35 Burst results for "Yugoslavia"

NY Rep. Claudia Tenney Shares Her Backstory and Connection to the Former Yugoslavia

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:57 min | 2 months ago

NY Rep. Claudia Tenney Shares Her Backstory and Connection to the Former Yugoslavia

"First welcome back to our one on one end studio in discussion with New York's congresswoman Claudia teddy. For those who aren't familiar with your backstory. I didn't even know it until you came in today. You said you mentioned my book, and then you said you sold me on TV and you bought my book, which talks about my parents who escaped Hungary under communism and then mentions what was happening next door in Yugoslavia. Share with us who aren't familiar or who aren't from your district, your connection to the Balkans in the Eastern Europe. I'm not of Yugoslavia in descent or Balkan descent, but I did actually see you and I said, oh, look, you know, because one of my jobs when I worked at the former Yugoslav consulate, which is obviously gone because of the war. We're still look for people in the Balkans, people in the region, and I just, you know, anyone with a sort of the accident, even though Hungarian is not similar to several creations to different route language, I just said, oh, who's this guy? Oh, he's talking about hungry. Interesting because of all that was happening and Yugoslavia being so unique, technically not behind the iron curtain. Tito was able to keep him out of the common form. So I went to Yugoslavia as a student in 1981, 40 years ago, just for a study group and ended up falling in love with the place to just so diverse and interesting and continued to stay there. Work for the consulate worked on the Olympics in Sarajevo in 1984. Learn the language, you know, just continue to go back and then obviously through the war, it was a tough time for me. I had friends from every part of the country, the former years of everywhere. Because we all worked in the consulate together, and so that's been my connection and just living in a country that was communist and then seeing the transformation since the war and them trying to emerge as a market economy, and reading your book where you hear about you're talking about some of the things that happened and how a lot of Hungarians were trying to cross through Yugoslavia and get to freedom and how Tito basically turned them in. And they read the benevolent dictator who was Marshall, Joseph pizza, right? Right, yeah, so called benevolent dictator, and that's where I, you know, I think we're on this moment in American history where people should learn that when they say we have communism we've never just done it quite right, and we had a benevolent dictator in Tito, not a benevolent dictator. Tito had a dissident camp where people were tortured and killed on a barren island in the Adriatic Sea. So it's all these communists. And he played and he played the nationalities. Right. Slovenes vice the Croatians, the Croatians versus the Serbs. Yeah, and technically he was Croatian, but first and foremost he was a communist. Right. He was able to bridge the gap and keep an allied relationship with the Americans and with kind of keeping everyone at bay to maintain this sort of artificial union of these countries and Yugoslavia, which wants Tito died. You know, they devolved into war within about ten

Yugoslavia Claudia Teddy Balkans Yugoslav Consulate Tito Balkan Hungary Eastern Europe Joseph Pizza Sarajevo New York Olympics Marshall Adriatic Sea
"yugoslavia" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Inside grab, then part of Yugoslavia. On the first night, I stuck up to an empty first class carriage to be woken in the early morning with a jolt. The train had derailed, having struck a cow on the tracks. But back in third class, I discovered that the train had no food and so generous Turkish workers shared their garlicky blood sausage. I finally learned to purchase dinner during quick stops and small Yugoslavian towns from vendors who are crowding the platform. And I also learned that train travel whether India or Croatia is not just transportation. It's the very best way to get to know the people as well as their food. It's time to head into the kitchen of Milk Street to chat with J. M. Hirsch about this week's recipe, which is Ethiopian style chick. Piece to Jason. How are you? I'm doing great. You were in Ethiopia. I was this Baba and you came across the recipe, which is very common, their which we don't tend to make here, which is a chick piece, too. But it's not the kind of stew that I would think of as chickpea stew. No, no, you know, it has the consistency actually of polenta, And it's called Sherawat, and it is made from a combination of onions and spices. And a mixture of ground dried chickpeas that have been seasoned. It's cooked very much again like polenta. And as so much of Ethiopian food is eaten with injera, the sour dough kind of spongy flatbread that they use both as a bread and as a utensil. It's a daily Neil because it's inexpensive, easy to make and very nutritious. And so I I cooked with a woman. I guess China who's a very talented home cook, who introduced me to not just this dish, but also to kind of the way spices work in Ethiopian cooking, which was completely different from what I expect, but I saw some of the photos from your trip, and one of them was a guy. Grinding spices, and the entire shop was orange. Yeah, you know, it's fascinating because spices are treated so much differently in Ethiopian cuisine. When we're cooking, we often think of the main component of the meal, whether it's protein or vegetable or whatever, and then we figure out how we want to spice it. They come in from the opposite direction, where they start with the spices. Very often it's bayberry, which is kind of the national spice blend..

J. M. Hirsch Ethiopia Yugoslavia Croatia Jason India one this week Milk Street China first night Turkish Yugoslavian both Neil third class first class morning Ethiopian
BioEnergy Healing for 5th Dimension & Beyond

Merkaba Chakras

01:57 min | 6 months ago

BioEnergy Healing for 5th Dimension & Beyond

"Podcast episode of kaba chaka's. I'm your host savan gulf and today we talked to author and bio energy teacher chung gore daniel about how to use bio energy healing for overall wellness in our bodies and in direct connection to the christ consciousness of source itself. Though with that. John gore welcomed in makamba chagas. Thank you for having me. Thanks that they can imitation. I love energy. Healing is one of my favorite topics. Talk about And connecting to crystalline consciousness of stores. So before we dig into your work Can you tell us how you even got into this in. The first place is now normal career path. I'll try to make it fast. As the long story all started in yugoslavia born and raised there in a hungarian family man consider it kind of normal bad was in a chemical engineer. Mom was a teacher and so i liked both directions. I actually went to study engineering in college and about halfway through. My dad's friend was visiting and It was an editor for a magazine. He was very much into all kinds of weird stuff energy and the crystals and whatnot and he was telling my dad's something and i thought it was a joke because my dad was laughing but he was showing him the energy how he could feel it And so i. I dropped everything and i'm like whoa wait a second you know. Let me see this. And there was something i felt my whole life but i never knew what

Kaba Chaka Chung Gore Daniel John Gore Makamba Yugoslavia
Co-Founder Marko Anastasov on the Creation of Semaphore

Code Story

02:24 min | 6 months ago

Co-Founder Marko Anastasov on the Creation of Semaphore

"Marco and staff has been working with computers for a longtime. He grew up in former yugoslavia in the nineties. When there was civil war hyperinflation in the economy was taken back twenty years. His father was electronics guy. There was always a computer around the house. He found himself fascinated with information. And the things. You could conjure up on the magic screens. And he found that computers were place. You could build things that were not influenced by the outside world as a kid. He played sports mainly volleyball. He's taken many lessons from his time playing volleyball. Where a group of people have shared sense of purpose driving towards a goal while building applications under the guise of his web development agency rendered text. He and his fellow builders saw a need to have a way of automating the processes of building testing and integrating and doing so fast. This is the creation story of semaphore. Semaphore is cloud based product for college. You companies our customers are software development teams and semaphore helps them. Automates the process of testing and deploying code. That's kind of a big deal these days because you know software is built collaboratively. The problem that people need saul is how. How do you build software together. You know multiple people adding new codes implications. How do we make sure that it's everything's actually working right. So that's why in modern software development. You know there is an emerging practice of automating various phases of testing and delivering basically applications to end users and customers. So we help them do that. Productively because our product is thing here of that whole aspect of building software for them. Prior to creating similar we were small web development consultancy company was called rendered text. It's still call that but semaphore is what more more now in the world in our practice of basically building applications for clients typically like small start ups we basically saw needs to have how way of automating these processes of testing and integrating software together

Volleyball Yugoslavia Marco Saul
"yugoslavia" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

05:15 min | 6 months ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Your mailing address set up and then place yourself there while also traveling around like i think for you. That would be very reasonable step. And i think it would be pretty convenient to again. Direct flights do k. And us i bet yugoslavia to el salvador's through panama from the island. You can you can do scan really. Interesting is against super interesting okay. Is there anything in towns of these islands that as it been any rejection by locals that people are doing this the people get impossible to the country that they come from them not at all. And that's what i always say like. People say it's dangerous. There is crime there and all that stuff again lucan like follow the money. Follow incentives right. Like they like you to come to the island. Bring your money and spend your money there like they waiting for you. Your their income and now as like as their tourism has been shut down for quite a while like they basically survived on selling passports. Like that's where the income comes from as a as a nation so they're pretty welcoming towards that. And i spent quite some time on the island and i'm like super white blonde girl and i was very welcome Everywhere i ask a lot of questions about everything About local crime Local like shootings or anything like that about their opinions. My huang let stuff like it was just interesting to talk to. local tuck. Taxi drivers all the time and They were pretty cool. Like i never had any issues. It's a opportunity to live out the sovereign individual thesis of volleyball. Breedlove talks about is funded about you can truly become a sovereign individual individual any digital. No matter what i mean. I'm not gonna do this. I guess if my business was entirely bitcoin by i could just become digital nomad. I could take payments in bitcoin. And would i even need to register a company. Some don't even need to have a company..

el salvador yugoslavia lucan panama Breedlove volleyball
IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

The Promised Podcast

02:02 min | 6 months ago

IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

"We learned this week that next sunday as we recorded on july eighteenth another delegation of one hundred fifty or so idea of soldiers code-named the lightning of the heavens will leave israel on a mission marking. What would have been the hundredth birthday of hannah. Censh- mayor memory for blessing. Hana sanish the budapest born poet and soldier in these secret british special operations executive who on march fourteenth nineteen forty four. When she was just twenty two parachuted with others into yugoslavia where she joined a partisan group and was soon captured by nazi soldiers at the hungarian border and then tortured and murdered by firing squad on monday. To a f- hercules transport. Planes will fly over the forests of eastern slovenia. Where sanish made her last. Jump and one hundred soldiers mostly from the idea but also hungarian. Slovenian and croatian soldiers were reenact sandwiches. Jump the purpose of the reenactment. According to colonel yuval guys the commander of some hueneme the idea paratroopers brigade is to strengthen the ties between the idf and local countries and to try to recreate the heroism of the shoe paratroopers and quote the name of the mission. The lightning of the heavens is taken from his most famous poem. Highly colicky sorry. I walked the case. Aria which goes my god. My god may these never end the sand and the see the rush of the water the lightning of heaven. The prayer of man among the soldiers travelling to slovenia is one who was called up for reserve duty to serve as an educational officer for the mission tel aviv university professor of jewish history. Lieutenant colonel seem Golden husan lieutenant. Haddara golden may refer blessing was killed at twenty three in the two thousand and fourteen gaza war and whose body has been held by hamas for the seven years since and again like mariam said it would take hours months even dissect and elucidate the historical religious and political currents that converge in. This baffling act of symbolism

Hana Sanish Sanish Colonel Yuval Paratroopers Brigade Slovenia Hannah Yugoslavia Hueneme Israel IDF Mission Tel Aviv University Golden Husan Haddara Golden Gaza Mariam Hamas
Caller Comments That Critical Race Theory Divides by Igniting Past Resentment

The Dan Bongino Show

01:04 min | 7 months ago

Caller Comments That Critical Race Theory Divides by Igniting Past Resentment

"Well, let's see. I've got a comment about critical race theory, which I Suggestion here after we called the people's Democratic race history that way, it can be anything you wanted to be imagined. Right? Well, anyway, so hard problem with critical Race theory is that it is designed to actually stir up old resentments rather than bring understanding and racial harmony, So it's counterproductive for what they claim they wanted to do. So it's sort of like what they did in the Balkan peninsula Back in 1990 the hero after when the Yugoslavia fell apart, you know, so you had the Croats and the Serbs and the Albanians and everybody else fighting each other because they stirred up all the hate It's from the past, and that's what this Bob, you know, That's an X. I don't mean to interrupt you, but that's an excellent point. Like where has this model the ball organization ever worked? I mean, it's not. I mean, I'm not late. It's not funny. It's really tragic. Because it's an excellent point. Where has this

Balkan Peninsula Yugoslavia BOB
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WJR 760

"Fuller. This is anything is possible, and we're talking to Marina Arsene, A bitch. In the 19 nineties, She challenged hatred and violence in Yugoslavia by performing their own original music, lending a variety of ethnic and cultural rhythms and melodies. To reveal our common humanity. Marina, welcome a real honor to have you. Hello and thank you very much for inviting me to such inspirational show. I'm honored. Thanks. Can we start by talking about your childhood in Yugoslavia and your mom and your dad, please? Yes, Well, I was born and raised in at that time Yugoslavia. It's now Servia. I was very curious child I had about 100 plastic pianos, but at the age of four Um, my parents really didn't know what exactly to do with all my energy with all my curiosity, So at that point, they sent me to a classical boy school at the age of four. And then later on, I started even swimming because they said, I still have extra energy that I have to burn somewhere well, and at the time Yugoslavia was a communist country. When I was raised in the eighties, and we I have to say had the kind of everything free if you're very, very talented than you have an extra, so I went to two schools. My father was a economist and professional soccer player. So I can say that I learned from him a love for people and passion and kindness. And my mother is attorney And she was running the pension fund in forming Yugoslavia during the teacher's time, so she was very disciplined. She was very proper and she loved art. So if you put all those Characteristics together. I can say That's me and I have not had any free time. I was always kind of working on Excel Ng in whatever I started, so it was first piano and that became my really first love. Um, at the time, my professors, especially classical ballet teachers, said Listen, She is bored, very bored at this ballet class, and she's constant. She's standing by the piano accompanist, I think is best for you if you take her to a music school so she can start piano. It took them a while until I get a real one. By the age of seven. So about three years I had to convince them that death, my love and also we lived in a very small apartments. My room was S so small that they had to put upright piano on one side of the wall. On the other side of the wall was my parent's bed. So I have to tell you my father would call my mother every day to ask if I stopped practicing so he could come home and s. Oh, there you go. After very, very shortly Two years later, after and the age of nine. I wanna first piano. Petition. In that time Yugoslavia I was performing all ready for the audiences of 2000. It was my first solo concert. I perform Chopin, Beethoven brands. I started at the time by one of the world's great piano, mass masters and their many Russians who were coming through Yugoslavia to go to the rest because it was still USSR. They were closed, and so one of them could stand in beginner picked me and another girl to work with me. So one of the first bigger concerts and actually, one of my recordings were with send Peter's books always Where I perform most of piano concertos and that was turned into a CD and later became one of the best South classical CDs in 11, European countries. We're talking to Marina Arsene, A bitch.

Yugoslavia Marina Arsene attorney soccer USSR Chopin Peter
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

"Long divergent thing. I remember what the original question was. But that's kind of now. I got here. Oh no you did it was. It was great in terms of military intervention. How did you perceive what might have seemed to be a righteous choice to intervene militarily militarily prior to nine eleven regardless of the place or purpose. And how do you see that type of intervention today. Well actually i. During the nato bombing actions in yugoslavia that was really worked on. Because i did not agree with that. And i didn't. I was in ill serving in of at that time and i even had a.

nato yugoslavia
PUBG Mobile Announces Massive Prize Pool for 2021

Esports Minute

02:02 min | 1 year ago

PUBG Mobile Announces Massive Prize Pool for 2021

"Pubg mobile is heading into its Global championship for 2020 the pmdc to welcome fans. They made an announcement for the upcoming season, which promises to be a huge one for fans of the mobile Battle Royale and twenty Twenty-One pubg mobile have a total prize pool of fourteen million dollars the highest total prize pool for a mobile a sport in one year in history month that price will be spread across a much larger ecosystem than we saw in twenty-twenty this year pubg mobile operated two leaks the pubg Mobile Pro leagues in South Asia and Southeast Asia off next year. They will add 7 more regions. Those regions are turkey Western Europe Arabia North America Latin America and Brazil. The final region being added is the Commonwealth of Rome. Dependent states, which is basically the old Soviet Bloc with Russia, Ukraine Yugoslavia and other countries in that region, the actual format of the year will be similar to fans of League to split beginning in January and am waiting in a global championship in Fall. There will also be major invitationals held over the summer pubg mobile is seeing record-breaking growth and viewership and fans who want to buy in ahead of next season as the Regent enters the pubg mobile Bots world can watch the pmdc from now until December 20th. The current pmgc is competing for a prize pool of two million dollars. The new pubg mobile format is really important for a couple reasons, It's the biggest mobile Esports structure. We've ever seen attached to one game and it's also the most fleshed-out format for Battle Royale Esports we've ever seen well fortnite has put down more money and prizes. They don't operate Regional leagues and you are close to level. We're going to be seeing from pubg Mobile in 2021. And in other good news for pubg mobile. It seems like the game is on track to be reinstated by the Indian government. India was the name. Growth region for pubg mobile for most of this year and the government banned the game along with a lengthy list of other apps with connections to China a few months ago according to a leak reported by Indian Publications over the weekend. There is a place to bring pubg mobile back to the world's second most populous country sometime soon, but we don't have much more information than that.

Pubg Mobile Pmdc Ukraine Yugoslavia Pmgc South Asia Southeast Asia Arabia Latin America North America Brazil Rome Russia Europe Indian Government India Government
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Across the river. And one of the first victims was a little two years old. That was sleeping in a crib. She was a Muslim little girl. Living in a Serbian side of the town, so Muslims killed her, hoping to kill somebody who is a Serb. It's just It's just the representation of absolute nonsense of what happened and how these wars they're absolute tragedy. Serbs put the announcement if you are a male From this age to this age, maybe 16 to 68 something like that. You need to report to join the army. As soon as my husband saw this He came home. Gave me 5000 Deutsche marks in cash. That was a huge amount of money for Yugoslavia at that time, and he says I'm not going to join the army. I'm leaving. He didn't Kiss the kids. He didn't hug and kiss me. He just left. I can just guess that it was too hard to say goodbye. I remember closing the door and saying Now it's up to me. I have to old parents here. I have two little kids here and I need to keep this together. If I can remember correctly, it's maybe few days. Just few days things started getting worse and worse and worse. Serbs surrounded every building and.

Yugoslavia
Latest On A Military Conflict In Ethiopia

All Things Considered

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Latest On A Military Conflict In Ethiopia

"Prime minister, Maybe Achmed won the Nobel Peace Prize. And yet less than a week ago, he launched military operations in the country's northern region. Now that conflict is threatening to turn into an all out civil war. NPR's later Peralta walks us through what's happening and later to begin. Give us a sense of why the prime minister had won the Nobel Prize. He changed everything in Ethiopia. I mean at home, he ushered in a raft of democratic reforms, and then he also made peace with Ethiopia's mortal enemy, Eritrea. During his Nobel lecture, he talked about how he fought in that war, and he called it the epitome of hell. Let's listen to a bit of that speech of Sin Brothers slaughtering brothers on the battlefield. I have seen all their men, woman and Children trembling in terror under the really short ofthe bullets and alterations. You are makes for betterment, heartless and savage mint, he says. War makes for Bitterman heartless and savage men and when I became to power, people on the streets of Ethiopia told me that he was sent by God and now He has started this new conflict in the same part of the country where this war between Ethiopia and Eritrea happened and his air forces now bombing targets in his own country. What's the cause of the conflict? And at this point, how bad is the fighting? So it's complicated because, but it's essentially a power struggle. Document came to power in 2018 after huge popular uprising, and one of the things that he did was dismantled Ethiopia's ruling party, which had run the country with violence and brutality for almost 30 years, the guys who ran the show, where the TP left the Ti Guy People's Liberation Front. And they were sidelined. Since then, Abby has accused them of destabilizing the country by stoking ethnic tensions. Abby's allies have accused them of assassinations, including one attempt against Abby himself in last week. The government says that the TPLF sent forces to attack a federal military base, and that's when Abby ordered his army into the ticket region. Now how bad the fighting is, has been hard to report because the government has shut down phone lines and the Internet is often the region. I'm still waiting for a visa. Reuters, which does have reporters on the ground eyes reporting, hundreds are dead on each side. Sudan State media has also said that many refugees have started fleeing to their country. So it's serious. What are the TV I fighter saying at this point, it's It's a lot of bravado. They're calling the government dictatorial and treasonous. And those are the same words that the government is using against them. And they say that they're open to talk. But at the same time, you know, they also say that if they're hit hard, they plan on hitting back Justus hard. Either. We talked about the threat of civil war. How higher the stakes here they're huge. Some analysts say that this could be like Yugoslavia where Ethiopia breaks up in Ethiopia, by the way, is The second largest country in Africa by population, and the conflict also has the potential to draw in Eritrea and even Sudan, and if it's protracted, it can really destabilize the region that is already super vulnerable. And we can't really think of thiss as just a regional government against a powerful federal government. I mean, this is really one well armed, well trained military against another well armed, well trained military in a really fragile A place in Africa. That's NPR's ater. Peralta speaking to us from Nairobi. Thank you. Thank you. A

Ethiopia Maybe Achmed Abby Eritrea Bitterman Peralta NPR Tplf Sudan Government Reuters Justus Yugoslavia Africa Federal Government Nairobi
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

"Entered to burn therein today for us to deny. Elian fifty more. He, he went to Leeman in the him what had. Been In June. That day, we will seal over their mouths and their hands will speak to us and their feet will testify about what they used to earn. Well Natia. Up? Almost now. A. Double at all in Yugoslavia. Do Home, and if we will, we could have obliterated their is and they would race to find the fat and how could they see the? Woolen now. Famous. On. Junior..

Elian Leeman Yugoslavia
CALM, The Campaign Against Living Miserably

Mentally Yours

04:42 min | 1 year ago

CALM, The Campaign Against Living Miserably

"Simon welcomes mentally ill thanks very much for joining me. So, can we start off just with the basics tell us about com what exactly does it do? com is the campaign against living miserably, which is an excellent name and adds up to com. Ca Yellen we are we're suicide prevention, organization So our I guess chosen Lens on the world is suicide. an and that's to us as a barometer of how well society is doing and. How it needs to be fixed. In two thousand, eighteen, nineteen, the office of National Statistics numbers showed the suicide in the UK by eleven, percents, and that's off to a steady plateauing of numbers. So we can see there's something. Happening across society in the UK The needs to be addressed that now that of course, he's pretty coded pre lockdown pre economic impact or those kinds of things. So the way way tackle suicide. Is. Three one as we campaign for Societal and personal change. So we with big. Brands. The everybody will know like. TV and Dave and spotify and talk shop top man TESCO and. They just the list goes on and on positive messages people to enable them to change behaviors, which they preach may be damaging to seek help to help people around them epitomised thing by a recent partnership that we launched with Carling. Calling of the L. Become Caring and. Working there to help people. Coffee a macaw themselves also campaigning that we do is to societal change result. Of thing, we did projects four in two, thousand, eighteen, two years ago. With it in this morning we. Were responsible for the appointment of the first of A. Mischief assault prevention. So that's campaigning The second leg on stole if you like is cooled collective, which is where we bring people together will though virtually now around shed passion points. Running and And football and those kind of things when we allow people to join groups through the complexes the final on. The most. Tangible output of where we where we raise money and what we spend it on his help line, which is open from five till midnight seven days a week for anyone that needs it whatever agenda whatever you need when non-judgmental and hotline staffed by Professionals by people who are paid to work on the outline and their that to give advice to help people whether you're at your wit's end and suicide is is becoming an option will help you with a You might be feeling just a little bit. Wait it out by what's going on right now I now I am on most people with to help you any with anything that you need. You might be feeling fine worried about somebody else without help Yugoslavia all no matter what com is there to help. You have a happy life and to try to Change Society for the better. I'm what about you? Personally, when did you get involved in? Why did you want to get involved with this charity in particular? Up I've never worked for charity or been involved in mental health tool I. Wilson Television in the business and then lastly, in appetizing don't judge me but I I was literally run up by the Chairman James skulks to say why you why senior life will advising advertising agencies on stuff coming through something worthwhile for four months and of site. That's three and a half years in is fantastic. It's calm. I. Think he's attractive to so many people because we don't behave like a charity. Now, that is any way to denigrate chows as a child. She's fantastic. Brilliant things Supplement stuff that arguably government should be doing but did have have real profound pup calm is a charity but we behave and communicates in ways which may be more like a a modern brand. So we communicate through music and comedy and football, and running and cycling, and or those kind of things which we tap into popular culture So we've seen huge growth in the last three years most notably in the use of helpline, which is which is more than double. So it's a brilliant privileged to be able to run the thing.

UK Football Simon Change Society Tesco Carling Assault Spotify Chairman Yugoslavia Dave James Skulks
Slavoj Žižek - Slovenian Philosopher and Writer

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Slavoj Žižek - Slovenian Philosopher and Writer

"Guest. Today is a Slovenian philosopher and writer whose vast catalogue of work because earned him celebrity status across the globe, radical leftist, his work compasses, everything from psychoanalysis and political theory to art and film. Criticism Hegel in a wired brain evaluation of the German philosophers relevant in the twenty first century, tying in the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of his birth is his latest book. Saliva Jack Welcome to meet the rices. I'm here. Thanks very much. Now listen, you've been called the Elvis of cultural theory, the most dangerous philosopher in the West and I'm keen to know how you go from your birth in Louisiana through film studies and writing copy fat, but convince fit to this revered status in in the philosophical and academic world, so let's stop them in the former Yugoslavia. Tell us about your home. Life and the influence is there on you as as a child is an incredible story. Place Myself, but how might Chedda experiences in Oak Yugoslavia? We're really a blessing in disguise. I won't. At the university? Being attacked as after I finished my studies, I wasn't able to get a job, but after tutoring here so unemployment they put me into a research institute, which was basically opposed, gave me of the freedom of it was that she needs who dabbled and. So. You know is out of Communist was other the freedom that I needed I sat through. The West connections I in frowns then in the UK in United States, also another thing you can sign me communist kind but communism we don't opened walks the west, and I saw the big thing in my life was debt. Early seventies late sixties nineteen shakes ditch and I was in my studies. The scene was dominated in republic Slovenia by on drunken, fundamentalist on the other hand. Frank with school much then there was defense right of a disaster local. Rochon journalism and the younger generation immediately found a way that. Also Changed Yugoslavia was open towards the West. We didn't have any usuals in the sense of Oh my go- democracy we meeting. Everything will train usually about socialism, but also no illusions about Western democracies combat in an ideal. I, did so it's not me. It's also whole group of people. I was listening to lock you on, but now other sound following me getting international recognition. It was an incredible luck. You know when French asked me. What would you be if you were to get your boats? After finishing, your starts may honestly clear. I moved to an unknown professor in this fee. troll over country called. Slovenia own, It's not a joke. Thanks communist oppression I Orient Myself. The roads are I was I must admit this incredibly lucky. Tell me about your movie making stint shaky. Joe People think it's some kind of both modern joke and so on, but you know many of might be nervous so in the wrong I cannot walks myself. It's not a joke for more than half a minute on beverages guide overdose. Documentary movies that are made until note I am. To meet I shake, or my gestures especially soccer snow, because seeking all the time, so people can see me. The mathematically covet positive until if you don't get me, you have everything that you need to know.

Yugoslavia Frank Joe People Slovenia Hegel Louisiana Writer Soccer UK Professor United States
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 1 year ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

ESPN Daily

05:32 min | 1 year ago

The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

"I. How did you get on the chess? Beat in the first place? So I get really interested in these really need sports that. People are super invested in Ashwari. Kumar is an international features writer for Espn Lake if you're going to which. Of People Are Watching these chess tournaments that you wouldn't even know where that's happening in. Iceland. Or Finland, and so I had this curiosity so I was thinking so Bobby Fisher was such a huge part of chests in the US what Ron Labor is tennis. What Jack Nicklaus's to golf? That's what Bobby Fischer is to chess. Bobby Fisher of the United States will finally meet Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in Belgrade Yugoslavia, but the chess championship of the world plus a purse of one, hundred, thirty, eight, thousand five hundred dollars, the richest prize for a head-to-head confrontation in any sport, but boxing. So who is the next Bobby Fisher? So I went to Saint Louis last year to sort of figure out what is going on in the chess world, so saint Louis has sort of become this chess capital of the country. Let's start with the basics here. What is a chess grandmaster? And what does it take to become one? Usually what happens? Is this International Chess Federation F. And they have this point systems so chessplayers. Lead different tournaments in accumulate these spines that. Gets them to a certain level of expertise, and they are then title the grandmaster, which is in fact, the highest I do that. A chess player can be awarded by International Chess Federation usually these. Players between the age of ten and fourteen, and so they go through these rigorous tournaments one after the other parents take them all over the world. And the get the title by around thirteen fourteen, and then they start to perfect the art of being perfect, just player. So you mentioned Bobby Fisher. Who is probably the most famous chess player all time? Actually is definitely the most famous chess player of all time. Who are the stars of the field today? The poster by of chess is at the moment Magnus Carlsen. Calzon is the best in the world. The youngest number one ever and no one can explain to you how he does what he does. It seems to come from another world, which is why he's become known as the Mozart of chess. He's from Norway. He sort of had this. Has this bad boy live to him? He's like interesting. He'll drop these nuggets about other players. You make jokes about his opponents. He talks trash social chicken. How do you not? He's GonNa do the same. Yeah the lack of comas is astounding. And quite disappointing. He talks acts. Yeah for sure sorta like that kind of Worcester wise. He's called the golden boy of chess. And then this. Is. Bobby Ana crew art, there's this Chinese grandmaster Ding Laren and then USA's Wesley so and Kara Nakimora. Really Good Armenia has live on Romanian so these are some of like the famous players at the moment that go up against each other all the time. So I the grandmaster that you decided to focus on with your story, the one who lives in Saint Louis is actually Italian. His name is Fabiano Caruana. Who is in? How did he get here? Fabiano Caruana is the number two seed in the world. He's an Italian American chess grandmaster. He became a grandmaster at fourteen years of age, fourteen years, eleven, months, and twenty eight to be exact, and he at that time was the youngest grandmaster in the history of Italy in the United States. E was sort of beg to be the next big thing in in US chess and he came back now. He has an apartment in Saint Louis. He lives there and he sort of boot. BOOT his life from scratch, and he was never like the big personality like Norris Magnus columnist. He's the guy that will is very chill loves video games and let us work to the talk to his justice stories about that call in the next Bobby Fisher like the next big thing. He's the one person that can actually dig down. Magnus, Carlsen in the world championship and become the next world champion. So what does? Chess match in a grand masters tournament. Actually look like. How does it play out? Okay so two grandmasters shake each other's hands. sit down across from each other is chessboard. This o'clock next to them that the are constantly looking at. This goes on for at least six hours right every day, and so during these six hours, the brain has to have most oxygen supply. Which means your heart is functioning three times faster than on any given. And because of that sustained higher blood pressure, and sustained higher level of activity by the heart and the rain, the body goes through intense physical. Energy lost during. A chess game that lasts six to seven to sometimes eat hours said.

Bobby Fisher International Chess Federation Chess Fabiano Caruana United States Magnus Carlsen Saint Louis Bobby Ana Tennis Jack Nicklaus Ashwari Finland Iceland Espn Lake Kumar Boris Spassky Features Writer Norris Magnus Worcester
Hannah Senesh

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Hannah Senesh

"Today's fearless. Woman is both a maverick and a legend a national heroine in Israel. She parachuted into enemy territory to liberate Jews during the Holocaust looking death in the eye. Let's talk about Hannah said Nash Hanis. Ns was born in nineteen twenty one budapest Hungary the daughter of an author and a journalist. Honecker up in a literary household she routinely kept journals of her own from H. Thirteen right up to her death in the nineteen thirties as antisemitic sentiments were burgeoning and Budapest. Hana was drawn design scientist activities and in nineteen thirty nine. She left Hungary for what was then. Palestine there she. I attended an agricultural school and eventually settled at kibbutz. Yom where she wrote poetry and a play about life on the kibbutz in nineteen forty three at the height of World War Two. Hana enlisted with the British army in volunteered to be a paratrooper. The mission was to help the allied forces establish contact with resistance fighters in Europe. Were also working to help the Jews. Hana trained in Egypt and was one of only thirty three people chosen to parachute behind enemy lines in March of nineteen forty four. Hana parachuted into Yugoslavia and began working with the Yugoslav partisans. A Communist led resistance the access powers. The partisans were considered among Europe's most effective anti Nazi resistance groups Hana's Fervor and passion for the movement or captured in her poem. Last is the match. But she wrote during her time in Yugoslavia. After three months with the partisans on across into hungry in June of nineteen forty four at the height of deportation for Hungary's Jews with the goal of reaching her native Budapest. She didn't make it Hana was quickly picked up by the Hungarian police who were faithful to the Nazi party. Despite being repeatedly torture Hana declined to give up information pertaining to her mission. Even when the police threatened to harm Hana's own mother she held steadfast and her resistance and refused to cooperate during Hana's trial October of nineteen forty four. She didn't appeal for mercy and instead defended her actions at every turn on November seventh nineteen forty four. Hana was ordered to be executed by firing squad in the moments leading up to her that she refused a blindfold that was offered to her. Instead choosing to stare squarely into the eyes of per excecutioner. She was only twenty three years old. After her execution a poem was found in Hana's sell it read one two three eight feet long to strides apart. The rest is dark. Life is fleeting question. Mark one-two-three maybe another week or the next month may still find me here but death I feel is very near. I could have been twenty three next July i Campbell on what mattered. Most the dice were cast. I lost Hana's life was brief but her impact. On the world lasted long pastor untimely death her diary and poems were published posthumously and several of her poems have been set to music in one thousand nine hundred fifty Hamas remains were brought to Jerusalem and reinterred at the military cemetery on Mount Herzl to this day. Hana remains a symbol of self sacrifice idealism in the face of dire circumstance.

Hana Hungary Budapest Europe Yugoslavia Israel Palestine Nash Hanis Nazi Party Hannah British Army NS Hamas Mount Herzl Scientist Campbell YOM Mark One-Two-Three Egypt
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Yugoslavia on mother's day the children type their mother releasing or only when she's paid them to do so with sweets rather good okay let's start with Mister Rogers trademark sweater in every episode was sewn by his mother so here is a problem I didn't watch the Mister Rogers documentary really want to cry the whole time that's how I feel I feel like this is so pure that it has to be true yeah I still Rogers is the most wholesome human that's ever existed in the history of the planet if he was going to wear anything it was going to be by his mom even Bob Ross I think herbal man I would love to see that like boxing match also you some happy little clouds literally killing with kindness yeah right I think it is false Mister Rogers was old so how old was his mom one hundred that's the name he was in the old we were just little so we thought he was super late thirties early forties and I yeah I mean maybe fifties but even then yeah I say it's true I'm going with let's go to the next one mother stays the biggest greeting card holiday in the U. S. okay my first instinct is false on this one yeah I think there's I think Christmas wins on a like every okay let's go to the next one Ballantine's anymore too yeah okay so false and then in the former Yugoslavia children tie up her mother's releasing her only which is it didn't do so okay so it's so good but here's the thing Jake is also has a really sick twisted sense of humor so how do you feel like you could make this up except for the Yugoslavia.

Yugoslavia Mister Rogers Ballantine Jake Bob Ross boxing
'The Bachelor': The Women Blow Up on Peter for Bringing Back Alayah

Pardon My Take

02:30 min | 2 years ago

'The Bachelor': The Women Blow Up on Peter for Bringing Back Alayah

"Pete took Victoria F on a one on one date to a surprise chase. Rice concert turns out Victoria. F Dated Chase Rice before four. Coming on yes I mean our guy chase is like Charles Woodson back in the day like you know two thirds of the world's covered by water one-third by Charles Els Woodson Chase Rice is dated two-thirds a world so I'm two-thirds of the world's covered by water the other third is by chases ropes. Yes let's keep it classy. He's a lover his season. He no he is his vocal inflections. Yes is come. He's just a good dude. P Then took the woman on a group date to the Cleveland Browns stadium where there was traumatic place on pickers house. They played a game of tackle football coach by Josh cribs and Hanford Dixon. Also also I guess on the show when Chris was saying like all right. We're going to Cleveland and usually that's where all the girls like. It was just like everyone who's just blank face. WE'RE GOING TO CLEVELAND. And they're all just like oh I love when they do that. So that's an old real world trick when they were like and your trip is Argentina. And then when you're going to Yugoslavia of Lia ship and then Eliah whoever you guys remember got sent over love you assault was your map from nineteen eighty seven. It was not Yugoslav anymore shows now respect Croatia Vania. I actually did that on purpose so that I wasn't offending occurrence country. Okay didn't want to get cancelled. Elias shows back up and ask him out of fashion that lived in Yugoslavia. You guys are missing. The most part Alaya showed up. She got home last week so she's not on. The show actually had death squads that that executed people that were fighting against Nazis. So this is kind of a pattern for you in today's episode absorb get Alaya. Who got sent home last week? Shows back up and ask Peter to let her come back in and he did The other girls. That are pissed at Pete Heat and some threatened to leave so is this an empty threat or they actually goal-bound. I don't know this is like a union situation. The the rest are unionizing. Potentially that's that's what it sounds like. Well I mean the whole show is about roses so they're probably LDS say true. I don't get that joke but I I get I bet you it was a good one. Yeah you've probably really noticing roses on twitter. The twitter now. You actually haven't God that's it. Okay great I mean. That's the worst last. But that's a pretty every clip number. What happened Eliah

Charles Els Woodson Chase Rice Yugoslavia Chase Rice Charles Woodson Twitter Cleveland Browns Stadium Pete Heat Cleveland Rice Eliah Victoria Hanford Dixon Victoria F Elias Josh Cribs Chris Football Argentina Assault Peter
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Of pressure off and on the spouse and family once Yugoslavia got into civil war my family left in my eyes so I was there by myself so that no we didn't have to worry about that but don't force rate is very high so is do you feel that hi how long have you been out of the agency I will I last stop working for them when the troops left Iraq in two thousand eleven do you ever think that maybe if some foreign whoever looking for you is there still a price on your head you know I wouldn't want to end up in a rainy and controlled territory against the way I'm still on their watch list that could mention that in the book when I overflight Iran and rejected by always we don't have an emergency landing in Iran for you know the words all right I probably shouldn't go to Cuba and I probably should go to Russia just just to be safe nice with that we will let you go the book as Americans bite right reflections of my career in the C. I. A. H. K. Roy thank you for talking to us that's fascinating stuff man thank you gentlemen I appreciate it very much there you go I was cool boss you got a man you gotta have stones of sin DM Aliso mana be awesome yeah I am in the radio whoever was the Iranians are looking to kidnap you to torture you because the Bosnians below yen I am about as real as it gets we feel like I'm really like I'd really have an impact on on the the country right in doing good things on the bad guy yeah before I came to work today I had a sandwich and a coke and that's IT my cholesterol might be in danger Robinette this third way does the death he'd probably tablespoons of butter as much danger as I put my eyes of in today and those guys in a war zone amazing what you got money from the U. C. L. traffic center you see health Westchester hospital nationally recognized for providing superior medical care and outstanding patient experiences heavy traffic thanks to an accident south seventy one above fields hurdle that one with injuries very heavy back up south seventy five south of town from Crittenden all the way back to north of the seventy one split that's due to some slow moving pothole repairs you've got a hit skip on Pippen at Compton an accident Martin Luther king near Dick Smith Wynton Rohtak Fleming and a broken down south on St Avenue near west eighth street we still got some street partial closures downtown to the partial building collapse for street closed between Walmart in elm fifth street closed between elm and race elm closed between third and fifth and race street closed between fifth and fourth and there are some heavy back ups in that area as well I'm rob Williams newsradio seven hundred WLW the forecast from a seven hundred WLW weather center for tonight mostly clear and forty for tomorrow partly cloudy and fifty nine it is fifty five now newsradio seven hundred WLW you've got the Gobbler we've got the game thanksgiving football triple header bears and lions NFC north showdown next the bills had a big challenge the cowboys top it off with a six and Val gets invited out in Atlanta thanksgiving game something to be thankful for Tuesday at noon on seven hundred W. well W. this holiday season with the festival of lights and walk.

Yugoslavia seven hundred W
UNs workplace mental health initiative addresses simmering issue

UN News

10:27 min | 2 years ago

UNs workplace mental health initiative addresses simmering issue

"Over half of all U N staff working field duty stations some of which have extraordinary stresses that need to be faced every day that's from Fabrizio Hawks child the UN Assistant Secretary General Full Strategic Coordination who spent thirty years working engineering the first anniversary of its Workplace Mental Health Strategy which Mr Hall Style said is challenging the Tabu addressing mental health issues in an view with UN news is Natalie Hutchinson he explained why the UN launched the initiative to address concerns from headquarters in New York to the world's conflict zones I think this has been an issue that's been simmering away in the Organization for for a very long time but if I can be frank I didn't think has been adequately acknowledged I didn't think its importance until just over a year ago was was fully acknowledged and I think a number of things Fortuitous circumstances came together I think there was very strong leadership from the medical service that was aware that there was never growing number of people with with challenges coming and then we have a secretary general who has a very very strong interest in modern and interest very strong commitment to due to the issues and from what I recall there was also a survey that was that was carried out that got very strong participation from staff and based on the survey that it was done it appeared that UN staff or somewhere like twice as vulnerable to to UH non UN staff to mental strains which is not surprising given the circumstances we work in so I think the the approach was is fed by a survey but it was the consents go back very far but I think finally thanks to the medical service and thanks to the leadership of the of the secretary general they'd crystallized into a strategy the plots a meaningful way forward on the the statistic of UN Person now being twice as vulnerable to mental health issues is is that because there are so many personnel in the field doing humanitarian work in being exposed to conflict compromising situations or is it the organization at large what over Hoffa stuff depending which parts of the UN Yukon but in the I pretended over half the stuff is now in field duty stations and some of those field ut stations have absolutely extraordinary stresses yes I mean in Mogadishu attacks on staff a part of the landscape and their regular there and the preventive measures that are taken and in Iraq some years ago you went allowed to move out of your office space or your you're sleeping Ace without wearing a helmet and flak jacket and carrying a flight kit so the measures that are taken to predict off often themselves bring about an extraordinary level of stress not to speak of the attacks that stuff may be subject to but it's not I think staff in certain duty stations subject to extraordinary levels of stress potential trauma but I think was surprising in the survey for correctly is that there were also very high levels of stress at many headquarters locations and I think you know there are stress factors even in peaceful locations that should not be disregarded it's sometimes in the the work that sometimes the UN work we have to try and reconcile the views of many stakeholders often those fields not reconciling lable were subject to many contradictory precious if I can if I can be very candidate the level of stuff support team support supervisors support is very very throughout the organization Working in a in a multicultural multinational he's Asian brings many benefits but it also it also brings stresses so I think we we we have to acknowledge we work in extraordinary environments it even in headquarters locations and we have to be much more attentive to what this does to the well being off of our staff and I say that because we were employed to help others that is the heart of our role our role is help those who suffer from deficits and peace and security deficits in human rights deficits in access to development and we should never lose sight of that we're not here and if we're not functioning well as individuals and functioning well as teams so in that sense if we want to be optimal in terms of what we can do for others making sure that were were in in good spirits quite literally is is tremendously important and I think the strategy is no magic wand but the very fact that the profile of the issues being raised in a very serious committed efforts to do more is step forward certainly this idea of helping personnel helping ourselves so we can help others what are some of the key ways that the strategy is tackled these issues I think one big part of the strategy which is absolutely critical is just making it permissible to talk about these things to addressing some of these issues is making it permissible for people to talk about some of the stresses they're under and being liberated do that in itself is a big held and at the same time is also boosting access to counseling opportunities for those that need it for example I think now that that there's a move to introduce tele counseling which means that people will have access to formal counseling opportunities having more preventive approaches but where prevention fails as as it will often in extreme circumstances we work making sure that people have better access to counseling and when necessary treatment so how has this changed since your experience thirty or so years ago in former Yugoslavia when you were working in the field how has addressing mental health changed I I think it's changed radically if I think back to the mid ninety s both former Yugoslavia for example the Great Lakes region you could barely speak about grit your teeth and get on with it I the Congo and after there was the refugee influx into Congo from Rwanda after the genocide Sir was every day to go through the camps and to supervise the collection of dead bodies and there were it was taken aback by the very thought that was in the early ninety s I think by the time of the Haiti earthquake two thousand and twelve jumping the trauma that arose I was dealt with Colleagues in two thousand eleven after there was an attack I'm an pathetic but at the same time even now there's still a lot of stigma we've come a long way but we still have quite far to go

Thirty Years
Kashmirkashmir And Pakistan discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Kashmirkashmir And Pakistan discussed on World News Analysis

"You're listening to the panel discussion of the world today with me. Let's go back to our panel on the current situation in kashmir region so pakistani augustan the prime minister imran. Ken house visited pugs. Dan administered kashmir amid the ongoing tensions with india during the independence day can has threatened to coat teach adelie a lesson and avowed to fight until the end against any indian violations in disputed kashmir or yugoslavia to pakistan. Go put up india as your plan to attack on pakistan administered kashmir once again. I warn you get ready. We are fully prepared to respond. The time has come when we

Kashmir Pakistan India Prime Minister Ken House DAN Yugoslavia
News in Brief 17 July 2019

UN News

03:12 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 17 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. More corporations needed to secure the arrest of fugitives charged with war crimes such as genocide said the U._N.. Prosecutor forts known as the international residual mechanism for criminal tribunals says bromate's told security city council members on Wednesday the first priority is office remains to quickly wrap up the trials and appeals of alleged war criminals from the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and genocide against tootsie in Rwanda which fall under the mechanisms jurisdiction with eight people still on the. Run he said that we're not yet. Receiving the corporation needed to secure arrests will he noted a general lack of national capacity in the difficulties of tracking down international fugitives in the mocking the twenty fifth anniversary of the genocide against the tootsie and others Mr Brennan said the victims of waited for too long for justice with some fugitives remaining a threat to international peace and security today we will utilize all tools available to us to address the challenges we face he said including former reports of non-cooperation cooperation to the Security Council if needed expressing deep concern of a how migration and migrants themselves are being politicized and scapegoated in Hungary and independent U._N.. Human Rights expert on Wednesday urged the government to immediately end its crisis approach to the. Issue migrants arbitrators dangerous enemies in both official and public discourses said Felipe Gonzalez Morales the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights of migrants in a statement released following the end of an official visit he called on Hungary to reevaluate Erato current reality in relation to migration terminate immediately the so-called crisis situation and lift relevant restrictive measures he edged the government to reassess its security oriented narrative when it comes to migrants and move towards a human rights based approach coach adding that security concerns could not justify human rights violations to Geneva where indigenous peoples from around the world gathered on Wednesday to discuss how to protect their unique cultures and traditions in the face of challenges including climate. Change from Cornelia in the Russian Federation which is home to nearly two hundred different ethnic groups Alexi psychotic told you a news how warmer global temperatures had threatened centuries old practices the snow's melting earlier earlier and I remember when I grew up in my childhood dates we had snow already in October. Now have snow only in December December sometimes when January and it impacts legs for example the ice on the lakes and efficient it Kim box forestry it impacts digits people's hunting and many other ways of life which indigenous peoples exercise in addition to the threat from climate change Mr Psychotic who's from the sense of support of indigenous peoples in Karelya maintains that.

Security Council Hungary United Nations Mr Brennan Felipe Gonzalez Morales Russian Federation Prosecutor Official Cornelia Alexi Yugoslavia Bromate KIM Geneva Karelya Twenty Fifth
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"A Yugoslavia so you're slob and us a sweet sweet right they're the ones that are dominating and they don't have great personalities now it's so it does does nothing to entice you but my point was it were missin like a group an unbelievable what I've ordered through tennis fans aren't yeah tennis fans aren't there enjoying every second of a true historically they know where this rates true but it doesn't hit like the top of shows you know what I mean that is what either reinvent the wheel as she ended the day and this is not legally stated yes I hear ya but I'll give we're in the business of of of generating reaction and passion and revenue dollars for tennis we will be in this business true we just would have our jobs right and there'd be no first take the beetle skipping should you won't be debating tennis people don't care now I needed to hear well we can get the care of the appreciated you know I mean well the accomplishments are amazing and that's what we're not appreciated yeah but I I know about twenty two more July's them I just I don't I don't I mean I feel like when there's an open like with it with it with is a golf major but a lot of people since about golf to not but okay think about not that they're out were sporting competition right but just take sports center think about them and I know of course they have Wimbledon I understand all that of course the Cary tennis I know yeah but you can just see the resources that they use the you know even their belt like what he's doing his night show he will ready we came from the golf channel so maybe that's part of the answer there but they will carry over the Gulf conversation the entire week it will even believe into areas where they don't wear wear it out global shouldn't tennis doesn't Wimbledon's on Wimbledon's off back to sports center all right let's get back as soon next that's it yeah it's like the credit in because they have to well because it's it can because they generate some money for sure and it's an unbelievable accomplishment that we're witnessing you know what I mean I'm a starkly just coloring the sport of tennis yeah I don't I don't dispute that I yeah I here's what I want to know where's all the devout tennis fans I don't I mean where are they I I would say about hero great I just don't I don't don't seem all social media maybe I'm not following the fall of the wrong people I mean you do it mentally coming from a golf guide a good golf yours guy clearly but golf destroys tennis I think you're in our coverage say this lesson and I'd stay in the United States also think it's actually misrepresented how popular golf is versus tennis internationally we could branch into that what I want to know maybe we can we can get to this coming up next because for years everybody's told me golf is too expensive social economically doesn't match yeah take six hours of play around check check check okay then you can get any half half as tennis racket find a wall in a bowl I mean you could play technology could play tennis match in thirty minutes but you can have a volley in thirty minutes go home and it's actually engaging and fun I notice book for all the things used against golf in keeping it you know behind the NFL the NB eight certainly ball hockey but you know where where it didn't well it's below baseball too all the things that people use against golf too low rate on the pecking order of importance or relevance actually support it is but yet tennis doesn't elevate that's and they've got inherent advantages they should and I don't know why that's the case I don't either a five five two one two forty two twenty seven also I'm gonna get this low but here because you know historically if the three players that we're watching now truly are.

Yugoslavia tennis thirty minutes six hours
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Region which I think is where I don't know that it's probably near Yugoslavia okay we also have put two in New Guinea as a four point eight that's not popping New Guinea it's Papa Papa New Guinea is that how you say it I tug always heard it well okay then is Papa New Guinea even though it's spelled P. A. P. you a here my deck islands region has a five point five earthquake other earthquakes around the world we know today though yes Sir okay Ecuador the Flores sea Pacific Antarctic region had a five point two south of Bali Indonesia four point six that a stroll region another four point nine they've had several years of five point three they've had several already in the last why I'd say five hours so it there are earthquakes happening all over the world wherever there are fault lines yeah that's where they're happening here is one of three point on the Canary Islands do you think this is the start of the end the which now at the start of the question I know it's a you had it's a question right well I gotta ask but it's not well you don't know hi you're right I think you know what if there is a huge huge earthquake yeah outside of Las Vegas do you wonder is that the start of when California finally falls off into the ocean like alone is our inter phone that's not going to for years he free movies if the huge one happened on the San Andreas fault right isn't that the one that they say could just sever California right off yes they do say that well or is that just the movies it's just they say that though don't they say they're going to call up and catastrophic problems but no one in that has any type of scientific training can prove or will even admit that it's going to fall off in the ocean people who get who get the isis people who get scared when of their kid jumps out from behind the the closet door and says blue are the ones who say but it's going to California is going to crack right order fall right in the ocean so that's how you know have a kid go jump out and then if they jump and you say oh you're gonna believe California I got I got swampland for you in Florida by an a bridge in Brooklyn that's for sale out up in waters and so that's what was give me no good okay three oh two in the morning oh my gosh that means it's time to say Chicago stories told twenty four seven on seven twenty WGN Chicago smart speaker users just a play WGN radio on tune in here's the news now with Roger better she mostly cloudy seventy six at o'hare speaking of that earthquake in California a seven point one reading on the Richter scale overnight and that was on the heels of a six point four earthquake on July fourth the seven point one quake hitting southern California Friday night could be felt between a lady in Los Vegas including the location of that fourth quake as we mentioned penny Harvey who lives in trona which is not too far from the epicenter of this quake says everything that didn't break Thursday broke on Friday and she says the after shock is still happening just keep just keeps coming not as bad of course as the quake but I next to scare you you don't know what's coming next there have been dozens of aftershocks ranging anywhere from three point all all the way up to five point five since that seven point one quake happened about ten thirty I in Chicago time in local news more than thirty people have been arrested in connection with an incident at navy pier were seventeen people were injured in a stampede following the fourth of July fireworks display right the security office number sign in navy pier signal a possible active shooter and begin the cost of the product itself into the ground Chicago is to put a patrol police saying.

New Guinea Yugoslavia five hours
Europe's Balkan dilemma

FT World Weekly

14:18 min | 2 years ago

Europe's Balkan dilemma

"Today, we're looking at the Balkans, an area that dominated international attention twenty years ago after the wars in Bosnia and Kossovo. But it slipped from the headlines in recent years. Joining me to discuss the region, and at some certain prospects are the T euro penatta, Ben home, an Fokin correspondent, Valerie Hopkins. Ben the F T this morning described the Balkans as the most volatile region in Europe. Why would he say that? Because historically, it has been a region that has been full tired of by competing power blocks. You know, the ultimate empire the Austro-Hungarian empire the Russian empire and that has left kind of overlapping, national, and ethnic and religious divisions. And we are still living with the legacy of that, and sort of overlaid by an incomplete transition to democracy and the rule of law after communism and. Then probably on top of all of that you have corruption. It's deeply rooted. So Ben before we continue. Let's just define the region. How big is it? And how significant so we're talking about the western Balkans region roughly twenty million people about the population of the Netherlands, but with a really tiny economy, about the size of Slovakia's. And we're talking about Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herzegovina Albania, north Macedonia, and Kosovo, of course. So it's a pretty small number of people with a pretty small combined GDP. It's not significant, but it's always been a source of instability as we've known for the last century. Valerie, Ben referred to this as a kind of incomplete process and some of the countries in the regions, maybe all of them have hurt. The delta Modeste nation will be joining the EU I'm thinking, particularly of north Macedonian Albanian, but they're finding very hard. Yes. Well, that's true. They've been hoping to join but also the e u has been hoping for them to join I mean for the first time this was articulated in two thousand three in there. I e you some. In Thessaloniki, all of the countries of the western Balkans were promised a credible path to accession we're given unequivocal support from the Member States and one year ago after north miss Adonia and underwent quite comprehensive changes north Macedonia, to its name, and two other reforms and L Bainian committing to a very onerous judicial reform were promised that they would get a green light this year. And as we saw yesterday that decision was punted again, for a couple of months, at least until October and from their point of view, how much of a disastrous. Well, it's quite a big disaster. I mean, enormous Adonia which recently changed its name in order to end a decades long conflict with Greece over their name, which Athens believed implied territorial desire over the Greek region of the same name, the whole public support for the agreement and public support for the government is riding on the guarantees towards progress towards the EU that are written into that. So north Macedonia, has moved forward in terms of its NATO membership. Several countries, I think, have already ratified the NATO accession protocol for them. But, you know, the European Union membership is what the public really wants and at a certain point, it may become untenable for the leaders of the country to stay in power if they can't deliver on what was promised them, and that would be a disaster for them. And for Europe. Yeah. Mean Ben you've been pretty critical of the youth decision. What's the argument for saying the eaves being sources that it had a unique? Novo paternity to put these two countries move firmly on the path of judgement. EU rules values and sort of binding them into the EU orbit, we have to remember that sort of enlargement process. If you just put aside the various problems that we've experienced over the is in the grand sweep of history. It's been a remarkable success for the EU it stabilized the region, it's brought prosperity and it's dissolved the division between eastern western Europe and the argument just to recap for those who don't totally recall took the EU from what fifteen countries to now. Twenty eight to twenty eight. Yeah. And so, in argument is probably the most effective European Union foreign policy, and it has helped put countries on the right path, and stabilize democracy and promote reform and promote the rule of law. But perhaps there are now plenty of people in the EU think we've reached the end of that process and the legacy problems from previous enlargements have come back to haunt the EU. Maybe the enlargement the accession process was not rigorous. Enough. And so now there are plenty of people who are having second thoughts about it. Yeah. And I mean just to play devil's advocate, I suppose if you are European politician, you will say, well, sure the future of these countries matters, but as he was saying Elliott's twenty million people in the, you have the rise of populists across Europe and places like France, the Netherlands, Britain's voted for Brexit. And it doesn't appear that accession to countries like, oh, near is popular. So perhaps that wise, not to do it quite possibly. But I mean, I think the calculation has to be how long can you keep these countries on the path to accession without ever actually giving them accession at the end of the day? And that solvency something that the EU has tried with Turkey and it's backfired arguably spectacularly, although you could also blame premise, Erta one, perhaps originally topper one for the kind of backsliding in democracy, and the sort of drift away from the European mainstream, in Turkey, but I mean that is clearly the calculation it would be good for Europe if. If Albany could be put on the path to membership even if it never actually meets the criteria to join fully, and you mentioned Obama. Valerie back from there. Give us a description of where the country is in terms of its economy, and its politics because when I was growing up out, mania was like the most isolated place. It was North Korea Europe. And the idea that it might even be close to joining the paean union in some ways, seems miraculous. Well, indeed, it is. And it's quite far off. But I think, you know, to build on what Ben said many Member States have grown tired of the process and have learned that they need to impose further and further restrictions. We see that many of the countries that have joined in recent decades still have problems with their judicial systems. So we're talking countries like Romania Bulgaria, yes, Hungary. If I may say, so the conditions and the demands that Brussels and the Member States have made on countries, which are hoping to join have actually become much more onerous Albania, my story that I did while I was in Toronto was about the extremely onerous. Writing process that all judges, and prosecutors are being subjected to which has left. The country's supreme court with only two judges. One of them I think is being vetted this week. So it may have only one judge so far, only one judge survived because the two tional court, I believe, has only one judge, which is actually quite stabilizing, on the political. See now as the parliament has moved to impeach the president for calling early elections. And no one in the court can judge on this. I don't wanna get too deep into their politics. But I would like to say to that Albanian has also accepted to host the first FrontEx mission FrontEx being the US Border police agency because during the two thousand fifteen migrant crisis, the EU sort of realized woke up and remembered that actually all of these countries in the Balkan route are inside of Europe that if you have weak states week, police weakens to, to Sion's at that will have consequences for the security and safety of the rest of the block. So there should be more interest in improving those institutions and the best way to do it all. Of the academic work that's been done in the Balkans shows that the carrot of enlargement, and of a real credible accession path is the best way to inspire reforms, but how is the economy doing? And how connected is opening to the rest of Europe, now compared to those days of isolation. I mean silly, anecdote but, you know, I come across our Bainian in London now buildings around the corner. So to some extent, they seem to have been integrated little bit. Well, absolutely. I mean, quite a significant portion of Albanians left the country in the nineties jobs, better opportunities. And I think it's rare to meet now lenient who doesn't speak at least two or three languages. But now, people are coming back business ties between mania and especially Italy, Switzerland UK are very strong and the economy's growing, I think actually in the Balkans. The economies are growing much faster than the EU average about four five percent. They still have a long way to go to catch up, but there's quite a lot of vitality and what about this issue of organized crime, which is thrown at all the countries in the Balkans. But I think particularly. Albania for those sitting in Brussels or elsewhere, saying, do we really want country in that condition inside the EU, how serious is the problem? Well, it is a serious problem. And it you know, it also goes to show that again you can't separate the Balkans. Even with the Albania or north as Donio, anyone not being inside of the EU criminals will always find a way to engage in their activity. It seems to me in some of my discussions with police dodges prosecutors that sometimes this threat is overblown. For instance, the Dutch parliament, several weeks ago passed a Bill asking their government to withdraw visa-free travel for all Baynes, dude organised crime. And then when you go and inject a Dutch officials, they say actually, this is not necessarily for violent crime. A lot of people are trying to get on both. Maybe they're trying to come to the UK but actually they're not necessarily being arrested for trafficking in drugs, or persons Ben turning to the other country. We were talking about north Macedonia that I suppose, makes the point that this is also still an issue. To some extent, war and peace. I mean they had extremely tense relations with Greece for sometime. Yes. They have done over the dispute over the name after the collapse of the former Yugoslavia. And that, of course, has prevented Macedonia, north Macedonia is now 'cause integration into the Atlantic community, the NATO. So I mean, it really was a huge that Ford when Zorn's Iovan Alexis, it press the Greek premier achieve this deal, and it still highly contentious in Greece. And we have a general election next month in Greece, where you are likely to see the return of a center, right? New democracy led government and new democracy has been very, very critical of the naming deal with north Macedonia. It remains to be seen whether they will actually go as far as to block their entry, but I suspect Athens will be a lot less accommodating in the future than it has been over the last couple of years. And if I recall correctly at the time, there was some evidence, which the Cyprus government acted on the Russian espionage Intel. Emergence agencies trying to stoke up opposition to the north Macedonia settlement does that raise. Also, I suppose a subsidiary issue, but crucial one which affects Europe's judgment, which is that to the extent that this area is not integrated with the rest of the EU becomes the sort of floating space. And there is no evidence that not just the Russians but also the Turks and even the Chinese are taking an interest in the western Balkans. Absolutely. I suspect it's possible to maybe overplay, the extent of Russian influence, although it has been substantial an acute in some places such as the authentic your and Montenegro and this attempt to stoke up resistance to the referendum on the name changed Illinois with Macedonia, which the Greeks are pro Russian country, actually expelled him Russian diplomats accusing the spine. The Turks are obviously increasingly involved in Bosnia to governor, and Albanian in Kosova, and the. Please spot an opportunity to extend their influence through commerce and through infrastructure spending. So, yeah, we're replaying centuries of history where this region has been kind of plaything for the great powers. And of course, I suppose it's easier for Europe to ignore to the extent that these above Ling cute problems, but lots of problems as long as it doesn't actually break out into violence. Now I mentioned at the beginning of the program that the broad or can region. We were at war twenty years ago is there danger of the old conference coming bubbling back. Or is it more that we're talking about serious, but subsidiary issues of people flows economic crises organized crime, and so on, is there danger of real all while I think you'd be foolish to rule out the danger of a return to conflict in this area in the sense that forty years ago, you might have done the same thing but history has shown how quickly this place can erupt into. James, and I suspect that remains although I'm sure it has reduced in the last ten twenty years, and there is more at stake for the region's inhabitants. If they have a clear path to e membership, which will bring guarantees of security, and better economic prospects. And the end of the day, I have the firm feeling that it's often corrupt politicians who have their own economic interests at heart, who are perpetuating the kind of ethnic divisions in this region. More than popular convictions. And Valerie euro correspondent on the ground. So how stable or unstable does it seem to you? Well, I do agree with Ben that seemingly innocuous crisis can escalate. And I think that in most of the countries, you really do have this kind of boiling, the frog situation where I is correspondent struggle with sometimes seemingly small jumps in a story, actually could carry larger consequences later. But I think rather than conflict, the major risk is just that the country will empty out with people losing hope. That they will be able to create a better life for their children and grandchildren. For instance, in Bosnia, which is a population of three and a half million in the last three or four years. I think two hundred thousand people left since January some thirty thousand people have already left the country. And that's when I talked to people, it's really a matter of losing hope that they will join the European Union and have a better life. So these countries will suffer catastrophic demographic decline. And western Europe will find if they didn't integrate them, they'll show up on the doorsteps. Well, many of them, actually are getting jobs in western Europe, which are empty, you know, these are educated workers doctors dentists health worker, social workers, so it's not the same as migrant crisis. Most of them are going legally with work permits, but they're leaving their home countries for good. Okay. We'll, we'll have to leave it. Thank you very much indeed, to buttery Hopkins in the studio and to Ben holes. Well that's it for this week until next week. Goodbye.

Europe European Union BEN Macedonia Bosnia North Macedonia Greece Nato Albania Valerie Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herze Netherlands Athens Valerie Hopkins Brussels Kosovo Adonia Slovakia Member States North Korea
"yugoslavia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"You might not know this week marks the seventy four th anniversary of victory in Europe. When the allied forces, formally accepted, the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany and their so called invincible army while we traditionally recognize the day is having occurred on may eighth nineteen forty five the German surrender was officially signed at twelve sixteen A M on the morning of may ninth. It was then back dated to the previous day. But here's something unusual was actually the second time Germany, and surrendered the first surrender came on may seventh and the French city of Reims with the German army surrounded by US and British forces supreme allied commander. Dwight Eisenhower demanded Germany off of their immediate, simultaneous and unconditional surrender on all fronts Hitler's successor called donuts authorized, the surrender Hitler was dead by that time, which was signed by general. Alfred yodel at two forty one central European taught I vividly describe that scene in my book killing patent the Soviet Union. However claim that the surrender was illegitimate because it failed to explicitly require German soldiers to lay down their arms. The Russians demanded another signing beheld in Berlin. And presided over by the Red Army supreme commander, not wanting to offend Stalin and the Soviets general Eisenhower agreed the less than forty eight hours later, the German signed the second and final act of unconditional surrender along with representatives from the USA Soviet Union, France and Great Britain. So that was it the war in Europe finally over more than fifty million debt. Well, almost over in Yugoslavia in a tiny village called doc their Yugoslav partisans fought against the. Independent state of Croatia. The final shots of that battle fired on may twenty fifth seventeen days after the day. So all Americans are busy celebrating the defeat of the third right on may eighth. It was a little premature for the Yugoslav partisans was still fighting against Hitler's minions weeks later for closer look at the last days World, War, Two two books healing patent and my latest killing the SS. I think you will enjoy them right back. But I I have been telling you about a first time buyer in Texas now, I want to show you.

Germany Dwight Eisenhower Hitler Europe supreme allied commander Soviet Union Red Army US Alfred yodel USA Soviet Union Yugoslavia Reims Texas Croatia commander Berlin Stalin donuts France Britain
North Macedonia, Pope Francis And Skopje discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

North Macedonia, Pope Francis And Skopje discussed on BBC World Service

"Pope Francis has just rival north Macedonia that the start of the brief visit. It's the first pope since the country gained independence from Yugoslavia mother. Teresa one of the most renowned figures multi-culturalism was born in Skopje now north Macedonia's

North Macedonia Pope Francis Skopje Multi-Culturalism Yugoslavia Teresa
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of Yugoslavia. All of these nations were formed or reformed in the twenty first century. That's new they are t more or less than two thousand two months. Negra in Serbia in six Kozovo, eight some nations still disputed status, but here on says you their nation. Smell. Tony. Yes. Ronnie the raccoon Ronnie the raccoon powder the snowshoe hare. Snowshoe hares. First name powder was. Powder. No. Here. Go the wolf. Call the wool quasi the Susquehanna. What she the SaaS Quat? And Schnee Mun the snowman Neeman thus snowman. Well, I guess these are all. Second or third country names for regional American produced creatures, for instance, in Mexico, the word Tondo means stupid. So lone ranger could not have stupid as companion. So they call them. I believe Sobral. So I'm Suming perhaps similar reasons these creatures were renamed by in the country, or they all at one point lead the KGB. Not sure about that second one. But the first one isn't quite right. Does it have to do with the Olympics? It certainly does does it have to do with these guys being mascots for the Olympics which.

Ronnie Olympics Schnee Mun Yugoslavia Serbia KGB Susquehanna Mexico two thousand two months
"yugoslavia" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on 710 WOR

"At one eight hundred three to one zero seven ten and speaking of that it wants to go out of this man, he was born in Yugoslavia former Yugoslavian I've seen him so many times because he brings all his friends and neighbors to me for years for ten years. He's been bringing his friends and neighbors to me, and this is seventy nine year old, man. And finally he comes for himself. He came for himself. Why why seventy nine years old born born in Montenegro Yugoslavia, he has two children. He fifteen years ago had cryotherapy at one of the big hospitals and had hormone shots and cryotherapy Kreil therapies Latin word freezing therapy. And since that time since the cryotherapy erections have seized, and he's had trouble urinating and his PSA's. Has been rising keeps on rising and rising and rising and rising and rising, and it's already up to twelve point six and the cancer is back. Why do we know that while we know that because number one after successful treatment of prostate cancer, the PSA should be zero like, Johnny brags? We have a new radio attitude about all the numbers that affect his life. The numbers that are important to him in the biggest numbers zero his PSA is zero. That's what the PSA should be after successful treatment. Well, this man sad to say had cryotherapy at one of the big hospitals of the doctor didn't tell them that. That's not really a primary treatment of prostate cancer. So he got bamboozled into cryotherapy, and we see many men who've had cryotherapy it just doesn't work, and it causes side effects like this man where his erections have been gone and urinary function has. Pez worsened. So he came to us with this high PSA, we up see them to prove that it's cancer and he had a biopsy proven aggressive cancer. So again, the at a high PSA the high Gleason score PSA is the blood tests. Gleason score is how the cancer looks at the microscope and he's on treatment. Now doing great fully functional intact doing everything he wants to do I've met his two sons. Of course, I told his sons that they should get checked out for prostate cancer. Because the dad has it. He's the first degree relative..

prostate cancer Yugoslavia Montenegro Yugoslavia Gleason Johnny seventy nine years seventy nine year fifteen years ten years
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:43 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KCRW

"Sorry. I forgot about grandma and Yugoslavia. And I just started like taking in all of the things around me. And my mom said, wow. It's as clean as a pharmacy. Which is what we say in Serbian when a place is clean, and I had to agree with her. It was like we had been plopped into one of the Disney films that my dad used to get from me on the black market. And then she said you could eat off the floor, and I had to agree like I felt like actually doing it. I felt like getting on my body and kind of like sliding across the beautiful gleaming tiles. I wanted to jump on the escalators and travel up and down singing and dancing to the the beautiful music. That was playing everywhere that that we went. It was I was kind of amazed that no one else was marveling in the way that where you were. And my mom said look all kids, and I looked around and actually everywhere like every few steps there were these beautiful flowers growing out of plant is and I realized that my life, you know, that the world was his big and beautiful place, and that I had been confined to the small grey corner of it up until now and everything smell like perfume and copying my mother. I put my wrist out and these beautiful Singaporean woman in a suit like spritz does with perfume. And we walked around looking at these like youthful glass fronted stores that had this like beautiful colorful Powell in them. And there were these massive screens everywhere and on the screens. They were ads for all the latest stuff that you get like entertainment systems and shoes and Walkmans, and then add came up that just stopped me dead in my tracks and on the screen there is this ad. And there were these little kids about my age, and they're all like laughing and having this great time while this tiny, gorgeous squiggly, worm toy just like wriggles around everywhere. And ours is watching these add an up close the worm like its face is really beautiful appointee. And it has little Gregory is and his like soft pink for and it's the most amazing thing I've seen and apparently at that moment. My mother becomes an immediate convert to consume a culture because she grabbed my hand, and we macho over to the currency exchange counter, and she slams down who Yugoslavian Dina's get some dollars. We're going to a store and she buys me the worm. Now, this is pretty unheard of. I worry that if my dad had been there would have been like an argument between them they would have been a discussion about money, and how we didn't have much and how we were moving to a whole new country that was expensive. But we just asked there. My mother doesn't even look at the price tag. She just gets the worm and buys it for me. And on the plane. I'm trembling with excitement I'm not thinking about grandma anymore. Any of that stuff that has happened in the past? I'm just thinking about how as soon as we take off. I get to urban this box and the worms comes in in this little round box. And I open it up, and it's kind of coiled inside, and I touch it. And it's it's I feels like the softest feathers. And I wish to it in like one of the three English words that I know so I say girl girl, and I expect it to kind of come to life and start wriggling. Around like in the ad and my mom's kind of looking at me with these weird expression. Because I guess she thought that I was smart. As she explains to me that the worm is in fact alive, but that it has this little invisible string that's attached to it. And that's how it merged around as a once. I get the hang of this does actually move around and this adorable way that it had had done on the ad. And when I get the hang of it, I kind of get the attention of this little boy across the aisle in the plane, and I stick my arm out. And I make the worm crawl up it, and he watches, very solemnly suitably impressed. And I think this is pretty pretty amazing. Like, I decide I'm going to carry this little worm around in my pocket, like a gorgeous these secret I start to think about my life in a stray leeann, I think maybe the kids will love me. I imagine this beautiful classroom with these little kids. I imagine them saying to each other. Well, how did you see that new magic girl, and I'll be standing there with my worm? Then you kid on the block. And on the plane. I practice the three English words Einars, girl and howler and tomorrow. And I think this is the start of my new life. And I think that we can get great. It's a pretty good start main. While my mother, she puts her around my shoulders, and she wipes tears from horizon looks out the window as we travel further and further away from our little world cut to the present day. I'm in my new harm in New York pregnant, having another consumer experience in which basically I'm being sold things left right and center, and I'm panicking because I think that I'm not going to be a good mother in advance that if I'd buy like a machine that hates up but wipes for babies, or if I don't buy this special memorial with elephants that speak in French and saying. And the more. I'm stressing about this. I suddenly remember the best toy that I ever had which was the worm. Right. So while I've got my computer in front of me, and I grew goal magic fuzzy worm and it comes up immediately. And I remember when I first this worm. It was like the best thing that I had seen in my entire life. And now I feel very confronted because his image that has come up in front of me, the worm looks really crap. Like, it just looks like this piece of matted fuzz with this piece of fishing wire coming off it, and he's little is that has stuck on. We'd like bits of glory coming off the side of them and the images so disturbing to me that I don't even know what to do with it. I I'm really upset by it. Sorry. I immediately pick up the foreign to call my mother in Tralee, even though it's the middle of the night. But this is an emergency. So I call her up and she picks up, and I say, hey, mom, do you. Remember that worm that you've got me at Singapore airport. And she says, of course, I do. And I say, well, I have just found it on the internet. And it looks really terrible. And I can't believe that I loved it so much and my voice does is involuntary wobble. Because I'm thinking about how much I loved the worm at the time. And how pathetic it all seems now. And there's a little pause and my mom says impossible. The worm that we got in. Singapore was wonderful. You must be looking at a completely different worm. And then I think back to that time. And I remember me here crying, and then Singapore airport and how impressed I was by this worm. And for the first time, I think about what it would have been like for my mother, and I realized that she was also leaving her whole world behind and we were travelling to a whole new country, a whole new language. She was leaving behind everyone grandma who happened to be her Ma and it must have been really frightening for her as well. But she she didn't let on she kept it together and even more than that, she managed to offer me a distraction and make me scared in Martin. And like even now decades later when I have called her is distressed adult who waddling around on the other side of the world. My mother is still trying to protect me by keeping the myth of the worm alive. And for some reason, I think of that Belinda Carlisle song somewhere in my heart. I'm always dancing with you in the summer rain. And I remember may at the airport, and my my young mother holding my hand. And I think about how when we got to Australia the kids didn't actually love me. Like, my my three words didn't really help me out much. I I got laughed at and I got bullied and kids called me stupid, and dummy and things like that. Because I couldn't speak English. And I know that I can't actually protect my future kid from the world. I come show that he'll get teased because you maybe he'll have big ears like his dad or he'll have a big noise. Like me. And there are plenty of far worse things that he's going to have to learn about in the world that I can't protect him from. But what I can do is offer some sort of protection in the form of that magic that. My mother often me. A way of saying the world as a wonderful place instead of just a frightening place. And I know that it works because somewhere in my heart that worm is still dancing like it did that day, and it is still the Moore's magical thing that I have seen. Thank you..

Singapore airport Disney Yugoslavia Walkmans Singapore Tralee Belinda Carlisle Dina Gregory Einars New York Moore Martin Australia
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the moth radio hour from PR axe. I'm Kathryn burns in this hour. We're talking about moments of occasional magic our final story as told by Sophia Stefanovic at the gorgeous, Saint Ann's church in Brooklyn heights. Via live if a off. Sir. I was five years old when I left Belgrade. My dad had left a couple of weeks before us. Sorry. It was just me, and my mother and my newborn system, and we relieving Yugoslavia and going around you harm in Australia with a fuel stop in Singapore. And at the airport. My grandma sandy I held my face in her hands. And she said you will never see grandma again. When my face crumpled at this. She said by way of consolation, that's because I'm very old, and I will probably die soon. Sir. The last time that we had been at the airport had been under happier circumstances. We were going for vacation in Croatia. But now there were tensions between the Republic of Croatia. And the Republic of Serbia where we were from and some people including my dad thought that there might even be a war, which is why instead of going for one hour to a place that we knew and loved we were picking up all of our things and traveling for about thirty hours to the other side of the world to start at lives again. And in the plane. I cried a lot just because of all grandma had said, but because I really liked my life up until then. I I really liked the little communal Yod where I would play with the kids from the surrounding buildings and I loved how in the winter Belgrade smelled like snore and cigarettes and chestnuts. And I love that family and friends live there. And I was scared about going someone you and so for the first half of the journey. I basically cried and vomited and pulled on my mother's slave while she tried to get my newborn sister sleep. And finally we landed for fuel stop in Singapore. And we kind of miserably trudged out of the plane. And hit the like, we went through this tunnel these air conditioned tunnel. And suddenly we were at Singapore airport. And that is the moment that my life as I knew it completely changed. So my first five years had been spent in socialist Yugoslavia, and I had loved it. But that's because I had never been to Singapore airport. And it was amazing. Welcome to capitalism. I realized that actually my whole life up until that had.

Singapore airport Singapore Belgrade Republic of Croatia Kathryn burns Yugoslavia Sophia Stefanovic Croatia Brooklyn heights Saint Ann Serbia Australia five years thirty hours one hour
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Here & Now

"The results of yugoslavia's well initially they were happy with the results but then hugo chavez immediately took actions to consolidate his authority he put forward a new constitution in nineteen ninety nine increase the presidential term limits changed the con- congress from being a bicameral to a unicameral body and put forward a number of of other measures he the oil is so important to venezuela ninety five percent of its export earnings come from oil exports and so the state oil company pay to pay was replaced with his political cronies one of the ways that hugo chavez was able to gain so much popularity especially among the lower class lower middle class was because of the multiple programs he put forward housing programs medical program and others using the windfall oil profits that venezuela generate at the time of really high oil prices back in the early two thousands oil obviously is still at the center of venezuela's economy is that something that makes it very different than the other countries in the region is that it's got these big oil reserves well you know venezuela is has the world's largest proven oil reserves and is completely dependent upon oil force for export earnings and what that is allowed as during the time of high low prices when hugo chavez was in power up until he passed away march twenty thirteen he was able to consolidate his thority because the state had so much money because the higher prices and he was able to use it to for corrupt purposes to buy off the loyalty of those in the military and other other political leads as well as then provides them programming for the less well off that they had never before experienced construction of houses giving giving out government jobs and that's thing he also took other actually took actions to limits the ability of the opposition to to organize he nationalized private sector companies there was an outflow private capital from venezuela during that time that hugo chavez is really consolidating his thority through the use of oil money and of course when the price of oil fell to the situation began to change dramatically in venezuela what about the relationship with the united states how has the u._s. shaped the history of venezuela back in two thousand two there was a brief coup against hugo chavez and there was a businessman pedro carmona who briefly took the office of the president he he he then went ahead and dissolve the the congress and a few other actions and at that time there was initially some tap it support from the united states for pedro carmona and then that type secretary rice than then walk back the the u._s. u._s. support there has long been an antagonistic relationship that dates back to president bush between reticent will and the united states hugo chavez always saw the united states as his nemesis and the anti appeal is on the anti u._s. mantra gained him so much more popularity not only among some in venezuela but he used the high oil prices of the early two thousands to try to expand vastly expand venezuela's reach in so far as creating a leftist block of countries that fundamentally were anti u._s. at at at the core so he was able to use hatred of the united states to gain popularity in venezuela and yet there are so many venezuelans who have fled the country to come to the united states yes there over three million venezuelans that have left the country after nicholas maduro took took power in april of twenty thirteen he defeated and recovery eliciting election that was not seen as wholly legitimate but wasn't as condemned as as the election that took place last may lower oil prices led to an ability to provide for the for the social classes by montereau and the and the the opposition to him grew fervently and that and that opposition was met by madero with repression with violence with locking up political prisoners in jail this has helped to get us to where we are today in venezuela where nicholas maduro has moved.

yugoslavia ninety five percent
"yugoslavia" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"But. I'm a Joe when it's out 'cause. Discuss. I'll get into. But it's still fiscal. Thank you. Dot com. Another spot. Stunning. Call me launch slide. Ego. Washington yugoslavia. Thank you. Maki? V. Happy. Now, you.

Joe yugoslavia Washington