20 Burst results for "Yukon River"

"yukon river" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:38 min | 11 months ago

"yukon river" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Winter will show this is a crazy time to be watching things and it's all going to have an impact on all of our personal lives all of our professional lives we're going to keep you up to date it's not about being fearful it's about being prepared and that's what we're gonna do stay connected red winter will one day after three to six your emergency situation station when we return to Roger McGrath in the story of Klondike gold strike queen Belinda Mulrooney when the book was supplies is wrecked on a sand bar in the Yukon River who's in a partnership with Alex mac Donald to salvage the cargo the galaxy hands over six foot seven and weighs nearly three hundred pounds he began as far north as a labor and worked his way up to managing an Alaskan trading company through the acquisition of one mind after another he's becoming a multi millionaire he will soon be known as the king of the Klondike well done we'll have a cruise over to cargo but not Donald has the goods divided before of morning arrives six crates full of food stuffs for himself at least cases of whiskey and boxes of rubber boots for more money with winter approaching and starvation a real possibility foodstuffs will be at a premium you'll pay through the nose for this Linda tells Mick Alex this Melanie Mayer author of staking her claim the life of Belinda Mulrooney Klondike in Alaska entrepreneur you can understand Belinda's relation to Alex macdonald if you think of her rough and tumble days with her uncle's in Ireland they like each other but they're competitive very competitive their so called practical jokes or tricks where the jokester sets up the other person to be duped but Belinda is determined to not be anybody's victim early in the spring of eighteen ninety eight there's an unusual heatwave causing the sudden fall rapidly melting snow and ice floats the Klondike country work in the mines is impossible without boots one of the big L. X. arrives at Marnie's pleading for rubber boots for his men.

Roger McGrath Belinda Mulrooney Yukon River Alex mac Donald Linda Mick Alex Belinda Mulrooney Klondike Alaska Belinda Alex macdonald Ireland Marnie Melanie Mayer
Josh Flowers from Aviation101: Tools to Help Avoid CFIT

AviatorCast: Flight Training

05:50 min | 11 months ago

Josh Flowers from Aviation101: Tools to Help Avoid CFIT

"I WanNa talk a little bit about Actually kind of bringing in a tool that you and I used I. I didn't brief you on this or anything but a tool that unite us when we flew from battles down to Nanna on our way back. 'cause we got in a situation where we got a close to see fit. I. I'm not sure I'd say close but I I wouldn't it but it started to be car alarm. Bell STARTED GO OFF. We need to get out of it. Basic right so see fit is controlled flight into terrain. We were flying around the mountains. The weather was a little bit. It wasn't even like marginal really when we went in there. But I never considered a The rain could start on top of you and just come down. Which is what happened and then as I was happening we got into an area of smoke and so we kind of got in the situation where almost instantly within two minutes everything went away We were done away. Yeah and we knew that there was rising terrain in front of us. And we're going to want to climb here soon and is like all of a sudden it just kind of faded into like Milky White Mist and it was like okay So it it. We weren't close to see fit. We had so many outs. The the the important thing is our wisdom. Our past experience is what caused us to start setting off alarm bells on our heads individually. I like okay. How do we get out? Let's get out. Let's stop this. What do we do now right? Neither of US had a warm and fuzzy anymore. It went away right and when that happens like you just gotTa go with your gut and we. We were looking at four in the terrain pages and stuff. And we yeah. We had these amazing tools in the cockpit to help us get out of it but ultimately what kept us out of that situation was our aeronautical decision making and judgment to be like this just got way worse than we thought it was going to. We know that there's lower land that way we're GonNa go that way and then sure enough. We go that way and the weather got better and we can see everything yet. Yeah Yeah I mean I. I felt like in that situation where the everything deteriorated so quickly in our alarm bells. Were going off. It was nice to be able to pivot something like four flight Rome. You did a good job in that sense because you you basically looked at the train very quickly and you could see on the terrain adviser like hazard advisor where to go so we basically did a left ninety degree turn and went to lower terrain and it was. It was kind of like river valley that led to to lower landgraf and almost immediately things improved like the rain went away but then we got in the more smoke and then we follow the Yukon River down so it was interesting to to come up against those situations. You have any advice for people. I guess that the get themselves in that situation like 'cause you've been in you've fallen a lot now so you've probably had a dozen situations where it's like okay. Something needs to change. What do we do? So what is your advice for? Someone that is getting into a situation like that right. I think I think one issue is had you get yourself in that situation to begin with but we're talking about like in the plane. They're already in the situation. Worry about debriefing. It later when you're in the plane. What tools do you have to to help you with that? Like even if you've got a garment for thirty bring that thing up to the terrain page and start looking at what you've got around you and of course I just want everybody flies with an IPAD. These days use that become. I've I've run into a lot of pilots and in fact we just had this conversation with my dad about this morning. Dan Greider right now to do this like AAC. Up Recurrent Training series in addressing fatal accident rates and stuff. And we had this long drawn out conversation about when you're going to depart in airport or you're gonNA fly around terrain or fly at night. Anything like that. There is no excuse to not bring up a terrain page of some sort like get turn on the obstacle layer on four flight or bring up the terrain terrain profile or synthetic vision that synthetic vision is awesome. You know if you've got a stratus or a century or in our case we have the garment transponder That talks to the eyepatches brings something like that. Use Your resources not only use your resources but know how to use them effectively. No every little feature And it'll you don't Wanna find out in a situation like that. It's kind of becoming critical almost like life or death critical for you to know these features and know how to access this kind of stuff. You don't want to be figuring out in that moment that you don't know how to access the terrain page or access that vision you know. Sit in sit in bed like before you fall asleep plot your eye powder pull out your phone four flight and just play with it. Learn the new features and of course four flight has all the they've got all sorts of webinars and stuff that an online videos that walk you through all those features but know how to use the tools that are in your cockpit. That's a big. It's a big deal. Yeah is interesting because when when you pull up the map view when we were in that situation I pulled it. The synthetic vision view like right away like an airplane has the ability to pull in the Harz from the airplane so I can actually see. I can't see the synthetic vision on four flight so I pulled that up. You pulled out a route and so we had like instantly a safe way to navigate in case we did go. Imc for some reason even though we were trying to avoid it and then you had an out to get out the other direction. And so exactly I. I think that's it's interesting because you talked about like knocking in the situation in the first place. You know we could rewind the clock on that in in in We could talk about that. We don't need to but it comes on the judgment. I like knowing when things are getting bad and then being willing to like knock it off and do something different right like you have to do something different to get yourself out of that and then you know utilizing tools to assist you in that

Nanna United States Bell Rome Yukon River Harz Advisor Stratus Dan Greider River Valley
"yukon river" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"yukon river" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Ranges the frozen Yukon River and the Bering Sea coast correspondent Julie Walker reports while the official race began in willow the ceremonial start was held fifty miles away on Saturday in anchorage that's where fans got to cheer on and had some of the more than eight hundred dogs in town for the event I did a rod defending champ Kaiser says competition is stiff but he thinks his chances are good there's a lot of good teams ill but I like my team for sure it's a really good team in dogs last year few few new ones that are really good meanwhile Pete is protesting claiming more than a hundred and fifty dogs have died since the race began in nineteen seventy three yeah I did a rod disputes the number but won't give its own count to the AP I'm Julie Walker with news time seven fifty six now Bloomberg moneywatch on ten ten wins two of the nation's one time tech innovation icons have been busy wrestling over a rejected marriage proposal and what the Xerox effort to combine with H. B. comes down to is ink cartridges you know it's not sexy it's not the future of computing but it is massive and it makes a ton of money bluebirds Austin Carr while the printing industry has been a decline HP's printer supplies business made almost thirteen billion dollars in sales last year with the printer division overall adding sixty three percent of the company's profits with backing from activist investor Carl Icahn who owns stock in both companies Xerox has been trying to buy the much larger H. P. for what HP says is a laughable bit he would prefer Xerox's management take keep managing the company if they did merge but he just wants a merger to get there this past week Xerox tickets thirty five billion dollar bid for H. B. to the PC makers shareholders with a formal tender offer saying it's the best way to deliver a premium to those with H. P. stock Bloomberg money watch a twenty.

Yukon River Pete Julie Walker wrestling H. B. Austin Carr HP Carl Icahn Xerox Bering Sea official champ Kaiser Bloomberg H. P.
"yukon river" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"yukon river" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Yes one one today and you're playing Joanna in written a joint that was pretty funny thank you for laughing at that I still learning how are you doing our site site I ever heard not work in a very long time I like your site Brak you're gonna make me really happy then if you let me when I don't let anyone win yeah okay everybody the menu bar and you really want to get I have very little confidence in my intelligence so I constantly affirmation that I can't win okay we're gonna send broke out of the studio Joanna games play like this you have thirty seconds to answer as many questions as possible if you don't know one just a passing it to be broke out right to win okay at all alright here we go your time starts now snack food twenties were first invented in what decade ninety eight the Yukon River flows through which state California what vessel sports league has the highest arrest rate in America on average who has longer tongues men or women what what nation wide breakfast restaurant originally started out as Danny donuts how many US presidents have ever gone the national debt down to zero Brooke back into the studio so Joanna how's your holiday going so far again better than last year really what happened was that the last year I was working last year is crazy like okay because I work at the airport there durable job it was actually during the holiday okay I'm glad it with that way because as soon as I ask what happened last time like yeah it might be really sad it is going to really bring things down okay got it was if they had to work alright sweet respect and fear the headphones on ready yes all right your time starts now snack food Twinkies were first invented what decade fifties the Yukon River flows through which state main what professional sports league has the highest rates in America hi to restoration America NFL on average to as longer tongues many women women what nation my breakfast restaurant originally started out as Danny donuts Denny Dunkin donuts sorry how many US presidents have ever gotten national that down to zero the two which America America centered over the scoreboard NCAA guys there because they thirty minutes ago I was making love to you there's been a contamination we've had a lot one Joanna for more and you got to correct today.

Joanna Yukon River California America Brooke Denny Dunkin US Danny donuts NCAA
Tribal Energy: Powering Self-Determination

Direct Current

08:38 min | 1 year ago

Tribal Energy: Powering Self-Determination

"For many life on an Indian reservation in is defined by hardship and struggle when treaties and laws like the Indian Removal Act signed by President Andrew Jackson in eighteen thirty four native Americans onto reservations nations. The lands they were told to resettle on often small and remote uprooted from their traditional ways of life. Native communities had to adapt their new environment without access to the services says white settlers enjoyed even today things like medical care employment and reliable. Electricity are difficult to come by many tribes like the piggeries Pueblo of New Mexico. I am governor Craig. Konczal from victories. Pablo we're located in northern New Mexico. Where about twenty seven miles south of Taus Pueblo saw so a lot of the people in pictures are fixed incomes or low incomes our job ray at the very low where isolated area where about forty five minutes? It's from any kind of a grocery store workplace jobs currently at the PUBL. Now if the lights go out or the power goes out we have no means of calling the ambulance who have no means of calling fire so these are some of the things that working in. How can we get off the grid for emergencies? Say off the grid for long term short term just keeping the lights on is a significant challenge for some tribal communities when that's made increasingly difficult by the threat threat of natural disasters in the Pacific northwest. The Spokane tribe is wrestling with the effects of climate change on its energy security. I'm Timothy Horon. I'm the Executive Director Director. The Spokane Indian Housing Authority with the Spokane tribe in North Eastern Washington Spokane tribe head Fires back to back in Twenty Fifteen fifteen in two thousand sixteen. The twentieth. Sixteen fires called the coyotes mountain fire and destroyed eighteen thousand acres and took out fourteen homes. uh-huh no one was injured. No lives were lost which was fortunate but it did come. Within a mile of the Housing Authority office and the tribal administrative the straight of center and the power line the distribution lines coming into the reservation were burnt in the fire so the tribe had no power and the power was necessary because there wasn't a backup generating system on the pump for the water. It had no independent source of water to fight the fire. I think it was a wakeup up. Call for the tribe. It certainly was for Mitt Thousand Authority because it almost took out all of our senior housing as well that it unless we were better prepared unless we had some independent systems for generating power that we were going to be at the mercy of the elements and due to climate change and the fact that our our forests are dryer. They are more susceptible to fire. We'd had a pattern of fire more than the Department of Natural Resources on the reservation said that it could remember remember. I think a century so each tribe has its own unique priorities but it can be even more complicated than that. Even within a single tribe members may be spread out across across a wide geographic area with different issues depending on where they live. My Name is Sarah sure. I am the environmental and Energy Attorney for the Forrest County. Automate community a tribe with its reservation in northern Wisconsin. And then several other pieces of trust property in both Milwaukee and Campbell sport. The tribe has a number of different challenges. One of the tribes overall goals is to be one hundred percent energy independent pendant by generating its own electricity by having its own source of energy through only renewable sources energy independence for the tribe is important for a number of reasons if we're talking about climate change for example in times of natural disaster. The traditional grid red may not be able to support all sectors of the population in areas. That are more rurally based. That's an even greater challenge because the infrastructure itself is not as developed as in more metropolitan areas so coming up with a concept that works for both the reservation in northern Wisconsin and then also the properties in Milwaukee where the tribes economic economic base is that can be challenging so having the ability to have a sovereign energy portfolio and and to be energy independent by producing your own energy gives you the opportunity to avoid and mitigate some of those natural disasters astaire's for some tribes that work with the office of Indian energy like the eastern band of Cherokee Indians. Energy Development has a direct link to their economic prosperity. I'm Joey Al I'm I'm from Cherokee North Carolina and I'm part of the eastern band of Cherokee Indians. I'm the secretary of Agriculture Natural Resources. For the tribe the energy challenges that we face are around our largest industries school school the hospital the Casino and our travel services and administrative buildings. This particular project is on secondary casino because it served by smaller utility company and West North Carolina. It's called Murphy. Electric Power Board and through this project. I learned that they are actually about sixty five. Seventy percent of the low capacity they can serve that that community and with gaming is twenty four seven three sixty five. We can't miss a second of any kind of powerless for the gaming industry. What motivates the tribe in? My view is that with the growing population. You know. The demand for electricity across residential services is going to increase we're expanding in our economy not our primary Harris Cherokee in Cherokee chair he were broken. Ground on a new things about four hundred or five hundred room hotel one hundred Thousand Square Foot Convention Center. They're also looking at expanding into an outdoor shopping area area and so the Casino represents the largest service low for the tribe and so as we're moving forward again we need to look at how can we reduce our carbon footprint and and also looking to supply our own. Some are demand so far we've heard from tribes in the contiguous United States but there are hundreds more native communities in Alaska. Many of these are located located far from any kind of infrastructure and more often than not depend on fuel flown or barged into the community for survival. My name is franny his I. I am from four Q Kahn. A village of ATHABASCA descent and we like to refer to ourselves as with Chin people bull from Grachev and four few Khan and our kitchen language means people of the flats. We're very remote village on the map of Alaska were up in the northern eastern part of the state along the Yukon River. We're actually a hub village. But we don't have any roads that you can drive out for Yukon to. We can travel on that river by vote in the summertime and bring supplies in other than that where isolated where to bring anything fresh in when we have to fly in this very expensive easiest way to set up electricity in a remote site like where we are is to bring being in a diesel operated generator. They're easy to transport they're kinda tough and they drink a lot of fuel to operate and then that brings the problem that the price is high and not only does the price get to be expensive. But we couldn't depend for to be on all the time and we didn't really have good reliable electric resources. We have to keep our water moving moving because we have extreme weather to where can get fifty below for a month. It could then warm up to maybe twenty below still still so-called at that water cannot stand still pass to always be circulating and it takes the hookup to the power plant. Keep that going wing and when our power plant was going down I thought. What can we do here what they did and what everyone we spoke to for this episode has done is reach out to the office of Indian Energy Lasana and her colleagues work with tribes native communities to identify their biggest energy needs and the best ways to address them whether that's through technical expertise education and outreach or financial support

Spokane Tribe New Mexico Indian Energy Lasana Wisconsin Milwaukee Alaska Cherokee Indians Spokane Indian Housing Authori Energy Attorney Indian Removal Act Governor Craig Pacific Northwest Taus Pueblo Andrew Jackson Thousand Square Foot Conventio Housing Authority
"yukon river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The crazy thing is that through all of this she can't read a map one when who one of the main functions of that key we says part of her brain that the doctors took out as I said was spatial reasoning and so after the surgery maps just look weird to where it's it's it's like just a bunch of information on a piece of paper all those lines a little squiggly is just noise to the head as she navigates through a race well I take a pink ribbon with me so when I'm out the middle of nowhere and I have three ways to hit a troll I'm not quite sure which way to go left is that right take away a drop a rude and mean after a couple hours if she feels like she's not on a trail anymore she just goes back into she gets to the pink ribbon and then she picks the other way on the Yukon there was time where cash I was lost for two hours when I was in the middle of nowhere all alone huge heavy winds is written across the Yukon River on did you win that year that you were lost for two hours yeah mostly Diane finds these sort of work arounds for what she lost in the surgery but the fact is she only became this amazing runner after the surgery so what we're talking I just couldn't help but wonder well I mean it I'm I wonder at lake do you think did having part of your brain removed make you an altar runner and yet did you send the question yeah yeah I do and she says no I think having a brain injury puts me at a disadvantage but I think for me that the one advantage if I had to say I have an advantage would be on time.

Yukon River Diane two hours
"yukon river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hour a night for ten days three the crazy thing is that through all of this she can't read a map one I mean who one of the main functions of that key we says part of her brain that the doctors took out as I said was spatial reasoning and so after the surgery maps just look weird to where it's it's it's like just a bunch of information on a piece of paper all those lines a little squiggly is just noise to the head as you navigate through a race well I take a pink ribbon with me so when I'm out the middle of nowhere and I have three ways to hit a troll I'm not quite sure which way to go left is that right take away a drop a ribbon mean after a couple hours if she feels like she's not on a trail anymore she just goes back into she gets to the pink ribbon and then she picks the other way on the Yukon there was time where cash I was lost for two hours I was in the middle of nowhere all alone huge heavy winds just rip and across the Yukon River on did you win that year that you were lost for two hours yeah mostly Diane finds these sort of work arounds for what she lost in the surgery but the fact is she only became this amazing runner after the surgery so what we're talking I just couldn't help but wonder well I mean it I'm I wonder it like do you think did having part of your brain removed make you an altar runner and yet did you send the question yeah yeah I do and she says no I think having a brain injury puts me at a disadvantage but I think for me that the one advantage if I had to say I have an advantage would be on time.

Yukon River Diane two hours ten days
"yukon river" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KGO 810

"Nineteen forty-three. No help is coming. But it's looking there is a search out. There are characters in Brian's book, the story of the survival of one man and also the recovery of the remains and the closure for the families of everyone else in this crew of the iceberg NS. There is a search out by men who've come to Alaska for different reasons over time. But I you quickly recover the fact that at Ladd field and at the other fields in Alaska they've been part of a major battle in nineteen forty two. The battle of midway is celebrated is the miraculous moment that the aggression of the Japanese imperial navy was blunted and the Americans became the cl- began the clawback to defeat the Japanese empire. There was a subpar a subplot of the battle of midway which. Which was that Yamamoto the Admiral commanding the Japanese forces in this grand plan to overwhelm the American battle fleets in a final shootout, which was going to settle the matter between Japan and the United States. I kid you not it was the plan in Tokyo. That's how they thought and forty to send a task force to capture the Aleutian islands. And you have a man wonderful character. He's a major at this point who's leading the search for Leon Leon crane at this point. Who is he Brian? But his name is Richard Charles ragle. He came north to Alaska. To work as a professor of geology at the university of Fairbanks. He always had an interest in aviation. So before the war, he was a Bush pilot. He was a aviation instructor. He was part of this group of a flyers who were really changing Alaska during the late twenties and thirties opening up a route delivering mail ferrying people across the state. So he was it was very kind of. Pioneering time in Alaska on the ground. But also in the air as well. So he had this background and eventually became the head of the search and rescue unit at Ladd field. Not without the episode of attacking by himself, the Japanese invasion fleet in the Aleutian islands and running bombing runs against Japanese submarines to intimidate them. When he had no weapons on board. Very colorful, all these all these people in Alaska are pioneers colorful, but they're fighting a war. They're fighting a war against the elements and regal doesn't want to give up Niger's there. The search I believe at one point there, sixteen planes out. But because the last radio position was so far from the crash, which we know now to be the Charlie Yukon river, preservation nat-, natural preserve that they don't know how to find that be twenty four, and it's it's they're despairing about it. So we'll go back to Leon. They're they're looking for you Leon. But. You crash too far away from the last radio position. And they don't know to go to the Charlie river Leon knows that. He's on a river Lino seize on a river. He I thinks he's he has two walkout. Why does he think? Yes. To walk west. What what's the what's the clue for him, Brian? Well, he at first tries to go overland, which turns out to be a monumental blunder. Almost a fatal blunder. He he knows to the west is a smaller base called big delta, which was south Fairbanks. And this was he knew this was the closest civilization. But he had no idea how far away it was. He was guessing it was a walkable distance. But he also didn't know that there were tall mountains. Valleys wilderness. I mean nothing in between. He he was really trying to assess the situation based on very very limited knowledge of the area. But also very limited knowledge of where the plane was in respect to big delta and Fairbanks as well, which were pretty much. He's quickly. Understood that going overland was a non starter. So the MIT graduate is now facing the fact that the river is the highway of the wilderness, and he must stay with Charlie river you've given a map, that's very helpful. And I looked up on Google have to see where we were the river twists back and forth back and forth back and forth. So he descends to the river, and he starts marching, and he doesn't know how long he has to live. You knows how many matches he has. But he's starving and his eating snow at this point. If he doesn't find shelter and food how long do you think he has brought I think at this point. He probably has. Days to live. The the match supply was dwindling. He was facing hunger. Of course, he had he had water. But also as you pointed out by by his decision to eat snow, which would seem an obvious way to to quench. Your thirst. Also raises other problems too, it it inflames the mucus membranes and your mouth swells your tongue and in a way begins to dehydrate, you even as you're as you're consuming water too. So this was a poor decision by him. But one with with you know, he had very other very few other options. So he's walking up the river. And the reason he did this is because he knew that he was south of the Yukon river, and that he knew that the tributaries in this area would all eventually flow into the Yukon. But but clearly he had no no concept of how far away he was for those of you who are going to be lost in the wilderness. Always stay near the rivers. Because that's where the people are. That's where always the settlements are. And there it is ahead of him. And he can't quite believe that he's seeing a ten top. What does he find Brian? Well, he sees as you say ten top. And then he comes closer. And sees this tent is atop a raised platform, then he looks even farther, and he sees just beyond that a small cabin. And again, he he initially thinks it's some kind of Mirage or a pile of of driftwood that maybe resembles a cabin. He stumbles through the snow gets closer and realizes that it is in fact, a trappers cabin. That was the only one he wouldn't have known this at the time, of course. But the only one for many many miles around. So this was an incredible stroke of luck. Yes. And inside is food is warmth is it's the the roof is intact. So he it's about I figured it was about ten by nine inside with a ground of the solid floor everything to survive, although he's in very poor shape. He's starving. So he takes some time for his appetite to come back. He gives himself hot cocoa. And in the coming hours and days. He will discover that not only is there food inside. But there's there's storage of food and utilities and saws everything he needs a left behind by name may men named Phil Barral, and it says fill Baril woodchopper Alaska at first you think Phil Burrell woodchopper who is Phil beret O'Brien. Well, he is really a prototype of of what Alaska was oh, this part of Alaska was was like at this time. He traveled up around the turn of the century from the mid. West and he was a trapper. He was a minor. He was a hunter. He was a fisherman. He had odd jobs. He was living this frontier life that that many people did at that time and still do and this cabin was a place that he would go to in the summer deficient trap. And in the in the rules of the frontier that that are still there, and and not just in Alaska. You would leave a cabinet like this stocked with provisions in case someone in need came by and this person. Of course was crane at one point Phil Baril had worked a dredge that was an invention. I think it's the nineteen thirties. Is that right, Brian where they were going to get gold out of the Charlie river, the Charlie rivers a detail here. That's important. Who is chief, Charlie Brian. Well, he was a member of the EPA basket and. Guess we shouldn't call it a tribe, maybe at Athabasca culture, which is spread across central and eastern Alaska there various tribes, but they're connected by a common language, common belief system. And this chief Charlie was was one of the leaders of a clan that that lived on this river, they would face a yearly flooding they the the life. There was was extremely hard. And once the western civilization western amenities of began to arrive their way of life their traditional way of life began to disappear rather quickly. But people like Phil braille and the others at the time would would look to them and realize that they were also a store. House of of information about life in in this part of the world and learned a lot from that learned a lot about survival learned a lot about respecting the environment and so forth. Leon crane now comes to his senses. He's got mittens even got a twenty two left behind by Phil. He's got food, but he doesn't have enough to get through to the spring. He's got to get out. He's got to make the decision especially because one morning a here's an earthquake which turns out to be the ice breaking up. And that means there's going to be damage or perhaps the highway will be will be not available to him. And so he's got to move. Now. He makes a decision. I kept thinking stay where you are Leon to build a sled that he's going to haul behind him. It's a crude sled in. It's he does about four miles a day. But he starts out the Charlie river. He finds another lean to find a canoe. He found a sleeping bag before and one of his exploration. So he's got all the equipment and he's hauling it behind him with. With food but the rivers breaking up and the danger to him. Now is that he's going to crash through the eyes? So he can only walk during the day. And then he does go through the ice. How does he survive that Brian? Well, he did what is essential even though it sounds perhaps counterintuitive he plunged into the ice more than once. But the time when he was most covered with with this frozen water. He had to strip off his clothes in me at least fire and dry himself out because leaving this wet clothes on is is a certain recipe for death. So he space this several times and had had the presence of mind to to realize what what needed to be done. He keeps marching and he starts marching February twelfth it's now early March. And he is I don't think he has days to go yet left, but he certainly exhausted and in despair, and he comes across sledge marks. And then dog prints does that. Tell him that he's going to survive. I think at this point. He he had hope that civilization was nearby. But he also face this once before when he came across Phil Brill's cabin that first time and in his eastern sensibilities urban sensibilities from Philadelphia, he assumed that this was perhaps the edge of a settlement. So he was fooled once before he thought that this cabin could not conceivably be just alone in the wilderness yet it was so when he saw these these tracks, and what was set up as a landing strip for for a Bush plane. He knew that there was a sign of civilization, of course. But but he wasn't certain that that it was nearby. Not only was it civilization. There was a man named Albert aims. And there was Phil Baril himself. And when we come back.

Charlie Brian Alaska Charlie river Leon Leon crane Ladd field Aleutian islands Phil Baril Charlie Yukon river Yukon river university of Fairbanks Baril woodchopper Alaska Richard Charles ragle Fairbanks Tokyo Phil Brill Google Niger Yamamoto Japan Phil braille
"yukon river" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Emily did a lot of groundwork. She spent the past year and a half digging through church records in court documents. She tracked down priests and people who knew them all to find those skeletons in the closet, and what she uncovered is a new chapter in the Catholic church is continuing story of sexual abuse. It takes us to some of the most isolated corners of the country native communities in Alaska and the northwest. We'll hear from the accused and from the Jesuit leaders who moved them around long way, Emily discovers how the church use a college campus, the high priests, including father pool in plain sight, I've only seen photos of James pool. An all of them he has a broad constant smile and dark rimmed glasses. People remember him as handsome and starting. Was his life stream. The radio station is a ministry. It's also an educational vehicle to try to bring the people ideas that will help them help themselves to move forward in. What is pretty difficult situation up there? Of one culture that has been overtaken and kinda swamped by another culture. So we're in there trying to help them hold again. Canham is a cozy place. It looks like a house, and it's always warm inside which means a lot in the winter and gnome you can spot the station from almost anywhere in town. Because of a giant electric star attached to the antenna that reaches above the roof, a friend of mine who also worked there said if I wanted to learn the real story of James pool, I should talk to a woman named Elsie Boudreaux a few weeks later Elsie told me she'd be happy to talk I knew on some level. Like, I was waiting for you to come. Because there's still more of a story to tell us waiting for you. I don't know how else to say it long before he founded Canham, James pool was the priest were Elsie grew up Saint Mary's. It's a tiny native village near the Yukon river the Jesuits built a boarding school nearby. An orphanage in the early nineteen hundreds and the church was part of everyday life for kids like Elsie. So you have to understand that I grew up Catholic, and I loved everything about being Catholic. I was a devout Catholic. I went to a Catholic high school Catholic college, and I grew up believing almost like I was more Catholic than I was Yupik, and they had a lot of power in our village. And which is true for a lot of the belligerents in Alaska when else he was a kid, she travelled to Nome in the summer to stay with her sister Florence who seventeen years older wood. Babysitter niece, and nephew and volunteer at him. I remember doing that show with father pool. Like, what do you remember about that? Well, I remember being in the Kym. And there was no one else in the building. It was just him. And I. Saturday's since he was usually alone. That's Elsie sister Florence Bush. She also worked at the station and hosted the requests shell and Elsie says for a kid like her working at Cana whim was a big deal. So I was able to say some things on the radio, which I thought was really cool. You know? But then like when songs are playing. You know, he would kiss me and kiss and stuff. So kind of weird..

Elsie Boudreaux James pool Canham Alaska Emily Florence Bush Yukon river Yupik Nome Saint Mary Cana seventeen years
Zimbabwe's president welcomes court challenge

A Public Affair

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Zimbabwe's president welcomes court challenge

"This is the BBC news it's union. McDonald Zimbabwe's newly reelected president Emmerson mnangagwa's insisted the elections were free and fear he says his rival. Nelson Chamisa had a crucial role to play in Zimbabwe's future but he also had the. Right to challenge the outcome Mr.. Jimmy says his party is, prepared to present evidence in court. That vote-rigging. Led to. His loss Mr. mnangagwa's. Defended. The election is open to the world Fiftieth. We went out. You know millions to share or future Yeah it, was British in Zimbabwe democracy First of all of unfettered freedom with is of the world, when us? We, believe what if free fair, election Officials in eastern Afghanistan. At least twenty five people have been killed in a suicide attack. On a mosque used by the Shia community hundreds of people were taking part in Friday prayers inside the mosque in Gardez the capital of Factoria province when two men wearing women's burqas entered into opened fire at least one blew himself up in, Turkey is handed down life sentences to. Nine people over the bombing of a peace rally in two thousand fifteen. Which killed more than one hundred people the attack shortly before elections proved a turning point in the full skill revival. Of Turkey's conflict with his car dish. Minority Virginia Gidley kitchen reports the twin explosions outside Ankara's main railway station targeted a peace rally pro-kurdish labor activists the demonstrators had gathered to call for an end to the growing violence. Between the government and Kurdish PKK militants fury survivors blamed the government for failing to provide security for the rally even though Previous Kurdish peace rally had been attacked. The government itself held these state group responsible for the explosions however ignoring a unilateral ceasefire declared by the PK. The government responded by redoubling its attacks on PKK targets Britain's Prime. Minister Theresa May's meeting president Macron is summer retreat in an apparent attempt to soften French resistance to our plan for leaving the European Union is the latest in a series of British meetings with individual European leaders and officials here's a reporter Adam, Fleming Brexit is just one of the. Subjects on the agenda for this meeting among the vineyards and beaches of. The south of France MRs may will want to explain her white paper on the future relationship with the EU leader. To leader but it's not clear if. President Macron will judge it as enough movement from the UK for the EU to change its long-standing and collectively agreed approach to Brexit and Brussels feels that needs to be more movement, on outstanding Voice issues such as. The, Irish border before serious discussions about the future. BBC news China says it has plans to impose new. Import tariff some sixty billion dollars worth of US goods the commerce ministry said the plans would go ahead if Washington did not back. Down from President Trump's threat to slap import tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods. It says its. Plans were rational unrestrained the United States is implemented sanctions against three foreign businesses over their alleged activities with North Korea the measures effect to. Russian Bank and the Chinese and the Korean firm as well as a Moscow-based individual the Justice department said. They were helping North Korea the UN Security Council sanctions NASA has named the nine astronauts who will fly to the international space station on new spacecraft built by Elon Musk's SpaceX corporation and Boeing next April the seven species And to space women are part of. NASA's commercial crew program a new project working. With US aerospace companies to develop the next generation of space craft following the space shuttle's retirement seven years ago Nicole own Apu man a US Marine Lieutenant Colonel will fly aboard. The Boeing star liner spacecraft she said. It was an opportunity of a lifetime debris involved in the test and development and then to. Be there on launch day and to experience the result of all that, hard work it's going to be. A proud moment for the team it's going to. Be a proud moment for America so I'm just grateful to be able to help usher in this new era of American spaceflight and as a test pilot it doesn't get any, better than this The Russian foreign ministry says an American sailor who appears to have wandered, aimlessly in the bearing see for two weeks is safe. And well a spokeswoman said John Martin from Anchorage. In Alaska had been sailing on the Yukon river when he decided to venture into the open sea reports quote him as, saying he was planning to reach China BBC news Wwl RT thanks listener.

Emmerson Mnangagwa United States BBC President Trump PKK European Union President Macron Mcdonald Zimbabwe Nelson Chamisa Turkey John Martin Boeing Zimbabwe North Korea Jimmy Afghanistan Nasa Theresa May Virginia Yukon River
"yukon river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"From no shoe fairbanks that's why everybody uses aeroplanes airplanes cool did you spend any time around anchorage at all the only thing i did was the airport but the time that i spent what's up in fairbanks the thing i can't tell you about anc which is that fishing is very popular down know that the people go they do a lot of halibut fishing it's cetera salmon fishing yeah i know you like the fish you were saying you like the fish yeah i like to go back someday but my experience was well mostly up in their banks but i happen to saddam okay and to be honest with you i was very disappointed in it it's very very very touristy saw what's touristy touristy good to know i even went into the pack and they said that the only thing i was considering doing i couldn't tell you i was going to hire airplane it's it's like a seven hour bus ride or eight hour bus ride choose to get from the pack to actually get the deny only okay i mean that's one way i mean everything is getting outside of the pack to see the mountains is another eight hours yeah it is and if you wanna go hiking on the trail the woman told me she says well you know there's there's grizzly bears unbelievable up fish well you know getting a lotta reported grizzly bears and on the trails attacking people and stuff all right what i would suggest is hot take take the five hundred dollars hired era i couldn't take it because it was too windy it's very touristy up there like they have whitewater rafting gets they were telling people you know hire a jeep and you know you don't like yeah hundred dollars they take it out on a big safari and basically what i did is i fought my own baps and just outside then allie pack i i would just take off myself with go down the road check it out but i one thing i will say i can remember advocate pass whatever ben by the thing i attic pass advocate attic pass smell it when you when you go up when you go up to highway fast and fairbanks is powell all the pipe it's the only road it it's like three or four hundred miles long and hard of bitch gravel pot of its ashfall the first stop is the yukon river this trae an actual trading posts i mean you can go up to fairbanks you it was a furrier up there you could every kind of animal imagine i bought my daughter a setup moccasins that were made by the athabasca hand be work i mean i think those costs we like to what she will they be for but the thing that i remember the most about ak when you cross over into the tundra it's like it's like a an entire number it's like it's like you landed on the book the tundra with tree not this i mean they have trees along the road up there did a sixty seventy eight years old than i am bushes in my front yard my house that pickens each treats yeah all right because it because of the it's the lack of sunlight it isn't so much the cold weather but you know for six months and in fact when you go up there this time of year you're going to have well i don't know about anchorage but i was up three hundred miles north i mean i get up there on july fifth all right what twelve midnight the sun is right off your head twenty four hours straight taylor weird all right but but when you cross over in the atlay i remember standing outside attica you know there are rest stops along the way because this is service road service appreciate i have to go out and poverty i really appreciate you checking in and hanging out yeah okay i pay one more thing i want to say you said you lived on campbell app in revere yeah that's right grow up you you'll live in donna the end yeah you know but check it out check it out let me share one more thing real quick we're we're actually had to go talk to you time thanks man stanford bbc news radio ten thirty.

sixty seventy eight years five hundred dollars twenty four hours hundred dollars eight hours eight hour seven hour six months
"yukon river" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"And native alaskan group and indigenous group who resides along the yukon and co yukon rivers they traditionally hunt bears in the winter by digging them out of dens a practice that they have engaged in for thousands of years that's how they hunt now if you're the kind of person who likes to sort of cultural imperialism that would come in and tell them digits group of people whose acted a certain way for many thousands of years and live in harmony with its environment that they've got it all wrong that they're not sportsmanlike because they have a traditional us practice of eating bear me in the winter that they pull out a dense then go ahead and be that kind of guy what as far as what goes on with regular hunters like people who are operating under sport hunting licenses it is not a practice to dig cubs out of their dens and kill them there's no like need there's no demand it'd be like saying this if you live in new york and you open your trash can up and you find a little nest of rat babies in your trash camp okay it would fear radically be legal for you to take a dole knitting needle in slowly kill all those rat babies with a dole knitting needle theoretically one could go do that so to say that people in new york are allowed to kill rats that they find in their home in their garbage cans you could put it that way or you could be the kind of guy who says it's now legal for people in new york to brutally slaughter baby rats with dole knitting needles.

new york yukon
"yukon river" Discussed on Angels Radio AM 830

Angels Radio AM 830

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on Angels Radio AM 830

"Representation of latin american scene from venezuela mexico all the way to argentina and really give you a fusion of the flavors that i learned to cook to eat to taste in all my troubles in the times that i spend for example in argentina in peru colombia venezuela my country of birth central america cuba northern part of south america so seeing all these ingredients that i always say that when you come into the united states where one culture where latin american so i wanted to present that culture into our folding would you really see the techniques and the fusion of ingredients of all the regions in one dish so that's actually what i wanted to bring the chica in how feeling is it's almost like what i said he's that love is that commitment that we have into a culture for from when you start speaking spanish to the time that you're trying our food you i want you to feel that you're in a little part of south america i think they do know another element that you have it she colorado which is really special is you have a very creative bar program this is las vegas so libations are kind of important to the experience gives us some of the highlights of the bar program well let me tell you know being good he's not good enough you have to be excellent and that's one of the things that would definitely practice every day and we try to push our our very best not only in the food program but also in our mixologist programs let me tell you we have incredible cocktails we have female winegrowers and female tequila growers we have a galvez i mean you i mean it it's just an array of beautiful cocktails i there is one that i absolutely love that is call a p no sandia which is to say which is yukon river in a watermelon and it is like our version of gin tonic it has a little bit of cucumbers lies that gin tonic you have a little bit of a crack juniper berries and then what we do with a watermelon as we it cuban and we put it in the freezer so actually becomes the ice cubes and it's just so delicious and refreshing is perfect for tomorrow's brunch but of course now lorena chica is kind of a fascinating.

mexico argentina colombia south america united states yukon river venezuela america cuba colorado las vegas lorena chica
"yukon river" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"Historical and psychological points of view and from the people who are living there i take a small single engine plane from fairbanks to cold foot i'm nervous because the weather forecast calls for cold temperatures and high winds but my pilot louis is cool and calm so i start to relax on the eighty minute long flight nice up here ten thousand feet fox today or when hit down around the hills has become the clouds louis points out that ox bos of the mighty yukon river that flows west you see the alaska pipeline and the dalton highway heading north both of which go all the way to prudhoe bay on the northern edge of the continent louis drops me off on a small landing strip which is just that snowy strip with nothing else around landed co foot and it's living up to name the feet really aren't cold but my nose in love with louis pilot for getting me here safely it's wendy standing out in thirty below zero lisa i presume up there peak christian is the northernmost us park service ranger in the country he's lived in the gates of the arctic national park with his family for seven years he has a warm smile and green is that are quick to sparkle when he speaks of his workplace which also happens to be his own backyard.

fairbanks louis mighty yukon river louis pilot arctic national park alaska prudhoe bay ten thousand feet eighty minute seven years
"yukon river" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"In the lobby of ramsey solutions gerald as weather's gerald how are ya great dave doing better than i deserve now here you where are you from i'm from fairbanks alaska all the way to nashville for screen wow good for you how much of your pay it off one hundred eighty thousand dollars and seven years ago and your income during that seven years range seventy five to one hundred and that included some rental income okay very cool what do you do for a living i'm a fish biologist up on the yukon river nate very fun good for you a couple of fish there there's a few so one hundred and eighty thousand dollars worth what kind of debt is forty thousand in consumer debt equally between a truck loan student loans credit card and signature loan and then my home loan of fifty thousand and then a rental property of ninety so you paid off your house and your rental and all your debt your hundred percent debt free one hundred percent i'm looking at where people i love it man congratulations well that's a perfect seven year track man well done how old are you i'm forty six and every thing is paid for everything's paid for haven't been debt free since college love how what's the house worth well dave it's not worth a lot i thought i was going to get rich in real estate so i bought a couple of fixer uppers and realized it was a lot harder than the tv shows make it out to be.

gerald fairbanks yukon river alaska nashville seven years one hundred eighty thousand do eighty thousand dollars one hundred percent hundred percent seven year
"yukon river" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Dot com eric metaxas coming up tonight at eleven on am 970 i see dot com shelly y'all barak he had had where we can go 744 jelly welcome back to the show girl how you doing what they're fall thanks hey kill you first of all a big shout out to papillon papillon would rake with thank you see we go i call i told the joyce as a joyce we're we're we're we're my going she goes good you gotta go to have younger now pat on they also own lilies correct yes loves lilies that the victorian decor louise the bag for that very nice street and then oscar wilde have to go there all of these that what an ontario i'll take it by the way what what you might not know about happy on a day with thrilled to see each hour of course railed it it was so cute the manager was there are are are are weak uses name went waitress so the me are servers name was killed her she was from ecuador and remember that she was so nice and so they could not had been morris but a bone the food was absolutely spectacular thanks for that show you're welcome newark i'm glad to have such a great time and they have opera night on saturday the into opera that's where you should go to wear papillon yes they have out like opera singer seattle restaurant yeah this is great it's crazy things going on in new york you never know let's have what makes glasses joerg with their joe the opera singers hit two high of unknown he could he couldn't resist yukon river you have a jumper there but that very funny now but will break the glare shelly what else you got going on on the city now over the weekend a true rock and roll legend just for you joe darlene love oughta of his love for the holidays and she's going to.

eric metaxas joyce ontario ecuador morris newark new york yukon river Dot oscar wilde opera singer seattle joe darlene
"yukon river" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"In an effort to search for the plane but turned back because of poor weather boy that's what's tough you're out in that neck of the woods and you you go down it's up pain not only for u unless you're deceased him in this case kiss heavy went the river and just to come to it immediately are died on impact then that's all she wrote but it's very difficult for search and rescue operations when there's inclement weather darrell polti a former search and rescue coordinator in russian mission said he help with the search on tuesday a voter traveling along the yukon river from another village spotted the plane in the water keep that in mind yesterday they recovered the plane contacted russian mission by vhf radio the voters information was relayed to a small commercial plane leaving russian mission whose pilot related the plane gaurd that's two state troopers see that's how it works village communications is the best in that way kind of lyon of sight or communication smaller communication radius and then it continues they'll be looking on the river in the islands and sandbars in the fish camps in the area polti said police said he hopes the break in the weather on tuesday comes to hold by the way with all that as they mentioned it's in god's hands now and boy that's the truth say a prayer for this guy but i mean he could have landed in the river swim swam swam swim swam swarmed assure then his good to go here's that song remember this whole street hill street blues right everybody be careful out there we should be i think the show god i wish i could go to mcdonalds imagine of this is the end of the show i now hey everybody thanks for listening time anderson show sending up like italy forty five minutes what would i do oh my god i got goosebumps not from the song but broadly thaw out of just leave in the show geez big gator validity here i love that song in i'm kidding i like talking to all of you folks you're like really will will leave look change stations no you won't yeah well you're gonna listen a disco the 70s station logan nights do do well they that would be good you might speed though it'll be careful.

coordinator yukon river mcdonalds darrell polti anderson italy forty five minutes
"yukon river" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"The beginning of hill street blues remember how he says that hey big careful out there but can you find hill street blues let's do that won't play that while i'm talking why not right i mean it's fun it's our show it's our show hey here's something not fun pilots still missing after discovery of his plane in yukon river i mean that doesn't bode well for him alaska dispatch news reporting alex demar marvin rescuers searching for a russian mission pilot found the man's airplane in the yukon river down river from the village but the man himself a still missing that's what alaska say troopers reported yesterday afternoon his name is kyle stevens aged thirty one you went missing monday wealth lying a small plane from russian mission to bethel to pick up volunteers for the christian mission where he works a coworker said his plane was found about ten miles down river from russian mission and boats towed it to shore that's what trooper spokesperson megan peters said stevens remains unaccounted for she said stevens says wellknown across the yukon cusco quim delta the y k delta if you've heard that term for his role as a summer camp councellor at the keiko retreat center about ten miles north of the village a lot of people are desperately praying for him that's what sharon pens said who works at the mission stevens was flying his own personal plane a donation from his mother that arrived just last week to help stevens provide outreach in villages across the region stevens is married to young kids he's worked at keiko for many years pens set her husband jonathan was traveling ahead of stevens in a separate cessna plane on monday her husband encountered heavy fog along the route he notified authorities when stevens failed the land and bethel yikes there's your attribution right there russian mission do you know where that is at situated along the yukon river it's about seventy miles north of that full state troopers received a report of the missing pilot at six twenty nine pm monday now what happens well typically aircraft from the civil air patrol in bethel they would come out and they did in this case they conducted aerial searches yesterday along with in alaska air national guard helicopter from jay beer from joint base elmendorf richardson the helicopter had also taken off monday night.

yukon river alaska kyle stevens megan peters keiko retreat center jonathan bethel jay beer alex demar yukon cusco quim sharon pens
"yukon river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"International i'm tom power every so often a story hits the news about some long treasure which is a relic everyone thought was lost in it's being found again in the most interesting of these discoveries are usually hiding right beneath our feet stories about permafrost thawing to reveal ancient weapons and cave lions and longlost viruses but you can't permafrost has given out something even more unexpected buried underneath silent films hundreds of films and footage thought lost forever have come out of dawson cities frozen soil and these are just any films were talking about priceless and irreplaceable prints featuring the biggest stars of the silent film era now a new documentary tells this incredible story and not only the story of the fine but also how this northern town directly affected a hollywood of the early 20th century and in entertainment industry that we know now bill morrison is the director of dawson city frozen time and i spoke to him about what it was like to piece together a mystery involving long forgotten real's and real's of old film i bill hi tom how are you i'm well i to go back to the beginning of this why were these films in dawson city yukon to begin with their dawson the city had established itself as a n point on a distribution circuit that hit a probably larger and clinton not as remote towns when they got to dawson city they were several years old and there they sat it was too expensive to ship them back the distributors lost interest in them and so it became sort of a holding on tank for these prince and they would just accumulate over the years and they'd have to find ways of getting rid them because of course they are very flammable they were on the old nitrate stock which is very flammable so i think they're the mode number one of disposing them was just to dump them in the yukon river and mode number two is to have a a bonfire um but those very dangerous also so in the default mode with just to let them accumulate an and at one point there became a opportunity to there is a a big swimming pool they were filling in and um to have this pit already dug for you and to just you fill it with landfill seemed like a your exist of excuse to.

hollywood bill morrison director yukon river dawson city tom clinton
"yukon river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"yukon river" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Many uh it was a dangerous prospect but like most of the garbage in town uh they waited 'til the ice broke up and they threw it on the yukon river and and it floated down uh in there was a report i assure this film on indoor and city a couple of months ago and somebody said that somebody had fished a real out of the river and giving it to the parks department i i've never seen that real but if it's out there i'd love to see it said they're still may be more films to be retrieved kathy jones gates when the protagonist of the the film a maintains that on the very site where the real's were recovered on there must be hundreds if not thousands of more real still bear underneath their recreation centre they just didn't have the time to recover was it better to bury them under the recreation center what what is now the recreation centre clearly neither the only real that survived so however else they were exist in in the rest of the world a didn't work but what's ironic about this is that indeed um they were well preserved there there is they show very little even though they do show some decay that's water damage none of them mm suffer from the typical nitrate decay that were familiar with um the and most of the damage really came after they were uncovered from their icy tomb uh brought out into the summer air of of dawson in a nineteen seventy eight handled by amateurs and when they were eventually shipped to ottawa than the film professionals finally got their hands on them they had a a mess that was driven rabin where the emotion was actually dripping.

yukon river dawson rabin kathy jones ottawa