35 Burst results for "Yuki Noguchi"

The New Campaign To Remedy COVID-19 Vaccine Doubt Within Black Communities Online

All Things Considered

04:14 min | 9 months ago

The New Campaign To Remedy COVID-19 Vaccine Doubt Within Black Communities Online

"Of ad campaigns aimed at promoting vaccines in debunking myths about them. Last week, the Ad Council launched its ad featuring four former presidents, including Barack Obama. You will protect you and those you love from this dangerous and deadly disease. Biden administration plans to ramp up its own vaccination campaign in the coming weeks. Many of these campaigns and to reach a black community hit hard by both covert 19 and disinformation. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. As far back is nine months ago, pediatrician and health activist Rhea Boyd noticed Social Media Post citing false information about the safety of vaccines in development before any of the vaccines had reached emergency use authorization. We already saw that disinformation targeting black communities online, the State Department since blamed Russian intelligence operatives for spreading some of those rumors. But at the time, Boyd says, it wasn't clear where it was coming from, You know, it would just look like a user with sow seeds of doubt. It doesn't look like a campaign for misinformation. It looks like a bunch of users who are sharing their own conversations about what they think about the vaccine and what seems like insider information boy decided to push back with her own campaign. She framed hers, too, as a conversation, one based on questions, her family and neighbors were already asking, she says Many of the questions people have about vaccines are universal. But many people in communities of color can't get answers because they lack access to medical care. Boyd works with the Kaiser Family Foundation and historically black colleges. This month, they posted a syriza videos, including one featuring comedian Kamau Bell, posing questions to black medical professionals. First question the vaccine happened fast, like

Biden Administration Yuki Noguchi Rhea Boyd Social Media Post Ad Council Barack Obama NPR Boyd State Department Kaiser Family Foundation Kamau Bell
The Dalai Lama Gets A COVID-19 Shot And Urges Others To Get Vaccinated

Chris Douridas

00:53 sec | 9 months ago

The Dalai Lama Gets A COVID-19 Shot And Urges Others To Get Vaccinated

"Tibet's spiritual leader, became the latest global leader to encourage vaccinations after getting his first shot today as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports 85 Year old is in India, which has the world's second highest caseload behind the U. S. The 14th Dalai Lama left his home and made his first public appearance in over a year. He got his vaccine at a local clinic and Dharamsala, where he lives in exile. In a video statement recorded afterward, a band aid on his right shoulder is visible, more people. Should have courage to dig isn't just injection. It will serve the greater good, he said. And doctors say it's safe. His message comes as Indian companies make a concerted push to manufacture and distribute vaccine. Most of the world's vaccines are already made their Yuki Noguchi NPR news

Yuki Noguchi Tibet NPR Dalai Lama Dharamsala India
Vaccine Distribution: An Equity Challenge

Short Wave

09:28 min | 9 months ago

Vaccine Distribution: An Equity Challenge

"Okay paying we are talking vaccine equity in the pandemic and just a quick note. We are focusing a just here in the united states for this episode. So let's start with some top line numbers three covid. Nineteen vaccines have been authorized for emergency. Use in the us one very recently. How many people have actually been vaccinated so far well. Since vaccine distribution started in mid december around fifty million people have gotten at least one dose of a covid nineteen vaccine that includes about twenty five million people who got into doses means they've been fully vaccinated with either the pfizer or madonna vaccines. And that's some real progress over the past few months. Still just around eight percent of the total. Us population has been fully vaccinated. So there's still a long way to go. yeah i mean. Do we have any demographics on who the people who got the vaccine are like. Do we have any data on race or ethnicity well. Last week i spent some time at a cdc conference which was online and a bunch of public officials talked about it including dr marcela nunez smith who we heard from earlier. People of color are getting vaccinated rates below their representation in the general population. We know these challenges reflect longstanding deeply rooted systemic rallies. But here's the thing. The data that she's talking about is still pretty limited. You know so far race. Nothing to see. Data have only been collected for about half of the shots given out. Wow only half the thought i mean. There's a little bit frustrating. That's that's not enough data. Yeah it's it's really not and the biden administration pointed this out themselves and they acknowledged that it's pretty abysmal. Doctor rachelle will lansky. She's head of the centers for disease control and prevention and she says the problem is coming from a couple of different directions. Individuals may choose not to report. It may not be required of or requested by providers and some providers as well as jurisdictions have restrictions on data sharing so some of these data gaps are due to the fact that we have inconsistent systems around data gathering. Which you know is something that has been in quite a bit with this pandemic. Yeah that's certainly part of it and there's reasons why people might not want to share their personal information about race ethnicity especially people of color you know. The federal government has a long history of exploiting and under serving minority communities and that extends to this day but now there are government officials saying that. It's up to them to try and convince people that it's important to give their information. Here's neurath shaw. Health official in the state of maine in public health. What gets measured gets managed and if we measure the right things then we will manage the right issues if we measure the wrong things. Then the did that we collect. That may not bear resemblance to current present. Elf challenges is actually what we will end up managing. Yeah so early. On in fact vaccine distribution the only metric that was available was the number of doses sent out in the number of doses administered which basically measured speed and so if the biden harris administration wants to achieve both and equity with axiom distribution. They're going to have to get more comprehensive data on race ethnicity to get a handle on the problem. Yeah i mean. I want to talk about what the biden administration is doing specifically to address this issue of a vaccine but first let's talk about some of the ways. The general rollout has put. Vulnerable communities added disadvantage. Because that's definitely happening. Yeah and to be honest. It's been hard for everyone including health reporters to keep up with the changes that are happening. Daily and weekly with axiom distribution. I mean every single state has its own rules about who qualifies and had a sign up. Obviously that confusion is compounded. If the information isn't coming to you in the language you speak or you don't have access to computers and email and even for people who may have read up on how to book an appointment. It's taken them hours to actually research in book one. So if you don't have time to figure that out and if you don't have access to transportation or time off work to get an appointment and was places you probably haven't been able to get vaccinated yet. Yeah i mean and that's when you know for sure that you want the vaccine. Exactly dr christian rumors. He's a physician and executive that family health centers of san diego. He points out that people also have questions that are very specific to their own circumstances and we want those answered before they feel like they can make an informed decision to actually get vaccinated. Here he is speaking to. My colleague yuki noguchi residency is not just one thing. And in many cases. They're very unique to their own situation. Like i just got treated for cancer. Or i'm on a certain medication or i've had an allergy in the past and those are questions that'll be answered most likely from talking one on one with a medical professional or some other trusted person. Which again if you're part of an underserved community is hard to access. If you don't have the time to seek out those answers it'll be much easier if the vaccines and the resources were coming directly to you right right okay. So ping what has the biden administration specifically announced or done to address vaccine equity so at that. Cdc conference. dr marcellina smith acknowledged that this is a huge issue. And it's not gonna be easily solved. Must attend the underlying social structures arborist as we look ahead to building resilience into our recovery. What we do believe now. Is that the way we get american vaccinating and the emphasis he placed reaching the hardest hit communities attached just as important as being the goals the number of people that's needed so their strategy to get to those goals basically amounts to increasing a couple of different things number one the number of vaccines available number two the number of people giving vaccines and number three. The number of places people can get vaccinated and specific to equity. They've launched a few fema supported mass vaccination sites. These are huge operations set up in stadiums and parking lots that are aiming to give at six thousand shots a day and they're putting some of these in places that score high on something called the social vulnerability right which is a cdc measurement of how vulnerable community is based on social factors like poverty for example. They've also started sending vaccines directly community health centers which serve around thirty million people over. All many whom are rural belong to minority groups or are low income and the centers can also offer outreach in different languages and support for signing up. I mean are they also leaning on non-medical sites to i mean like i know working with community leaders and partners be especially effective. Yeah well they're also talking about sending out that nation trucks to job sites and setting up clinics and local churches and high school gyms and ymca's those non-medical sites that you were talking about and these community clinics might not be serving thousands of people a day but they will make the vaccine available and convenient for people in those communities to get gosh so the vibe administration is really trying to take a both and approach. They're supporting mass vaccination sites to get a lot of people vaccinated quickly and they're also realizing that some people will take more time and more effort to reach so they're also trying to figure out ways to gather better data and target underserved areas. Okay so you know. Most of what we've been talking about today paying as the government is handling this which i would argue is the most important facet but i mean. Is there a sense of individual responsibility here. I know there are a bunch of stories out there about people line jumping or like going into communities outside their own to vaccines how we have all heard the stories and it's hard to say how much it's happening but it does make people feel like the system isn't working you know and what bioethicists have said to me is. That cheating happens for sure but it's probably not happening enough to undermine the system overall i mean. Is that all kind of a short term problem. I mean there's a huge demand right at this point and not enough supply but the hope is that you know in the coming weeks or months the situation will change as vaccine manufacturing and distribution ramp up even further right. Yeah and that's been the hope all along. I mean for weeks now. We've been hearing about a flood of vaccines that will be coming online in the near future. That will make it less. Cut throat to vaccine appointment and we're not there yet but there are some promising signs. The government has now ordered a total of six hundred million doses of pfizer in modern of vaccines to be delivered by the end of july. Which is enough to cover three hundred million people and that's more than all the adults in the us right right. Plus we've got the newly authorized. John jay vaccine which will eventually make a difference right and getting all these shots in urgent right now because we're kind of in a race between vaccinations and variants. Which means that. The more people protect right now. The fewer people will catch the virus and the fewer chances the virus will have to keep mutating in ways that might make it avai the vaccines and the treatments. We've developed so that's why it's still super super important to keep the other measures that prevent the virus from spreading double masking staying physically distant. You know we're all excited about vaccines but health. Experts are saying right now that in the middle of the vaccination campaign is not the time to let up our guard okay pingpong we appreciate you as always thank you for coming on the show things so much. Mattie appreciate you to

Biden Administration Centers For Disease Control An Dr Marcela Nunez Smith Rachelle Will Lansky Neurath Shaw Biden Harris Administration United States Dr Christian Yuki Noguchi Pfizer Dr Marcellina Smith Madonna ELF Federal Government Maine Confusion Allergy CDC San Diego
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:45 min | 10 months ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"Losing additional unemployment assistance, another pandemic related protections. Democrats in control of the U. S. Senate continue their work today to include a minimum wage increase in a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package that they could pass quickly without GOP support. But It's a juggling act because the Senate's also just beginning a historic second impeachment trial for former President Donald Trump. Majority leader Chuck Schumer says he's confident the Senate can handle it all. You know, it was said a few weeks ago in all the punditry and everywhere else. At the impeachment trial would throw a wrench into President Biden's early agenda. We are here today to say we are not letting That happened. We can do both at once. Impeachment trial opens this hour with four hours of debate over the constitutionality of the proceeding. The defense wants the jurors of the U. S Senate to dismiss the charge against former President Trump that he incited the insurrection of the U. S Capitol last month. Resulted in multiple deaths. MPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The House impeachment managers serving his prosecutors argued Trump's lawyers have offered no good defense. In a new brief, the House impeachment managers say Trump refuses to accept responsibility for his actions and instead is trying to shift blame for the violence to his supporters. Managers say the legal theories Trump's attorneys have offered in his defense don't hold water. They reject trumps argument that the Senate doesn't have the jurisdiction to try a former president. They say that argument is wrong, constitutionally and dangerous as a matter of practice. House managers argue that the Senate does indeed have the authority to try Trump. They say his actions are quote the paradigm of an impeachable offense that he should be convicted and barred from holding office in the future. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington Starting today. Some pharmacies they're booking appointments for covert 19 vaccines. A limited number of pharmacies across the U. S will be getting doses to administer starting this Thursday. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has more because almost every community has one pharmacies. They're considered a key channel for administering vaccines. And right now, demand for vaccines is far greater than supply. Initially, the federal government will ship a million doses a week to about 10% of the country's pharmacies. Each participating store, in other words, will on Lee administer an average of about 20 shots per day. Consumers are advised to check their local eligibility requirements, then check their pharmacies websites to see if appointments are available, But retailers and federal officials urge patients Appointments will be hard to come by until vaccine supplies ramp up likely in late spring. Yuki Noguchi NPR news The Dow is up.

Donald Trump Senate president U. S Senate Yuki Noguchi President Biden Ryan Lucas NPR GOP Chuck Schumer federal government Brian Lucas Washington Lee
The Rise Of Gig Work: Companies Turn To On-Demand CEOS

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:30 min | 1 year ago

The Rise Of Gig Work: Companies Turn To On-Demand CEOS

"Experienced executives of doing gig work do is, some companies are turning to on demand Workers to be CEO Zen Piers Yuki Noguchi explains why Duncan Thomas has served a CEO of a medical practice a Russian software firm and logistics company, each stint lasting a few months. It really suits how I like to work, and it suits how I like to engage people and, you know, it gives me tremendous work life flexibility, Thomas fell into temporary executive work by way of a traumatic experience. Six years ago, he was working long hours as the CEO of a vocational college. I came back from a vacation and I was feeling unwell on Guy went to the doctor that day. And that day, they said, You better go down and get an ultrasound. The doctor returned head hanging advanced melanoma, he told Thomas left him about seven months to live. Nine chambers of my lungs and I have three of my liver, and the biggest ones were nine a half centimeters in size, so it was pretty overwhelming. Thomas was trained as a veterinarian and found a clinical trial. A test drug eliminated the cancer from his body. It was almost like a rebirth. Thomas, a native Australian living in Los Angeles, reevaluated what he wanted out of life and work. Working as an itinerant CEO, he says, leaves him time between gigs to recharge with his family. The pandemic increase the popularity of gig work for CEOs. It's left Cos in turmoil and more leaders are willing to trade in a higher salary for short term stints and greater flexibility. Jody Greenstone. Miller is co CEO of the business talent group. It matches experienced executives with interim CEO jobs. Mello says she started her firm because companies in transition or crisis often need temporary expertise. But they don't want the multiyear commitment of a long term CEO. And the notion that I could just, you know, need somebody for three or four months to come in and solve a problem or help me, you know, build a new business just didn't exist in a formal way. The fact that so many people Are now no longer community to an office, she says, brought in the pool of temporary executives and the companies wanting to hire them. And what that did is it really opened up the world of talent, but succeeding as a gig CEO isn't easy. High end temps are often flown in to handle crises and scandals. Duncan Thomas has seen his share. The challenges can be very real. Thomas has taken over at firms that were cooking their books or the previous CEO sexually assaulted an employee. Writing. Such ships isn't easy. For starters, Thomas says. Workers often this trust leaders who parachuted in they're suspicious of their motives. And no, they won't stick around. Ah, lot of the stigma that I've come across is that you are changed around. You're a mercenary. That you are only into the money that you don't really don't give a damn about people these days. There's the added challenge of managing teams you've on Lee met online. But Peter woke with says there are also some advantages of coming in fresh make really comment as an outsider, independent don't have favorites that often helps also Well quits lives in Chicago. He's currently juggling two separate executive gigs at a robotics company and an e commerce firm. One of the benefits is never getting that rut of being in one company for a long time. So he says, it never gets boring. You can Noguchi NPR news

Duncan Thomas Thomas Ceo Zen Piers Yuki Noguchi Jody Greenstone Business Talent Group Melanoma Mello GUY Los Angeles Cancer Miller LEE Peter Chicago Npr News
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"Floyd's killing in Minneapolis placed police violence again in the national limelight, with protests erupting. But black and Brown communities say the effective police violence is felt long after demonstrations died down. In fact, research shows trauma from racism and violence can leave imprints on a community's health, including on pregnant women. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi. Outside the corner store where George Floyd died. Murals, stuffed animals and origami cranes filled the street. So I'm Rachel Heart of men. I am on the faculty. Rachel Hardman grew up nearby and it's a public health professor at the University of Minnesota. We walk in a field where there's a memorial for victims of police violence. It looks like a replica of a cemetery with about 200 grave markers like Ralph Bell, right? Hard del Cheryl over here. Many of these people were local and died at the hands of police. Travis Jordan in Minneapolis. He's actually it was a friend of one of my dear friends, Hardman surveys to makeshift cemetery. My first thought, is it This isn't even all of the names. And that breaks my heart. This scene, she says, doesn't capture the whole of the problem that police violence leaves marks across a community of survivors, their families and neighbors. Hardiman studies racial disparities in health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth of 3 to 4 Times The rate of whites That holds true regardless of wealth or education. Black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality. Weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Hartmann's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that. She studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016, and two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis. And we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes, nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died at route, she says. It's about stress. Ah, lifetime of struggles of her housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stress across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth in particular. Then in the start of life is so important, because if we can't get that, right, you know we're setting someone up for a lifetime of pain and a struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles, Hardman says, might help doctors better understand challenges for women like Raven Cane. I meet cane and her three week old daughter, Remmy. Okay. Prior to Remmy Kane had five miscarriages with no medical explanation about what caused them. I had gotten an ultrasound and had seen a baby in a strong heartbeat. Literally had come back the next day, and there was nothing there. So I just had this really high anxiety anxiety about losing her pregnancy with Remmy, too. She was about four months pregnant when the pandemic hit. Then George Floyd died blocks from her parent's home. You know, During that time, it was constant sirens when they were saying that the KKK was supposedly in town, and it's just stressful. It's like and then you're trying to Carry life and then you're thinking about them being a black person in this world and the things that they might encounter, Kane tried to distract herself by hosting a family party to reveal she was having a girl. My dad was jumping open down like he was so heavy, he said. He was in the garage and cried a little bit, cried partly out of relief. He told her the world wasn't safe for black boys. Midwife Rebecca Polston. Here's that often. Holsten started roots community birth center five years ago to offer women more support than a traditional hospital. Clinic defied the odds in five years on Lee. One client has had a preterm birth, she says. That's because the clinic addresses trauma. Some of the things that we explore is not finding out the sex. Of their baby because the stress that it brings when you find out that you're having a black sun. That kind of stress, she says, is palpable all around her. After George Floyd's death, Colston says she confronted a group of white men flying Confederate flags three blocks away. She closed the birthing center for a week. But the threat, she says, isn't just from outsiders. Once an elderly neighbor fainted nearby, Polston and her staff rushed to help and the police came up with their hands on their guns saying, What are you doing to us while we're taking blood pressure clearly healthcare providers those Interactions where those who you call for help. May not come to help you but come to harm you shadows every aspect of one's life and it becomes especially acute when you're in your birthing phase of your life. That rings true for coming Love Valenzuela. I don't know how to explain it, but I feel like that trauma is just in my body balance way Low is a doula. Originally from Chile Four years ago, she went into early labor. On her way to the hospital. Police pulled her over for driving with high beams on she told him. him. I I have have an an emergency. emergency. I'm I'm pregnant pregnant and and he he stops stops me. me. I I need need to to see see your your driver's driver's license license and and registration. registration. So So I'm I'm scrambling, scrambling, shaking. shaking. Just remembering makes like my heart beagle so fast. She was scared and her contractions intensified. She says he'd be raided her ticketed her and insisted she keep the windows rolled down its frigid cold. I'm crying my tears or freezing as they're coming down because it's so cold. Her baby survived. But this spring, Valenzuela nearly died giving birth to her second child. She blames her earlier encounter with police because my uterus had worked so hard, potentially from this previous Drama. I actually had an acute hemorrhage. Two months later, George Floyd died about a mile away. She's still haunted that he called out for his mother as he died. So, too, is researcher Rachel Hardiman. You know, when George plaids yelled for his mama and summon all mothers, Hardman stands just a few feet from where he was killed. It's just so painful. You know, this'd why do the work that I do is so that every mom gets to have a healthy baby and Have a good life. She's expanding her research nationally to keep digging into the connections between police violence and its impact on mothers and their babies.

George Floyd Rachel Hardman Yuki Noguchi Rachel Heart David Greene Minneapolis NPR University of Minnesota professor
How Police Violence Could Impact The Health Of Black Infants

Travis Holcombe

06:58 min | 1 year ago

How Police Violence Could Impact The Health Of Black Infants

"Floyd's killing in Minneapolis placed police violence again in the national limelight, with protests erupting. But black and Brown communities say the effective police violence is felt long after demonstrations died down. In fact, research shows trauma from racism and violence can leave imprints on a community's health, including on pregnant women. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi. Outside the corner store where George Floyd died. Murals, stuffed animals and origami cranes filled the street. So I'm Rachel Heart of men. I am on the faculty. Rachel Hardman grew up nearby and it's a public health professor at the University of Minnesota. We walk in a field where there's a memorial for victims of police violence. It looks like a replica of a cemetery with about 200 grave markers like Ralph Bell, right? Hard del Cheryl over here. Many of these people were local and died at the hands of police. Travis Jordan in Minneapolis. He's actually it was a friend of one of my dear friends, Hardman surveys to makeshift cemetery. My first thought, is it This isn't even all of the names. And that breaks my heart. This scene, she says, doesn't capture the whole of the problem that police violence leaves marks across a community of survivors, their families and neighbors. Hardiman studies racial disparities in health, focusing on a longstanding problem. Black mothers die in childbirth of 3 to 4 Times The rate of whites That holds true regardless of wealth or education. Black babies are more than twice as likely to die in their first year. Research suggests racial discrimination is a likely cause of both preterm birth and infant mortality. Weighing factors like obesity, smoking or poor prenatal care. Hartmann's latest research looks at how police violence in particular might affect that. She studied women in and around Minneapolis after police shot Philando Castille in 2016, and two years later, Thurman Blevins Thurman Blevins had just been killed in North Minneapolis. And we asked folks do you feel like this is impacting your current pregnancy and Over half of the women in our study said Yes, nearly 60% of those women gave birth to pre term babies who were underweight or died at route, she says. It's about stress. Ah, lifetime of struggles of her housing, education and safety. Large body research shows that that stress across pregnancy can have an impact on low birth weight and preterm birth in particular. Then in the start of life is so important, because if we can't get that, right, you know we're setting someone up for a lifetime of pain and a struggle and disadvantage. Examining these struggles, Hardman says, might help doctors better understand challenges for women like Raven Cane. I meet cane and her three week old daughter, Remmy. Okay. Prior to Remmy Kane had five miscarriages with no medical explanation about what caused them. I had gotten an ultrasound and had seen a baby in a strong heartbeat. Literally had come back the next day, and there was nothing there. So I just had this really high anxiety anxiety about losing her pregnancy with Remmy, too. She was about four months pregnant when the pandemic hit. Then George Floyd died blocks from her parent's home. You know, During that time, it was constant sirens when they were saying that the KKK was supposedly in town, and it's just stressful. It's like and then you're trying to Carry life and then you're thinking about them being a black person in this world and the things that they might encounter, Kane tried to distract herself by hosting a family party to reveal she was having a girl. My dad was jumping open down like he was so heavy, he said. He was in the garage and cried a little bit, cried partly out of relief. He told her the world wasn't safe for black boys. Midwife Rebecca Polston. Here's that often. Holsten started roots community birth center five years ago to offer women more support than a traditional hospital. Clinic defied the odds in five years on Lee. One client has had a preterm birth, she says. That's because the clinic addresses trauma. Some of the things that we explore is not finding out the sex. Of their baby because the stress that it brings when you find out that you're having a black sun. That kind of stress, she says, is palpable all around her. After George Floyd's death, Colston says she confronted a group of white men flying Confederate flags three blocks away. She closed the birthing center for a week. But the threat, she says, isn't just from outsiders. Once an elderly neighbor fainted nearby, Polston and her staff rushed to help and the police came up with their hands on their guns saying, What are you doing to us while we're taking blood pressure clearly healthcare providers those Interactions where those who you call for help. May not come to help you but come to harm you shadows every aspect of one's life and it becomes especially acute when you're in your birthing phase of your life. That rings true for coming Love Valenzuela. I don't know how to explain it, but I feel like that trauma is just in my body balance way Low is a doula. Originally from Chile Four years ago, she went into early labor. On her way to the hospital. Police pulled her over for driving with high beams on she told him. him. I I have have an an emergency. emergency. I'm I'm pregnant pregnant and and he he stops stops me. me. I I need need to to see see your your driver's driver's license license and and registration. registration. So So I'm I'm scrambling, scrambling, shaking. shaking. Just remembering makes like my heart beagle so fast. She was scared and her contractions intensified. She says he'd be raided her ticketed her and insisted she keep the windows rolled down its frigid cold. I'm crying my tears or freezing as they're coming down because it's so cold. Her baby survived. But this spring, Valenzuela nearly died giving birth to her second child. She blames her earlier encounter with police because my uterus had worked so hard, potentially from this previous Drama. I actually had an acute hemorrhage. Two months later, George Floyd died about a mile away. She's still haunted that he called out for his mother as he died. So, too, is researcher Rachel Hardiman. You know, when George plaids yelled for his mama and summon all mothers, Hardman stands just a few feet from where he was killed. It's just so painful. You know, this'd why do the work that I do is so that every mom gets to have a healthy baby and Have a good life. She's expanding her research nationally to keep digging into the connections between police violence and its impact on mothers and their babies.

George Floyd Thurman Blevins Minneapolis Yuki Noguchi Rachel Heart Rachel Hardman Ralph Bell Del Cheryl Hardman Travis Jordan Philando Castille North Minneapolis Raven Cane Remmy Kane Hardiman University Of Minnesota Floyd Rebecca Polston
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm David Green. When George Floyd was killed by police earlier this year, it's sparked both massive protests and Conversations about the many ways racial inequality plays out in this country. One of those ways is health. Black people are twice as likely to die of heart disease and covert 19 as white people. Those differences are visible in one of Minneapolis is most diverse neighborhoods. It's just three miles from where George Floyd was killed. But there's a clinic there that has decades of experience, grappling with race and health, and it's now being held up as a model. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has been reporting in North Minneapolis and joins me how Yuki! Hi, David. So take us there. What got you interested in this neighborhood? Yeah, What Interested me in north Minneapolis is it's incredible racial diversity within a state that's mostly white 90% of residents. There are racial minority. It's about half black, about a third Latino and about 1/10 Asian, mostly Southeast Asian, and the area reflects what we know Nationally that communities of color have more health problems, especially now, with the pandemic cases of Cove it in north Minneapolis run 5 to 6 times higher than the state. So safe to say this is a place that's been grappling with questions about race and health and that relationship for a very long time. Absolutely. North Minneapolis is like a poster child for race and its effect on health. And that's been the case for decades. When we're going to talk about this one clinic I mentioned, But you know you mentioned the case for decades. I mean to tell us more about that history. You know, George Floyd's death struck a really cord here, and the protests afterward felt like a real echo from the past and explain why let me take you back 53 years ago, there were similar protests there. Back. Then there was unrest over discrimination, including in access to health care, among other things. And that led to similar sort of rioting and protests on the streets of North Minneapolis violence..

Minneapolis George Floyd David Green Yuki Noguchi NPR News Noelle King NPR
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News. I'm Noelle King and I'm David Green. When George Floyd was killed by police earlier this year, it's sparked both massive protests and Conversations about the many ways racial inequality plays out in this country. One of those ways is health. Black people are twice as likely to die of heart disease and covert 19 as white people. Those differences are visible in one of Minneapolis is most diverse neighborhoods. It's just three miles from where George Floyd was killed. But there's a clinic there that has decades of experience, grappling with race and health, and it's now being held up as a model. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has been reporting in North Minneapolis and joins me how Yuki! Hi, David. So take us there. What got you interested in this neighborhood? Yeah, What Interested me in north Minneapolis is it's incredible racial diversity within a state that's mostly white 90% of residents. There are racial minority. It's about half black, about a third Latino and about 1/10 Asian, mostly Southeast Asian, and the area reflects what we know Nationally that communities of color have more health problems, especially now, with the pandemic cases of Cove it in north Minneapolis run 5 to 6 times higher than the state. So safe to say this is a place that's been grappling with questions about race and health and that relationship for a very long time. Absolutely. North Minneapolis is like a poster child for race and its effect on health. And that's been the case for decades. When we're going to talk about this one clinic I mentioned, But you know you mentioned the case for decades. I mean to tell us more about that history. You know, George Floyd's death struck a really cord here, and the protests afterward felt like a real echo from the past and explain why let me take you back 53 years ago, there were similar protests there. Back. Then there was unrest over discrimination, including in access to health care, among other things. And that led to similar sort of rioting and protests on the streets of North Minneapolis Violence. Northside.

Minneapolis George Floyd David Green Yuki Noguchi Noelle King NPR
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get people back into their homes. Get get life more back to normal, the better off all of those individuals are going to be on DH. You know, it's It's just it's just a real challenge. National Guard troops are distributing food, water and supplies in eight Louisiana parishes, Edward says they've handed out some 161,000 tarps so people can make temporary repairs to get back home. Debbie Elliot NPR NEWS a pharmaceutical company, working on a covert 19 vaccine is suspending trials as scientists examine why one volunteer became ill. Here's NPR's Joe Palka. Vaccine comes from a partnership between the University of Oxford in the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. It's being studied in thousands of patients in the United States and the United Kingdom. The illness apparently occurred in a UK volunteer. The company has not revealed the nature of the illness, but did confirm that there has been a pause and vaccination to allow a review of safety data. The company said in a statement that quote this is a routine action, which has toe happen whenever there is a potentially unexplained illness and one of the trial's closed quote. The next step will be to determine if the illness was indeed related to the vaccine or just a chance event. Jo Palka NPR NEWS This is NPR news. A new poll finds almost half the households in the U. S air facing serious financial difficulties during the Corona virus. Pandemic problems appear to be worst in cities among black and Latino households. NPR's Yuki Noguchi says The findings come from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. The five parts survey shows a majority of households in the largest cities are dealing with lost jobs or reduced work hours, causing serious financial problems that are particularly acute among Latino and black households. In Houston, For example, 63% of households overall reported serious financial problems. But among black families in Houston that was 81% and among Latino households. 77%. In many cases, savings have been depleted. In addition, households have serious problems paying their rent and utilities. The poll also shows the impacts are much greater for families was less than $100,000 a year in income. Yuki Noguchi NPR news in Hawaii, the mayor of Honolulu, says he's extending the city's Corona virus stay at home order for another two weeks. It'll run through September. 24th. At the same time, the mayor says. Beginning tomorrow, people will be allowed to run, sit or eat by themselves in public places such as beaches, parks and trails. A bombing in Afghanistan's capital today has killed at least 10 people. The Taliban deny responsibility. The country's first vice president appear to be the target. I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news.

NPR Yuki Noguchi Houston Jo Palka Joe Palka first vice president Taliban Debbie Elliot United States University of Oxford Dave Mattingly United Kingdom UK Louisiana National Guard Corona Afghanistan Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hotels, which are being used instead of traditional emergency shelters. Because of the pandemic, the sooner we can get power restored. Get people back into their homes. Get get life more back to normal, the better off all of those individuals are going to be on DH. You know, it's It's just it's just a real challenge. National Guard troops are distributing food, water and supplies in eight Louisiana parishes, Edward says they've handed out some 161,000 tarps so people can make temporary repairs to get back home. Debbie Elliot NPR NEWS a pharmaceutical company, working on a covert 19 vaccine is suspending trials as scientists examine why one volunteer became ill. Here's NPR's Joe Palka. Vaccine comes from a partnership between the University of Oxford in the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca. It's being studied in thousands of patients in the United States and the United Kingdom. The illness apparently occurred in a UK volunteer. The company has not revealed the nature of the illness, but did confirm that there has been a pause in vaccination to allow a review of safety data. The company said in a statement that quote this is a routine action, which has toe happen whenever there is a potentially unexplained illness and one of the trial's closed quote. The next step will be to determine if the illness was indeed related to the vaccine or just a chance event. Jo Palka NPR NEWS This is NPR news. A new poll finds almost half the households in the U. S air facing serious financial difficulties during the Corona virus. Pandemic problems appear to be worst in cities among black and Latino households. NPR's Yuki Noguchi says the findings come from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. The five parts survey shows a majority of households and the largest cities air dealing with lost jobs or reduced work hours, causing serious financial problems that are particularly acute among Latino and black households. In Houston, For example, 63% of households overall reported serious financial problems. But among black families in Houston that was 81% and among Latino households. 77%. In many cases, savings have been depleted. In addition, households have serious problems paying their rent and utilities. The poll also shows the impacts are much greater for families was less than $100,000 a year in income. Yuki Noguchi NPR news in Hawaii, the mayor of Honolulu, says he's extending the city's Corona virus stay at home order for another two weeks. It'll run through September. 24th. At the same time, the mayor says. Beginning tomorrow, people will be allowed to run, sit or eat by themselves in public places such as beaches, parks and trails. A bombing in Afghanistan's capital today has killed at least 10 people. The Taliban deny responsibility. The country's first vice president appear to be the target. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR News in Washington. Support for NPR comes from the Public Welfare Foundation committed to advancing a transformative reproach to justice that is.

NPR News NPR Joe Palka Yuki Noguchi first vice president Houston Taliban Debbie Elliot University of Oxford United States Dave Mattingly Public Welfare Foundation United Kingdom UK Louisiana Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Corona National Guard Washington
Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

"A new survey measures the financial pain as the pandemic goes on. Almost half of American households have suffered serious financial losses were told in a new poll, by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard t H. Chan School of Public Health in the country's four largest cities. The situation is even worse especially for Latinos and black-americans fifty to eighty percent of those. Households report serious financial problems. They can't pay their rent or their mortgage or their credit cards, and they've depleted what savings they have had. NPR's Yuki. Noguchi reports on the findings. The pandemic is creating serious financial problems, job loss depleted savings or possible eviction. That's despite hundreds of billions in government stimulus and other support. The survey shows economic stress running higher in the. country's four largest cities, New York, Los Angeles Chicago and Houston. Latino and black families were substantially more likely to face serious economic distress compared to white counterparts. Robert Blend in is a professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard and Co author of the survey. He says the results show the personal financial challenges run deeper and broader than previously understood. I would've. Expected that all the aid that was coming from various sources would have narrowed not eliminated the differences by race ethnicity the survey conducted. This summer also found distress among households making less than a hundred thousand dollars a year. It's a just a lack of funds creating knock on effects trouble paying for food or medical care, which in turn lead to serious health consequences. The surveys implications could mean everything from a bigger drag on the economy to the nation's mental health outlook and blending says, the prognosis is grim at the time of the survey. The federal government was offering six hundred dollars a week in additional benefits for the unemployed. That was not renewed after July it's going to get worse because there is nothing for the people we serve eight who earn thousand. Dollars a year already communities are not working fulltime to fall back

Robert Blend NPR Harvard T H. Chan School Of Pu Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Federal Government Professor Of Health Policy Noguchi New York Harvard Houston Los Angeles Chicago
California Legislature Passes Mental Health Parity Law

All Things Considered

01:27 min | 1 year ago

California Legislature Passes Mental Health Parity Law

"Federal and state laws require insurance companies to cover mental health Justus they would medical care but actually getting insurance for mental health treatment can be tricky. In California, the Legislature is trying to make that promise riel yesterday it past one of the country's strictest mental health parity laws as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. When Monica Vera Schubert son Bobby, injured his knee a decade ago, she monitored his painkiller prescription until it ran out. That's where all of a sudden his behavior started changing to the point that he was no longer a friendly, happy go Lucky kid. He raided his grand prize medicine cabinet and sold off his mother's jewellery to feed is growing addiction. Where Vera Schubert lives in Burbank, California, state and federal law already require insurance companies to cover mental health as they do medical care. But she says she encountered multiple hurdles once her insurance pre authorized her son for inpatient rehab. But when he showed up, they couldn't get the insurance to coordinate with them. So my son walked. He walked home to his grandparent's house, and he goes, I'm never going back there again. She ran into other roadblocks as well. Long waiting periods requirements. He tests positive for drugs. Paying out of pocket would've cost nearly $50,000 for a single month felt terrible, overwhelming, so overwhelming that how many times was it fate for certain Bobby eventually received treatment and entered recovery.

Vera Schubert Bobby Monica Vera Schubert California Yuki Noguchi Legislature NPR Burbank
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now is for 35. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. And I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. Face masks are a staple of pandemic Life. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week declared them a critical tool for preventing the spread of the Corona virus. We'll have more on the benefits of masks in a moment, but face coverings present a unique challenge for people with hearing loss who depend on seeing people speak. As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. Some mask manufacturers have a fix. Blake Blackman and his fiance welcome their second child last month. This is boat, though, is deliciously cute. He entered the world after a quick labor arriving almost before nurses were ready as soon as the first push happens is no no, no, no, stop stops up babies already crowning And this is like I need to go get the other nurses 20 seconds later, like six nurses come running in getting everything prepped. His fiancee, Jessica Corner, understood those instructions on Ly because she could read her north. Lips through a transparent face mask. The mask was custom made by a good Samaritan living nearby. How do you think it would be if there wasn't the see through your masks? He may be hard corner was born death. She abandoned sign language in middle school after a cochlear implant restored most of her hearing, But she still relies on a clear line of sight to see what people are saying. She's not alone. Face masks, maybe a public health essential, but they come with social downsides. They hide smiles and obscure expressions. They can telegraph suspicion or danger. And they could be a serious impediment for the 10 million Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing. Personally, Blackman says he's sceptical about the masks on their protective power against the virus. There's a lot of people around here, You'll just think it's a fib. The science is clear masks reduce viral transmission, and the hospital required him to wear one. But normally, Blackman says he doesn't even at the heating and air conditioning company in Salisbury, North Carolina, where he works with about 100 people. None of us were mass. We have to do our social distancing and everything, but as far as that was, like, really don't wear masks, the ones he and corner used in the delivery room came courtesy of Karen Franks. Frank's lives in the same town. But across the political divide, the mask thing has become a part of that political divide. And I don't understand why Franks is an elementary school music teacher who says she never leaves her house unmasked. She spends eight hours a day sewing masks, she donates, You know, it's kind of selfish of me. I look people wearing masks. And if I can get people wearing masks so I can feel safer and be safer then maybe may, making him for people will do it. A friend told her about an expectant couple seeking clear masks. So Frank's cut a hole out of a regular one and inserted clear plastic her husband uses at his comic book shop. It's a high end. My large used to protect comic books, offensive comic thoughts and repels moisture is so That was what I was making it out off. Those masks found their way to Blackman, who they later realized had once been Frank's a student. Oh, he was a very good student. He has dark eyebrows and a really sweet smile. Speaking of smiling and students, Frank says she is considering using a transparent mask herself if classes resume. In fact, teachers everywhere are clamoring for clear masks. Demand for those didn't exist until recently. Now, one of the few commercial companies making see through masks says it received orders for millions of them. Demand has skyrocket. I mean, we're working around the clock, Aaron Sue is CEO and co founder of Clear Mask in Baltimore. It started in 2017 making a niche medical product for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. It's product has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for use. But Sue says its popularity has led to copycat scams. He says clear masks are especially in demand among teachers for a lot of Children. Communication is nonverbal. Being able to see who we're talking to is fundamental to how we communicate and connect. Yuki Noguchi. NPR news As we just heard, even though most face masks make lip reading harder or cover a smile. We've been told again and again to wear them because wearing a mask lowers the chances that you will spread Cove in 19 to others. A growing body of evidence suggests that the opposite is also true that is wearing a mask might protect you two here to walk us. Through. The research is Dr Monica Gandhi and infectious disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco. Welcome Thank you very much for having me. All right, so briefly walk us through the theory here how our masks also beneficial for the people wearing them. Right. So as you said, they're very beneficial to protect others because you shed at high rates from your nose and mouth even when you feel fine, so that had been kind of the party line for a while. But they really are protective of you as an individual and sort of putting it all together. It really is that the less virus that you get in the less sick you're likely to be so not only do mass protect you and we've seen From getting the virus and altogether and that's been seen and hamsters to these That's been seen in a health care worker study that was just published last week in Jama. But if you do get the virus in You get very little end and you're likely to get what's called an asymptomatic infection or not have any symptoms at all. And or a very mild infection. So it really is based on the fact that we've known for many years now, probably 100 that the more virus you get into your system. More likely you are to get sick and these mass protect you. Oh, that's so interesting. So if mask wearing does turn out to lower the severity of the disease because you're loing lowering the amount of virus that you're taking in Would that translate them to fewer deaths? Yes, so it really looks like any country that has adopted universal mask wearing and many, many countries have Even as they open up and they're seeing each other more and there's more cases it has led to much, much fewer deaths or severe illness, So the idea about this virus is it's completely Bizarre how it can cause no symptoms in some people and very, very severe symptoms and others. And what we want to do by wearing a mask is get down the bad stuff of all this virus that can cause very severe illness. And yes, we've absolutely not only seen that in countries. But even in settings where they're outbreaks, but everyone mast there's like a 95% rate of not having symptoms at all. There was actually a outbreak in a chicken factory outbreak received through factory in this country, but everyone was masking, and it was 95% asymptomatic rate of infection that is fascinating. I mean, mass wearing has become divisive, right? It's it's a political issue in many parts of the country. Do you think this evidence could help change the public health messaging around masks by Appealing to people self interest. Yes, I think that what I'm hoping for is that I do understand that politics always gets into everything. This will protect you. Your family. As well as others. This will protect you. That means that we should all be wearing a mask because we need to get through this pandemic. We're miserable. This is taking a long time. And if we all put over our faces, we will get through it faster. All right. That is Dr Monica Gundy. She is a professor of medicine and the director of the UCSF Center for AIDS Research. Thank you. Thank you. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Indonesia has the most covert 19 infections and death sent out in Southeast Asia, with.

Clear Mask Blake Blackman NPR Frank Centers for Disease Control an Yuki Noguchi Food and Drug Administration asymptomatic Ari Shapiro Karen Franks pandemic Elsa Chang Los Angeles Washington Aaron Sue Indonesia Jessica Corner
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This's public radio. This is Corona Virus, a weekly report from NPR News and Lulu Garcia Navarro Cove. It 19 is infecting more and more people in their teens and twenties. That's contributing to a recent surge and outbreaks, especially in the South and west. Public health officials are imploring young adults to limit social contact to help protect their more vulnerable elders. But many younger people actually see isolation as a much greater risk to their own mental health. As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports. Audrey just turned 18 and achieved a lot already. She's a college bound student athlete who volunteered and worked in student government in high school. But for years she struggled with anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. All of which drove her to work harder. I was spending so much time on my homework, I felt like I was losing my friends to my thoughts with race over and over again about my friend. And then I would have the difficult thoughts about suicide and some scarier stuff that landed Audrey, who withheld her name for medical privacy in treatment last fall, she says the coping skills she learned gave her perspective on quarantine. I know all about how seeing friends and seeing people outside and social interaction is vital for survival. It's not that she isn't worried about Cove it 19 in fact, cases air spiking in her hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina, So Audrey wears masks and stays six feet from friends. But for her generation, she says, infection isn't the primary threat. A lot of people are calling attention to Corona virus because it's right in front of us. But at the same time teens depressions rate it's a silent threat. The risks of infection differ by generation. For many young adult's life at a social distance without peer support comes at a high cost to mental health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says nearly half of people between 18 and 29 report feeling symptoms of anxiety or depression. That's twice the rate of their parents and three times higher than their grand parents. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for people under 35 yet somehow, says Audrey that's not talked about. We haven't seen the government or we haven't seen adults as passionate about the things that we really care about, like mental health and climate issues. Menlo Park, California psychologist Lisa Jacob's council's mostly adolescents and young adults. She says there was calculations differ. They are appropriately realizing that isolation is a risk for them as well. It's a risk factor for depression and depression is a risk factor for suicide. And 8% of American teens attempt suicide each year. Jacob says many patients complain older generations failed to address their fears of school shootings and climate change. After not being protective after not being taken seriously. They were asked to take extreme measures to protect other groups and to put themselves at risk by doing so. Scientists say socialization isn't a luxury for the young. It's critical for development. Gregory Lewis studies social interaction at Indiana University, He says young brains need social connection to feel secure. We expect as a human being, I have other people there to share the stressful times. And to be our backup. When they're not. They're physically that is of itself tells her nervous system. You're in a dangerous environment because you don't have these people here, even for digital natives who grew up with smartphones. Talking by small screen offers no replacement for a calming hug. Older adults, he says, have had more time to develop their social networks and find partners. Younger people are missing a larger percentage of what previously was there to buffer them, so the societal challenge, he says, is finding ways to balance risks of infection. Against the need to foster those essential social bonds. Yuki Noguchi NPR news in New York City, businesses are slowly reopening and more people are riding the subways. Stephen Nesson of WNYC reports. The agency that runs the transit system wants to make sure people have easy access to what they need for a safe ride. Latest effort includes vending machines stocked with personal protective equipment at 10 of the busiest stations. Wearing a mask is required by law..

Audrey Lisa Jacob NPR News Lulu Garcia Navarro Cove Yuki Noguchi Centers for Disease Control an WNYC depression Stephen Nesson New York City Charlotte North Carolina Menlo Park California Gregory Lewis
Coronavirus may lead to 75,000 "deaths of despair," study says

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus may lead to 75,000 "deaths of despair," study says

"News new research estimates how many more people will die from drug and alcohol use and from suicide as the result of the pandemic and its effects the national mental health foundation well being trust says what it calls deaths of despair could range from about twenty four hundred additional deaths to more than one hundred fifty four thousand over the next decade and peers Yuki Noguchi reports two of the biggest factors known to contribute to deaths of despair or financial stress and social isolation the pandemic has forced both realities on millions of Americans which has mental health experts sounding alarms the study looked at past economic shocks and disasters and projected different death tolls scenarios depending on the unemployment rate and the speed of recovery from the pandemic it also analyze the potential effect by region the most vulnerable demographics include non Hispanic whites in their fifties and sixties and those living in western and southeastern

Yuki Noguchi Social Isolation
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Forget living paycheck to paycheck many families have lost work in this pandemic and running out of cash as they wait for unemployment checks and government stimulus money to arrive NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports on the tough choices some families are making about which bills to pay and what experts recommend there are eight souls living under Diana Behar's roof only one is still working full time food act the biggest thing in my household right now these kids can eat now this car her husband five children and a grandchild are at home in Lexington Kentucky sometimes they eat the same meal of potatoes eggs and hot dogs to save money before you know if they would finish your plate I'm just like okay we're just on the right in the trash and put your plate in the sink now it's like whatever you don't eat me secretive administration administrator her husband losses dishwashing job last month he hasn't received a severance is restaurant promised unemployment benefits haven't arrived not all her works from home as a call center operator but the four hundred eighty dollars a week she earns isn't enough so she asked her landlord for a break and his response where business as usual she was also make her car payment but utilities like water and electricity are not shutting off service they're offering extension through may first so I'm figuring I can get away with that for a minute just to do the car some of the insurance and the rent and groceries in many households cash is scarce and families are cooling what little they have to pay for what's most needed near the cliche rock and hard place that we're going to face in the next couple months for the average American family I just just staggers me Kathy Hower is a financial planner an ache in South Carolina lower income families she says have little wiggle room some don't have credit cards or are maxed out so Howard says she's giving advice she's never given before differ as many payments as possible and worry about it later but she says don't.

NPR Yuki Noguchi Diana Behar Lexington Kentucky administrator Kathy Hower South Carolina Howard
Laundry Between Emails: Working From Home Goes Viral In The Time Of Coronavirus

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Laundry Between Emails: Working From Home Goes Viral In The Time Of Coronavirus

"All right today's other big story around the world companies are asking their employees to work from home because of the corona virus outbreak. Some people love it other people don't. Npr's Yuki Noguchi Talk to people about their experiences. Early last Tuesday Cindy. Ruiz got an email. They're just shutting down the Office for the Week. Corona virus cases cropped up near the San Mateo Office of Dun and Bradstreet Res Works in sales for the financial data company for many the widespread. Embrace of remote work is a welcome change. They've always wanted they're reacting on social media the way kids celebrate snow days. No commutes flexible schedule. Home-cooked lunch. Ruiz however is in that camp. Sure she says there are some perks. If you could call it that I did do laundry I clearly. I'm doing laundry. The Corona virus is putting remote work to a gigantic test. The sheer scale of it is unprecedented throughout China. Italy Japan and South Korea workers have been on lockdown last week. The same happened in Seattle Amazon facebook. Microsoft and Google all told employees there to remain home. Twitter and payment company square are also working remotely. Ruiz says she misses things at the office. Like your special headset. And her big screen computer. Also her home. Wifi is neither fast nor secure enough to access some critical websites. Most of all. She misses her colleagues. This past week reminds release of her last job where she worked from home every day. That was the reason why I left that position and went to this one. I'm a person that needs to be in the office. Remote work is teaching companies a lot. About how well? They function when they're not altogether about a week ago. Jonathan Wasserman told employees to work from home he. Ceo Of Square foot a New York Commercial Real Estate Company. The last time that happened was a year ago when the office Internet went down said Okay work from home and two-thirds employs for like go but my laptops at work this time he wants to be prepared personally. Wallstrom is no fan of remote work. He says it's impossible to read a room over a conference line. Plus about a third of square foot staff are brokers they tour buildings with clients if all the sudden they said. You can't have face to face meetings with people who'd be hard for us to bunch of those transactions. In fact remote work isn't always possible. Hourly workers don't get paid if they don't work for example. Those in retail manufacturing or healthcare usually must be physically present to work. But it's a huge perk for people like tristen yet. Gaillot is a field manager for a and loves working from home in Toledo for me. It's a lot easier to work in silence. I also appreciate the fact that working from home. I can kind of migrate from room to room. If I'm not feeling super productive in one room get says it can be isolating so relying heavily on tools like slack and Webcams are key. I get a lot of face time so I don't feel like I'm like socially isolated at all. I also realize not. Everybody is built for this. If you're very extroverted which is not me. You probably would not enjoy this as much as I do. Guy Yet hopes the corona virus will help promote working from home if employers. Don't have to come in. They're not paying to commute. They're not adding to the carbon footprint. they don't have to buy or bring a lunch. It's not clear whether the corona virus will change Wasser. Strums mind about remote work. His Real Estate Company ordered loads of hand sanitizer and told employees to come back to the office. I don't believe people are productive at home at the same time. He worries about his wife. Who is seven months pregnant and commuting to her office. And we'll see how much longer we keep sending her to do that. Especially because she can meets on the subway perhaps he'll change his mind about remote work again. You GUCCI NPR news.

San Mateo Office Ruiz Jonathan Wasserman Dun And Bradstreet Res Works NPR Yuki Noguchi Wasser Twitter Gucci Npr Wallstrom Seattle Real Estate Company Gaillot Amazon Microsoft China CEO Commercial Real Estate Company
Trump briefs the nation on how his administration is tackling the threat of a coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. but health care workers don't feel prepared

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 1 year ago

Trump briefs the nation on how his administration is tackling the threat of a coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. but health care workers don't feel prepared

"Tonight president trump briefed the nation on how his administration is tackling the threat of a corona virus outbreak with screening people we have been at a very high level screening people coming into the country from infected areas we have been quarantined those infected and those at risk now the centers for disease control and prevention says there are now sixty cases of the corona virus in the U. S. and the US healthcare system is bracing for more but some health care workers here say they don't feel prepared NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports so far coronavirus cases in this country have been isolated but this week the center for disease control warned communities to prepare for an outbreak that worries marine Dugan she's a veteran nurse at the university of California San Francisco Medical Center this month to corona virus patients were transferred there UCSF is one of the premier hospitals in the country but do can says her frustrations are mounting because she says her employer offered little notice or training to those caring for the infected patients you want to do that we work extremely hard to do the best for our patients so don't so the thought the sale was not only nurses if all the other staff it's a nursing assistant it's transport every staff member is worried coronavirus has yet to sink in American health care workers as it has in China the deaths of hospital workers there have heightened scrutiny of the US healthcare system's ability to protect people on the front line do then says the medical community it wasn't fully prepared for previous viruses like sars and Ebola and she's concerned lessons learned are not being applied today for example the medical where provided she says leave their necks exposed to guarantee or providing are in adequate I'm sorry I get very passionate about this because we work so hard to make sure that our our nurses were protected and therefore they can protect the public in a response UCSF said it's taken multiple extensive safety precautions including isolating sick patients and training for proper use of safety gear it said it brief workers treating the patients but the hospital does not as a matter of course inform general staff of incoming infection cases thus far hospitals in the U. S. have been able to plan for incoming patients that's very different from an outbreak we're sick people come in off the street that is far more dangerous for health care workers and the public they treat mark Robb is chief of infectious disease at the university of Nebraska it's the arm recognize case that comes through your hospital system or your clinics that really pose the greatest risk what sauce that'll is considered a model for managing infections it's pioneering Medical Center is one of the few with experience treating a bola it has an isolation chamber that filters pathogens it practices dry runs making sure respiration masks that workers most critically he says it screens patients at the hospital entrance right at the front door we sequester people away from the rest of the traffic that's one of the biggest hazards he says a coughing patient can quickly infect medical staff and other patients waiting in emergency rooms and doctors offices

Donald Trump President Trump
Enjoy The Extra Day Off! More Bosses Give 4-Day Workweek A Try

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Enjoy The Extra Day Off! More Bosses Give 4-Day Workweek A Try

"Suppose your boss offered you this. A full week's pay working only four days a week on one condition that you get a full week of work done in that compressed amount of time a growing number of companies are doing just that and liking the results so much so the four day week has gone from niche workplace concept to a growing global trend. Npr's Yuki Noguchi reports now even American employers are eyeing at shake shack ran an experiment a year and a half ago managers at some stores would only work four days a week. The Burger chains president. Tara Camman says staff loved it being able to take kids to school. You know a day. A week will one day less of having to pay for daycare for example recruitment spiked one word spread the company recently expanded its trial to a third of its hundred sixty four stores that for shake shack to find time savings elsewhere like using computers to track supplies of ground beef for example. It was a way to increase flexibility. Corporate Environment have had flexible work policies for awhile now. That's not so easy to do in the restaurant. Business working four days a week might sound crazy especially this phones and email reminding us of our jobs twenty four seven but in some places the four day concept is taking off like a viral mean. Many employers aren't just moving to ten hour shifts four days a week as shake shack. They're going to a thirty two hour week without cutting pay last month. A Washington State. Senator introduced a bill to shorten the WORKWEEK Russian. Prime Minister Dmitry. Medvedev did the same. Britain and Finland are considering similar moves. Last summer Microsoft's trial in Japan led to a surprising bump in sales and a decrease in electricity bills. Much of this is thanks to Andrew Barnes from New Zealand. He never intended to become a global evangelist. This was not a journey. I expected to be on. Barnes's CEO of Perpetual Guardian and Estate Planning Company. He used to believe long hours. Were good for business. But he also understood the toll. They took on employees and their families especially on mental health so two years ago he used perpetual Guardian. And it's two hundred forty workers as guinea pigs quarter. This is the people on not productive for every hour. Every minute of the day there in the office. So Barnes cut distractions. The biggest target meetings fewer and shorter meetings saved a huge amount of time. So did curtailing office Chitchat. He monitored social media. You've got rid of open floor offices. All this barn says made it easier to focus deeper on the work. Remarkably employees got more work. Done logging fewer hours sales and profits grew employees commuted less and were happier. The company didn't police. How workers spent their time. But if performance slipped the company could revert back to the full week schedule. Barnes says that alone motivated workers. Perpetual Guardian story went viral and things went haywire for Barnes and frankly I couldn't drink enough coffee to deal with the number of companies that approached us. Demand was so Great Barn. Set up a foundation to promote the four day WORKWEEK. Ironically he's been working a lot of overtime you only get one chance to change the world and it's my responsibilities at least on this one to see if I can influence the world for the better to date. Most of that interest has not come from American companies and indeed. The four day week doesn't work everywhere not only niggles heard from other leaders who say it didn't work for them. She says it fails when employees aren't motivated and where managers don't trust employees. Niggle is co founder and CEO of wild bit a Philadelphia Software Company. That moved to afford a week three years ago. She says it's been a success. We had shipped more features than we had in recent years We felt more productive. Quality of our work increased so then we just kept going with it. Personally she says it gives her time to rest her brain which helps solve complex problems. You can ask my teachers multiple times or somebody's like on Sunday morning. I woke up and I was like I figured it out. It's been about a month since Michael parlow started working a four day week. It was a perk of his new job as a budget analyst in Westminster Colorado. He works ten hours Monday through Thursday or as he puts it until the job is done. He says he much prefers the new way. Because it is about like getting your work done more so than feeding the clock that freeze Fridays up for life many delightful tours like talking to an NPR reporter or visits to the DMV for instance. Today we're going to go and get our license plates but that also frees up the weekends for you know the weekend Gucci and Pr News Washington.

Andrew Barnes Estate Planning Company Perpetual Guardian NPR Niggle Michael Parlow Tara Camman Yuki Noguchi President Trump CEO Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev Great Barn Microsoft New Zealand Senator Washington State Westminster Colorado Analyst
Coronavirus Casts A Pall Over Cruise Industry At Height Of Booking Season

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Casts A Pall Over Cruise Industry At Height Of Booking Season

"Diamond Princess cruise ship has become a symbol of global health nightmare. So far more than one hundred and seventy passengers have contacted the corona virus about about thirty. Six hundred people remain on board. The ship quarantined in waters off the coast of Japan. Passengers are largely confined to their rooms where they have to remain for at least another week and as the spectacle plays out on television and social media. The cruise industry is really starting to take a hit. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi Diamond Princess Passenger. David David Abel has been documenting life in quarantine. Medical staff doing checkups through the night. Small boats faring supplies of food and medicine. He told Britain's channel Channel Four News. Twenty four seven will not allow to open the door until there is an and they bring the food to us other than that we all like prisoners keeping the spread of the virus contained in those close quarters is not only a big medical and logistical challenge. It could also take a big bite out of the cruise line business. This money's Luthra is president and CEO of a deceased solutions. A Miami software company that handles bookings for cruise companies. Everybody's out Lizard says about ten days ago reservation started to plummet. We started to see it with the flight bookings I everything started getting canceled especially the Asia and now on the crew sign. I mean we've seen about a forty percent drop. I want to say that's happening amid what's supposed to be peak. Season Luther himself is scheduled to embark on crews out of Sydney in a week. Originally he was the poster fly through Hong Kong. He routed to avoid that virus hot zone he says he still loves cruising but cannot imagine spending weeks castaway and hold up with his two kids. I know how to explain it to my six year for my eight year old. Why can't use that rule. China makes up a small but growing segment of the forty five billion dollar cruise industry. Emily only flippin is a senior analyst with the Motley fool and that really was supposed to be a boon for the cruise line industry in China. This is a major setback. Another cruise liner Holland. America's Westerdam's has been drifting around Asia. It's been denied entry at five ports in spite of the fact that it has no confirmed cases the virus but the cruise line industry associations. Brian Salerno says this outbreak is an isolated issue the senior vice president of maritime policy. He says he expects Little Long. Term damage clearly not very widespread problem within the cruise industry. Right now the industry has taken precautions. Sion's screening anyone who's sick or recently traveled to China or been in contact with someone there plus argues. The ships themselves are safe because medical title care is on board so when you take a cruise on a cruise ship. You're traveling with your hospital in a sense gene. Sloan a writer for the point guy. A travel website says the cruise. He's industry has shaken off worst. Crises in the past. Remember the dramatic sinking of the cost Concordia. That killed thirty two people trying to a lot of speculation. You know this is GonNa Kill the cruise business. Every year brings a new challenge. NOROVIRUS Zeka hurricanes or loss of power. Sloan says the cruise industry has grown own through them. All so this virus too

Luthra David David Abel China Yuki Noguchi Diamond Princess Asia Brian Salerno Sloan Japan Senior Vice President President And Ceo Miami NPR Hong Kong Senior Analyst Britain Sion Luther Sydney
#OkBoomer Vs. #OkMillennial: Workplace Nightmare, Or Just A Meme?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:20 min | 2 years ago

#OkBoomer Vs. #OkMillennial: Workplace Nightmare, Or Just A Meme?

"You're that phrase boomer. It's a younger generations. Retort to ideas they consider outdated or off base. Ideas like millennials are entitled and don't work hard the response okay boomer short for baby-boomer well twenty five year old New Zealand lawmaker recently. Silenced older hecklers during her speech on climate change the average age. This fifty second parliaments is forty nine years old now. Some employers are cautioning against using this phrase at work fearing it could lead to claims of age discrimination. Here's NPR's Yuki Noguchi thirty year old social media manager. Sophie Vershbow has seen her share of okay boomer means in recent weeks to her. The sentiment behind them is this. I think it's sort of a dismissive. Like okay whatever you say like just spout whatever ever you wanna say as someone who doesn't get what we're talking about there's backlash to including from those comparing okay boomer to racial slurs last week the AARP REPEA- The group most identified with boomers weighed in. That did not go well. These warring posts and the social commentary around them suggest a yawning in gap between the old and young. They speak to different attitudes about social and political change and raise questions about how deep those differences go verse by works at a book. A publisher in New York. She likes working with boomers but says there can be issues. These younger generations keep feeling very misunderstood outside of family. The workplaces where generations rations interact. The most people are living and therefore working longer than ever so for the first time in. History the workforce now spans five generations from the silence generation in their seventies and eighties. Two generations e just entering their twenties work is also where many social issues play out presenting the potential for generational the bait over everything from gender neutral bathrooms to the metoo movement but Vershbow says discussing age at work even whereas professionally relevant can be tricky for example. She says she wants noted during a meeting how her age cohort shops differently. I was literally called. Just she felt silence. She says aware that she's not the one in in a position of power that still lies with her elders. I think these are really sensitive issues. That are super difficult to discuss in the workplace even when they're vital vital to the work. You're doing cashed. ECON is twenty two and sells advertising for the Houston Chronicle. She says she has a lot in common with the baby boomer. She worked with directly but outside of that circle. That's not always true. People say things like Oh you look good today like an older man. And that's that's such a weird thing to say she. She thinks okay boomer to herself when colleagues don't understand the concept of a fluid gender identity though say something like you know there are only two genders and and I mean I understand that. That's how they were raised but that kind of stuff just doesn't fly now. Megan Johnson is a consultant for companies on generational differences Johnson Johnson. Who is genetics? By the way says older workers need to figure out how to pass the baton unless the older generation really let's their ego down in a lousy the younger generation to come on board and challenge the way they do things. There's going to be this. Disconnect of course generational griping and stereotyping are nothing new. Remember when Gen xers were called slackers so not everyone agrees that okay boomer speaks to deep underlying tensions. I tell you I was a little surprised by Susan. Weinstock boomer herself and a vice president at AARP which advocates for people fifty and older because we have a lot of research that shows how much workers actually liked to work together no matter the generation so it might be that okay boomer is just another example of how social media soza sense of discord the way it has in politics in fact. Aarp unwittingly played a role in that last week another executive at the group was quoted saying okay millennials. But we're the people pull that actually have the money that to win viral under what else the Hashtag Okay boomer later. Aarp responded to the mid inspired saying social media took the statement out of context. The group said it meant to say don't overlook or dismiss boomers don't let stereotypes like that. Divide US

Boomer Aarp Sophie Vershbow United States New Zealand Yuki Noguchi Houston Chronicle Johnson Johnson Megan Johnson NPR New York Publisher Econ Weinstock Vice President Susan Executive Consultant
For Many #MeToo Accusers, Speaking Up Is Just The Beginning

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:56 min | 2 years ago

For Many #MeToo Accusers, Speaking Up Is Just The Beginning

"This message comes from. NPR sponsor. Xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like Xfinity X.. By get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply two years ago people began using the Metoo Hashtag and posting their sexual harassment and assault experiences online. It's one of the biggest changes to sweep the workplace in decades but what became of the women inspired by Mu to. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has been taking a look dino. Lee Alameda says three years ago. The CEO CEO of a TV distribution firm she produced shows for grabbed and propositioned her. For Sex as he became more aggressive. She complained to the company's lawyer. Nothing thing happened later. She says the CEO pressured her to sign what amounted to a confidentiality agreement. And I absolutely refused. I would never ever sign that the Florida company Olympus at terminated. Her contract then came the metoo movement. A global groundswell of cases like Alameda rippled through Hollywood. Newsrooms newsrooms tech companies and politics. The number of sex harassment claims filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Spike. Almost fourteen percent last year. Amita says me to give her confidence and Camaraderie. She weighed the risks. She was a one person contractor going up against a powerful executive in June she filed suit detailing her claims of sexual harassment and retaliation. It changes everything you become a different person. She says it's also also devastated. Her career and finances clients are reluctant to hire for fear of getting involved. I like to retire is this just. Don't feel happy I lost the passion. Does that make sense now. I'll meet and the company are tangled lawsuits. The company and Tom Molar. The CEO declined uncommon on her ongoing case in a separate suit. Olympus ad says Alameda was fired for taking kickbacks in court papers Alameda counters. That was not a kickback. Kick back but an entirely unrelated contract with another firm despite the high personal toll. Alameda says it hasn't changed her mind about speaking out from a spiritual standpoint. I believe in miracles. I've already won. There is a common refrain among people who've told me there metoo stories on one hand there's relief in solidarity talking openly on the other speaking out often takes a great personal toll emotional and financial there. There isn't much data about the outcome of two complaints for a number of reasons. Most cases never make it to court. Details of investigations often remain under wraps because of settlements and confidentiality agreements. Plus many more people never come forward half of employees fear retaliation if they report illegal or unethical behavior at work according to a recent survey by HR acuity a company that tracks internal investigations CEO. deb Muller says another problem problem is that about half of complaints aren't even investigated by their employers. So if someone is courageous enough to come forward he have to make sure that when they come forward something happens. uh-huh Sharon to honey is director of the time Legal Defense Fund created to support people bringing metoo cases. She says legal help is unaffordable for many paramedics housekeepers and waitresses. The fund is now fighting one hundred sixty six harassment cases in court to hotties retaliation is a factor in nearly all of them For Low wage workers that can look like shifts being cut being told there's no work for you Being assigned to shift that earns you less money or being outright fired hired. One thing that surprised to honey is how many of the accused are fighting back even filing their own lawsuits. That speaks to a strong and vocal Michael Backlash against me to take Jamie Marky. Mark is a successful video game and Animated Voice Actor K Dad. We're out scenic stealing marquee archy worked alongside Victor Medina who has his own fan following. How long have you been holding onto this? I think it's yours. After after numerous women came forward accusing Magnon sexual harassment. Marquis took to twitter in February. She posted her own account of Mignona grabbing her by the hair hair and harassing her eight years ago I found out that he had pulled the hair of at least half a dozen women that I knew and we had never discussed it. Fun and entertainment company investigated then fired Manana. His attorney did not respond to requests seeking comment in the nine months since the reaction mostly from meninas fans has been fierce. One even raised funds for a defamation suits going on youtube to attack murky to take take away a man's livelihood you deserve to be ground into dust Mignona eventually did sue markey and others are posting their allegations on twitter. A judge dismissed that case marquee nevertheless received death threats. The front door to my house has been posted online. My fiance's is children's names have been posted online markey says she's lost an untold amount of work. As a result I did not think that people would actively family try to sabotage my career to keep other people from believing me and yet perhaps remarkably markey says she has no regrets. Let's about speaking out. She

Harassment CEO Lee Alameda Alameda Ceo Ceo NPR Sue Markey Twitter Olympus Yuki Noguchi Youtube Amita Tom Molar Florida Legal Defense Fund Executive Assault Victor Medina Attorney
Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:26 min | 2 years ago

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply u._s. Immigration and customs enforcement needs more space to house undocumented immigrants and increasingly the agency is finding it in rural regions and new analysis by n._p._r. Indicates a majority of detainees are held in rural areas but as n._p._r.'s yuki noguchi reports those detained in far flung places also have a much harder time finding lawyers and are far more likely to be deported. It took ten and a half months for you. L. alonzo to meet with a lawyer alonzo had turned himself over to immigration officials in laredo texas seeking asylum from cuba last october since then he's been detained in two rural facilities i in louisiana and now in adams tmz county mississippi about a two hour drive from baton rouge alonzo's wife. Madonna's rodriguez is a permanent u._s. resident. She lives in southern florida with their two children the n._b._a. N._b._a. leary very far from anything. She says too far to afford hiring. A private attorney. Lack of legal help is one of many challenges for undocumented undocumented immigrants and an even bigger problem for those detained in remote locations yet. Ice is adding detention facilities far from cities over half fifty. The two percent of detainees are held in rural areas according to n._p._r.'s analysis of ice data and that rate is increasing. Liz martinez is a board member of advocacy z. Group freedom for immigrants. It's very concerning trend that immigration detention is moving to rural areas remote areas where it makes it so much harder for a person in detention to get the support that they need detainees in urban areas or at least four times more likely to find attorneys to represent them. According to a two thousand fifteen university of pennsylvania ovadia law review study last year the southern poverty law center sudeiss and its parent agency the department of homeland security the civil rights group alleges the government is deliberately liberally detaining people in rural areas far from legal resources is which currently detains nearly fifty six thousand people declined comment on that case in in an emailed statement an ice spokesman says the agency looks at airports healthcare and legal resources when selecting facilities he also says detainees have access to phones and video teleconferencing and can meet with lawyers during visiting hours but many immigration attorneys complained rural facilities lack necessary resources there aren't enough. The phones are translators. Call connections are poor. Visiting hours are too restrictive and it's simply too far to travel. You'll alonzo's wife has been able to visit him. Only only once alonzo was recently diagnosed with lung cancer which makes the weight more excruciating. He eventually found a lawyer one of the rare detainees with free three representation but his wife says his asylum request and to request for parole have been denied grumpy what more could a wife with a sick husband one other seven to be with him at the very least i want to offer him my support and for my children's offer support one of the key reasons detainees are held in remote regions appears to be the money cheap labor cheap land. Lauren rich eisen is acting director of the brennan center justice program. She says many rural areas viewed prisons as job. Engines hundreds hundreds of new facilities were built in the nineteen ninety. S inmate population peaked then declined leaving lots of empty beds. Ice is now contracting with those rural prisons. It needs those beds as it continues to detain more immigrants. Just last week is arrested. Nearly seven hundred workers at food processing plants in mississippi loyola university law professor andrew armstrong says she sees that happening across louisiana win. The criminal justice reforms were enacted that left empty not beds that were ripe for contracting with ice. Those contracts can be lucrative. The state pays local sheriff's twenty four dollars and thirty nine cents a day to house an inmate eight by comparison ice pays five times that an average daily rate of more than one hundred twenty six dollars is confirmed it recently opened eight new detention and facilities seven of which are in louisiana all but one of them are in sparsely-populated areas. Lisa lehner is director of americans for immigrant justice. She represents detainees in glades county florida about one hundred miles from miami. Glades is the state's fourth least populated county surrounded by acres of sugarcane infield. I've never seen immigration attorney up there. You've never seen one never detainees there. She says are tweeted like hardened. Criminals glades aids has been the subject of a number of complaints and lawsuits they allege everything from misuse of pepper spray and solitary confinement to religious persecution later argues conditions are worse in rural facilities in part because fewer people can observe what's happening by contrast. She says when a brooklyn new york ice facility lost not for a week during a cold snap in january there was an outcry and if there's going in and out you would imagine that the people who are detaining immigrants are going to behave in a more careful way. It's not just that treatment might differ immigration courts in rural areas denied. Many more asylum cases sending detainees back back to their home countries. N._p._r.'s analysis of research from syracuse university found judges in rural immigration courts denied eighty seven percent of asylum cases compared to just over half an urban courts. Romi learner is associate director of the immigration clinic at the university of miami's law school. It is an issue because it means if you got a bad bucks. I think the team isn't a certain facility then you're almost guaranteed to be deported mississippi detainee. You'll alonzo hopes to beat those odds. He's appealing feeling his case for asylum and hopes to reunite with his family. You can gucci n._p._r. News this message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary ordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

L. Alonzo Louisiana N._P._R. Comcast Attorney Florida Lauren Rich Eisen Glades County Florida Adams Tmz County Mississippi Yuki Noguchi Liz Martinez Leary Mississippi University Of Pennsylvania Texas Mississippi Loyola University Religious Persecution Miami Madonna
'Do I Know You?' And Other Spam Phone Calls We Can't Get Rid Of

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 2 years ago

'Do I Know You?' And Other Spam Phone Calls We Can't Get Rid Of

"All right. Cell phones. Have made our lives easier for sure. But lately, when you pick up the phone, you are likely to hear something like this message concerning your unsecured credit debt. These spam calls make up at least a quarter of all phone calls in the United States, but there is hope the FCC is set to vote today on rules clarifying that phone companies can step in to block these unwanted calls. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has that story by now. This is a familiar drill the phone rings. It's not a familiar number. Is it important or yet another spam? Call the problem of phone spam is so pervasive. It's creating related nuisances for people like to KOTA hill. He says he gets a hundred junk calls every month and also gets calls from people who think he's spamming them, they call saying do I know you or why did you wait me up? And that was definitely an angry one. In fact, he'll hadn't placed any of those calls. His number had been spoofed that is fraudsters used software. Trick? The caller ID system to make it appear as though calls were coming from hills phone. He explains this over and over to the people calling him and not. Every caller is understanding one woman, chastised him. She went on and on about how I was letting people use my phone and not controlling them. There is an irony here. The cellphone has become our everything our wallet photo archives, computer and music library. But it's also becoming less useful as a phone consumer reports found seventy percent of people, no longer answer calls, they don't recognize regulators and industry are combating John calls, but at least far having succeeded. In fact, the Federal Communications Commission, which regulates phone companies had its own spam problem, Patrick Weber, heads the agency's consumer bureau. We've seen recently scammers using our number spoofing, our number to try to convince consumers there from the in some Wigan, get money out of them. He says bam calls are the number one. Consumer complaint and the agency's top priority. The FCC is demanding all US phone. Carrier's install technology to verify calls and flag potential spam. The deadline is the end of this year. Jonathan Nelson is on the front lines of this battle Nelson, is director of product management at Haya a Seattle technology startup that's designing ways to block spam. He tracks phone calls across the US on giant computer monitors, this huge vast area of green, which is good. All the good calls. But then there's little red areas bounces along. You know, it's the scammers Nelson says, they devise clever new ways of bilking people. The latest being the one ring scam which emerged may third that day Nelson's monitors turned a flurry of read. It was explosion of calls. We never seen that level of all your before in this case, robocaller hang up after one ring hoping to trick the victim, and the calling back on an expensive international toll line likely to west Africa, scammers profit by. Taking a portion of the added fees. Many scams prey on fear of arrest or investigation by government agency targets include immigrants tax payers, debtors or retirees. Skims cost Americans an estimated ten billion dollars a year. They're success Nelson says is making people skeptical about answering calls. We're kind of seeing the death of the phone call. Most cell phone carriers recognize they need to step up. Chris -opay associate general counsel for Verizon wireless. He says this year, the companies investing more than ever in technologies to detect identify and trace jump calls. There's an arms race where they are looking to evolve to get around some of the protections, we haven't place. I would say that the carriers are not winning that arms race or I think that's true. The key here is to restore trust and voice calls doing. So waste says won't be easy because telephone networks are so interconnected. If another wireless carrier doesn't flag spam. Call Verizon's network might not recognize. It's a problem. That's just one way, he says spammers might still get through Yuki Noguchi NPR news. Washington.

Jonathan Nelson Yuki Noguchi Federal Communications Commiss United States Verizon NPR Kota Hill Carrier BAM Washington Wigan John Patrick Weber Seattle Americans West Africa Chris -Opay Associate General Counsel Director Of Product Management
Quest Diagnostics says 11.9M patients' information may have been exposed in data breach

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Quest Diagnostics says 11.9M patients' information may have been exposed in data breach

"The lab company. Quest Diagnostics, says a security breach at one of its billing contractors has compromised nearly twelve million patient records as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports some of the stolen information includes financial, and medical information and social security numbers quest was notified last month at an unauthorized user gained access to it's billing collection service, America. Medical collection agency quest is a major medical testing company, that conducts tests for everything from routine blood screens to drug use, and chronic disease. The company says it is still finding out results of the data breach, while the stolen data include the personal financial and medical information of its patients. The company says it does not include laboratory test results quest says it has suspended sending collection requests in the company that experienced the breach, you can Gucci NPR news.

Quest Diagnostics Gucci Npr Yuki Noguchi NPR America
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst just hours before meeting with Japanese Prime minister, Shinzo Ave. President Trump is downplaying North Korea's recent missile tests, tweeting, he didn't view, the recent tests as disturbing that he thinks Kim Jong Hoon will keep his promise. Japan's governor though, a government though, calls Pyongyang's tests violation of UN resolutions, something national security adviser, John Bolton agreed with earlier today. Trump is on his first aid visit to Japan as NPR's. Yuki Noguchi reports President Trump's visit to Tokyo comes at a time of deeply aggravated trade tensions with the US this week economic data showed fagging Japanese economy that lay bare the country's vulnerability to potential trade disruption, the Trump administration earlier this month, the later decision to issue broad tariffs on Japanese cars and auto parts doing so would have caused so much chaos to the industry. Japanese car maker, Toyota rebuked. The. Idea of hurtful to both countries. Meanwhile, escalating terrace between the US and China are also having ripple effects for Japanese manufacturers, you Gucci and PR news. Washington. San francisco's. Police union is calling for the police chiefs resignation this after he apologized for a raid on journalists home and office for member station. K Q. E D Sonia Hudson has more. Police were investigating a leaked police report that the journalist Brian Carmody says he obtained from a confidential source after growing criticism. From city officials police chief Bill, Scott said in the statement on Friday that investigators showed a quote lack of due diligence addressing Carmody status as a journalist, but Tony Montovia, president of the San Francisco. Police officers association says Scott was involved in every step of the investigation just summarily throw these investigators under the bus for zone political coverage, that's unacceptable, and he needs to answer to that. A police spokesperson says an internal investigation will look at how the case has been handled on all levels, including by the chief for NPR news. I'm sonia. Hudson in San Francisco.

President Trump NPR San francisco Sonia Hudson Brian Carmody Japan Washington US Kim Jong Hoon Janine Herbst Scott North Korea UN Yuki Noguchi Toyota president Pyongyang
New Round Of Tariffs Takes A Bigger Bite Of Consumers' Budget

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:52 min | 2 years ago

New Round Of Tariffs Takes A Bigger Bite Of Consumers' Budget

"The price of stuff lots of stuff from canoes to floor lamps to bicycles went up literally overnight last night. In fact, the Trump administration raise tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of imported Chinese products. The US and China are in trade talks this week. But so far no deal. NPR's? Yuki Noguchi has the story. Jim Kittles family furniture business is operated throughout Indiana. For nearly nine decades started my grandfather's by father, what kinds of things do you carry on your shop floor that room biting OBE living room? Occasional table kills furniture. We'll have to reprise new shipments of all kinds of furniture from nightstands to love seats. The new tariffs increased from ten to twenty five percent raising the underlying cost of Chinese-made items. What percent of the stuff that you have on the floor. Would you say is affected by the tariff? I think about thirty percent but much of the remaining seventy percent of goods are also affected much like automobiles. Parts of those goods are produced offshore summit. China kills been through this before last September a ten percent tariff took effect back then kindle, and his Chinese suppliers agreed to absorb most of that the cost of consumers only increased three percent this time around his suppliers. Can't afford to do that a neither can kill or other retailers. The vendor is no longer going to be able to take any more. The retailer is not going to be able to absorb it. Because right now retailers are at best marginally profitable Furniture's, though, different. Existing tariffs are already making life more expensive. They've increased consumer costs by one point four billion dollars a month. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to date tariffs have largely affected raw materials, like chemicals and wooden beams used to make other products. New tariffs will affect a larger number of finished goods things consumers actually by like by. Nichols. Catherine. Russ is an economics professor at the university of California at Davis. She says the latest round of Taras will add another five hundred dollars a year in costs for the average American household, and that could grow President Trump has pledged to broadened tariffs even further to all Chinese imports, including big ticket items whence the tariff goes onto cell phones. I mean, then you're really going to see people scream determining sticker price will be a dilemma for Jim Kittle. How customers will react is not Kittles only worry Indiana's main industries include farming and carmakers those are dealing with retaliatory tariffs China imposed on American goods. So Kittles customers are already squeezed. If they don't have the money to buy tractors or probably not gonna buy furniture. That is indeed what's happening not far from one of Kittles stores in Lafayette, Indiana since China impose tariffs last fall. Former Brent bible has nowhere to sell his soybean and corn crops. And that's just got worse. Just in the last three days of trading. We've seen the price reduction that equates to about a fifty thousand dollar loss for us bible points out that he's also a consumer an increased tariffs on steel and aluminum have raised prices on tractors and farm equipment. He needs. We are buying those products at an increased price, and we're paying that tariff as a supplier and a consumer. He says tariffs are hitting him on both ends. You can Gucci NPR news Washington.

China Indiana Kittles Jim Kittles NPR Federal Reserve Bank Of New Yo Yuki Noguchi United States Gucci Npr Jim Kittle Donald Trump Kindle Brent Bible Nichols Washington President Trump Russ Lafayette University Of California Davis
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Normally chief financial officers job involves pouring over balance-sheets and Bank statements. It's a bit different in the cannabis industry. Business is still conducted largely in cash because under federal law. The drug remains illegal last month, the house committee advanced legislation that would authorize banks to serve legal marijuana businesses for now managing pot business in the thirty four states where marijuana is legal requires some creative work arounds. NPR's? Yuki Noguchi reports Tom did you vani spends his time trying to figure out how to move money to run his business loads of it. Did you is a former Ernst and young accountant and a family, man. But now his job feels a lot more gangster then pencil pusher. Did you vani looks like he could be radioed his brother with a nightclub bouncers build? He says he likes living on the edge, at least business wise. And that's how he ended up here. Leaning into an unmarked armored van metal cages that middle cage. It's to protect cash from would be thieves. This is how you transfer money at Camdessus an organic pop producer in desert hot Springs, California, under the watchful gaze of big men carrying lots of guns have an ankle holster like another one of the small of their back, and they're wearing tactical gear. Pretty crazy. They safeguard coded bags carrying mostly twenty dollar bills over the course of a month. We probably have two million dollars in cash. That's in. State of transit counting all that is a pain. And it's heavy he has fulltime workers doing just that it's three or four hours a day that they're standing in front of that machine. Feeding cash into it. It's three times after every transfer at an undisclosed location that process he says, we're not allowed to see gets transported again on a random schedule to our processing facility, which is a different city that I won't name the legal narrow one of business operates in murky financial world without help from major banks can Bessant for example.

marijuana Yuki Noguchi cannabis vani desert hot Springs NPR Ernst accountant California Camdessus producer Tom two million dollars twenty dollar four hours
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yuki Noguchi explains why the CEO's are getting involved. Blake Majkowski founder of Tom shoes supports causes like access to clean water, and I care in poor countries, but embracing something as controversial as gun control is different. He says his board of directors debated whether he should engage in a political issue unrelated to their business. Everyone is very concerned about you. You know, doing something like this? But ultimately, we recognize that this opportunity for us to really be a leader business and to show our customers that we're engaged in the issues that matter most to them he along with the CEOs of Levi, Strauss, Dick's sporting goods, an RX are realty sign. The letter calling on the house to pass stricter background checks. Majkowski says about twelve percent of its customers say they won't buy his company's shoes anymore as a result. But he says today's CEO's need to accept that some customers will leave, but those who remain will be more loyal. Yeah. We we lost some customers by doing this. But I think we also strengthened our relationship, and then Wade it was far greater than different with boss. Scott wreck is CEO of Rx are realty a developer in the New York area. He has also become a vocal advocate for gun safety. Even though the issue has nothing to do with his business. I find it important for she owes to take a greater level. Of social responsibility. But the decisions I sound off comes with substantial risk. Paul Argenti is a business professor at Dartmouth. He argues CEO's should be very careful. You're basically, speaking out on something out of passion, not out of logic and businesses have shareholders, and it's really not worth taking a risk unless it's absolutely important to you. That may be why the number of executives who signed. Today's letter is still small and largely made up of executives who've already spoken out on gun violence. John find Blat is president of every town for gun safety a gun control advocacy, group, he points to banks and other retailers that have adopted their own gun control policies over the last year dishes, a key moment very much like the moment when corporation supported marriage equality, which was often seen as a turning point for that movement. Find light says he hopes to see growing business support for gun control. But he also acknowledges that even if the Bill passes the house. If stiffer opposition in the Republican controlled Senate, you can Gucci NPR news Washington. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Targeting someone because of their dreadlocks corn rows or other hairstyle can now lead to steep fines in New York City among other things employers. There can no longer force workers to straighten their hair to promote a certain corporate image, the new guidelines apply to everyone, but they're specifically meant to protect black people who often face discrimination because of their hair Oluwa, a ladder sui visited a couple of New York City hair salons to learn what people there think of the new protections hair has often been a battleground I used to have to get my hot cold when I gotta Huggins was ganger. She went through great wants to get her naturally. Kinky hair to be straight. That was like torture a hot comb, literally put that on the stove a heated up, and then they call through your hair, you could hear like sizzling the worst the worst today. She's got dreadlocks that go pasture shoulders growing up straighter hair. Seemed like the most acceptable hair instead about natural kinky curly hair, which is also she sitting in a salon chair at the beans. Hallway waiting to get her neograph interlocked, it's Saturday morning and the salon. If they're women platinum quails in orange tip. Twist. Someone's getting a harebrained dry for that it floats up around her face like a cloud..

CEO Yuki Noguchi Blake Majkowski Scott wreck Blat Rx Tom shoes ta Huggins New York City Paul Argenti NPR founder Wade Senate Gucci NPR Levi New York Washington Dartmouth
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"Is managing partner at Baker Tilley's human resource consulting group millennial turnover is different than any other generation before. And if I'm able to recruit somebody based off this benefit and then retain. Chain them for twelve or twenty four months longer than I'm getting a reward out of that. There are possible downsides often if an employee leaves before a certain amount of time, they must repay the money. But while I'm says that can backfire sometimes what we see is that an employee becomes disgruntled, and then they're working they're simply because they don't wanna have to repay. But many say the upside is big at fidelity, for example, more than a quarter of its workers signed up for the program, which is only three years old. It pays up to ten thousand dollars over five years Aisha shrieking Taya vice president of fidelity says those who participate stay longer at the company for us really focusing on retaining those people. Especially after we've invested in training them as a really important thing. The program success lead. Fidelity did now sell it as a service other employers can offer she trained beer ball is director of congressional fares to the site for human resource management. She says loan repayment. It would be more affordable to nonprofits and small businesses. If congress makes it tax free for employers and workers more employers might be able to offer student loan repayment as a benefit to their employees, even without the tax benefits. Some employers say, it's worthwhile Madeline Macintoshes CEO of penguin Random House, which started offering loan repayment two years ago. She says about ten percent of the publishing companies five thousand employees participate, including she says older people who returned to school or took out loans for kids. I feel like it has really have outside emotional or psychological benefits for employees. I feel like if they were ranking it this would be up there at the top. And I don't think it's the most expensive. It's cost the company about a million dollars to date, far less. She says than what it spends on health insurance. Yuki Noguchi, NPR news, Washington Virginia's Lieutenant governor, Justin. Fairfax has kept a low profile since to sexual assault act. Cassation's surfaced against him earlier this month, but yesterday, he gave an impromptu speech at the state Senate comparing himself to lynching victims of the last two centuries. Ben pave your has the story from member station. W C V in Richmond. Good. We're gonna do it again. Senator will come to order. This Sunday was the final day of Virginia's legislative session. Fairfax was leading proceedings as he's done for the last seven weeks. Fairfax said he hadn't planned on addressing the allegations against him. But he went on to connect them to the state's history of racial violence..

Aisha Fairfax Washington Virginia Baker Tilley managing partner Madeline Macintoshes Senate vice president Yuki Noguchi Senator Richmond congress NPR CEO assault director Justin ten thousand dollars
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Some employee unions are negotiating for more time for members to pay their utility bills as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports Britney Spears his name is often confused with Britney Spears, but Sears is no multimillionaire, pop star. In fact, money is tight for Sears federal correctional officer in saffron, Arizona at home. She bundles in warm clothes as she shuffles over to check her thermostat. So right now, it is at it is at sixty it snowed since the shutdown began. But Sears keeps the heat off hoping to save one hundred dollars this month while she isn't getting paid. If it gets to about like, fifty degrees or something it's really cold in here. So i'll. Turn it on and get it up to maybe like sixty or sixty five in the no turn it off again in the background. There is a persistent beep of the low battery indicator on her smoke alarm and just haven't had the time to really think about something like that. She's still working ten hour shifts at the prison when she's not she's calling her mortgage and car lenders about deferring payments. She's also scouring the house for things she could, sell including apprised camper van. She just paid off. Sears is a single mom raising a six year old boy on her own since the shutdown began she switched to cheaper grocery stores and buys frozen, not fresh. She drives less unexplained store, son. Why three dollar video game isn't in the budget doesn't have money right now. I can't get that right now. I'm not getting a paycheck. And he's like what you go to work. Mom. Maybe I go to work, and it's like, well when I get older, I'm.

Sears Britney Spears Yuki Noguchi Arizona NPR officer one hundred dollars fifty degrees three dollar six year ten hour
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Some employee unions are negotiating for more time for members to pay their utility bills as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports Britney Spears his name is often confused with Britney Spears, but Sears is no multimillionaire popstar. In fact, money is tight for Sears. Who's a federal correctional officer in Saffire, Arizona at home. She bundles in warm clothes as she shuffles over to check her thermostat. So right now, it is at it is at sixty it snowed since the shutdown began. But Sears keeps the heat off hoping to save one hundred dollars this month while she isn't getting paid. If it gets to about like, fifty degrees or something it's really cold in here. So I'll turn it. On and get it up to maybe like sixty or sixty five in the no turn it off again in the background. There is a persistent beep of the low battery indicator on her smoke alarm and just haven't had the time to really think about something like that. She's still working ten hour shifts at the prison when she's not she's calling her mortgage and car lenders about deferring payments. She's also scouring the house for things she could, sell including a prized camper van. She just paid off. Sears is a single mom raising a six year old boy on her own since the shutdown began. She's switched to cheaper grocery stores and buys frozen, not fresh. She drives less unexplained explains to her son, Wyatt three dollar video game isn't in the budget doesn't have money right now. You know, I can't get that right now. I'm not getting a paycheck. And he's like what you go to work. Mom, like, I know. Maybe I go to work as I when I get older, I'm gonna.

Sears Britney Spears Yuki Noguchi Saffire NPR Arizona officer Wyatt one hundred dollars fifty degrees three dollar six year ten hour
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"Really does for plex me. How you expect this to end when you tell the president of the United States. You can't get it. You get one dollar for a wall. When in the past Democrats have appropriated billions for the wall. What is he supposed to do? Just give in he's not gonna give in Graham speaking there on Fox News Sunday house speaker Nancy Pelosi says that Trump must reopen the government I before negotiating wall funding the standoff over funding led to the partial government shutdown that has now in its fourth week without an end in sight and NPR's. Yuki Noguchi reports it could affect the country's overall employment picture, the labor market has been strong and last month hiring surged, but the government's closure will likely com. The January employment surveys the unemployment rate currently stands at three point nine percent. But that could take up this month. That's because nearly half of the eight hundred thousand furloughed federal workers are not reporting to work. They will be counted as unemployed or temporarily laid off in the next government report, the remaining half, a federal employees who are working without pay will still be counted as employed depending how long the shutdown laugh analysts say it could push the unemployment rate up by two tenths of a percent. Yuki Noguchi, NPR news, Washington. Tens of thousands of teachers in Los Angeles are planning to walk off the job tomorrow despite a forecast of one to three inches of rain. The issue is pay smaller classrooms and more staff. United teachers LA union says despite the school district's claims of a deficit they say it actually has a big reserve with more than enough money to meet teacher demands. Some six hundred thousand students could be affected by the strike. You're listening to N. PR news support for NPR comes from the Wallace foundation fostering improvements in learning and enrichment for disadvantaged children. And by the arts for everyone ideas at Wallace foundation dot org. Unrolled gambles with you on this pretty beautiful Sunday afternoon coming up at three o'clock. It is Anthony valid as so have another hour together. And we're going to start off with a request for early lavas green and gold on KCRW..

Yuki Noguchi NPR United States president Wallace foundation Nancy Pelosi KCRW Los Angeles Anthony LA union Graham Trump Washington nine percent three inches one dollar
"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"yuki noguchi" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Barbara Klein secretary of state Mike Pompeo says a boycott of Qatar by four US Gulf allies has draw dragged on long enough. He says Gulf unity is key to establishing a coalition against Iran, but the Gulf nations accused Qatar of funding extremist groups and of being too close to Iran. Meanwhile, Israel says it's carried out airstrikes in Syria against Iranian weapons being stored at the international airport in Damascus NPR's. Daniel estrin reports from Jerusalem, Syria said the air strikes took place late Friday night, Israel has publicly admitted to the strikes, which is rare Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel, targeted Iranian warehouses with Iranian weapons in the latest of hundreds of recent Israeli attacks on Iranian and Hezbollah militant targets to try to thwart Iran's military buildup in Syria Netanyahu said quote, the accumulation. Of recent attacks proves that we are determined more than ever to take action against Iran and Syria. The US has backed such as rarely attacks. Also, the Israeli army says it's found these sixth and what it believes to be last tunnel dug by Hezbollah militants to cross into Israel. Daniel estrin NPR news Jerusalem. This is the twenty third day of the partial government shutdown and NPR's. Yuki Noguchi reports it could affect the country's overall employment picture, the labor market has been strong. And last month hiring surged, but the government's closure will likely complicate the January employment surveys the unemployment rate currently stands at three point nine percent. But that could take up this month. That's because nearly half of the eight hundred thousand furloughed federal workers are not reporting to work. They will be counted as unemployed or temporarily laid off in the next government report, the remaining half, a federal employees who are working without pay will still be counted as. Employed, depending how long the shutdown laugh. Analysts say it could push the unemployment rate up by two tenths of a percent. Yuki Noguchi, NPR news, Washington..

Iran Syria Israel NPR Daniel estrin Hezbollah Yuki Noguchi Mike Pompeo Qatar Jerusalem US Washington Israeli army Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Barbara Klein nine percent