Dispatch' dispatched ahead of imminent first trailer

Lights Camera Barstool

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

First poster for Wes Anderson's 'The French Dispatch' dispatched ahead of imminent first trailer

"I look at the French dispatched. The next move for Sanderson and we're recording on Tuesday. Trey was coming out Wednesday us. We don't have the trailer I imagine we. We know what we can expect a lot of people this movie. He released a poster. It's the most wes anderson poster of all time it's supposed to look like a cover of the New Yorker Magazine Snakes and the New Yorker also had the exclusive rights to release the first images this from the movie Has So many people in the movie. Bill Murray Franson Tilda. Swinton Jeffrey Wright Adrian Brodie Benicio ACL. Del Toro Owen Wilson Timothy Xiaomei Lee said do Liev Schreiber Elizabeth Moss Edward Norton Willem Defoe search around and Kristoff vaults Alz Jason Schwartzman Rupert Friend Henry. Winkler Bob Balabagn. I mean Anjelica Huston. The list goes on and

Del Toro Owen Wilson Timothy X Bill Murray Franson Tilda New Yorker Magazine Trey Adrian Brodie Benicio Acl Anjelica Huston Edward Norton Willem Defoe Liev Schreiber Elizabeth Moss Wes Anderson Jason Schwartzman Sanderson Bob Balabagn Swinton Jeffrey Wright
Defective software could have doomed Boeing's crew capsule

Burn Fat Orlando.com

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Defective software could have doomed Boeing's crew capsule

"This month a close call for one of Boeing's shining projects defective software could have doomed Boeing's crew capsule ABC's Dave Schreiber has more the first triple the starliner cancel that was destined for the international space station in December had to be cut short Boeing says it's automatic timer was off by eleven hours the software trouble left the unmanned camp so the wrong orbit just after it took off NASA says if a ground controller had not intervened the starliner could have been destroyed NASA must still decide of Boeing needs to do another test flight

Boeing ABC Dave Schreiber Nasa
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

Unstructured Interviews

14:00 min | 2 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

"He signed onto being LAPD double agent. Basically that was that was the end of his freedoms now back to the altar and all that I did find a book called spiritualism or SPIRITISM BY G H S. Two books are you follow. ESTA Brooks Yeah I'm sorry to tell you that. ESTA Brooks in. My research is one of those guys even middle of mind control. He's like Sidney gottlieb kind of character. He's like the Louis Jolyon west of UCLA who did Mind Control Control Experiments. You know the CIA gave huge amounts of money. The Not only to you know what you would think be. You know typical prisons prisons but also to universities you know to journalists William F. Buckley was on the CIA payroll Eric. So you get a sense of how insidious their influence was back. Then the unabomber. If I recall was part of the experiments show me say. I've heard that as well home so so I guess you get A sense of Reagan and of course Nixon being president and their sense of militarism and paranoia toward what was considered to be a possible revolution. And I don't think we'll ever see it's like again in. US history for literally. Yeah yeah literally I was just GonNa say Eric People like Reagan and younger and Richard. Nixon believed there was going to be a military attempt at overthrowing the US government which I think is absurd. Well they were being. There was a a lot of people who are feeding that stuff too. It's like I couldn't help but think of parallels with Colin Westbrook and how he was sort of running you know donald freeze but then. There's some speculation about Krishna. VENTA being influence on Charles Manson and all of these guys had this running theme of well. Okay I'm it's hard to get my thoughts together but I found it very interesting that you were talking about the worries of I guess you say Black Revolution and they were emulating the situation with the SLA. But Charles Manson was emulating that situation or his family's emulating that situation as well in the opposite one of the things I talk about on the Etro tour a bus tour of Manson land God bless Richard and Kim because they have introduced me to people in the La Sheriff's department and the it once again it's the Black Panthers it turns out that there's an angle by which Manson's since followers especially the quote unquote girls were trading dynamite found in abandoned gold mines in California uh with Black Panthers And in exchange the girls brought back to Manson's group guns and one day the Black Panthers there's greeted Manson's girls with the dynamite and said thank you. Now get the hell Outta here or before we kill you. And that was the end the relationship so the L. L. A. P. D. and the La Sheriff's both could have arrested while they did arrest Charles Manson and his followers initially and then let them out and then the infamous murders happen they could have kept them in jail and basically my research reveals through. You know Richard in Kim helping me that the LAPD and and the sheriff's Department thought that there was going to be an a violent engagement between Charles Manson's followers and the Black Panthers and they left them out. They're hoping for that engagement. So that they could sweep up and arrest any black panthers so so there's a similarity in terms of the theme of we'll do anything to break up the Black Panthers enters Between revolutions and and of course the Manson murders and would it be fair speculation. I've always kind of felt that Charles Manson himself was nowhere near as dynamic or fantastic as as billing. Well if you're talking about as music music Eric I would tend to agree with you. I think it's pretty bland Charles Manson again. I like because I've I started writing in writing feeder when I write a non fiction book I want the protagonist no matter how negative to be three dimensional. Sure and and without apologizing Charles Manson. You've got to remember that. His mother was a prostitute never knew his father he was raped in jail and within the reformatories and he was not a normal guy before he got out of his teams. I agree so one thing he learned was how to manipulate violate young women to to tell them they were beautiful. He learned from Dale Carnegie. He actually worked for a while for scientology. What was wild he were you got cut off? Yeah he was he was a guy who worked for scientology in Hollywood. And we're and we're trying to recruit people and that didn't work out so well my good friend Paul Krassner who we lost. Not Too long ago had done a lot of really great articles about the SLA in about Manson found out that Manson was let go by scientologist because he was a a little creepy but he wanted the reason he studied. Eric is he wanted to learn how to manipulate the the women that would basically become his family and again without going. Too far down the rabbit hole. The Manson land tour talks about the fact that he watching completely in control of the family. Exactly why Tex Watson and Linda Kosabe Ian were running drug deals without his is knowing it Tex Watson introduced Charles Manson to Sharon Tate. We wasn't a random murder so if you take week if you take Quentin Tarantino's amusing movie and you take Tom O'Neill's chaos book which is twenty years of here. All all the people I met and I still don't know what happened. And you set all that aside and say this guy was a lunatic who manipulated people. And he was burning people on drug deals and the people in his family got out of control and and killed people without his authorization nation. You have a better understanding of what Manson was about. And if you look into then Bouli. OC who wrote helter skelter which sold a couple million copies sir. You understand that. He was accused of prosecutorial misconduct. Because he he was trying to use Susan Atkins as a star witness. And the man tonight said you testify against Charleen. You're in big trouble. So all of a sudden she was unreliable liable and Buluwayo say was stuck with Linda Ca Sabin and he said you know. Put your hair up in pigtails and look innocent. Well forget the fact that you were one of the biggest LSD dealers in Boston will forget the fact that you and Tex Watson were burning people in drug deals in Los Angeles Angeles and you will testify that Charles Manson ordered the murders. And if you do that we will give you immunity. And if you don't do that you you will never see the light of day again. This pretty common honestly it's unique to The Manson family. I mean they're always trying to flip somebody sure but in essence they're flipping. Linda Kosabe Ian to lie so so actually Bouli. OC is also Guilty of of Leaking stuff to the press which could have created a mistrial and Charles Manson could've walked and and part of all of this. I guess the best way to wrap this part up part of all this is that they had a legitimate fear the LA DA's office and that fear was if Charles Manson was ripping off people with drugs and Tex Watson and Bobby Beausoleil went crazy in drug burns and killed somebody in a panic. Charles Charles Manson is an accessory and in one thousand nine hundred seventy and accessory to murder could get eighteen months. Can you imagine what the world interest in the Manson murders. What would have happened if the La da even if they got convictions actions against the others? If Charles Manson only got eighteen months they had to lie and say that he ordered the murders nothing. He's a good guy and then it should have walked free but there was no way in hell and again it's ever younger. Are Powell who worked with Ronald Reagan and the SLA Soleil was ever younger. Who basically went to Buoy Osi? Who was two years in the? DA's office went around the DA. who was in charge? WHO said? Hey it's just a bunch of drug burns and and younger realized that Bouli Osi was saying not only. Could it turn our reputation if Manson gets accessory but it will make our reputation in our careers if we say. He's the Spin Golly who hypnotize people to murder rap thing. They're just a bunch of burnout to screwed up in drug burns. And that my friend is the inside nine-story of the Manson murders. Since truthfully nobody would really care if it wasn't for Sharon tate same way nobody really care about the SLA without Patty. Hearst this is this is very true which is a kind of a sad comment because when you when you think about you know what the LAPD in the CIA a were doing. It's terrible it. It's a horrible history and people should know more about this stuff but again people perceive it as radical politics and it doesn't sell and so forth and so on ask you about that a little bit because you you know admittedly elise year I guess Somewhere to the left of Bernie Sanders. We're looking at practical guy. I know that when Elizabeth Warren says I I want Medicare for all that she's making a huge tactical error the politician because to not recognize. That's how powerful the health industry and big Pharma is in. This country is to just be naive. Like they're the things that you and I want in World Eric and then there are things that are possible given the system. You can't boil the ocean now. That's not where I was going where I was going to sit. I I look at you know a lot of stuff. There happened there in. It's obviously from the laugh. Door would be perceived as left. But they're also have been some Bruce Miss Justices or you know real questions about things going to the right and you know a lot of people say that Waco way out of hand and there are there. Instances like that because Waco kind of generated forget the other one ruby rich sorry Ruby Ridge route in college by most as terror waivers and they were hard core right winging borderline Nazis. I I know of that but I'm kind end of wondering if this is not a government. That's anti laughed. Maybe it's just it's a government that's anti anti-government does that make sense it. It's kind of. I'm curious because I've been on Shows we're the host is far right but what they appreciate about. My research is that I'm saying look at what these agencies have done in the name of justice and the law so you it's kind of you all of a sudden there's a middle middle ground shirt now of course if I talked about you know forgiving college debt. They go get off my show. But you know there's this interesting middle ground on of of people who do not trust the government and of course you know if Congress is at sixteen percent and you know. Donald Trump's impeached reached obviously. There's a huge movement in this country. Rejecting trust in government. The question is how do you change the system to make it better. there's so many things that prevent that lobbying You know campaign finance reform. you know citizens united there. There are so many things that enabled this system that a lot of people say. Hey lobbying thing is a form of graft it's a it's a an industry paying someone in order to look at the bills that they wants. Shouldn't it on the floor of Congress. Well that doesn't sound very very democratic to me. But that's the way our country operates so wild well DI radical but then you say okay..

Charles Charles Manson murder Tex Watson LAPD CIA Black Panthers Donald Trump ESTA Brooks Sidney gottlieb Sharon Tate OC Eric People Ronald Reagan Bouli Linda Kosabe Ian US UCLA Louis Jolyon William F. Buckley scientology
Hallmark under fire for pulling TV ads showing same-sex couple

Mark Blazor

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Hallmark under fire for pulling TV ads showing same-sex couple

"It's the time of love but not for this group some gay themed ads are being pulled from the hallmark channel ABC station rubber explained the cable channel has pulled the ads for a wedding planning website after pressure from a conservative advocacy group we had featured two brides kissing at the altar the backlash comes as the family friendly hallmark channel is in the middle of its holiday programming a spokesperson called the controversy a distraction there was immediate criticism on Twitter Ellen DeGeneres said isn't it almost twenty twenty Dave Schreiber ABC

Ellen Degeneres ABC Dave Schreiber
A convicted murderer who momentarily died says his life sentence has been served

Glenn Beck

02:08 min | 2 years ago

A convicted murderer who momentarily died says his life sentence has been served

"There's an interesting case is a jail house lawyer by the name of Benjamin Schreiber and he was convicted of bludgeoning a man to death because he was involved with that this man's girlfriend and they had an affair and that they decided that that this guy was gonna die so he clubs him to death with the wooden handle the pick up pick axe I mean pretty brutal stuff so he's found guilty of first degree murder and sentenced to life without parole okay now what happens to him two decades later he's hit with severe septic poisoning he develops kidney stones according to court records were so large they caused him to urinate internally and then he fell unconscious and then he died in the hospital and doctors were able to bring him back to life by administering adrenaline epinephrine through an IV people you'll hear that all the time I was dead and they brought me back to life it does happen and there is no issue that happened to him so here is just a school right legal argument I can give him all the credit in the world he filed a legal appeal saying that he died before he was resuscitated therefore he had fulfilled his life sentence I'm done I don't write and the court said no as a matter fact dying for those few seconds is not a get out of jail for free card or yeah I do the Iowa court of appeals and saying that and I love this site language in the a the decision he will remain in prison until a medical examiner determines that he is dead for good as opposed to just dad for a period of time and the court also wrote Schreiber is either a live in which he must remain in prison or he is dead in which case this appeal is

Benjamin Schreiber First Degree Murder Epinephrine Iowa Two Decades
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

34:27 min | 2 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Play or apple APP store. We'll come back to radio uh shut his and do his job like and he you can shane it's been going on for you take the great you Taylor they are say for now hunger style Taylor he lies still in his as Guy abused a we have a weekend Uh uh where a in your liquor command Oh you know you must choose from nineteen sixty seven Peter Paul and Mary Great Mandela Right here on deep dish radio my guest today is author Brad Schreiber we're discussing his book music is power Peter Paul and Mary featured prominently in Chapter Pretty much dedicated to the to the folk music scene of the of the late fifties and six these yeah they called it the folk music revival that Bob Dylan and Peter Paul and Mary and Joan Baez and all those other wonderful artists fostered yeah this one means a lot to me personally a couple of reasons one is I saw Peter Yarrow do this at San Francisco state and he had kind of a rat speedway's and he was playing Solo and sang side tears pouring down my cheeks at the end of it so years later in fact within the last two years there's I was fortunate enough to interview Peter Paulin not married because she's gone but Pierre Paul and Theo Theodore McKell and I said to Peter do you remember that time um you sang the Great Mandela at San Francisco State he goes no I really don't remember her I say well I'll never forget and richie havens is called this the greatest antiwar song ever written it's pretty interesting if you think about the words him because it goes from the way families were apart during the Vietnam War yeah between father and son to political prisoners dying to the idea that in if you if you you've only given your life you've only wasted your life the idea the ideas metaphysical what is a life for have you really wasted your life if you lose in an effort to change society I don't think any other song in the history of sociopolitical music has ever asked that question which is why I think this is it's an extraordinary song excellent choice as we were listening to it here in the studio I got thinking about all the other songs of that era and of that genre that you mentioned in the book and even some that that you know that exist outside of that and I I I was excited to hear why you chose that particular one it's this it's this very strong message yeah including what they do with the harmonies of the Andy It's just phenomenal Albert Grossman you know some people have if things to say about him but as their manager he's the one who came up with the idea of Peter Paul and Mary on three separate microphones yeah and when you you're on headphones as as tim did it's startling in its clarity in its beauty and you know so Albert Grossman didn't just manage Bob Dylan and Peter on Mary he changed the way folk music was recorded yeah I in fact as a note to the listener if you listened very carefully you'll hear that the the recording that I chose was pulled from vinyl and you can hear the POPs in the hisses so I wanted to give you that that nine hundred sixty seven experience opposed to digital copy I wanted to given the opportunity to really hear the way it was intended to be heard and sonically sonically it's beautiful again it's another one of those songs that if you did not speak English you'd think what Oh what a lovely lovely song lemon tree or something it's so pleasant and and then you hear the words and it pokes you in the is wonderful and and that's what it's supposed to do it's supposed to haunt you and supposed to inspire you and again I can't say enough about that metaphysical message which I think is y Richie havens loved it so much yeah I it's written by the way Peter Paul and Mary of course covered other people's music right so Peter Yarrow wrote this all by himself and Oh my God you should have been writing more songs but where we got to nineteen sixty seven pal yeah yeah did did Richie Havens Cover this did richie havens did as a matter of fact did a great great version of it now of course the Great Mandela is disturbing as it should And is not going to be licensed on TV commercials used an awful lot I know in in movies you know you're not going to hear the great Mondello in like a comic book with it it's called the revolution will not be televised and you will not be able to stay home you will not be able to plug in turn on cop out you will be able to lose your cell phone during commercials because the revolution that'd be televised Revolution will not be televised the revolution will not be you without commercial with the revolution will not John Missile Spiro Agnew confiscated from I'm sanctuary the revolution will not be televised the revolution will not be brought to you by the head will not made the Revolution will not give your mouth feels the revolution will not get rid of the no the revolution will not make you look by because the revolution will not be televised them that will be that means that will be exciting sitting down place run out of all the monorail with a brand new process that won't read great depression just the proper Ho -cation held at me take relevant and women will not have expanded down the chain for tomorrow because black looking for bright nate the revolution will be televised and that will be the Harry Potter woman and the president's Glen Campbell known as the Revolution will not be the revolution will not be right back after a message about a white white lightning bedroom the tag the giant and your toilet bowl the revolution will not go with cope the revolution will not might turn the bathroom will put you in the and Gil Scott Heron the revolution will not be televised all was powerful always powerful great jazzman Brian Jackson that baseline is just incredibly sumptuous. Yeah a song like this of course the pop culture references and the political references are old dated but look we're still dealing with police violence right instead of Spiro Agnew instead of Spiro Agnew and and John Mitchell were dealing with Rudy Giuliani and and trump's other POWs so here here we have the corruption of politics the inequity in society between people of Color and people who are white and you can substitute whatever pop culture references you want in place Oh bull winkle and Julia Julia Being Diane Carroll who recently attorney who was the first running regular black lead character in American television on Julia true so that's what was going on in nineteen seven Andy When Gill wrote this remarkable song which has been used in you know in pop culture over and over ironically exploited in commercials times yeah yeah it made me think that it would be interesting to see this updated every ten or fifteen years idea and have him you know I'm not going to get into politics on the show because it this is really about the book but have him get into you know making updating the rest France's every music is Bauer is about sociopolitical change and these songs in part of the book is looking at the lives of the artists and how what they're dealing with personally while they're writing these songs that changed society and in the case of Gil Scott here and we're talking about being addicted to crack there is AH heartbreakingly beautiful New Yorker Profile of guilt towards the end of his life and he wouldn't leave the house he was always getting high and the writer for the New Yorker said Hey Gil let's go out and grab something to eat and Gil looked at him in that sly sense of humor he has and he said Man when I hear that Sunshine's not good for you you know he was incredibly sensitive poet in some ways we he can say I think fairly that Gil Scott Heron lead us to think about poetry slams you know st poetry yeah you know the watts prophets and and other groups like that where early on in the sixties but Gil Scott Heron said look it's okay to quote unquote rap but what is it about and even win rap music which eventually became hip hop came out Gil. Scott Heron was saying Okay you've got this microphone would you want to say with it what is the song about there's plenty wrong with this country pick a topic don't talk about you know you gotTa Yeah Right Party will you know there's something more to talk about yeah and so he is a very legendary figure not only in terms of socio political protest but in terms of black culture really concentrating on poetry and for that I think he you know deserves the half chapter he gets his power great fantastic chapter and and having this in the back of your head as you read it is a fantastic now transitioning to another prominent black poet who was not only a brilliant poet but astounding musician where do we go next well it's the same year it's nineteen seventy right and Jimi Hendrix's version of the Star spangled banner at the Woodstock again art fair in August sixty nine sixty nine so that's fifty we just celebrated fifty year anniversary of that right so th there were maybe four or five hundred thousand in people to start early in the morning of the last day there were about thirty thousand people who saw Jimmy and a newly put together Dan play this and forever UH uh-huh Sir Yeah yeah in Uh live from Max yes cours farm in August of nineteen sixty nine James Marshall Hendricks and his band covering of course our nation's anthem You go into it in detail in the book but give me an idea why this particular version of the Star spangled banner is is is culturally significant well so many musicians have responded to their emotional state when they first heard this and thank God for Michael Wad Lease Woodstock film in Music Is Power I've interviewed John McLaughlin the amazing guitarist who founded the Mojave Schnur Orchestra he said with first time I heard Jimmy play this heard the recording I was stunned it was it was overwhelming I remember being an interview with Brian Eno physician and composer and producer he said I had tears coming down my face the first time I heard this is maybe one of the few songs in the history of popular music that had no lyrics and was a political statement the promise of America and democracy set against juxtaposed against the sounds of screening and missiles exploding and bullets singing right it speaks to not only our history here in the civil war but the wars that we are continually getting involved with overseas and makes you Chian not world war two whichever way considers the good war but the other wars why we get into them so that's why.

Gil Scott Heron Gil Spiro Agnew apple Julia Julia Gil Scott Taylor Jimmy Scott Heron Jimi Hendrix France Brian Eno Diane Carroll Bauer Mojave Schnur Orchestra attorney bull winkle Sunshine
Joe Exotic: A Dark Journey Into the World of a Man Gone Wild

Hollywood And Crime

02:52 min | 2 years ago

Joe Exotic: A Dark Journey Into the World of a Man Gone Wild

"I'd like to welcome you to a most unusual wedding. It was the winter of two thousand fourteen in in a little dance hall and when you would oklahoma a wedding was just getting started. The room was decorated in hot pink and tiger stripes. The the audience was a mix of humans and animals several people there with different kinds of monkeys. There were for the most part in their strollers or on on their mom's lap or in their shirt. Jacqueline thompson was among the guests. She watched his three men in matching hot pink. Cowboy shirts and black jeans walked to the front of the hall. Today we have gathered to witness. The union of travers john and joe joe said that he always had two boyfriends at a time he never just had one. Joe was the groom in the middle. He had a chrome pistol hanging from a leather holster elster around his hips and a bleach blonde mullet his real name was joe schreiber vogel but he was better known as joe exotic in the book of ecclesiastes dis bet you didn't know this. We are even better for triple. Braided record is not easily broken jones fifty one years old one of his husbands to be was in his late twenty s and the other was just nineteen eighteen okay and can we have the rings fleas jacqueline in the other guests watched as a small eight gripping. A white satin pillow was carried carried up to the front of the hall after me these rings as a joe slithering on one fiancee's finger and then on the other other. You may now kiss after the wedding. The party moved down the street to joe zoo. There joe was in his element climbing in and out of cages while a camera crew captured it all for his youtube channel at one point mean joe lead jacqueline over to bear cage handed her a marshmallow and told her put it between your lips cypriot my mouth and i'm like you now hesitating to put my face through the bar and then he grabbed her head and shoved it up against the cage inches from the bears mouth and they're just all of a sudden grab the food in his tongue ended up going down my throat and all i remember is getting a mouthful of sand and flour it was like i was gagging and he was laughing so hard animals pitas fans and they got that on tape too

Joe Joe Jacqueline Thompson Joe Zoo Joe Schreiber Vogel JOE Oklahoma Youtube Travers John Jones Fifty One Years
Too Many cups of coffee could raise migraine risk

Atlanta's Morning News

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Too Many cups of coffee could raise migraine risk

"News about your health that extra Cup of coffee could leave you with a splitting headache Harvard researchers say people who suffer from migraines that drink three cups of coffee or more increase their risk of getting the intense headache attack by forty percent ABC's day Schreiber says five cups of coffee raises the risk by one hundred and sixty one percent migraines affect ten percent of the world population women more than

Schreiber Harvard Sixty One Percent Forty Percent Ten Percent Three Cups Five Cups
At least 3 dead in garlic festival shooting in San Francisco Bay area

Dave Ramsey

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

At least 3 dead in garlic festival shooting in San Francisco Bay area

"Of a shooting in northern California ABC's Alex stone reports the shooting happening at the Gilroy garlic festival Gil Roy years south of San Francisco in the southern end of the San Francisco Bay Area the garlic festival is a very popular festival there were reports of shots fired people running out of the area there are reports that there are victims potentially multiple victims again we city councilman is saying that three are dead twelve wounded and the shooter one shooter in custody the festival is a nationally known three day event date Schreiber A. B.

California Alex Stone San Francisco Gil Roy San Francisco Bay Schreiber A. B Three Day
New Jersey selects Denmark's Orsted for major offshore wind project

News, Traffic and Weather

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

New Jersey selects Denmark's Orsted for major offshore wind project

"While the debates surrounding climate change continues new jersey is one of several blue states moving ahead with efforts to tackle it a._b._c.'s dave schreiber has more new jersey's state board of public utilities has picked a danish company To build a wind energy project off the coast of Atlantic City Denmark's largest energy company, or stead, which already operates a wind farm off Rhode Island's block island says the project known as ocean. Wind could power up to a half a million homes, when completed in twenty twenty four governor Phil Murphy says if New Jersey's offshore wind industry will create thousands of jobs and invite new investments into the

New Jersey Atlantic City Denmark Dave Schreiber Rhode Island Phil Murphy
Cuba launches widespread rationing in face of crisis

WBZ Midday News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Cuba launches widespread rationing in face of crisis

"In Cuba crisis with food shortages, and it's now lead to rationing across that country. ABC's Dave Schreiber government of Cuba says it will begin widespread rationing of chicken, eggs rice beans, soap and other basic products. Because. Of a grave economic crisis. Various forms of rationing will take place to deal with shortages of staple foods Havana, blames the hardening of the US trade embargo by the Trump administration. Economists also say there's been a plunge in aid from Venezuela

Cuba Dave Schreiber Trump Administration ABC United States Havana Venezuela
Cuba, Dave Schreiber And Trump Administration discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Cuba, Dave Schreiber And Trump Administration discussed on WBZ Morning News

"Meanwhile, in Cuba, a crisis with food shortages ABC's, Dave Schreiber has more government of Cuba says it will begin widespread rationing of chicken, eggs, rice beans, soap and other base. Products because of a grave economic crisis. Various forms of rationing will take place to deal with shortages of staple foods Havana, blames the hardening of the US trade embargo by the Trump administration. Economists also say there's been a plunge in aid from Venezuela to

Cuba Dave Schreiber Trump Administration United States Havana Venezuela ABC
New plastic surgery statis reveal trends toward body enhancement - Science Blog

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

New plastic surgery statis reveal trends toward body enhancement - Science Blog

"News. Plastic surgery patients are more knowing more about their body than their face ABC's. Dave Schreiber, the American society of plastic surgeons yearly statistics report shows a a quarter more million cosmetic procedures performed in two thousand eighteen compared with twenty seven, gene. It was a one percent increase overall surgeries top procedures included breast augmentation liposuction nose reshaping eyelid surgery and tummy tucks. Minimally invasive cosmetic procedures like vote talks chemical peels and laser hair removal saw a surge of two percent. But compared to the year two thousand procedures decreased by five percent

Dave Schreiber ABC American Society Of Five Percent One Percent Two Percent
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And so the political scientists would respond to you. Oh, you're not really you're a covert partisan. That's my donor migraine image was my daughter ADA, my brain imaging data would suggest that actually there are an study study having published yet, but I'm working right now. Now that there are actual differences in patterns of brain activity between people who identifies non-partisans than partisans, and they're in areas of the brain that are that are involved in social cognition primer on that knowledge ago. Yes. So it's it's some activity in a medial steer courtesies. So these are part of the brain dead on it. It's just been connected to basically in Antonio Damasio talks about it as the the hub of all hubs in the brain. Where all the parts come together on Zog's in in Alzheimer's. He observed inches if that's a good with that conclusion felt that the self dissolve because that region was deteriorating so severely. So yeah, I mean, the fact that that those differences between partisans non-partisans found there think is really intriguing as to what's going on in modern politics. So nothing else we can say about somebody's on the right for on the left in terms of their demeanor attitudes can brain image you and tell with eighty three percent accuracy. Whether you're liberal or conservative while you're gambling, which is pretty shocking, and what's really surprised about. That is your behaviors aren't any different the way you gamble isn't any different. It's the pattern of brain activity, and it's not just genetics data that we have is so strong. It shows that it could not match the haired ability that we have from twin studies that the the red brain blue brain is we call it in the paper are distinguished not because of genetics. I can only tell with the seventy percent accuracy for I know, your mom and dad, what political identity you're gonna have. And if I know your mom and dad, I know you're the environment. I know race I know in. I know hold onto things about you. And I also know all your genetics and yet brain activity is even more diagnostic in new studies of improved on mine on and can get you know to ninety five percent accuracy by showing a single disgusting. Picture how you brain reacts to that bag speaker discussing back to the gambling judging by how I feel when I'm gambling. My middle is on full fire. That would camper another one can just that you're more likely to be conserved on that is I hate gambling. I feel comfortable I feel like I'm just I'm I'm like, and I'm loath to give up to the next sort of bet. But I do and my middle if I could tell it's firing our just tell all, right? Go ahead one kinda thought it's just so there was a new study where they put people in a scanner. Instead, we're gonna shock you. We're gonna give you a severe electric shock in the next few minutes again amid black Titi differentiating conservatives and liberals on that. Which is really fascinating, very interesting. Well, they're really appreciate you spending time with such fascinating work. And is there a particular the electro for people to of politics, which was old? It's out of date. And I keep needs a higher a somebody to help me update it, but yeah, that's that's kind of my where or you know, certainly people can write me on Twitter handle at Paul Nero. Well in you. I'm gonna go get at PO L any you are. Oh, and I'm gonna go read the John Cossio books. If my great stuff and test up, thank you so much. Thank you Bye-bye. We'll see next time..

Zog Antonio Damasio ADA Alzheimer John Cossio PO L Twitter Paul Nero eighty three percent ninety five percent seventy percent
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"That was I saw meal with Neo Nazis marching down the streets has moved to become a centrist party. They they saw the government in Hungary has gone so far to the right that they basically needed to go somewhere else. And so they've they've moved the middle. That is extremely that gives me hope, but I. I worry about these populist ultra right-wing movements and an undermining democratic values when I got in full panic mode about that a a while ago. One of the things that boy stirred my bolstered. My confidence was the students. I've worked with I've worked with amazing students that are in all parts of government that are in the left, and right, and this cheesy Xijue cleaver the children are future in the. I've seen amazing students that I've worked with in a number of universities that are taking the problems the future seriously, and I think are gonna protect democracy. But I think that we shouldn't be sanguine about our democratic institutions are democratic norms. Is this all European through our American students as well in American students as well. I mean, these are mostly I've taught in the US so most of my career until twenty to twelve is in the US, but certainly among the Europeans scene. The same characteristics in the same qualities. And I think that there are a lot of people that I do think again that narrative, I do think the world's getting to be a better place. I think that in the long run I'm much more optimistic about the future of Hungary than my Hungarian friends who I think are rightly pretty. Blown away by what they've seen happen in last number of years by being steady. Good trend. I'm with you. I think both of our students of humans in that. For whatever reason you come out of that study radically optimistic, and if you're a student of history you remain up domestic right? I mean, it it the sweep is in a positive direction for the most part. And I'm like you. I feel like you though, I still get the sterban by how much acrimony is going around and have been, you know, there've been times in history whether been some major kerfuffle 's that have not been good, cool, even though they may have unjustified. They're not cool and the worry we're heading to something like that. And would like to see us to do it hungry did and just kind of move back into direction of more unit. Three hasn't yet. Moved back the Neo Nazi? But I mean, I understand that moved back moving different direction of of unity and discourse. And you know, freedom of speech and things that we. I've always valued and sort of get a common Lisa commented values going again. I think that there's a there's a space for that. Again. I think that the literature that I've encountered shows lots and lots of opportunity for us to work together. When a when I was in college, a friend of mine was this woman. Gabriel Gifford, and she was a friend of somebody that I was dating and I lost touch with her years later. She was in the news because there was an assassination shot naturally, and I was blown away by that. And I was part of it was just like, wow. A friend of mine has been elected to congress in. It's the first time I hear about it like she's been attempted assassination. I was mortified, but then I also shocked because like we don't have congresspeople shot that much like, and I started looking up like a win was the last time somebody in congress was shot. And if you go back in the I I looked in the like the night the eighteen hundreds there were lots of of murders of congressman by other congressman with with canes and axes and things. It's sergeant at arms like they had a job to break up the brawl became lethal and certain context, and like so as much as we've got some incivility right now, we gotta keep it in mind. You know, our congresspeople are not killing each other. And we wanna make sure that we maintain that the norms of healthy discourse in particular because one of the side effects of that negativity is it drives people out of politics. There's great research shows physiologically people have this kind of train wreck reaction, they see the conflict there tracked into it. But then they wanna get away from politics, and the largest group of voters right now are people who are claiming to be non-partisans who's say content houses that claim and. Yeah..

Hungary Gabriel Gifford congress US congressman attempted assassination Lisa
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And I can't remember all of the criteria, but is basically working towards a common goal with mutual respect with any set of four parameters, and I'll put this out back maybe fifties or sixties said, you know, if you can get people together to meet on the same of on this on a kind of an equal paying field in these interactions with some ground rules, you can get people working together. Pretty well. And there have been just a lot. What's in lots and lots of replication? So this is one of these findings. We don't have to worry about, you know, does it replicate it's been replicated tons of times that ninety five percent of the experiments that were done looking at this found confirmation of all ports theory, and they were involving hundreds of thousands of people multiple countries, in some cases, really extreme situations of groups that had literally been killing each other. You bring them in. That's fine. Heineken dinner great riff on this. They had an ad that I was showing the courses I teach on race or they brought people in who were from diametrically opposed identities and whatever they had him sit down have a structured conversation. That was basically the outpouring conditions and turns out there there ended up having a beer together. At the end of the advertisement. It's like the sweetest beer attic ever seen in it. So that shows that we are capable of getting together another great piece of more recent political science on this by some colleagues, Michael Nebo and a few. Other folks, they had an online forum, you know, we've heard all this about town halls, right? We're politicians were not even wanting to have a meetings with their constituencies because they just got out of hand negative and nasty. So think about that. And then think about like the comments section on, you know, any news article that you might Macron wide like I never read them. They're horrible right now. So given that in imagine you then have a online townhall like, okay, obviously that's going to be a train wreck. Like what cesspit that will be? Well, it turns out that it's not they set some ground rules out. They said like look we're going to have a moderator button will hit the moderate button. If we need to if it gets out of hand, here's the ground rules. We'd like people to talk to their congressperson on and on this online chat forum, and we're going to random recruit a random sample of constituents within that district. Turns out like people are nice. Each other. And they're they're they're not always agreeing. But they're they're having civil discourse. So and so if I if I extrapolate from the data or from the storytelling the narrative, you would you might argue that social media and media generally is the problem. I think it's a tool. Right. So they're doing they also are doing these online interactions, and they're also doing these kind of things that that are, but it's leading because they're setting up norms around it. It's leading to experiences where the politicians said, oh, I'd love to do more of these in the future and the constituents said, wow, I really respect the people who I live in the community with and we can get along. So my first career was is a lawyer and one of the, you know, the narratives that we have about juries. Oh, juries idiots, whatever it turns out when people serve on jury duty they come out of it with much more respect in a positive impression of the jury system because those twelve random strangers that come from very different backgrounds when they're working together to decide guilt or innocence. They I saw it as lawyer even in a case that I lost. I I ended up having tremendous respect for the jury because I heard how much thought an empathy and attention they had put into that decision. We're capable of a lot and whether it's face to face or online, the this recent work on the online stuff suggests were capable of at even online. So that again lifts my my hopes of humanity. I was expecting it to be a train wreck in it. It it wasn't what kinds of things keep you overnight. Now. By up that you find disturbing..

Michael Nebo ninety five percent
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"They also have this sense of of inequality in what's also fasting after that worked on by Sarah, others went on did it with dogs and with chimpanzees. I don't remember the details on it. But the chimpanzees were much more similar in the ways that they dealt with that to humans under a variety of of circumstances. Even more similar than the the monkeys. But the dogs were basically like is long as they get a reward there. Okay. Think of your dogs. They're not so much looking at it. But they'll take it from the other guy, but they're not throwing it back at you. Give them a Scooby snack. It's fine to give them a filet Mignon. It's fine. You give Pat on the head. It's fine. If you don't give them anything they're going to be not so keen. But like they're not going to be jealous. Right. There's not that same kind of sensitivity. But it's more the Chelsea we will harm ourselves to express our outrage. And again, I think this is Saint telling us something about the roller entity because outrageous such a it's such a currency is just it's just what everyone's doing all the time. They to me they everyone's throwing their cucumbers back all the time. And it goes at the happiness research too. Which is that we can be very happy until we see somebody else with more and then magically were unhappy. Yeah. Same found, right? Yeah. And we see this again, this idea of the negative partisanship. And the what is no also affect if partisanship in a relatively recent phenomenon American politics, where we just, you know, people on the left and people in the right hate each other in seem to get more out of the hating of each other than they do out of anything else. It's much more driven by these extreme intense negative emotional phenomena that are that are pretty destructive to the democratic emperor enterprise. All right. So I I want to circle back a couple of things you you speak in very precise terms, and I want to shine a light on each time. You do it to people understand packed in. We talked about the chimpanzees and the monkeys. We are not involved from chimpanzees and monkeys share a common ancestor. So I if luminary wisher common genetic link, but back to the narcissism of small difference in the affect of partisanship, the affect partisanship is is an amplification of small difference. Yes. Yep. Okay. I've been wondering and it's fascinating. I didn't know about Freud's contract with narcissism of small differences. But it has felt like to me that there was a narcissistic basis to all of this because narcissist for very prone to envy, and they're very prone to aggression, and they're very prone to otherness and and believing there, right? Is is there literally narcissism is narcissistic disorder of small differences. He I'm not sure if I would maybe take the analogy quite to the level of clinical precision. I do think that there is this in group out group dynamic, and I think I have this thing black wide. Yes. No all this wheel that way. That's they're prone to that. I think that there is maybe some of that. But again like to save all partisans are narcissist. Certainly is not the data that I have put it this way. You're right. That would be a gross overstatement. But I believe there's been a narcissistic turn if you certainly look at the data than look at the access to diagnoses and psychiatric hospitals. It's all cluster be all of a sudden. So at least on the path under the pathological banner. We've suddenly become more of the narcissistic zone. Now, you there could be many explanations for. That. But it makes me wonder have we all had a kind of a turn that way. Yeah. I mean, certainly I would say there's tremendous evidence that we have become disconnected. Okay. And so this great work by the the the lake research, scientists John Casio Baen his book on loneliness, and I got to meet him a number of years ago. And just he was like one of I've met a lot of amazing minds in. I was blown away by by him. Because he looked at this issue of loneliness from the molecular level all the way to the social network data to to like epidemiology. He's one of his famous kind of claims was that loneliness was as toxic for us is smoking in German, all it's it's a really important claim..

Freud Sarah John Casio Pat
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Others to have this kind of inter limbic synchronization is a phrase it's been used where my emotional states are connected to your emotional states, which in many ways, again makes really complicated that that old that other idea of economics of the kind of individual rational utility, maximizing if my utility function of my happiness is somehow connected. To your wellbeing. Whether it's I'm taking glee in your your successes or taking glee in your suffering. You can't do the math. So simply, right. And that's why connoisseur. Certain degree have kind of simplified in the beginning of a lot of economics textbooks. They just kind of like, okay, let's look at the individual. But the data in the modern or standing shows a lot more the brain imaging data, the experimental data a lot of different contexts that we do actually carry about each other. And we if we are in a world where others are suffering we suffer as a consequence of that. It literally makes the math more complicated, and almost well, not almost on doable. So there's some workout of one of the areas that I'm into quite a lot in my own research is complexity theory, and it turns out you can with very small numbers. If you've ever wondered, why are in all of these behavioral economic games, the prisoner's dilemma, why is it to prisoners wise in the whole the chicken game? There's all these game after game after game where it's two player games. Why aren't there three player four player? Well, it turns out that you can't do the math for many of these interactions. If you get beyond four five individuals interacting, the Matthys literally intractable in trying to solve Trojer quesion for more than two particles will or the three body problem in the classic in in physics like there's a reason you can't do. Predict where exactly the third body's going to be two bodies. No problem. You get lips. But you get into that third body, and boom, it's unpredictable and that's for fundamental. That's not. We don't have the math yet. The math says you can't do that. In addition to the the unusual preoccupation that humans have with other humans. There's a there's another layer of something that I just adds the complexity of all this that monkeys doing experiments that I think tells us something about our private human nature, which is I forget what the experiment was. But if if one monkey is rewarded an unduly for grapes. The other monkey will refuse to accept the grape for the for bras. Was the one who did some work with France to wall? And so, yeah, the experiment is basically you do a task, and you get a chip, and then you can trade that chip in for a food reward. And so one monkey is doing does the thing gets a cucumber slices perfectly happy cucumber slice on. And you know is just keeps doing it. We'll do it all day for the cucumber slice they likely cucumbers. That's fine. Then they see their neighbor does the same tasks when they trade in their token. They get a great end, the one you just got on the the video of this is absolutely awesome. And the you know, he starts throwing the chip around. And he won't like taps it on the age throws the cucumber backout them. I don't want to cucumber. I wanna grow. Exactly. And it's just like that sense of of of you know, this is on fair and unequipped treatment is a violation. So again rational choice theory predict you know, you get your your cucumber slice in. You are happy with your cucumber slice. It's not relative to what others have gotten. But we look back at our ancestors. And it turns out that are the the creatures that we have that we share in pollution repast with..

Trojer France
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The other thing back to back to the the uncanny valley. Do you think one of the theories there three or four good theories out there, but where it came from? But one of them was that it's a something about infectious disease and contamination that that that's a very primitive sort of a reaction sense of potential for contact contamination. I think that instinctively seems kinda right to me. Yeah. And my understanding of some of the brain activity in in terms of brain activation patterns, the paper a number of years ago. It's more than ten years ago. So it's it's a little foggy my brain. But if something like infestation incested inequity, and it was basically saying all of these kinds of disgust that we have about seeing worms in your foods, seeing the violations of the incest, taboo, or. Kind of disgusting high level social behavior. All of those have overlapping brain activation patterns, there's distinctiveness within them as well. But there's there's there's one of the things it's amazing that nature. Does is it reuses cognitive tool kits again, and again in physical toolkits, whether you know, my arm is a human is a is an arm. If your fish the same kind of limbs become offense, if your bird becomes a wing, and there's there's kind of reuse both on the physical walls in the mental structures, the neural tissue it's used in different ways. And so it seems like there's at least some evidence that these things are built on top of each other in kind of stages of evolution Conaway. I I wanna say that again because people you I know exactly John over that that statement can pass by without people really getting it is that that our brains are not when they adapt. It's not they reconfigure we have a new brains revolution. We pile mechanisms on top of older mechanisms, and we have this thing that's been calling the past Jackson. Tony and dissolution. Which is when more recently evolved mechanisms fail us. We dropped down to the lower mechanisms in extreme situations. Like life threatening situations. It. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. And and we see this. I mean again, like the example I used of of of encountering situations as social inequality being activating areas of the brain that are involved in me feeling my own feelings the same area of the brain allows me to feel my own feelings ends up being later on it looks like an evolutionary history allowing individuals to feel the feelings of.

Tony Jackson John ten years
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Speaks volumes about the human psyche is what this is is that as you make robotics, more and more and more humid, we like them like we like him better better until they get really almost really humanoid. And then we're just recoil disgusted. So that slight unlike nece, that's light almost me. But not me is something we there's gotta be some weird evolutionary adaptation associated just that. If Freud talks about this concept called the narcissism of small differences. So my brother, and I many people when they meet us just, you know, they do double take. 'cause they think we're really really similar, of course. I don't think that were similar at all very different very different. Yeah. Right there. We've got emphasize distinctiveness, and I think Freud's idea of the narcissism of small differences is all over the place. There's a great book one of the. Really interesting books of American politics in the last year. So is called uncivil agreement and part of the bizarreness he kind of, you know, maybe the uncanny valley or nurses, small differences is pointing out that, you know, the left in the right in the US right now on many many policy dimensioned don't actually disagree that much. If you look at you know, so living in the UK. If you go back to various periods in the U K history, you had a real left-wing a real right wing that were was wanting to nationalize everything and one was wanting to privatize everything, and you have this kind of swing in the government where kind of the role of the government was seen in very different ways. There are differences between the parties were at a moment of polarization. But if you look at. Voters. And and the the average citizens on give them whole list of questions about political issues. We're not nearly as divided on policy perspectives as you would think based on the very heated rhetoric. What we're already what we are really divided on is how much we hate each other the left and the right in the US the remainders in the Brexit tears in the UK. There's this tremendous amount of antipathy in that has really led to kind of incivility that unfortunately is really damaging to democracy and really surprising, given this maybe narcissism small differences. I mean, this is not the the left is not, you know, mostly a Maoist sin communists in hardcore socials there are there are socialists in the UK when I lived in the UK in nineteen ninety I met people who are real deal, marxists. And they were chain smoking in apparent you have to wear black combat boots. This whole cultural did about it that had to be a real Marxist. You had to do these things, and I've not met those in the Democratic Party. I mean, maybe maybe maybe some brand university professors in the sixties. But certainly that was not my experiment experience and similarly on the right wing while again, there's there are. There are some people that are allowed the equivalent of what I saw in Hungary ultra right-wing Neo Nazis. Those people are present the United States not say, they're not. But that's not the typical position of the Republican party. But the difference. Maybe there's categorical condemnation and can in containment of that far. Right. The far left is still glorified and amplified in allowed to, you know, run run run free with Thika over they want and to it's not clear what the left is doing with its far left. That's I think we're things get a little weird. But that's not even part of the public discourse. Really? If you are knows dealing with the diction, you know that.

UK United States Freud Thika Democratic Party Republican party Hungary Brexit
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"So one example was it's one of the buildings at UCLA were the psych building was they would have you know, somebody's walking towards the. The the the personally undergrads been recruited participate experiment. They're gonna go to the eighth floor of the building. And there's they're walking towards it. The somebody else's already in the elevator. They join them. And then there's a third person that's farther away. And there's kind of a a manipulation of how far they are in all sorts of other variables to see. Okay. Do you? And I now that we're in the elevator together. I've never met you before. Do we hit the close button or do? We just kind of wait for them to keep in hit keep hitting the open button for this person who's coming away. And there was evidence of kind of this cooperation of OSs in the elevator against them out of the elevator. And then it got later versions were as simple as I give to people read sticker, the third person agreed sticker, and we see acts of discrimination against the the green sticker person. And there's just example after example, after example of that type of remember there was one where a revaluing art or something and there's random dots. And here the group of the not dot group. Yep. And we conform. We want to. To be we wanna be an off. And we we alter the way that we perceive the world we alter we will even say things that just like that line is definitely short of that that other line even though they're obviously not in shorter equal length. So there's all sorts of effects of this. What is interesting to me about? And so part of that is just emphasizing this look at how silly we are in the ways that we can discriminate, etc. Etc. With amazing all of those minimal group heard. I'm experiments though is so we've just got into the elevator. And you know were of. We're maybe different genders or different races or different ages or different in all sorts of things that are very different about us. And yet for those few moments were cooperating, that's really weird. I mean from a kind of comparative, I mean, comparative comparing humans to a lot of other critters, you couldn't put too strange her animals together and just have them start cooperating that doesn't happen very much in the in the natural world and may just social cooperation in general even with with chimpanzees. You get two young chimpanzees. You give them a task where they've got a cooperate in order to make something happened. The chimpanzees are better at the technical problem solving than comparatively aged human children in terms like solving technical puzzles, etc. But the two chimpanzees just cannot cooperate. Whereas the two. No human kids, just they do so much even pre-verbal at a very young age. Cam are capable not always. But they're capable of cooperation. So I think that the minimal group paradigm the way that's been interpreted to some degree his emphasized, the the foibles of humanity without seeing in what I think is really the humanity humanity, the beauty of our -bility to cooperate. Even though we've been strangers now are putting together were integral. Okay. Let's let's get this thing done. Again. There's downsides in its there's an us them dynamic. That's created in their want to underplay that. But it's fascinating that we can also cooperate. Yeah. We have I I was just thinking about where where people get weird in terms of their. It's really a disgust emotion as pertains to otherness, and if you've heard the uncanny valley robotics. Yeah. That to me there's something in that that that.

UCLA
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Well. This study, it's not showing up the interior. It's it's really the anterior insular cortex was along with eventual medial prefrontal cortex area sorta I mean, it's a distinct. So the media prefrontal cortex is again part of that prefrontal lobe area. This is more inside the brain prefrontal lobe got so deeper deeper deeper stuff yet deeper physiologically deeper more closer to limbic enough. And in like, I said that Interros -ception usually that feeling your own feelings stuff feel like the influence really going to be. We may have the decade of the inflow coming up one of these days 'cause I feel like that's where all the bodily based information sort of. Noted the middle on the insulin sort of seal that go now to do with this, exactly. And we deal with all the time in chronic pain and trauma. That's all not working right for some reason. We don't really know what that means. We'll variously, but I I wanna get back to the sort of the robber's cave and the tribal stuff and talk more about that. And I just. I'm just concerned about that. That's the thing that sort of I spent a lot of time thinking about and it we just keep going down further down that rabbit hole. It seems. So I think that the most modern kind of data that we're hundred percent sure this works because it's been replicated lots and lots of times in a whole bunch of different ways. The is so robber's cave started off in it is kind of principle. It was saying you don't need centuries of conflict in order to lead to people doing, you know, group type, you know, group in in group out group dynamics, you don't need for there to be a five hundred year history or a wars or the civil war, whatever it led to what's known is the minimal group paradigm. And is that got more and more extreme explain their that got Korea that data. Yeah. So that's it's really fastening..

insular cortex Interros Korea five hundred year hundred percent
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"You know, some in some cases, everybody's got the same resources in some cases. Some people are really wealthy and some are poor. And you're then given the chance to spend your say you have twenty monetary units. You can spend a pound in or. Order to make the other person three pounds richer or three rounds poorer. You lose that pound. So you don't get that money from them. Or you know, it's not a lost. You just the mechanisms of the game. And it turns out that quite a number of people pay to create a more equal society. They're willing to pay out of their own pockets when they see somebody who's really not very many. Much money or they've seen somebody's gotten a ton of money. They're way willing to pay out of their pocket to take the rich down of the take from the rich and give to the poor. And that's really surprising, given typical rational choice models, and these are all anonymous games, and they're all you don't know who you're playing with. You'd never have no interaction other than there's a person a person beepers and see and we're scanning your brain. While you're doing these experiments, and we find activity in the inner cortex, and this is part of the brain. That is not the outer edge of the brain. It's kind of more towards the interior a little bit. And it's involved in a series of phenomena that are known as intereceptions. So when your stomach's grumbling a little bit or you can feel your heart racing. That's you feeling your internal feelings. And it turns out that the that some of the same regions in the. The brain that are active when you're feeling your stomach a little turned off are also active. If you see somebody else who's feeling ill. And I it will Astrit this when I give public lectures by pretending vomit, and I've gotten really good at it to the point that I freaked the audiences out by making disgusting noises and a number of people like you can see the utter disgust on their face as their stomachs are turning in a kind of empathy sympathy with me doing that. And it turns out that part of the brain that's activated. As I'm looking like, I'm gonna vomit and somebody else is than feeling that fellow-feeling Adam Smith describes it that same part of the brain is activated for some people not for everybody during these situations as they encounter, the choices about inequality. And so that's not just envy. So we can't rule out everything, but we can rule out. We can rule out altruism. And we envy doesn't really fit the data in the sense that they're they're also. Giving to the poor. So that would be this relief from their guilt at acting out there envy. Maybe it either. You know, this is the challenge with brain imaging data right is what we call the reverse inference problem. We know this part of the brain is activated under these circumstances. What that exactly means is much more challenging we've ruled out a bit. I don't know this data, but I'm going to bet it's activated during the. The trolley stuff. Right. So the the challenge with the insular cortex in particular for a reverse inferences? It's activated in like thirty percent of all brain imaging sunrise. So it's activated a lot right rom a whole bunch of different conditions. What is interesting is that we could also look at the pattern of activation, and then see how much what degree does that correlate with other things were interested in? So we're interested in out of scanner behavior in it turns out that the level of activity in that area corresponds to level two when they play that game when they're not being brain scanned. It also matches that behavior. So it's not just kind of we've selected the Vauxhall's the parts of the brain. Dan, lies in mind, the dated get this result. It also turns out to predict self reported levels of gala -tarian ISM quite well. We'll I was going to say the terms of terrorism, I always sort of associate more of those kinds of human motions with the anterior cingulate is that is that uprating..

insular cortex Vauxhall Adam Smith Dan thirty percent three pounds
"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"z. schreiber" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Great to get to talk to you after growing up here you on the radio and LA and here you are in what part of England now the sort of outskirts of York now, this is Exeter UK. So it's basically if you if you think of the UK's like your right hand, I'm living at the crease at your thumb God it, and you've been there long time or curious is my sixth year here. So really like, you're a Bruin by training. Wearing my UCLA sweatshirt just happened to be wearing that tonight through crazy. And then you taught it versus Andy egos. Well as right. Yeah. I taught there for seven years and just let's get some of the promotional stuff out front. Any books website. You want to promote? Yeah. The like you mentioned my very out of date politics, emerging dot com. And like I said on Twitter. Those the main promo things so you caught my attention on somebody else's podcast. I don't know what I can't remember what it was listening to immediately said I would love talked to our love to talk to him. Because I think, you know, I'm I'm a neurobiologist by sort of training. How do we understand people the current political scene through the prism of neuroscience? Yeah. It's a broad question. The bigger project. I'm working on is a book called your brain is built for politics than it's argument that the reason that we have the brain that we do as humans is the result of a three million year cognitive arms race to develop this most complex thing. We know about in the universe the human brain. And I understand the current political situation through that lens that the brain that we have was built not for national or international politics politics. We often talk about them, but the kind of politics of our family life in our community center cities in small-scale, tribal, politics, and we're using the same neural apparatus that evolved in his served us incredibly well for, you know, hundreds of thousands of years, and they were trying to adapt it for a very very different living condition in the twenty first century of six billion people trying to figure out how to share a planet. And yet in a weird way. We've done a pretty good job. Right. I think the real story here. The core is. Yeah. It's amazing. How good we've done. I just was reading than twenty eighteen half the world's population has made it into the into the middle class, that's mind blowing. I remember taking economics classes number years ago twenty something thirty years ago and hearing about the incredible percentage of people who were under a dollar a day, poverty, and they're still an issue, but nNcholas Kristof likes to point out that every the best day in history because hundreds of thousands of people are getting out of that extreme poverty in here. We are with half the world's population in the middle class. That's not what I was imagining when I was reading the grim dire on amaafuza stories as a kid, right? So what you say about Fuzhen? That's the stuff I was sort of reared on in college. Which was there's going to be a major famine it's going to be huge, and it must happen. And then we came up with GMO's. And all of a sudden literally hundreds of millions of lives were saved the demos were, you know, shit on. But. But I mean that was a portion of it. But is also we started if you're there's a great measure of economic wellbeing called the human development index developed by marches, San and others, and it measures among other things, you know, how many kids under five die will if your kids aren't gonna die before their fifth birthday. You don't need to have as many of them. People were part of the reason we have any population explosions was driven by these cultural needs to expectations. All your kids are gonna die. So if you wanna have a family and have kids to support you've gotta have a lot of kids. So that the odds of in a one or two making it to adulthood to support you in your old age you're going to play out. But. And that of course, had other effects, which is now women are freed up from being encumbered by this other human body that they're attached to right..

Andy egos UK Twitter LA England York nNcholas Kristof San three million year thirty years seven years