35 Burst results for "Yugoslavia"

Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

KNX Evening News

06:02 min | 4 d ago

Russia Bounty Reports, U.S. Troop Movements Put Trump-Putin Relationship in Spotlight

"That he has never once broach the issue of Russia, placing bounties on the heads of American troops in Afghanistan with his counterpart Vladimir Putin. Then just hours later, he announces the complete withdrawal of U. S forces from Germany. And Hodges is a retired lieutenant general in the U. S Army and former commanding general for United States Army Europe based in Germany. Currently he is an analyst and scholar at the centre for European Policy Analysis. General. Thank you for joining us. Thanks for the privilege. So let's start with the last thing first. Which was the announcement from the White House about us troops out of Germany. Did that shock you? Well, it was a surprise when I heard it two months ago when it came out in a Wall Street Journal report that about 10,000 we're going to come out on days. Of course, it was also a shock to all of the U. S headquarters in Europe at the time, as well as our allies. On today. Of course, the number that we heard was closer to 12 hours. So they're apparently going to moves to other regions. What is the basis for having troops in these numbers in Germany in the first place? Once the original idea, and then how are the other countries there now reacting to this Well, keep in mind that the total number of Americans that are based in Germany's 34,000 That's about 12,000 Air Force in 22,000 army so That's probably about 1/3 of what could be seated in the Coliseum there in Los Angeles or some other major university stadium. It's not a lot of people, the primary function that they perform. Ah, commanding control, logistics, intelligence communications. Things that help the United States carry out our national security strategy in our defensive strategy in Europe, Africa in the Middle East, so anything, they're not. They're providing protection for Germany at all. They're there to give us Forward, basing that makes it easier for us to carry out our strategy. But am I correct general that the Russians were never exactly to put it mildly pleased that these air troops were in Germany and would be not at all disappointed that they're leaving. Well, no, This is just to the Kremlin because they've done nothing to change their behavior in a positive way. They still occupy Crimea illegally. They still are killing Ukrainian soldiers and done passed done Mass every week. Still occupied 20% of Georgia. They still support the Assad regime, which has generated millions of refugees and killed hundreds of thousands of their own people and their supporting general Haftar in Libya, which is going to generate another 1,000,000 refugees. Into Europe, so they've done nothing to change their behavior. And yet we reduce our capability and Germany by about 1/3 so to me that that again now We've had US troops in Germany since the end of World War two on some people have said. Well, why are they still there? The Cold War's over and I would say well because of US leadership and because of NATO. We've had no war in Europe for 71 years. I mean, that's actually since 1945. Don't do math in public 75 years. That's an incredible accomplishment. When you think of the history of Europe so Well, with the exception of the break up in Yugoslavia, all the nations of Europe that have found each other for centuries. Now, basically all of the same team in NATO What a huge benefit to the United States that are most important trading partner partner. The European Union is stable and secure, so this is for our benefit. Move on to the other part of this discussion. The time we have left the president not confronting Vladimir Putin about the bounties in the most recent phone call, they have, and then reportedly also other phone calls that they've had Knowing that everyone would be watching for this that people wanted something to be said. Yeah, I don't understand. Um, while the president is not more forceful and clear, because actually the acts of the department offense up until this terrible announcement today of the action Of this administration have actually increased in Europe. We have more troops in Germany today than we did under President Obama and everything that President Obama promised. Has been carried out by this administration. So there's a disconnect between what Is happening on the ground in Europe and in what the president says to be candid. I can't explain that when it comes to the reports of bounces, own troops head in Afghanistan. I was there for 15 months back in 2009 and 2010. As a brigadier general, I always assumed that the Russians wanted to see us fail to see us bleed because of our support for the mujahideen with the Soviet Union was in Afghanistan. But, um Wouldn't when the domain of Thailand from Pakistan into Afghanistan was cut off. The Russian's still allowed us to move supplies What we call the northern Supply line moving supply around. We were still able to move through Russia to get stuff in and out so they could have really hurt us if they want to. I suspect that this business about the bounty is probably at some local level some overeager person. I never thought the Taliban needed any motivation to kill Americans. The president could make this go away if he was much more clear about how he opposes the criminals. Technologists. Retired Lieutenant general US Army Former Commanding general for United States Army Europe Thanks the K Index in depth podcast you're going Get that for free

Europe Germany United States United States Army President Trump Vladimir Putin Afghanistan Russia Nato President Obama U. S Army Wall Street Journal U. S Analyst European Policy Analysis Taliban Hodges European Union
Slavoj Žižek - Slovenian Philosopher and Writer

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Slavoj Žižek - Slovenian Philosopher and Writer

"Guest. Today is a Slovenian philosopher and writer whose vast catalogue of work because earned him celebrity status across the globe, radical leftist, his work compasses, everything from psychoanalysis and political theory to art and film. Criticism Hegel in a wired brain evaluation of the German philosophers relevant in the twenty first century, tying in the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of his birth is his latest book. Saliva Jack Welcome to meet the rices. I'm here. Thanks very much. Now listen, you've been called the Elvis of cultural theory, the most dangerous philosopher in the West and I'm keen to know how you go from your birth in Louisiana through film studies and writing copy fat, but convince fit to this revered status in in the philosophical and academic world, so let's stop them in the former Yugoslavia. Tell us about your home. Life and the influence is there on you as as a child is an incredible story. Place Myself, but how might Chedda experiences in Oak Yugoslavia? We're really a blessing in disguise. I won't. At the university? Being attacked as after I finished my studies, I wasn't able to get a job, but after tutoring here so unemployment they put me into a research institute, which was basically opposed, gave me of the freedom of it was that she needs who dabbled and. So. You know is out of Communist was other the freedom that I needed I sat through. The West connections I in frowns then in the UK in United States, also another thing you can sign me communist kind but communism we don't opened walks the west, and I saw the big thing in my life was debt. Early seventies late sixties nineteen shakes ditch and I was in my studies. The scene was dominated in republic Slovenia by on drunken, fundamentalist on the other hand. Frank with school much then there was defense right of a disaster local. Rochon journalism and the younger generation immediately found a way that. Also Changed Yugoslavia was open towards the West. We didn't have any usuals in the sense of Oh my go- democracy we meeting. Everything will train usually about socialism, but also no illusions about Western democracies combat in an ideal. I, did so it's not me. It's also whole group of people. I was listening to lock you on, but now other sound following me getting international recognition. It was an incredible luck. You know when French asked me. What would you be if you were to get your boats? After finishing, your starts may honestly clear. I moved to an unknown professor in this fee. troll over country called. Slovenia own, It's not a joke. Thanks communist oppression I Orient Myself. The roads are I was I must admit this incredibly lucky. Tell me about your movie making stint shaky. Joe People think it's some kind of both modern joke and so on, but you know many of might be nervous so in the wrong I cannot walks myself. It's not a joke for more than half a minute on beverages guide overdose. Documentary movies that are made until note I am. To meet I shake, or my gestures especially soccer snow, because seeking all the time, so people can see me. The mathematically covet positive until if you don't get me, you have everything that you need to know.

Yugoslavia Frank Joe People Slovenia Hegel Louisiana Writer Soccer UK Professor United States
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

ESPN Daily

05:32 min | Last month

The Chess Grandmasters Extreme Workout

"I. How did you get on the chess? Beat in the first place? So I get really interested in these really need sports that. People are super invested in Ashwari. Kumar is an international features writer for Espn Lake if you're going to which. Of People Are Watching these chess tournaments that you wouldn't even know where that's happening in. Iceland. Or Finland, and so I had this curiosity so I was thinking so Bobby Fisher was such a huge part of chests in the US what Ron Labor is tennis. What Jack Nicklaus's to golf? That's what Bobby Fischer is to chess. Bobby Fisher of the United States will finally meet Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in Belgrade Yugoslavia, but the chess championship of the world plus a purse of one, hundred, thirty, eight, thousand five hundred dollars, the richest prize for a head-to-head confrontation in any sport, but boxing. So who is the next Bobby Fisher? So I went to Saint Louis last year to sort of figure out what is going on in the chess world, so saint Louis has sort of become this chess capital of the country. Let's start with the basics here. What is a chess grandmaster? And what does it take to become one? Usually what happens? Is this International Chess Federation F. And they have this point systems so chessplayers. Lead different tournaments in accumulate these spines that. Gets them to a certain level of expertise, and they are then title the grandmaster, which is in fact, the highest I do that. A chess player can be awarded by International Chess Federation usually these. Players between the age of ten and fourteen, and so they go through these rigorous tournaments one after the other parents take them all over the world. And the get the title by around thirteen fourteen, and then they start to perfect the art of being perfect, just player. So you mentioned Bobby Fisher. Who is probably the most famous chess player all time? Actually is definitely the most famous chess player of all time. Who are the stars of the field today? The poster by of chess is at the moment Magnus Carlsen. Calzon is the best in the world. The youngest number one ever and no one can explain to you how he does what he does. It seems to come from another world, which is why he's become known as the Mozart of chess. He's from Norway. He sort of had this. Has this bad boy live to him? He's like interesting. He'll drop these nuggets about other players. You make jokes about his opponents. He talks trash social chicken. How do you not? He's GonNa do the same. Yeah the lack of comas is astounding. And quite disappointing. He talks acts. Yeah for sure sorta like that kind of Worcester wise. He's called the golden boy of chess. And then this. Is. Bobby Ana crew art, there's this Chinese grandmaster Ding Laren and then USA's Wesley so and Kara Nakimora. Really Good Armenia has live on Romanian so these are some of like the famous players at the moment that go up against each other all the time. So I the grandmaster that you decided to focus on with your story, the one who lives in Saint Louis is actually Italian. His name is Fabiano Caruana. Who is in? How did he get here? Fabiano Caruana is the number two seed in the world. He's an Italian American chess grandmaster. He became a grandmaster at fourteen years of age, fourteen years, eleven, months, and twenty eight to be exact, and he at that time was the youngest grandmaster in the history of Italy in the United States. E was sort of beg to be the next big thing in in US chess and he came back now. He has an apartment in Saint Louis. He lives there and he sort of boot. BOOT his life from scratch, and he was never like the big personality like Norris Magnus columnist. He's the guy that will is very chill loves video games and let us work to the talk to his justice stories about that call in the next Bobby Fisher like the next big thing. He's the one person that can actually dig down. Magnus, Carlsen in the world championship and become the next world champion. So what does? Chess match in a grand masters tournament. Actually look like. How does it play out? Okay so two grandmasters shake each other's hands. sit down across from each other is chessboard. This o'clock next to them that the are constantly looking at. This goes on for at least six hours right every day, and so during these six hours, the brain has to have most oxygen supply. Which means your heart is functioning three times faster than on any given. And because of that sustained higher blood pressure, and sustained higher level of activity by the heart and the rain, the body goes through intense physical. Energy lost during. A chess game that lasts six to seven to sometimes eat hours said.

Bobby Fisher International Chess Federation Chess Fabiano Caruana United States Magnus Carlsen Saint Louis Bobby Ana Tennis Jack Nicklaus Ashwari Finland Iceland Espn Lake Kumar Boris Spassky Features Writer Norris Magnus Worcester
Hannah Senesh

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:54 min | 2 months ago

Hannah Senesh

"Today's fearless. Woman is both a maverick and a legend a national heroine in Israel. She parachuted into enemy territory to liberate Jews during the Holocaust looking death in the eye. Let's talk about Hannah said Nash Hanis. Ns was born in nineteen twenty one budapest Hungary the daughter of an author and a journalist. Honecker up in a literary household she routinely kept journals of her own from H. Thirteen right up to her death in the nineteen thirties as antisemitic sentiments were burgeoning and Budapest. Hana was drawn design scientist activities and in nineteen thirty nine. She left Hungary for what was then. Palestine there she. I attended an agricultural school and eventually settled at kibbutz. Yom where she wrote poetry and a play about life on the kibbutz in nineteen forty three at the height of World War Two. Hana enlisted with the British army in volunteered to be a paratrooper. The mission was to help the allied forces establish contact with resistance fighters in Europe. Were also working to help the Jews. Hana trained in Egypt and was one of only thirty three people chosen to parachute behind enemy lines in March of nineteen forty four. Hana parachuted into Yugoslavia and began working with the Yugoslav partisans. A Communist led resistance the access powers. The partisans were considered among Europe's most effective anti Nazi resistance groups Hana's Fervor and passion for the movement or captured in her poem. Last is the match. But she wrote during her time in Yugoslavia. After three months with the partisans on across into hungry in June of nineteen forty four at the height of deportation for Hungary's Jews with the goal of reaching her native Budapest. She didn't make it Hana was quickly picked up by the Hungarian police who were faithful to the Nazi party. Despite being repeatedly torture Hana declined to give up information pertaining to her mission. Even when the police threatened to harm Hana's own mother she held steadfast and her resistance and refused to cooperate during Hana's trial October of nineteen forty four. She didn't appeal for mercy and instead defended her actions at every turn on November seventh nineteen forty four. Hana was ordered to be executed by firing squad in the moments leading up to her that she refused a blindfold that was offered to her. Instead choosing to stare squarely into the eyes of per excecutioner. She was only twenty three years old. After her execution a poem was found in Hana's sell it read one two three eight feet long to strides apart. The rest is dark. Life is fleeting question. Mark one-two-three maybe another week or the next month may still find me here but death I feel is very near. I could have been twenty three next July i Campbell on what mattered. Most the dice were cast. I lost Hana's life was brief but her impact. On the world lasted long pastor untimely death her diary and poems were published posthumously and several of her poems have been set to music in one thousand nine hundred fifty Hamas remains were brought to Jerusalem and reinterred at the military cemetery on Mount Herzl to this day. Hana remains a symbol of self sacrifice idealism in the face of dire circumstance.

Hana Hungary Budapest Europe Yugoslavia Israel Palestine Nash Hanis Nazi Party Hannah British Army NS Hamas Mount Herzl Scientist Campbell YOM Mark One-Two-Three Egypt
'The Bachelor': The Women Blow Up on Peter for Bringing Back Alayah

Pardon My Take

02:30 min | 6 months ago

'The Bachelor': The Women Blow Up on Peter for Bringing Back Alayah

"Pete took Victoria F on a one on one date to a surprise chase. Rice concert turns out Victoria. F Dated Chase Rice before four. Coming on yes I mean our guy chase is like Charles Woodson back in the day like you know two thirds of the world's covered by water one-third by Charles Els Woodson Chase Rice is dated two-thirds a world so I'm two-thirds of the world's covered by water the other third is by chases ropes. Yes let's keep it classy. He's a lover his season. He no he is his vocal inflections. Yes is come. He's just a good dude. P Then took the woman on a group date to the Cleveland Browns stadium where there was traumatic place on pickers house. They played a game of tackle football coach by Josh cribs and Hanford Dixon. Also also I guess on the show when Chris was saying like all right. We're going to Cleveland and usually that's where all the girls like. It was just like everyone who's just blank face. WE'RE GOING TO CLEVELAND. And they're all just like oh I love when they do that. So that's an old real world trick when they were like and your trip is Argentina. And then when you're going to Yugoslavia of Lia ship and then Eliah whoever you guys remember got sent over love you assault was your map from nineteen eighty seven. It was not Yugoslav anymore shows now respect Croatia Vania. I actually did that on purpose so that I wasn't offending occurrence country. Okay didn't want to get cancelled. Elias shows back up and ask him out of fashion that lived in Yugoslavia. You guys are missing. The most part Alaya showed up. She got home last week so she's not on. The show actually had death squads that that executed people that were fighting against Nazis. So this is kind of a pattern for you in today's episode absorb get Alaya. Who got sent home last week? Shows back up and ask Peter to let her come back in and he did The other girls. That are pissed at Pete Heat and some threatened to leave so is this an empty threat or they actually goal-bound. I don't know this is like a union situation. The the rest are unionizing. Potentially that's that's what it sounds like. Well I mean the whole show is about roses so they're probably LDS say true. I don't get that joke but I I get I bet you it was a good one. Yeah you've probably really noticing roses on twitter. The twitter now. You actually haven't God that's it. Okay great I mean. That's the worst last. But that's a pretty every clip number. What happened Eliah

Charles Els Woodson Chase Rice Yugoslavia Chase Rice Charles Woodson Twitter Cleveland Browns Stadium Pete Heat Cleveland Rice Eliah Victoria Hanford Dixon Victoria F Elias Josh Cribs Chris Football Argentina Assault Peter
US to deploy thousands of additional troops to the Middle East - CNN

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

07:09 min | 7 months ago

US to deploy thousands of additional troops to the Middle East - CNN

"CNN is reporting that the United States is deploying thousands of additional troops in the Mideast following they're killing the air strike they killed Qasim at Qasim Minnesota mining and I understand that number from everything I've seen is somewhere around thirty five hundred troops house intelligence share Adam Schiff says he expects to get briefed on the sometime today by US officials on the strike and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who as I understand it wise in Florida already I'm not going to say he was there golfing I'm just going to say he was in Florida already says that he believes that Qasim so I'm on the why is the mastermind terrorist mastermind who operated without constraints so I I think this is just a story there there's just a lot we just don't know about that way there is a lot we don't know about what went into this decision who is involved in this decision we talked to CBS consultant earlier who said that technically Congress did not have to be consulted they just have to be updated within forty eight hours so we're still waiting for that to happen yeah a lot of fallout from this story Hayes India thanks for holding on you're welcome I am listening to these P. I was on a call but I just had to these people talking about this man killing all of our soldiers who sent them there George Bush barackobama I give him no no mercy and now this yeah out in the queue we we a man who was assassinated who in the past what drug traffickers broker peace between the for some of the factions that were fighting over there which was instrumental in fighting ISIS and I'm gonna tell you right now Benjamin Netanyahu's neck is in the news just like Donald Trump gave him the order to kill this man they wanted him dead for years and if it if it is in this country just mindless to to not it in graph the ramifications of this I was watching out is here last week okay and there was a man on there he said if you're an ex patriot living in it in some of these Asian countries Middle East pack your bags packed your bags yeah yeah yeah Ronnie and I want to do to us when we down there with their for their airplane to kill two hundred ninety people right thing for these Christian fundamentalists are listening they're happy about this and rubbing their hands we're not gonna be Cynder so you can ascend into heaven and it happened in the Jewish community that sit still in Iran has condemned this option because we are going to cause rivers of blood consider that I'm I'm I'm just live it yeah I guess I can I can see all that from you Cynthia and your points are writing about three years yeah I think I'm out of my mind I've been watching this crap happen in here we are well I'm you know I'm not a day goes out like we saw this coming or or some people saw this coming as a Sam request this coming yeah I don't think they've done a lot of people really understand the full implications of this but what I will say is they will they will talk to a soldier last night he said he is so glad he got out of there they offered him three hundred about one thousand dollars tax free to be a contractor over there talking about our lack of military readiness readiness the soldiers who were being continue no joining they're not prepared they're overweight they're distracted their immature glad he's going to live and that's why he left in the case in the thanks for your time today appreciate the insight as well hi George your short haul survey every single one the old my Lil professional both of we always fall out with everything but it's a lecture by so that an incident Schreiber her in the back and it can be a very yesterday here you know we can only ask really fast that's not to worry so what gets me when you're done any part of the day all yeah what a live wire before why not wait yeah that's accessories actually yeah I guess so but I mean your point is well taking the timing and we've had a couple people weighing on why now why this time and I do wonder if people are we only processing what the fallout of this is going to be a Murray wrote closer a war three we have been for so long and I'm looking three I do I yeah my dad was still around twenty four laid off from the mail coming home party in one night alright so knows in the living room he said it was started in nineteen ninety four score and seven years which is twenty seven years thanks for calling thirty one there happens whether major glory that happened in the former Yugoslavia the only thing that a lot of things from the main before that he now we're analyzes when Hey George thanks for calling as always if there is a lie and say we are at thirty minutes after one o'clock yeah I think we need to mark this day and I'm guessing we're going to we're going to revisit this conversation and I have some of you called today call back because we're gonna we're gonna talk about this again I assure you you're listening to KDKA the only way you can take eighty K. radio with you is the radio dot com apps are downloaded today and listen anytime anywhere listen up in twenty sixteen New Mexico house seat was decided by only two votes out of almost fourteen thousand in two thousand ten state has risen Vermont was determined by one vote in two thousand two a Connecticut house he was determined by just one vote more than six thousand in nineteen ninety four oh Wyoming street house he ended in a tie the winner chosen at random went on to become speaker of the state house your voice matters use it to go to let's be the vote dot org to learn more his albums of all time Aerosmith toys in the attic nineteen seventy five toys in the attic is Aerosmith's third studio album with a million sold the band's most commercially successful album in the U. S. this album for the band represented a new start as recording artists the right songs from scratch on a deadline as opposed to the first two hours they were composed of songs for years one fifteen Amazon the fives gradu by browsers Chevrolets celebrating their grand opening in beaver falls and now my what's happening on this

CNN United States Qasim Qasim Minnesota
UNs workplace mental health initiative addresses simmering issue

UN News

10:27 min | 10 months ago

UNs workplace mental health initiative addresses simmering issue

"Over half of all U N staff working field duty stations some of which have extraordinary stresses that need to be faced every day that's from Fabrizio Hawks child the UN Assistant Secretary General Full Strategic Coordination who spent thirty years working engineering the first anniversary of its Workplace Mental Health Strategy which Mr Hall Style said is challenging the Tabu addressing mental health issues in an view with UN news is Natalie Hutchinson he explained why the UN launched the initiative to address concerns from headquarters in New York to the world's conflict zones I think this has been an issue that's been simmering away in the Organization for for a very long time but if I can be frank I didn't think has been adequately acknowledged I didn't think its importance until just over a year ago was was fully acknowledged and I think a number of things Fortuitous circumstances came together I think there was very strong leadership from the medical service that was aware that there was never growing number of people with with challenges coming and then we have a secretary general who has a very very strong interest in modern and interest very strong commitment to due to the issues and from what I recall there was also a survey that was that was carried out that got very strong participation from staff and based on the survey that it was done it appeared that UN staff or somewhere like twice as vulnerable to to UH non UN staff to mental strains which is not surprising given the circumstances we work in so I think the the approach was is fed by a survey but it was the consents go back very far but I think finally thanks to the medical service and thanks to the leadership of the of the secretary general they'd crystallized into a strategy the plots a meaningful way forward on the the statistic of UN Person now being twice as vulnerable to mental health issues is is that because there are so many personnel in the field doing humanitarian work in being exposed to conflict compromising situations or is it the organization at large what over Hoffa stuff depending which parts of the UN Yukon but in the I pretended over half the stuff is now in field duty stations and some of those field ut stations have absolutely extraordinary stresses yes I mean in Mogadishu attacks on staff a part of the landscape and their regular there and the preventive measures that are taken and in Iraq some years ago you went allowed to move out of your office space or your you're sleeping Ace without wearing a helmet and flak jacket and carrying a flight kit so the measures that are taken to predict off often themselves bring about an extraordinary level of stress not to speak of the attacks that stuff may be subject to but it's not I think staff in certain duty stations subject to extraordinary levels of stress potential trauma but I think was surprising in the survey for correctly is that there were also very high levels of stress at many headquarters locations and I think you know there are stress factors even in peaceful locations that should not be disregarded it's sometimes in the the work that sometimes the UN work we have to try and reconcile the views of many stakeholders often those fields not reconciling lable were subject to many contradictory precious if I can if I can be very candidate the level of stuff support team support supervisors support is very very throughout the organization Working in a in a multicultural multinational he's Asian brings many benefits but it also it also brings stresses so I think we we we have to acknowledge we work in extraordinary environments it even in headquarters locations and we have to be much more attentive to what this does to the well being off of our staff and I say that because we were employed to help others that is the heart of our role our role is help those who suffer from deficits and peace and security deficits in human rights deficits in access to development and we should never lose sight of that we're not here and if we're not functioning well as individuals and functioning well as teams so in that sense if we want to be optimal in terms of what we can do for others making sure that were were in in good spirits quite literally is is tremendously important and I think the strategy is no magic wand but the very fact that the profile of the issues being raised in a very serious committed efforts to do more is step forward certainly this idea of helping personnel helping ourselves so we can help others what are some of the key ways that the strategy is tackled these issues I think one big part of the strategy which is absolutely critical is just making it permissible to talk about these things to addressing some of these issues is making it permissible for people to talk about some of the stresses they're under and being liberated do that in itself is a big held and at the same time is also boosting access to counseling opportunities for those that need it for example I think now that that there's a move to introduce tele counseling which means that people will have access to formal counseling opportunities having more preventive approaches but where prevention fails as as it will often in extreme circumstances we work making sure that people have better access to counseling and when necessary treatment so how has this changed since your experience thirty or so years ago in former Yugoslavia when you were working in the field how has addressing mental health changed I I think it's changed radically if I think back to the mid ninety s both former Yugoslavia for example the Great Lakes region you could barely speak about grit your teeth and get on with it I the Congo and after there was the refugee influx into Congo from Rwanda after the genocide Sir was every day to go through the camps and to supervise the collection of dead bodies and there were it was taken aback by the very thought that was in the early ninety s I think by the time of the Haiti earthquake two thousand and twelve jumping the trauma that arose I was dealt with Colleagues in two thousand eleven after there was an attack I'm an pathetic but at the same time even now there's still a lot of stigma we've come a long way but we still have quite far to go

Thirty Years
Kashmirkashmir And Pakistan discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Kashmirkashmir And Pakistan discussed on World News Analysis

"You're listening to the panel discussion of the world today with me. Let's go back to our panel on the current situation in kashmir region so pakistani augustan the prime minister imran. Ken house visited pugs. Dan administered kashmir amid the ongoing tensions with india during the independence day can has threatened to coat teach adelie a lesson and avowed to fight until the end against any indian violations in disputed kashmir or yugoslavia to pakistan. Go put up india as your plan to attack on pakistan administered kashmir once again. I warn you get ready. We are fully prepared to respond. The time has come when we

Kashmir Pakistan India Prime Minister Ken House DAN Yugoslavia
News in Brief 17 July 2019

UN News

03:12 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 17 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. More corporations needed to secure the arrest of fugitives charged with war crimes such as genocide said the U._N.. Prosecutor forts known as the international residual mechanism for criminal tribunals says bromate's told security city council members on Wednesday the first priority is office remains to quickly wrap up the trials and appeals of alleged war criminals from the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and genocide against tootsie in Rwanda which fall under the mechanisms jurisdiction with eight people still on the. Run he said that we're not yet. Receiving the corporation needed to secure arrests will he noted a general lack of national capacity in the difficulties of tracking down international fugitives in the mocking the twenty fifth anniversary of the genocide against the tootsie and others Mr Brennan said the victims of waited for too long for justice with some fugitives remaining a threat to international peace and security today we will utilize all tools available to us to address the challenges we face he said including former reports of non-cooperation cooperation to the Security Council if needed expressing deep concern of a how migration and migrants themselves are being politicized and scapegoated in Hungary and independent U._N.. Human Rights expert on Wednesday urged the government to immediately end its crisis approach to the. Issue migrants arbitrators dangerous enemies in both official and public discourses said Felipe Gonzalez Morales the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights of migrants in a statement released following the end of an official visit he called on Hungary to reevaluate Erato current reality in relation to migration terminate immediately the so-called crisis situation and lift relevant restrictive measures he edged the government to reassess its security oriented narrative when it comes to migrants and move towards a human rights based approach coach adding that security concerns could not justify human rights violations to Geneva where indigenous peoples from around the world gathered on Wednesday to discuss how to protect their unique cultures and traditions in the face of challenges including climate. Change from Cornelia in the Russian Federation which is home to nearly two hundred different ethnic groups Alexi psychotic told you a news how warmer global temperatures had threatened centuries old practices the snow's melting earlier earlier and I remember when I grew up in my childhood dates we had snow already in October. Now have snow only in December December sometimes when January and it impacts legs for example the ice on the lakes and efficient it Kim box forestry it impacts digits people's hunting and many other ways of life which indigenous peoples exercise in addition to the threat from climate change Mr Psychotic who's from the sense of support of indigenous peoples in Karelya maintains that.

Security Council Hungary United Nations Mr Brennan Felipe Gonzalez Morales Russian Federation Prosecutor Official Cornelia Alexi Yugoslavia Bromate KIM Geneva Karelya Twenty Fifth
Europe's Balkan dilemma

FT World Weekly

14:18 min | 1 year ago

Europe's Balkan dilemma

"Today, we're looking at the Balkans, an area that dominated international attention twenty years ago after the wars in Bosnia and Kossovo. But it slipped from the headlines in recent years. Joining me to discuss the region, and at some certain prospects are the T euro penatta, Ben home, an Fokin correspondent, Valerie Hopkins. Ben the F T this morning described the Balkans as the most volatile region in Europe. Why would he say that? Because historically, it has been a region that has been full tired of by competing power blocks. You know, the ultimate empire the Austro-Hungarian empire the Russian empire and that has left kind of overlapping, national, and ethnic and religious divisions. And we are still living with the legacy of that, and sort of overlaid by an incomplete transition to democracy and the rule of law after communism and. Then probably on top of all of that you have corruption. It's deeply rooted. So Ben before we continue. Let's just define the region. How big is it? And how significant so we're talking about the western Balkans region roughly twenty million people about the population of the Netherlands, but with a really tiny economy, about the size of Slovakia's. And we're talking about Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herzegovina Albania, north Macedonia, and Kosovo, of course. So it's a pretty small number of people with a pretty small combined GDP. It's not significant, but it's always been a source of instability as we've known for the last century. Valerie, Ben referred to this as a kind of incomplete process and some of the countries in the regions, maybe all of them have hurt. The delta Modeste nation will be joining the EU I'm thinking, particularly of north Macedonian Albanian, but they're finding very hard. Yes. Well, that's true. They've been hoping to join but also the e u has been hoping for them to join I mean for the first time this was articulated in two thousand three in there. I e you some. In Thessaloniki, all of the countries of the western Balkans were promised a credible path to accession we're given unequivocal support from the Member States and one year ago after north miss Adonia and underwent quite comprehensive changes north Macedonia, to its name, and two other reforms and L Bainian committing to a very onerous judicial reform were promised that they would get a green light this year. And as we saw yesterday that decision was punted again, for a couple of months, at least until October and from their point of view, how much of a disastrous. Well, it's quite a big disaster. I mean, enormous Adonia which recently changed its name in order to end a decades long conflict with Greece over their name, which Athens believed implied territorial desire over the Greek region of the same name, the whole public support for the agreement and public support for the government is riding on the guarantees towards progress towards the EU that are written into that. So north Macedonia, has moved forward in terms of its NATO membership. Several countries, I think, have already ratified the NATO accession protocol for them. But, you know, the European Union membership is what the public really wants and at a certain point, it may become untenable for the leaders of the country to stay in power if they can't deliver on what was promised them, and that would be a disaster for them. And for Europe. Yeah. Mean Ben you've been pretty critical of the youth decision. What's the argument for saying the eaves being sources that it had a unique? Novo paternity to put these two countries move firmly on the path of judgement. EU rules values and sort of binding them into the EU orbit, we have to remember that sort of enlargement process. If you just put aside the various problems that we've experienced over the is in the grand sweep of history. It's been a remarkable success for the EU it stabilized the region, it's brought prosperity and it's dissolved the division between eastern western Europe and the argument just to recap for those who don't totally recall took the EU from what fifteen countries to now. Twenty eight to twenty eight. Yeah. And so, in argument is probably the most effective European Union foreign policy, and it has helped put countries on the right path, and stabilize democracy and promote reform and promote the rule of law. But perhaps there are now plenty of people in the EU think we've reached the end of that process and the legacy problems from previous enlargements have come back to haunt the EU. Maybe the enlargement the accession process was not rigorous. Enough. And so now there are plenty of people who are having second thoughts about it. Yeah. And I mean just to play devil's advocate, I suppose if you are European politician, you will say, well, sure the future of these countries matters, but as he was saying Elliott's twenty million people in the, you have the rise of populists across Europe and places like France, the Netherlands, Britain's voted for Brexit. And it doesn't appear that accession to countries like, oh, near is popular. So perhaps that wise, not to do it quite possibly. But I mean, I think the calculation has to be how long can you keep these countries on the path to accession without ever actually giving them accession at the end of the day? And that solvency something that the EU has tried with Turkey and it's backfired arguably spectacularly, although you could also blame premise, Erta one, perhaps originally topper one for the kind of backsliding in democracy, and the sort of drift away from the European mainstream, in Turkey, but I mean that is clearly the calculation it would be good for Europe if. If Albany could be put on the path to membership even if it never actually meets the criteria to join fully, and you mentioned Obama. Valerie back from there. Give us a description of where the country is in terms of its economy, and its politics because when I was growing up out, mania was like the most isolated place. It was North Korea Europe. And the idea that it might even be close to joining the paean union in some ways, seems miraculous. Well, indeed, it is. And it's quite far off. But I think, you know, to build on what Ben said many Member States have grown tired of the process and have learned that they need to impose further and further restrictions. We see that many of the countries that have joined in recent decades still have problems with their judicial systems. So we're talking countries like Romania Bulgaria, yes, Hungary. If I may say, so the conditions and the demands that Brussels and the Member States have made on countries, which are hoping to join have actually become much more onerous Albania, my story that I did while I was in Toronto was about the extremely onerous. Writing process that all judges, and prosecutors are being subjected to which has left. The country's supreme court with only two judges. One of them I think is being vetted this week. So it may have only one judge so far, only one judge survived because the two tional court, I believe, has only one judge, which is actually quite stabilizing, on the political. See now as the parliament has moved to impeach the president for calling early elections. And no one in the court can judge on this. I don't wanna get too deep into their politics. But I would like to say to that Albanian has also accepted to host the first FrontEx mission FrontEx being the US Border police agency because during the two thousand fifteen migrant crisis, the EU sort of realized woke up and remembered that actually all of these countries in the Balkan route are inside of Europe that if you have weak states week, police weakens to, to Sion's at that will have consequences for the security and safety of the rest of the block. So there should be more interest in improving those institutions and the best way to do it all. Of the academic work that's been done in the Balkans shows that the carrot of enlargement, and of a real credible accession path is the best way to inspire reforms, but how is the economy doing? And how connected is opening to the rest of Europe, now compared to those days of isolation. I mean silly, anecdote but, you know, I come across our Bainian in London now buildings around the corner. So to some extent, they seem to have been integrated little bit. Well, absolutely. I mean, quite a significant portion of Albanians left the country in the nineties jobs, better opportunities. And I think it's rare to meet now lenient who doesn't speak at least two or three languages. But now, people are coming back business ties between mania and especially Italy, Switzerland UK are very strong and the economy's growing, I think actually in the Balkans. The economies are growing much faster than the EU average about four five percent. They still have a long way to go to catch up, but there's quite a lot of vitality and what about this issue of organized crime, which is thrown at all the countries in the Balkans. But I think particularly. Albania for those sitting in Brussels or elsewhere, saying, do we really want country in that condition inside the EU, how serious is the problem? Well, it is a serious problem. And it you know, it also goes to show that again you can't separate the Balkans. Even with the Albania or north as Donio, anyone not being inside of the EU criminals will always find a way to engage in their activity. It seems to me in some of my discussions with police dodges prosecutors that sometimes this threat is overblown. For instance, the Dutch parliament, several weeks ago passed a Bill asking their government to withdraw visa-free travel for all Baynes, dude organised crime. And then when you go and inject a Dutch officials, they say actually, this is not necessarily for violent crime. A lot of people are trying to get on both. Maybe they're trying to come to the UK but actually they're not necessarily being arrested for trafficking in drugs, or persons Ben turning to the other country. We were talking about north Macedonia that I suppose, makes the point that this is also still an issue. To some extent, war and peace. I mean they had extremely tense relations with Greece for sometime. Yes. They have done over the dispute over the name after the collapse of the former Yugoslavia. And that, of course, has prevented Macedonia, north Macedonia is now 'cause integration into the Atlantic community, the NATO. So I mean, it really was a huge that Ford when Zorn's Iovan Alexis, it press the Greek premier achieve this deal, and it still highly contentious in Greece. And we have a general election next month in Greece, where you are likely to see the return of a center, right? New democracy led government and new democracy has been very, very critical of the naming deal with north Macedonia. It remains to be seen whether they will actually go as far as to block their entry, but I suspect Athens will be a lot less accommodating in the future than it has been over the last couple of years. And if I recall correctly at the time, there was some evidence, which the Cyprus government acted on the Russian espionage Intel. Emergence agencies trying to stoke up opposition to the north Macedonia settlement does that raise. Also, I suppose a subsidiary issue, but crucial one which affects Europe's judgment, which is that to the extent that this area is not integrated with the rest of the EU becomes the sort of floating space. And there is no evidence that not just the Russians but also the Turks and even the Chinese are taking an interest in the western Balkans. Absolutely. I suspect it's possible to maybe overplay, the extent of Russian influence, although it has been substantial an acute in some places such as the authentic your and Montenegro and this attempt to stoke up resistance to the referendum on the name changed Illinois with Macedonia, which the Greeks are pro Russian country, actually expelled him Russian diplomats accusing the spine. The Turks are obviously increasingly involved in Bosnia to governor, and Albanian in Kosova, and the. Please spot an opportunity to extend their influence through commerce and through infrastructure spending. So, yeah, we're replaying centuries of history where this region has been kind of plaything for the great powers. And of course, I suppose it's easier for Europe to ignore to the extent that these above Ling cute problems, but lots of problems as long as it doesn't actually break out into violence. Now I mentioned at the beginning of the program that the broad or can region. We were at war twenty years ago is there danger of the old conference coming bubbling back. Or is it more that we're talking about serious, but subsidiary issues of people flows economic crises organized crime, and so on, is there danger of real all while I think you'd be foolish to rule out the danger of a return to conflict in this area in the sense that forty years ago, you might have done the same thing but history has shown how quickly this place can erupt into. James, and I suspect that remains although I'm sure it has reduced in the last ten twenty years, and there is more at stake for the region's inhabitants. If they have a clear path to e membership, which will bring guarantees of security, and better economic prospects. And the end of the day, I have the firm feeling that it's often corrupt politicians who have their own economic interests at heart, who are perpetuating the kind of ethnic divisions in this region. More than popular convictions. And Valerie euro correspondent on the ground. So how stable or unstable does it seem to you? Well, I do agree with Ben that seemingly innocuous crisis can escalate. And I think that in most of the countries, you really do have this kind of boiling, the frog situation where I is correspondent struggle with sometimes seemingly small jumps in a story, actually could carry larger consequences later. But I think rather than conflict, the major risk is just that the country will empty out with people losing hope. That they will be able to create a better life for their children and grandchildren. For instance, in Bosnia, which is a population of three and a half million in the last three or four years. I think two hundred thousand people left since January some thirty thousand people have already left the country. And that's when I talked to people, it's really a matter of losing hope that they will join the European Union and have a better life. So these countries will suffer catastrophic demographic decline. And western Europe will find if they didn't integrate them, they'll show up on the doorsteps. Well, many of them, actually are getting jobs in western Europe, which are empty, you know, these are educated workers doctors dentists health worker, social workers, so it's not the same as migrant crisis. Most of them are going legally with work permits, but they're leaving their home countries for good. Okay. We'll, we'll have to leave it. Thank you very much indeed, to buttery Hopkins in the studio and to Ben holes. Well that's it for this week until next week. Goodbye.

Europe European Union BEN Macedonia Bosnia North Macedonia Greece Nato Albania Valerie Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herze Netherlands Athens Valerie Hopkins Brussels Kosovo Adonia Slovakia Member States North Korea
North Macedonia, Pope Francis And Skopje discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

North Macedonia, Pope Francis And Skopje discussed on BBC World Service

"Pope Francis has just rival north Macedonia that the start of the brief visit. It's the first pope since the country gained independence from Yugoslavia mother. Teresa one of the most renowned figures multi-culturalism was born in Skopje now north Macedonia's

North Macedonia Pope Francis Skopje Multi-Culturalism Yugoslavia Teresa
News in Brief 20 March 2019

UN News

02:46 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 20 March 2019

"This is news in brief from the United Nations. The UN has ramped up its humanitarian response to cyclone EBay, which was devastated large swathes of Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi in southern Africa, the UN and its humanitarian partners are providing emergency food, shelter water and health care supplies and on Wednesday. The UN's central emergency response fund allocated twenty million US dollars to ensure aid reaches the most affected people as soon as possible while the full scale of the humanitarian disaster is still unknown. At least a thousand people ob- Aleve to have been killed with around four hundred thousand displaced from their homes in Mozambique alone. These figures are expected to rise significantly as the full extent of the damage and loss of life across flooded rural. Areas becomes known. The United Nations appeals court has increased the forty year sentence initially imposed on former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan carriage to life imprisonment in two thousand sixteen carriage was found responsible for genocide and war crimes, including the planning of the nineteen ninety-five shred brunettes Masoka by the international criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia on Wednesday, the success to that court the Hague branch of the mechanism for international criminal. Tribunals lingerie upheld the twenty 2016 verdict as well as ensuring Mr. carriage will serve a life sentence responding to the appeal decision which was the last opportunity for Mr. carriage to overturn the initial verdict. Adama Zhang UN special adviser on the prevention of genocide said that it confirmed with accountability rather than impunity will prevail and UN secretary General Antonio, Gutierrez has told leading politicians business executives and civil society. You leaders of developing countries in the global south that cooperation is key to sustainable development and the fight against global warming. The UN chief was speaking at baba, plus forty a historic summit in the tinian capital Boina Aires, which as well as strengthening cooperation aims to increase transparency and strengthen accountability in developing nations Maria Fernandez bonanza, president of the general assembly also spoke at the event, which she described as a symbol of the determination of the global south to advance equality for all across the world praising the evolution of south south corporation over recent decades, mister Gutierrez said that it can never be a replacement for the responsibilities of developed nations and must involve young people civil society, the private sector, academia and others to build innovative partnerships, Khanna Lennon, U N news.

UN Adama Zhang Un Mr. Carriage United Nations Mozambique Mister Gutierrez Ebay Maria Fernandez United States Boina Aires Baba Zimbabwe Khanna Lennon Malawi Africa Special Adviser Yugoslavia
Greeks Approve Deal to Rename Macedonia, in Victory for the West

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Greeks Approve Deal to Rename Macedonia, in Victory for the West

"Has voted to back on historic agreements with Musset Dona each brings an end to a beat the twin seven year dispute over it's no the neighbor's name bone editions approved the name Republic of north Macedonia by just seven votes despite widespread opposition from the Greek public and joining me full always motorcycles, Athens, correspondent Nathalie of erica's. Welcome to the program. So nastily what is the atmosphere like in Athens this evening, we saw a number of protests in the streets off the CD before this historic vote. I think most Greeks will be digesting the news. They've not been happy about it. The some poll suggests that up to sixty percent of Greeks are not happy about it. And we've Kaley seen it in the images of many of the protests, which some have even been marred by violence, many nationals descended on this treats to oppose this. But also more cool-headed critics, you know, who were kind of opposed at this deal because they were gonna feeling you know, that it wasn't appropriation of of their legacy. Another country will now call itself about, you know, partly will call itself after name of one of its provinces, and they're quite worried about it. It's kind of the only thing they felt they still could control, you know, their national identity, either culture their history and with this deal. It kind of felt that they were even relinquishing this. If you will. Why is it that the question of Macedonia? Name us Bruce up so much anger in Greece. Why at his why has it become such a heat to topic that has lost at full twin seven years this row? Well, you know, when I mean, it's obviously partied historical. I mean, one the small Balkan province are broke away from Yugoslavia back in nineteen Ninety-one it decided to call itself Macedonia now, coincidentally, it's infuriated its neighbour Greece because one of Greece's largest provinces is actually called Macedonia for millennia, an Athens worried that, you know, with this new country, it might, you know, start claiming it's territory and it history shortly after northern Macedonia's independence, the young Balkans countries, then nationalist leadership acted on on this very nationalist, pride it directed large Brown statutes of Alexander the great his father's well, Philip who are considered Greek. You know, very important historical figures beyond that the also printed schoolbooks with a map of great Macedonia. Let's kind of confirming Greece's worries aside of that, obviously as I mentioned earlier, you know, the the Greeks are feeling extremely proud of their heritage and their history, and their culture, and Macedonia and everything that it implies is sport of of who they feel they are over millennia and now with this smaller country to the north who they think is a Slavic country. You know, it has nothing to do with a history. They speak a Slavic language as well. They feel that kind of appropriating a part of who they are to the core. Exactly. It

Greece Macedonia North Macedonia Athens Musset Dona Bruce Nathalie Kaley Erica Philip Yugoslavia Alexander Sixty Percent Seven Years Seven Year
Foreign diplomats urge Venezuela's Maduro to hand over power

BBC World Service

02:58 min | 1 year ago

Foreign diplomats urge Venezuela's Maduro to hand over power

"But on Saturday at a special ceremony. The Ukrainian Orthodox church under Moscow's leadership since the late seventeenth century will again be recognized as no Tournus church. This report from our correspondent Tinky f- Jona Fisher. This religious divorce is a rare victory for Ukraine over its much. Larger neighbour determined to make the most of it and with. An election just three months away. Ukraine's president petro Pora shaneco is in estan boo to be there. When what's known as the Thomas is officially signed. The Thomas will recognize Ukraine's orthodox church at separate and independent from Moscow ending a relationship that has lasted centuries. The decision may also lead to a lasting schism in the global author docs movement upset at losing its Ukrainian parishes. The Russian Orthodox church the world's largest has already cut ties with the patriarch. The first among equals of global orthodoxy Jonah Fisher in Kiev for three years in the nineteen nineties during the violent break-up of Yugoslavia, Bosnia Herzegovina was war ethnic Serbs, and at times ethnic Croats fought against the majority Muslim population in Europe's most bloody conflicts since the second World War the data. And peace accords. Finally, brought fighting to an end in nineteen ninety-five. But it's a fragile and uneasy peace and one that continues to affect the younger generation as James Noguchi reports.

Ukrainian Orthodox Church Ukraine Moscow Russian Orthodox Church Tournus Church Thomas Jonah Fisher Jona Fisher Bosnia Herzegovina James Noguchi Petro Pora Kiev Tinky President Trump Yugoslavia Europe Three Months Three Years
Palestinians trapped in coercive environment, says UN rights official

UN News

06:26 min | 1 year ago

Palestinians trapped in coercive environment, says UN rights official

"This is loose. Graffiti of UN news, many Palestinians, living under his rarely occupation suffer from a course of environment were settlements expansion has made people's lives. So unbearable that they feel pressured to move according to a top u n official there James Heenan, head of the UN human rights office in the occupied Palestinian territory said that permits for building in the West Bank were almost non-existent now for Palestinians, speaking to Reema Bauza of UN news in Jerusalem. Mr. Heenan explains the challenges Palestinians routinely face today in the West Bank and east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip was buying and then he's truce Lamon Gaza will have their own different types of human rights challenges. But some of the challenges of calling across the whole area. One is use of force another is freedom of movement. Another is the way in which space society and human rights defenders dramatically, and if we talked specifically about Gaza, what are the issues that were you the most widely the buzz is really hope for the population Gazans feel and are under pressure from old photos at the moment, they are suffering from an eleven year blockade and closures imposed by Israel. They suffering essentially also under the split between the West Bank and Gaza, the political split and the the factor thirties in Gaza, Mike loss, very hard for a number of people, including human rights defenders for us. The concern for Gaza is all about. Allowing people to have an adequate standard of living, which is a human rod under the ICCPR international could covenant uncivil political rights and towards that end. The UN is working tool to humanitarian response to what's going on in Gaza. Ultimately, of course, it's a political problem humanitarian, what are the other human rights challenges specific to the West Bank and east Jerusalem at the moment, the biggest human rods challenges are generated by settlements the expansion of settlements. And we produced two reports a year on this. In and of itself creates a number of human rights violations. So for example, severance themselves are violations of international, we know that. But when you establish a settlement in areas c in the West Bank, he generally brings populations into proximity brings a settlers into proximity with the local Palestinians, and we know that that proximity generates things like settle of items the take over of land blocking the freedom of movement. The Palestinians nearby things like the blocking of access to services for Palestinians nearby. So the settlement enterprises people call it doesn't just have a problem with the Silverton themselves, but the impact on human rights. The biggest thing that's happening. Most recently is what we call the environment where you have a desire to move, Tulsa and communities for the purposes of settlement expansion or creation. What's happened at the long pass? I communities would have just been forcibly moved. Now. What's happening is those communities are put on the enormous pressure. So feel I have no choice but to move, and that's what we call. The course environment. This comes from the jury's prudence of you hate Trump troubles on the former Yugoslavia this idea that you can make lifestyle bearable for people through combination factors. They feel they have to. So for example, if you have a community near settlement sky to expand they can be subject to settle labontes. They can be subject to demolitions. So they cannot build in the West Bank term ability in the West Bank. But I'll sit ins are almost nonexistent. So any expansion they come undertake the young people get married. They can't start the village because there's no it to live. They can't expect access to services are blocked a firing zone can be declared by military nearby, which will mean that they can't access they land. And it can also mean that there is actual live far near the village which is dangerous last year. We had a sixteen year old boy killed by unexploded ordinance of this in the field. A combination of all of these factors all of which are human rights violations as well. Jen at their base makes life extremely difficult for people, and you see that people are leaving because of this. We know type in the West Bank of people on the huge amount of pressure to leave, and we know cases in Hebron where families of decided to move. Now each case has to be looked at all it's merits businesses, very serious mental. And the thing is Palestinians have a very very strong resilience. So they don't move easily. But it doesn't mean that the pressure is not there for them to move. And we're concerned I'm concerned that saw these communities will feel they have to move at some point. We'll talk about the courts environment. What does your office do on that issue? We have not see role an illegal role. Yeah. I think the office has been instrumental in bringing together this idea and making sure that there's a common understanding about what environments based on the jurisprudence of into. National tribunals, we track the quiz environment that patents to see what's happening through the violence. Not just the instances of settler violence. But also, the trends, and we analyze trends, and we publish them. We are mandated by the UN to be public about these things. What is the final message would like to express? I think the involvement globally. Is not supportive of human rights to seem to be. Since some places ideology, the pasta or system in the past. And you hear a lot said about that these days, but as Kofi man once said, it's not it's not people who so human rights is relevant. It's usually governments he said even real and for us. It's more relevant than ever that not just our office. But everyone stands up for human rights because the car is very very worrying.

West Bank UN Gaza Jerusalem Gaza Strip James Heenan Israel Reema Bauza Official Tulsa Silverton Kofi Yugoslavia Hebron JEN Mike Loss Sixteen Year Eleven Year
Airbus delivers first H145M helicopter for Serbian Air Force

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Airbus delivers first H145M helicopter for Serbian Air Force

"Now Serbia's F O's has received the first abbess helicopters eight one for five m light twins. The country's defense Minister Alexander villain says they will enter service next year and be equipped with Serbian weapons. Marcus balkans. Correspondent guide loaning has more on this forest. Good often NT guy, thanks for being with us. How big a deal is this where you are. Well, it's pretty big deal for Serbia in terms of its purchasing power because it's nine helicopters in total in the order. But again, if you want to look at it in conspiracy when this model that it's it's a snappy title. Isn't it the H one four five, but when this was first launched? Yeah, they could have done better than they can they give it some sort of, you know, screaming eagle H one four five or something like that. But now they didn't. But friends bought thirty one of these when the model I went into service about fifteen years ago, so nine helicopters. Okay. The population of Serbia's probably about. You know, some around the an eighth of that of France a fair enough. It is a versatile helicopter and Serbia's case six of the nine again to go to the military and three to the police, and as you said some of these military choppers. Again, B be a quipped with a weapon system proudly armed with Serbian weapons, which is going to make them liked attack. Choppers. And it's much needed modernisation really for the Serbian military, which is still got a lot of old Yugoslav kits knocking around. Well. That's very interesting going. I wanted to ask you about this because I think we've discussed before about the I I don't know that the calibration if you like these pseudo military, turn of of surveys military, you know, is it is it sort of oriented towards the west is oriented towards the eastern is interesting because of this. What would you call it sort of neutrality military turns going back to the Yugoslav days? What does this development tell us on that basis? Yeah, it's precisely neutrality. This is what Serbia's always insisted. But the fact of the matter as people are always trying to read the runes, and this is people launched outside of Serbia our. I have to say, but when you've got a global environment as we do at the moment where everybody's trying to work out. What's of Russia's doing? What it's moves all what it's trying to achieve with those moves. Everybody's looking into every little deal and every little movement in somewhere like the western Balkans in a country like Serbia and trying to work out. How this affects the balance of power the balance of influence, and now Serbia will people in Soviet will tell you Phoolan the poli- tell him even though he's a russified file he'd probably tell you that Serbia's got this policy of military neutrality. It goes back to the days of Yugoslavia with a non aligned movement, and it's always purchased not just purchased from by east and west minutes actually, sold weapons because Yugoslavia was a massive arms producer, and it would be happy to sell weapons to both west and east, but you know, people do here all this stuff about Russian influence, and I'm sure some of those will be maybe a little bit surprised that for Serbia standards such a law. Helicopter order has gone to Airbus. We'll guide to that point as well. Then people may also be surprised to look I don't know how the Serbian military works with other agencies, and they might think, oh, well, naturally, we would look to the Kremlin. But in fact, this still very involved with NATO, which again flies in the face of this idea that Serbia sort of in in Russian pockets, it has been pointed out to me by people close to the Serbian military.

Serbia Minister Alexander Villain Yugoslavia Airbus Nato Russia France Producer Fifteen Years Five M
Croatia Airlines Gets 5th Interim CEO in Two Years

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Croatia Airlines Gets 5th Interim CEO in Two Years

"Month contract. And they've done that five times in a row on Croatia Airlines is a small player in international aviation, but it's very important to the country. Because twenty percent of GDP comes from toll resume undefeated to get these tourists into the country or around the country, then having a national airline, which functions is terribly important now crusher outlines at any particular secret has been a lot of trouble. It's been reporting losses. Yeah. It's had to sell off things like it's Heathrow. Landing slots and the transport minister now says the line called survive without a strategic Paul and looking for a financial advisor to help find one which is what caused what here is it the absence of a steady hand at the helm, which has led to the situation getting worse. Ooh. Has the situation getting worse. Led to people having you know, having to leave the. The the person that I've. Did said was reappointed a couple of times he went off to go air. So of one of the Middle Eastern car Carrozza try and projects an image of being, you know, reasonable cost but high standard of service, presumably Gulf Aron content. If they think that that that that that the CEO doesn't have any particular talent in the industry rollover small liked the is up two left because, you know, go being rolling six-month contract, or I it just isn't a way that you can run an ally the issue, here's you've got a legacy airline, which has come out of the break up of Yugoslavia, which is being state Huns for all sorts of different reasons, you know, strategic important certainly, but then you get in Croatia. This funnily enough the fun. The former finance minister has just released a book called the death of crony capitalism. Well, we have a lot of encourage your fortunately, still despite the title of her book. And it just hasn't been a very well run ally. Over the as thank you very much for joining us on monocle twenty full. You're listening to the globalist.

Croatia Airlines Finance Minister Croatia Heathrow Gulf Aron Paul Advisor CEO Carrozza Yugoslavia Twenty Percent Six-Month
"yugoslavia" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"It was a time when people were beginning to to experiment with psychedelics and some some spiritual practice, but not so much, but the whole campus was just kind of turned upside down, and then the politics of it meant that the police came onto campus, and it was it was getting impossible. So I left just before I had done all the work for my PHD, except my dissertation, and I decided to take some time off, and I traveled overland with my partner, then and I traveled overland from London to Delhi both through that that is like going backward in time. It was then before everything was so, you know, kind of globalized. And and it was amazing because at that time going through, you know, the former Yugoslavia Iran and Afghanistan and Pakistan into India. Every place was completely peaceful and people everywhere took us into their homes, and we took a bus from from London to Delhi longest buzzer on in the world. It was to two months. Again, it costs four hundred dollars and. But it then we stopped in lots of places, and and got to know people all along the way and also got to. Have some experience of their spiritual and religious practices all along the way. And that was really opening for me. You know, I had never really experienced much of anything besides Christianity. And Judaism before that. And then I got to India and I expected to stay for two weeks. Maybe an India. We were kind of, you know, searching for meaning. Yeah. And we were looking for it everywhere. And India was one of those places, but I got to India, and I. The first week. I was there. I heard about a course that a Burmese Buddhist teacher was was offering for westerners for the first time. It was the very first time. Right. A very western. Yeah. And it was in bug guy where the Buddha was enlightened. And and I did that course with many other people who are still might close friends. And if you're right that you I read somewhere that you you heard about that or at least in part because you you ran into Sharon salzberg on the streets. We had been at the same school. We already knew her. No, we didn't know each other there. So, but we heard of each other. And so she was a undergraduate in American studies, and I was a teaching fellow. But we had heard I guess that each other might be in India. So yeah. So we met there were very few westerners than I mean, there'd been the British Raj..

India Sharon salzberg London Delhi Iran partner Afghanistan Pakistan teaching fellow four hundred dollars two months two weeks
"yugoslavia" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And then the politics of it meant that the police came onto campus, and it was getting impossible. So I left just before I had done all the work for my PHD, except my dissertation, and I decided to take some time off and I traveled overland from London to Delhi. That is like going backward in time. It was then before everything was so, you know, kind of globalized, and it was amazing because at the time going through, you know, the former Yugoslavia Iran and Afghanistan and Pakistan into India. Every place was completely peaceful and people everywhere took us into their homes, and we took a bus from from London to Delhi so long as buzzer on in the world. It was two months. Yeah. And it costs four hundred dollars. And but then we stopped in lots of blazes and got to know people all along the way and also got to have some experience of their spiritual and religious practices along the way. And that was really opening for me. And I expected to stay for two weeks. Maybe an India. We were kind of searching for meaning. Yeah. The first week. I was there. I heard about a course that a Burmese Buddhist teacher was offering for westerners for the first time. It was the very first time. Right. Yeah. Mary westerners. Yeah. And I did that course, with many other people who are still might close friends, and there were very few westerners than I mean, there'd been the British Raj. And then there was a been gap. And then the us, you know, I think you did say this of it. What you discovered how would you talk about what you discovered in that experience of a serious introduction to contemplation to meditation. I, you know, it's hard to talk about I know, but. With the most basic thing that I could look inside myself and learn about the nature of the mind and the nature of the world. I was literature Sudan, I had read, you know, a thousand books probably, and I was always looking outside for more ideas, and, you know, more critical, understanding and more content. We didn't call it content. Yeah, we call literature. Right. And so just looking within was really stunning. And then that first course was from five in the morning till ten at night and. Little by little, you know, I started getting really quiet and still, of course, all kinds of things came up. But I really began to see that. I was not my mind. I was not my body. I was things, but I was also awareness. I began to see the basic nature of the impermanent of thoughts as they arise in follow. A and I started taking them less seriously. It was really wonderful. I felt much less dependent on finding things outside and it gave me a kind of radical self confidence. Like, I belonged here on the planet. And you know, and that I would be able to understand the basics of how it's all unfolding. I I would say that it also gave. Me kind of faith in the unfolding. I liked it you use the word sane faith. That's what it felt like it felt like I had a faith in actually the way things are and that that was okay..

London Delhi India Mary westerners Iran Afghanistan Sudan Pakistan four hundred dollars two months two weeks
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This weekend snap get to feature collaboration producer brianna brain from the lucky podcast brings us a story of one of yugoslavia's top basketball players since i was thirteen years old there was this tall six foot three and fell in love with game of basketball i played first division in yugoslavia that's like wnba here in in america her name is not a rothbart and in her country she's widely regarded as one of the best players to step on the court coaches said that i was one of the most wanted players they the country ever had i loved it so much i never wanted to leave i played all the way until i found out that i was pregnant and i remember that day we were warming up and i just couldn't feel right it felt like some of these pulling my legs down i couldn't jump and then that week i found out i was pregnant so i didn't play of course i didn't play after that not a story takes place in one thousand nine hundred ninety two about five years actually left league and open her own office now married and a mother of two she's focused on building a future with her family for not it doesn't know the country she calls home is on the brink of collapse my husband's in i took little kids four and a half years old and five in the half years old we lived with my in laws we were sitting the dinner table and we started hearing unusual noises outside of the window i look through the window it was unbelievable amount of people walking from one side of the town towards downtown hundreds of people yelling it was scary and suddenly i got i i.

brianna brain yugoslavia basketball wnba producer america thirteen years five years six foot
"yugoslavia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The ice and played and they were curious and they messed around and there were no parents driving wayne gretzky around in hockey league's all over the place and he said he learned all the magic and everything just playing a lot with the friends nearby and having fun on the ice and so a lot of these themes we come back to again and again let's talk about another character and this one's a great one robert hirschbeck born in croatia fled to communist yugoslavia with his family when he was eight settling in toronto they are the family live in a friend's basement for eighteen months and by the way you're going to hear a lot more of this story you're getting a flavor ford already aren't you again all these contestants start with nothing all of the sharks in the end started with nothing to let's hear robert and his life story i was born in croatia which was a communist country when i was there called yugoslavia we have dirt floors and no running water for a long time but it never seen because i was a little kid my grandmother lots of family dogs cats horses you never know the situation you grow up in until you compare it to something else yugoslavia was a great country if you were part of the communist party my dad was very anticommunist and would say all kinds of bad things about communism and he got thrown in jail twenty two times in the last time he got thrown in he was told if you come back you will never return he packed the suitcase grabbed my mom and me and you crossed the border to italy got on a boat and came to canada in yugoslavia my dad was such a happy guy he was a manager and he was pretty up there as well respected for what he did and then he comes to cam and he's sweeping floors in the factory he was never the same i think might ever other kid you never appreciate your parents until they're gone and i just think how hard he works to give me that opportunity interest you're such a need to justify that sacrifice i had lots of dreams whereas growing up i wanted to be a detective that a race car driver i was so unfocused my best friend went for this interview at a computer company and.

robert hirschbeck croatia yugoslavia ford communist party canada wayne gretzky toronto italy eighteen months
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of forensic archaeologists with the international commission on missing persons she's investigating crimes in the former yugoslavia and in guatemala and she joins me now on the line from the hague and how difficult is it to find physical evidence of a crime when examining human remains that may have been buried for many years oh i think or visit alert time um the sendings exposed to the elements and all the factors gives epa a possibility that certain amounts of evidence may be lost but i think the key thing is the evidence still remains over time and i think a kind of analogous situation is think about traditional geology at many thousands of years have passed and we still know at what happened on the landscape something the key thing is the evidence will remain on the landscape and hopefully in potentially human remains these crimes when you say evidence on behalf on on on on the physical landscape what what you mean by that and in evidence all a graves potential graves or overseas disposal mechanisms and i don't know the specifics in the ruins uk said only see the images like all the people have an and these may be quite shallow kind of burials than navy surface disposal but remnants do remain on the landscape clothing personally faxed as well as also the human remains himself is based very difficult as she to kind of a dispose of something fully on debt up other occasions web perpetrators of actually tried to do exactly that on older donors basically implicating sope stir that in the crimes they had committed but human remains themselves will will yield a quad lot of evidence even after many years decades summit is the recount off point i don't think there is yet again this is about preservation it's about natural climate and bury many factors that are at play in be different landscapes uh but there's a potential evidence for dna i mean dna all to identify the individuals as well as other physical evidence such as shell cases are ballistics perhaps near the evidence of machete injuries in certain instances so there is they're very good reason to continue to investigate whatever point there is access all political will to actually look at these locations.

yugoslavia uk guatemala epa
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The other day on the dream of thing she's a calmer that one should really move up in the republican party really think she's great but the thing is i dunno dhs knows where they are fbi when obama was president said they had a thousand and thirty people on the on the watch lists they haven't gone away so you don't have a i have a real feeling about that which is preventative detention i know it offends first amendment people i get it where does it end once you on unlock that one but you know i used to know liberal jews who would say to me the old syndicalist jewish people from new york i know many of them it's why i left new york by the way and became a conservatives thought solely because they grabbed my look pal and they gave me spritz the face the remarks political stuff listen to me you and your coa of yugoslavia's receiver tearing my lapel at one suit it's not that same for that reason but it's like they would say things like i'd love to see 99 guilty men go free than one innocent man locked up i said europe parts that was the way they thought led to the israelis i'd rather see 99 babykillers walk around amongst you than lock up one innocent amongst them i mean what are you how do you deal with this issue it's not an easy one i understand where this can go i know you could wanted to arresting innocent people so don't think i'm not sensitive to the other side of the coin i know mccarthy meant well but a lot of good people got hurt so you know we know would dealing with an dangerous and the women will save us from.

republican party fbi obama president new york yugoslavia first amendment europe mccarthy
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Not the ancient chinese wisdom that we believe to be the united states but a procedure that was written off his superstition and china in the sixteen hundreds in a gone away forever and mouth brought it back because they had no resources and tried to claim that this was their new medical again really as the only reason i brought it back and according to this article again couldn't get they couldn't provide medicine in the communist yugoslavia this is there here's the ancient he'll in our deserves better than any of that you know stuff it costs money healthcare system is the placebo effect yeah exactly right yeah exactly any any killed all the doctors to which i'm a big fan of the placebo effect guys that go with it but if it were on works right and so according to this article which again maybe completely wrong build the writer no no article tomorrow saying this is wrong but that's why i i say go with if you do acupuncture and it makes you feel better keep doing it whether it's really not what what the hell differences of make if it feels good who makes you feel better makes your next stop hurting go ahead and do it now i disagree i disagree if i'm not feeling better because of sound scientific principles i'd rather feel bad studies have found no meaningful difference between acupuncture and a wide range of sham treatments whether investigators penetrate the skin or not use needles picks target particular locations of the body site body cited by the acupuncture or random ones the same proportion of patients experience more or less the same degree of pain relief no matter what they do on all the studies sham treatments like the sham weill which reminds me there are acupuncture is on staff at the mayo clinic in the massachusetts general hospital for instance they're a thorough what are you call it placebo fists sir and why not exactly why hey john how's your knee feel and that bad huh what sorted pain treatment do you think works china acupuncture grade massage prayer crystals oxy go i was however you answer that question that's what we're.

united states china yugoslavia healthcare system writer mayo clinic massachusetts general hospital
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Frontline on the bbc world service this is the program that exposed the world we live in through the walk and the voices of leading artists on today's program will be exploring stories of history legacy and tradition we hear from the writer in what elon's on how the traditions of african barber shops inspired him to write to play the dictator the way in which the pery will unfold which is why alert terms and if it was of our road barbershop chronicles urges thinker witnessed it and we have to sao paulo on a journey through the past and the present to the city street obscene there is nobody kilyos with heavy traffic pollution stress free to art started as a way to alleviate told that you had it no great depressing city in st are change it that in a positive way not so instal on the cultural front we start today at the international criminal tribunal for the former yugoslavia at the end of november came the extraordinary news this next commander of bosnian croat forces had committed suicide by drinking poison telling a courtroom drama into a crime scene that was broadcast all over the world slobodon probably acts dramatic exit from his own appeal hearing eclipsed the verdict reached just days earlier in the longrunning trial of excommander of bosnian serb forces ratko manage watching these trials closely was lydia dim cuffs care and macedonian writer whose research tell the balkans wars shaped generation of writers born before the.

writer elon yugoslavia commander bbc sao paulo bosnian croat bosnian serb
"yugoslavia" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Lot of complete games in boston but it hasn't slowed him down they've got that sixteen game win streak it is however at risk of of going away because the miami heat were putting putting a pretty big beating on him is it gutierrez is there and said that it was pretty quiet and it looks like maybe that that qu why is it stadium a bunch of heat fanzine eight their turkey early in have that trip to ext lumber going on weren't cheering very loudly in the celtics chipping away so now it's ten point lead for the heat with about thirty five to play in the third something tell nick based on what we've seen from boston lately that they've got a plenty much aplenty run in the yet in this one in yugoslavia when on a team has a kind of winning streak so proud of what they are able to accomplish this remarkable in in in get blown out by a mediocre team like miami but i have to laugh is you're talking through the because our friend amino hasn't with a team goes the phoenix or a team spends a couple of votes in my view always yarmuth says you know what why emmy might have gotten them i saw me down phoenix couple weeks ago the laws do abed zones theme and he says you know scottsdale ghadames osgap out him he's got me a couple of times oh yeah it's got a lot of people but in this whole tally at the salty senior rida on down to wasted grain fire up the own achieving at the bootleggers and then get right back to the salty senorita touted john lewis but we mentioned celtics coming back they've they've come back to win eight times this season when trailing in the fourth quarter so they they have like i said not a lot of complete games but they've done enough which i guess uh one of two ways nick either that's a bad sign for them that they're constantly getting behind the scene for the rest of that they've won sixteen in a row without ever really getting it together all the way through you've got to feel like no matter what situation urhin because of his success you've had no nobody's going to stop you eu al anon cousin of kyrghiz because he has been absolutely unbelievable in the clutch guy re right now is the mvp of.

boston gutierrez celtics nick yugoslavia miami yarmuth rida john lewis kyrghiz mvp emmy phoenix
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The international criminal tribunal there's the international criminal court the icc which opened in two thousand two and a lot of critics say it's not working as intended syria comes to mind why is the icc fallen short a lack of their national well there was strong international will to end the war in bosnia after these killings around serb anita the warcrimes tribunal for the former yugoslavia you know has been largely effective yet unique situation bosnia where there was sort of a week russia and the serbs had no international backer uh and that's how the war ended in the war crimes tribunal for the former yugoslavia eggs form so the broader issued at permanent body the international criminal court is weaker and its authority is not spreading so 25 years ago when the court was created a man it was a different time uh i'm just wondering how you see it and whether they're still kind of the will for cooperation internationally i think there's a dramatically different world today where there's various power centers russia is much more assertive uh china and there isn't this dominance that existed in terms of the us in europe after the fall of the berlin wall 1989 so today you would just have total dismissal of nino narratives coming out of international bodies you have the change in technology the news media were anyone who wants to question our verdict coming out of any court anywhere can easily look online with a few key strokes and have their sense of victimization justified in you know there's a lot of false information out there so it's a very different world today you know these court proceedings have less authority david how hopeful argue that another tribunal could even be established a day for you know fill in the black were i'm not hopeful i mean i have to be honest about the sort of a strong sense of isolation the united states by the trump administration is not a fan of international justice you have a huge success for vladimir putin in algeria intervening for a dictator in a conflict were four hundred thousand people have died and putin has crushed any effort at justice there china's not interested in any kind of national tribunals either so i think we're moving backwards there's a deep sense again of satisfaction that this has finally happened macho found guilty all these years later but in terms of other situations.

syria bosnia yugoslavia russia europe news media united states vladimir putin algeria china berlin david 25 years
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Each d and atm new however warned break of it was born in the former yugoslavia to us serbian mother and the croatian father but has set up shop in paris for many years where he has become probably best known for his film scores but he's also traveled the world with his weddings and funerals orchestra sometimes known somewhat less grandly as the weddings and funerals banned under either name they do exactly what the title promises they play some of the funky upped the tempo music four weddings and yes funerals from the balkans this particular song happens to be from greece it's called t suck up peace souto risk risco your loves risk and it comes from an album the break of its released fold alcohol will be listening to some music for weddings and funerals on this edition of new sounds from the balkans from the near east central asia and west africa i'm john schaffer hope you'll stay with us let's could yin with and break a bitch and his wedding in funeral orchestra will follow that with a piece from the romanian gypsy brass bands known as fund fara choke carlier and they're album called on word to mars murphy's called the patrons funeral and then back to uh wedding music with another greek number from goeran break a bitch and his wedding funeral orchestra bald netanhayu kara boiko paid up again from the album called alcohol from which this song also come the the his wording two what yeah jonathan wasserman.

yugoslavia paris john schaffer mars murphy kara boiko jonathan wasserman greece west africa
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And then backed away that i said we are now you know happy just say that you guys had run up by an an and at hamburg twenty nine but you don't even know i flattening now quite the leader ban dr daily aama ties are on the board of the yemeni american merchants association thank you so much thank you for having me hm we've tackled a lot of heavy topics on the show today so tell you what let's finish with balkan mariachi yeah you heard me right turns out that mexican mariachi music caught on big time and cold war yugoslavia by bbc colleague pablo as far as it went to belgrade to find out why mexicans seen in my was very famous in i am very popular in yugoslavia and there were local bands imitative those songs plaguing mexican movies so it was a homegrown style that's that's wild so mexican mariachi music mexican movies all why did this mexican culture become so popular in the in the former yugoslavia to know that over retaining we have to look into their cold war after the second world war yugoslavia became ma a socialist country but they broke relations with that you always a sock so they stopped importing films some music from the ussr and so they have to look somewhat reynolds and they couldn't go to hollywood told to the west because they whereas felice country so they found that tell tentative in mexico it was like a third way to say so not from hollywood not from the soviets so he was coming in the middle it is there some cultural affinity between the two cultures that makes this kind of a natural fit like you know balkan a mexican cultures our what are they have in common to be honest sloughed corp which these famous meksi comes singer of the time who now he's 83 he told me that actually sapiens and mexicans have something in common which is that they are very temperamental he said to me when we laugh we love when we cry we cry we do it do not true way so proably that openness is something that links the culture with the latin culture of mexico so you met slavko perovic one at one of the stars of that seen in the form yugoslavia how did he go about learning these songs wall according to what he told me he went to.

cold war pablo yugoslavia ussr reynolds hollywood mexico hamburg bbc belgrade world war sloughed corp
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Eight hundred eight five hunt eight five five excu me eight five five four hundred savage joe at dr savages flagship in san francisco ksfo how're you i'm a short time listener i used the kgon ever i love opa by ellery but guy after all the disasters going on in europe i i love to travel but now i'm like i can't go there and more because obama is ideology spread being spray all over the world anyway my quite well largest quickly joe i'll tell you why you you can't even go visit yugoslavia thanks to the clintons oh yeah oh yeah whatever you had id eight years of whatever day he did apparently fred all that all we love everett by let everybody in now you know they're having tariff attack almost every other week it's ridiculous i mean you know anyway so the liberal media if you think oh what you're doing including the liberal breaks out there what you're doing it they are attacking trump and they want him to be assassinated in the same ideology ever any iran north korea and ice so who came up with if you think about the ideology bearing the same fight today are our enemy and look at celebrity what they're doing today they are so stop at trump and you know why because they live in a delusional world they think they are god because they make so much might have august fancy party so when date you what will they believe their own press clippings is what it is and what they're ticked off at people like rob reiner who came out with some dangerous language over the weekend on twitter i won't even repeated they're just mad that hilary lost that's all this is and i've said this before when i sat in the big cheer your for dr savage is that it's it's a media hissy fit it's a hollywood hissy fit it's a tantrum it is something that is not going away i said that when i was when i was here while back is something that is not going way now months later it is still not going away and joe the foundation of it is the election they they cannot be leave that hilary lost and not only can they not believe hilary lost they cannot believe she lost to someone like donald trump who they view as inferior they view as some time neanderthal they've you is someone is someone not as.

ellery obama yugoslavia clintons north korea rob reiner dr savage donald trump san francisco fred everett iran hilary hollywood joe eight years
"yugoslavia" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on KKAT

"Five hunt eight five five excuse me eight five five four hundred savage joe at dr savages flagship in san francisco ksfo how are you i'm a short time listener i use the uk jio whatever i love obama and hillary but after all the uh uh that's going on in europe i i love to travel but now i'm like i can't go there more because obama is ideology spread being spray all over the world anyway my point well what this quickly joe i'll tell you why you you can't even go visit yugoslavia thanks to the clintons oh yeah oh yeah whatever yeah the i eight years of whatever that he did apparently fred all day all we love every pilot everybody in her now they're having harrison almost every other week it's ridiculous i mean you know anyway so the the liberal media if you think oh what you're doing including the liberal breaks out there what they're doing instead they are attacking trump and they want him to be assassinated in the same ideology at our any iran north korea and iceland so who are the king up way if you think about the ideology during the same fight today our our enemy and if you look at liberty what they're doing today they are so staff at chuck and you know why because they live in a delusional world they think they are guy because they make so much might have august fancy parties so one day do it well they believe their own press clippings is what it is and what they're ticked off at people like rob reiner who came out with some dangerous language over the weekend onto twitter i won't even repeated they are just mad that hilary lost that's all this is i've said this before when i sat in the big cheer your for dr savage is that it's it's a media hissy fit it's a hollywood hissy fit it's a tantrum it is something that is not going away i said that when i was when i was here while back is something that is not going way now months later it is still not going away and joe the foundation of it is the election they they.

obama yugoslavia clintons north korea iceland rob reiner dr savage san francisco uk hillary joe harrison iran hilary hollywood eight years one day
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WLOB

"Eight eight five five four hundred savage joe at dr savages flagship in san francisco ksfo how are you i'm a short time listener i live kgon ever i love obama and hillary but after all the uh after going on in europe i i love to travel but now i'm like i can't go there more because obama is ideology spread being spray all over the world by anyway game by quite well what this quickly joe i'll tell you why did you you can't even go visit yugoslavia thanks to the clintons oh yeah oh yeah whatever the ida earhardt whatever they apparently fred all that we love everett violent everybody in who now having arafat all every other week it's ridiculous i mean you know anyway so the liberal media if you think about what you're doing including the liberal breaks out there what do they are attacking trump and they want him to be a fat made it into fame ideology has our any iran north korea and i want a way if you think about the ideology during the same fight but they are our enemy and celebrity what doing today they are so stop it shock and you know why because they live in a delusional world think they are god because they make so much might have august baffi party so when you while they believe their own press clippings as water it is and what they're ticked off at people like rob reiner who came out with some dangerous language over the weekend on twitter i won't even repeated are just mad that hilary lost that's all this is and i've said this before when i sat in the big cheer for dr savage is that it's it's a media hissy fit it's a hollywood hissy fit it's a tantrum it is something that is not going away i said that when i was when i was here while back is something that has not going way now months later it is still not going away and joe the foundation of it is the election they they cannot be lee that hilary lost and not only can they not believe hilary lost they cannot believe she lost to someone like donald trump who they view as inferior they view as some type or neanderthal they've you is someone is.

obama yugoslavia clintons north korea rob reiner dr savage donald trump san francisco hillary joe fred everett arafat iran hilary hollywood
"yugoslavia" Discussed on WJDX

WJDX

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on WJDX

"From out of town is half in yugoslavia broadway play how often do you make it to the cia and i always kinda laugh and say almost never i've been many times i in years past but it has been quite a while since i am gone having had numerous experiences of i guess which is the tony awards right of tony award winning plays the tony like the oscars for stage plays went to see the hottest ticket in town everyone's talking about it and i just could think to myself this is complete garbage and of course the politics of new york city theater are more extreme in their progressive nece and leftism and antigod anti republican anti white male nurse then and then almost anything else you could possibly find anywhere i mean it's like you're sitting down with the diversity and social justice coalition at that college up in washington state and i'm forgetting green not do green something or other uh that college where they have the crazy stuff going on that's what it's like with theater in new york city i mean i remember seeing a play not last play that i saw which is a a celebrated play called the hedwig in the angry inch and i can't even really describe to you what i mean it's about someone who is transgender and uh removes a part of his anatomy and i mean it's it is just while just not very good and have been celebrates probably ilan so broadway you get all this progressive stuff but you'd think there are i don't know maybe some lines to all this but of course that is not the case as we see here now shakespeare is a treasure for all generations i dunno i sound like a stuffy wanna be english teacher here but shakespeare's incredible as we all know a pickup shakespeare play read it go see it even better or watch a televised version of it and shakespeare's a genius of the written word way mozart was a genius of music and i've always wanted to go see shakespeare in the park but in in new york city they they have this production of shakespeare every summer in central park i've never been able to go mostly.

cia tony award york city theater shakespeare mozart yugoslavia social justice washington new york
"yugoslavia" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"yugoslavia" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"And if something comes up you deal with him for the but there's about a ten twelve solid guys it you look your merited a quarterback you as you america agai you see that guy every day you guys talk all the time there's certain positions that you know that you have to be involved in the strength of who you are as coach yugoslavia volatile guy's probably a little bit more like a secondary okay when i see still iconic older hey boys you know because i'm up because i'm used a beer with those guys right so that's part of it is well so you you you what's your hands on everybody but you can't touch touchable and this is where you leadership it comes it did you can sit do you consider yourself a players coach uh i i yeah i i don't know i i'm kind of a i'm kinda down the middle on that he here's what i am i can identify with the players because i was a player right i use that as an advantage for me because i know how they feel when something occurs or something about the happen i go i i i i get it i know why right a lot of times i tell the players i look helped me to help you help me help you here's the deal i'm do i was always big on explaining things this is why were doing that i was big letting players know this why mmm because why was knowledge not just because i say so why there's going to be a method why right okay it was not what to do how to do it why would boys aboard here's the reason and then i'd give him data or information that show this why would do this well i i wonder you know i it certainly a correlation i look at the teams insist sustained success of crazy at the time i just notice there all led by strong i own most militaristic type leaders in check in popovich and and i look for exceptions to the rule and the one that i can come up with ways phil jackson who has clearly had sustained success with several franchise in has more i think on credits has more they laidback attitude with his players well you say.

the deal popovich yugoslavia phil jackson