20 Episode results for "Youth Movement"

Climate Podcast Bonanza!

Drilled

28:20 min | 11 months ago

Climate Podcast Bonanza!

"Hatred listeners, we're getting close to releasing season five. So we'll have that for you in the next couple of weeks in the meantime I wanted to let you know about all of the other climate shows that are on the critical frequency network and or are coming soon some of these are a special sneak peek. The trailers aren't even out yet and we're really excited about what we have in store. Take a listen. Let us know what you think and we'll be back to you soon with the next drawn season. and. I. WanNa tell you about another climate change podcast. Broken ground is a podcast by the southern environmental law center that's digging up environmental stories in the south. The leaves season of the podcast explores how southerners living along the coast are navigating sea level rise as they race against the clock through personal stories and firsthand accounts. Listeners learn how all along the changing. Atlantic. Shores communities and individuals are meeting the challenges with determination to address this crisis had on how people on the frontlines protect themselves from the immediate and impending threats of rising tides. How to our social inequities come floating to the surface communities, battling flooding and storms Find out this season on broken ground available broken ground podcast, dot org, or wherever you get your. First. Generation Green new deal which takes you behind the scenes to look at the youth movement pushing for a green new deal. Stay tuned all the way to the N. for a special little bonus segment from these guys got a pretty funny interview from the guys who made the Ed Markey Video, which you may have seen going viral this past week. If, you want more stuff from them. I highly recommend you sign up for their newsletter. We'll drop a link to that here too. Here's a sneak peek at auction green new deal. I'm Sam Allerton I'm thirty years old I'm documentary filmmaker and I'm terrified of climate change and mankind has as little as a dozen years to save life on earth as we know it. We see. That, you'll energy. and. So a whole lot of other people of my generation. I would lie there awake for hours and just feel this like rising anxiety in my stomach invite guy in my heart don't have unlimited time and I think that's really difficult for people to wrap their heads around. I'm the host of a new podcast from critical frequency called generation green new deal. For years I felt hopeless because no one power seemed to be talking about this existential issue. It seemed like nobody was taking it seriously climate change is not a. Real intention for a lot of people before November two, thousand, eighteen climate politics seem dead in the water the fossil fuel industry kept us, walked for three decades debate about whether or not global warming was real. So what happened? The world is waking up. And change is coming with the you like it or not i. think there's something extraordinary going on globally where young people are finding their fire it's twenty twenty. Now, a presidential election is approaching and things are very different. Primary voters chose climate change as the top issue for the next president to address Winston in workers all around the world of flooding streets demanding action on climate. They call themselves the sunrise movements on Capitol Hill Police arrested fifty one youth climate activists. Tuesday science tells us we have nine years before the damage is irreversible we're fighting for the future of this planet if politicians are taking a different approach, it's because they've been pushed to do so. This podcast is about the people who are doing the pushing. We. Talk about the scale of the climate crisis and the inaction of establishment politician. So we gotta take over go to your politician demand the world that you want where's the people who voted you're supposed to listen to us? That's year old Johnson. Sixteen. She. Along. I've spent the last two years following the Youth Movement for a green new deal. In this podcast, we'll be talking about her scrappy organizations led by teenagers and twentysomethings have embarrassed politicians knocked powerful incumbents out of Congress and brought the US. Closer than ever to actually addressing the issue that will define the future of humanity climate change. Young people said, I'm not generation. Z.? Generation ged this generation green new deal. The very future of human civilization as we know, it is on the line what would you do to protect? I'm here before the whole country today announcing that we're the generation of the green new deal coming soon from critical frequency wherever you get your podcasts. No place like home from Marianne hit and Anna Jean Noor is a show that gets to the heart of the climate crisis. They just wrapped their third season bringing the light which was focused on various lessons that we can take from a wide variety of religious traditions to bring a strength in facing not just the climate crisis, but it turns out the pandemic and all these other crises we're facing to highly recommend listening to that season if you need a boost. We're back and this season of no place like home we're bringing the late we're exploring how spirituality it's many diverse and beautiful forms is a key ingredient to navigating the climate crisis is important from a Muslim perspective your valuable because you exist because God, created your value because you have a soul, you have value and everything in creation is similarly -able. Travel to Puerto Rico and meet a former evangelical. Pastor moved home to heal his community after climate disaster I didn't know how much I love the land told that moment when I saw like Bayer and in pain, you could almost feel groaning scripture talks about the growing of the earth sending a message to the sense of God like rice up and do something caring for creation healing the earth protecting. The sacred whatever the language we use spirituality has always explored are relationship with the earth and one another we know social movements throughout history have been rooted in spiritual traditions. What can the climate boom Maitland from that history? How can we bring our whole hearts to the climate crisis? Faith has helped and other social movements to paint a picture of what we are working towards not just what we are working. against. Man We need everyone to feel as whole as possible and as powerful as possible and as courageous as possible because we've got a lot of work to do because everything we love is at stake and there's no place like home our new season bring the light is coming to you soon. Next we have a new season of drilled coming at you. This season is going to be focused on the long running case between Chevron and various indigenous groups in. Ecuador. The case started in nineteen ninety three it's still going on. It's nuts. It goes in like a hundred different directions and I think you're GONNA like it. Here's a little snippet of that. This season underworld. They went after Conde Nast. Truly to believe to toss. The criminal. There's a lot in the film that they could've used to go on a more narrow requests. But they've not done that. They simply asked for the entire footage to be turned over to go on a fishing expedition. I think if I had it to do over, I would advise my client completely protest the trial and unfortunately steven didn't have that option because Stephen Lives in New York. And he subject to the jurisdiction of the court and he has to the case. My clients did have that option and that was not a card we choose to play in retrospect that may not have been. The Best Decision Hindsight is twenty twenty it was cold. So we would be all bundled up. We would be in this long line to get through security to get into the house, and then you would see a row of five black suburbans. Arrive with tinted windows and out of it would come senior management of Chevron their head of litigation there in tyrod legal team, and they were ushered in through a separate entrance as VIP's. So they didn't have to stand in the line with all the rest of US I am now tired of reading about Stephen and the ankle enough with Stephen and the ankle. I. Want the attention to go back on the Ecuadorians and what they had suffered. The state cannot contract human rights away. Human rights are inalienable. They belong to humans they belong to the people. Teak is a no bullshit look at the climate conversation what we're talking and not talking about on climate and where we might do better it's hosted by myself and Mary. Heckler and we have gusts pretty frequently this season so far we've had on Kendra Pierre Louis Kate Aronoff Brian Con epicurious editor David to an coming up. Soon, we'll have indigenous rates, reporter, Rebecca, Neagle, and lots more planned for the rest of the season to here's a little taste of it if you haven't given ellison yet. Often just feels like media as an institution has a very thin. Yes. Very, and so the difference in those two scenarios is your her you're harming and individual, and I'm not minimizing about pointing out flaws with an institution means that the institution has to reckon with that has to reckon with it rate. It's attitude it'd be like Oh. You did about thing to a person who reference institution will let you go even other they don't always do that. Yeah. We have HR policies that deal with that that's jammed but there aren't really greet policies to point out the fact that your institution is problem. That's a really good. People don't make those connections. They don't make the connection between racism and climate because the Stories Lapan large not getting told because of WHO's in the room and who knows the answer what question. It's not just using the room. It's who will let you do that. Right and some newsrooms and and this is shifting climate. itself is seen as an activist issue and when you add I'm an at brace. We're talking about two activist issues and that's yeah any. I've been thinking about this recently because i? Just read this book called. Jemima Code, which is all about black cookbooks and there is a serious racer. People in the seventy s you know. Lack people writing cookbooks at. Writing about the health trends that we are only getting around to now they were I mean there is a deep history of black being a deep history of black tank. Arrays. I thought it just do like a quick lightning round on things. You may not know about Bernie. Sanders. We'll see how you do I probably won't know them, but that's great content. Right. One why does Bernie Sanders hate icebergs? I can only assume he is a fan of the movie titanic. No is because only the top one percent can stay above water. Deep kind of fact. Next, we have another youth climate podcast. This one comes at you with stories and feeling and is really centered on the collective community feel of the youth climate movement, which personally is the thing that gives me the most kind of hope when I talked to those guys, it's not just the fact that they're working. So hard on climate norm I one of those people that thinks the youth will save us. It's just that their worldview is truly collaborative in a way that I find. Really inspiring. Here is a little preview of that show it's called inherited and it's produced by Georgia right and Juliana Bradley. Whether, we like it or not. We are each born into a flawed world. A warming world. And as we get older begin to understand exactly what we've inherited. Greed I. think that's our biggest enemy. Liga general darkness almost around our degeneration. Water there was water everywhere. And then as a generation, we face a choice. Either accept this hand we've been dealt. OR RISE UP, to change it. Young people I think throughout history have seized the moment mass people together you know nonviolent direct action. Around the world young people are growing up in the shadow of the climate crisis. But instead of resigning themselves to a doomed planet, they've made the choice to fight back. It just ticked me off how much. We knew. It's the people who are making billions of dollars off of fossil fuels. Are Making US feel like we're responsible their greatest threat to proffer right now are the climate striker's nobody needs a billion dollars. Nobody needs even close to that. They're learning from all those who have come before those who have fought for the right to vote to love to be equal. To live I think that we are doing what people have done in the past where saying we see something wrong and we're going to fix it if handful of people can affect so many lives and like what could thousands or millions of people fighting for justice do? The youth climate movement has revolutionized the way we see our future, their faces, their voices, and their actions have awakened the world to the injustice enormity of the climate crisis. wiz. I was one of the fifty one people arrested for sitting in Nancy Pelosi's office. I was just sitting in the hallway thinking about all the people in this country who've come before us who've been fighting for the same causes it finally felt like a turning point for the climate movement where. You. Finally see some hope that we could have a future that's liveable for us, and like this is what it's going to take you. And what it takes is growing the movement. We're all organizing onto their last night. So basically, what you do is you go through and just like swipe right on everybody. And then you. Take what time you gonNA. Go to the polls. Do you want me to. These young people come from everywhere many from places in communities that have been directly impacted by climate change. The, other big thing we heard was fire there were fires in the rockaways and that was the scariest thing because they didn't say where. And there are as many different climate stories to tell as there are people on this earth. I am in the same room with fifty activists and somebody asks who has been called the gratitude of their country. Every single hand on Darwin went up and this girl from Sweden said I think called the Gra Timber Sweden. Swedish. She's the most sweet humble girl in the world. Right is not actually even asking for this attention. We don't all have to Gretchen Berg were not all Gretchen Berg. I got tired of that single story of what I come and activists should be we all have our own stories. We all have our experiences as. And that's why we're here. To bring you those stories. Young people have decided to spend their childhoods, their lives transforming the world they've been given. Someone's gotTa do it I'm twenty seven. I'm twenty one years old. Now that I'm eighteen, I can vote I could start changing the narrative at fifteen. I'm also thirteen years old so we'll see how things play out. We don't choose the world we inherit. But we choose what to do with it. I'm Georgia right and I'm Juliana Bradley and this. Is inherited. Yes. Stewart. And finally in October will be bringing you hazard, which is a slightly different twist its environmental health show it takes the true crime format and applies it to chemicals asking the question in each season. Why are chemicals assumed innocent until proven deadly I think we've all been lied to by this big manufacturer. This is irreversible and something's got to be done. A. Hey, it's a me roost my new show, Hazard Visit Investigative True Crime podcast that ask the question why are chemicals innocent until proven deadly. Season one of hazard will focus on one specific pesticide Corpora, foss, inorganic phosphate pesticide used by farmers on more than sixty crops, including grapes, Strawberries, cotton, almonds, and oranges. In fact, they were created during World War Two as a nerve toxin. The reason I, chose to focus on clarify this first season of hazard is because I, myself had an acute exposure to it in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine. What I didn't know at the time is that I was pregnant Children are more vulnerable to environmental exposures than adults. So in Utero and in early life, especially during those periods, your neurological systems are developing. Your brain is developing and chemical exposures that can affect that development can kind of knock it out of track. Hazard tells the story of my journey to discover how my children ended up with neurological and anatomical birth defects. Researchers started seeing an unusual condition and babies or children. And started to do some retrospective investigation of something that these cases have in common. Tragically, it is a story that I share with many mothers. In the process of searching for answers to my own children's health problems. Began to ask the question. What took the environmental. Protection Agency. So long to ban Clark Ross, I ever since silent spring, and we got our first environmental standards and we had the banning of DDT and some of the other persistent pesticides. The chemical industry made it its job to walk the halls of EPA. And EPA when it comes to pesticides is thinking very hard about not being sued by the chemical industry I traveled to communities where Corpora paraphrase is still being used twenty years after its indoor use was banned is not something that wasn't an issue ten years ago unfortunately is happening as we speak just a couple of days ago will receive a phone. Call from farm workers here in the community. Bakersfield that were sprayed with pesticides and it's hard because they know that it's dangerous but unfortunately, sometimes the need to work is so great. They just feel that they have no choice hazard looks at the health effects of corporate issues in these communities and we narrowed in and focused on Clark paraphrase specifically. And we found that if the application occurred during the second trimester, those berths were threefold more likely to have developed autism. We'll look at the politics behind the chemicals long shelf life towards the end of Obama. Administration there was enough evidence to support the van of this pesticide for cultural purposes. The only thing that was needed was a signature of the EPA director, but that's one the change of administration happen. So we had Dow chemical, which is the primary maker of Harrah's contribute a million dollars to the trump inauguration. Had, one of the anti-regulatory executive orders was signed early in two thousand seventeen and the president gave Andrew Aware CEO of to how his signing pan. Finally, we'll look at what the future holds in store for. US and for pesticides in general. Subscribe to hazard wherever, you get your podcasts. Make sure to check all of those out wherever you get your podcasts and now that special bonus segment from generation green new deal. This is sunrise movements, Alex Akif, giving us the backstory on that Ed Markey viral ad. If you haven't heard that had here's a little snippet from it but go Google Ed markey green new dealmaker it's worth that. There's an invisible contract we all signed at birth a promise. Every hour we work means long days of freedom and security. Pave the road in your neighborhoods in it added up to a country. But when crisis hit. Trump's government abandoned America. We asked what we do for our country. They looked for what they could take. But. This. To make an ad that like a repeat of mass whole would be alive. TYPO. Like. You know politics is always it's always dealing with these really high polluted morality and I think it's you know most people don't think it in those terms most people don't think. So abstractly, they liked the fucking to is. They like booking they they they argue. Leonardo copy or Martin? Sheen went better in the movie That's what most people Massachusetts. WanNa. Actually talk about. So. Yeah. Just the base in energy, but it wasn't until the night before the ad actually. That me and SAM. We call the Jeremy Ornstein who also does story work for sunrise. Jeremy. Always. Hype always, very excited always full of optimism and energy. God because it's funny before every single big thing that me and Sam do we convince ourselves like this is going to stock? We caught up. We don't know what we're doing. We are one wonders it's it's a it's a good energy I think to start with creativity because it really makes you wanNA talk yourself and it doesn't mean you have a high expectations which is not bad. But yeah. We were really beating ourselves up and my script that point we just worry and terrible down human. Just down on political Jeremy was doing pushups and we walked through the Party a couple of times, and then we just did a sentence them structure where you know I would start off like there's an invisible contract we all side at birth and then Sam would have to make up the next line. We just tried to make it very much like furious improvisation once we turned on Gimme shelter that's when I just like got into the Marquee Kermode. Just like I live the rest of the house like like the Democrats and the Republicans, I said wait goddess save a fisherman. A month later, we had one hundred million dollars for fishing industry in like we just narrated it like it was like a like a movie trailer and it's like a phone and a drone shots up from the boat like the getaway car you know. So yeah. We just tried to top ourselves and just try to make something that may or US laugh and feel hopeful and cheerful and energized. and. Most political messaging is not based on expressionism. It's based on data. It's based on a Senate coal computation of human emotions rather than actually. Communicate, actual communication, actual joking and laughter, and the interaction that we hold dear in our social lives. Okay that is it for this time. You can go check out all of those shows wherever you listen to your podcasts make sure to subscribe so you don't miss any. Of the first episodes or new episodes coming your way. Thanks as always for listening and we'll see. Yes.

US Sam Allerton Ed markey Stephen Lives EPA Youth Movement Chevron Bernie Sanders Jeremy Ornstein Georgia Juliana Bradley president Capitol Hill Police Hazard Ecuador
Youth Movement

PTI

21:46 min | 1 year ago

Youth Movement

"Pardon the interruption but I'm Mike Low bond game three of the world series is tonight Tony here's going that means you can't possibly fall asleep early yeah hi I'm going to need a car to pick me up after the fourth inning okay says hey you know what I was signed pared you can now watch full episodes of P._T._I. Every day on E._S._p._N. Dot Com and the I told by the way that secondary Washington team you remember them I do skins redskins yet they were their usual dreadful cells last night moved to the victorious opponent the Minnesota Vikings won their fourth straight and kirk cousins played his fourth consecutive great game coincidence causes connected on on series game played in Washington DC in eighty six years or as I like to call it junior high the nationals host the Astros in a pivotal games having the most magical season they can possibly have that appears to be what the Washington nationals are doing and to me right now looking at this from the Astros they seem reticent they're making mistakes they've got all trade offs I here's what he has discouraged me this morning I woke up by looked at I should've the edge coming off that game I mean coming off what they did in Houston to win those two games from those two pitchers so I understand that but tone Sanchez's rested this is not like hitting that depends on timing Sanchez might just go out there and blow the tone some doesn't seem right been good against the nationals on June thirteenth in nets park he went seven two thirds seventy one third scoreless giving up two hits on the other side Annabelle Sanchez who is unbelievably great in his last outing two weeks ago he went seven two thirds of no hitters rested but most of the time this year he's a five arm not there at home in DC look at it from afar it looks like nobody in Bays walking getting the nationals way not even the Astros who I thought all season would be the world odd wars and girls in today's episode the clippers crush the warriors the vikings win again and Latin gives a quote for the ages but we begin today with the first one he's winner they're not gonna be yes I'll go into the details a little bit because I'm a little worried about the starting matchups in terms of pitching Zach Cranky has not been good in the playoffs but he's from apologizing to teammates to getting an eagles linebacker candies always doing the right thing question Tony is are you buying they're playing at this level is the new normal squall tonight I saw Tim Kirkman and Ward Oh Perez and to share all say Astros win tonight the bats will wake up I hope that's not the case I hope not oh now for your boy kirk cousins I just want to say and I know you agree with this that beating the Washington redskins no particular accomplishment everybody bids the the redskins his completion percentage was tremendous it was tremendous but didn't have any touchdown passes he's been great in this four week run he's got ten touchdowns and one picky sixth-inning pitcher in only seven starts out of thirty two did he get into the seventh inning so Mike my issue is this and you've heard me say it all year how do they sorry if the Nazis win this series is probably over if the Astros win it may just be beginning we'll bond who did he give the edge tonight you know the EDS has to go to the averaging three hundred fifteen yards per game he's completing seventy eight percent but for me if you asked me to go all in on kirk cousins seen him for so many years can smart thing to do burn him for game four so you can understand it's my worry that's how do it's only seriously for second that's a legit worry I get that I mean it's just it's amazing to look I know you'll get bogged down the details of the match ups sometimes in sports sometimes in sports one team is twenty three of twenty six passes and the three incompletions to throw away the other one was dropped causes has been on fire the last month Patrick mahomes if kirk cousins continues to play like he's been playing four weeks I'm sorry I'm not GonNa put somebody in a in a yellow jacket after four weeks yeah give me eight you know everybody grades easy now you know after the cowboys lost three straight games win one and every you know everybody is not like the Houston Astros can't come back and win one game against anybody anywhere to one is just to one that's right yeah you know most of us in the world at start really it starts at two one graphic I see on sports every sport television network is all the cowboys must be back because they won a game kirk cousins I think kirk cousins is air to make him stay in his seat I was thinking of going up to the press box and just napping somewhere tried to make the whole thing if I can I'm going to try my best I won't GonNA PTO get from six to eight hundred from six to eight ball year but it's not been coasties Patrick Corbin which is which is wait till after next week yeah when they play at Kansas City you know impact plays I don't feel the same way I can wait after that and don't even then we can come on and say kirk cousins is knocking them dead I'll tell you this there's some real stuff on our team on offense in digs and feeling and Dalvin cook have kirk cousins I thought he did a better job I think that you didn't Washington because of the craziness rebounded but again let's not make Joe Montana just shit I wanna see it three to four more times and Kyle Rudolph he's got stuff to work with they're good they're a good team. The Los Angeles Clippers followed their fourth quarter. beat down to the Lakers the other night with a Tony we do this sometimes we go through and we try to rank the quarterbacks and see where you would draw that line and guys you have guys who will replace I would always have a one off this is the reality there's going to be nights like that this year you've got to play through it you've gotta keep fighting and keep getting better that's the plan on quote Yvonne is this the Warriors Reality Tom it appears to be and here's why of course everybody knows Steph dream on and even Game beatdown of the Golden State Warriors the clippers went for one hundred forty four points and that is a ton after the game Steve Kerr said quote this is bowman how about him no Eric Pascoal Pascale and Amari Spelman Again College Basketball you warriors Mortiz Chris Ngelo Russell who hasn't been the warrior but he's an All Star S. three all stars in one lineup Kvant loonies been around a couple of years now you know him big guys we can be a presence they're going to have to have oh I'll take it from the war your standpoint you can't lose Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson and not take twenty game hit drafted by the the the the suns in this sort of sort of cast about you know the name Glen Robinson but not Glen Robinson the third the NASA warrior now but the after two gains the Los Angeles Clippers looked like worldbeaters yeah I overestimated how many points it was only one hundred forty one which is media presence but let me go to the rest of the guys now we talk about the new reality Jordan pool you may have heard of him from college basketball familiar with him as he warrior tone no we have this initial shock because it's one game in October one game after this initial shock they'll get better and Steve Kerr will coach people up there they do they don't have the horses to do the things that we're accustomed to seeing them do and they got beat last night it's tough to judge. Tony Hose me Tom a deep diving box from last night's NBA action before she is to glaze over when it comes to Atlanta's trae young not only too good to just take a complete knows dot I don't see you may be right about the clippers but then they've already played the best team so what do you expect right some room to shoot there is a great statistic here he leads the NBA in makes and takes makes from beyond thirty feet not steph curry believe about the warriors and Steve Kerr and how they're going to get better I believe that but it's a players league man and right now a lot of players in this League WanNa take it he scored Thirty Eight on eleven twenty when shooting but he had nine assists and seven boards Tony so much for being a scrawny little kid like you had of how you trash this kid when he was how totally dismissive you work of this was dismissive highlights from last year rookie del you need to start thinking about trae young as a star in this league come on now I want him to be a star if for the only reason no trae young day-night they those are dame Lillard shots three of four last night he shoots from beyond thirty thirty four percent that's a Monster Counseling Dracula tell me how you're feeling no one understands how only these no one will even let me into their house. I knock knock but they ignored me there's two I'm having a breakthrough it's not easy to be a vampire but with gyco it's super easy to switch and save hundreds on your car insurance Kemba Walker in Charlotte I mean you don't get into the playoffs you gotTa in Basketball Playoff there's a lot of good geico presents fig weekend ahead in college football which makes it a perfect time for a visit from our great friend the Enviable Young College Game Day analyst David pollock too young uh-huh what else I look in the mirror don't even see myself anymore if you don't see yourself clearly can you really expect us let's start with this number nine Auburn at number two. Lsu what sort of a chance should we give Auburn it's tough in your name name their coach tell me the Atlantic coach's name I tell me Lenny Wilkins no no no peers tony their new their yard line not a Oklahoma last year hitting absurdly dijon now why it appears to be taking another step from being a really so ridiculously underrated all these years underrated in terms of his defense and his bottling just everything he can do so it's GonNa be it's GonNa be a process on smarter about it than we are and we'll coach Khaki get his second win against a top ten team when look dame travels to an are so it's tipped ploughs Atlanta's Nellie got trae young with John Collins was a little more proven de'andre hundred Virginia cameras they got some guys Tony would shot for him maybe he is a star what I worry about my is when you're on a bad team and you score a lot of points what does it really mean well twenty You know game the shock is in a new building seeing the warriors Taylor I will tell you this and I agree with a lot of what you number thirteen Wisconsin Loss Illinois last week which of course for big ten people's unthinkable I cannot see Wisconsin giving Ohio State WanNa end up like Kevin love to Minnesota score and a lot of points at a team that goes nowhere let's take a break coming up could Auburn takedown Lsu this weekend we'll ask some order didn't that ballgame was Kinda Dare Lsu run the football more consistently now they weren't good enough upfront to stop the run game but they took their chance there. I think the expect Beau Knicks to go for an score thirty points in death valley that's a tough ask for a true freshman and offense struggled passing the football David family and you would see trae young shooting and he'd be shooting from way deep creating klay deep and I figured it's because he's small he's got a back up he's gotTa get the Dallas Shaun Livingston guys to take a twenty game here but draymond green and Steph curry great great players and Steve Kerr is a great great coates maybe that defensive line can make things hard for for Lsu Joe Borough but if they have a good day and they hold them to twenty eight or thirty one auburn's most famous enthusiastic alum Charles Wade Barkley at the airport this morning that's at chuck I'm really fired about fired up about Auburn's chances tomorrow let's let's go to Michigan the coach Jim Harbaugh is now one in ten against top ten teams after losing at Penn state the wolverines hosts number eight Notre Dame like Auburn does yes Florida's good players Upfront Auburn has a slew of really good players that can dominate a game and here's the thing Joe Boroughs and that passing attack got a young team and they I was hoping and thinking what you know what I was hoping and the Bulls might be the team that puts those guys together in ensemble eight any trouble I think it's an entire beatdown tomorrow am I crazy for thinking that now because when you go back and watch the tape excel oh I think he's an apology at some point too I think I I think you're GonNa because he takes him from greatly since and he takes them pretty well he does he just Brian Kelly has not been great away from home as well with the Irish I think this is I think I like Michigan in this ball game I think I think they're fine defensively they're going to be just fine and can do the same recipe and they have a better defensive front Derrick Brown and my gosh big cat and Davidson and co they got some dudes up front they can make some place is behind you. I've never been to South Dakota what should we know about this particular match up well it's so cool man because we go all over the place I think Wisconsin's struggles on defense is going to be athletically trying to keep up with a scheme that they've already shown they struggle with last week with Illinois now all about numbers and it's all about the game and they're gonNA read linebackers and they're gonna read safeties in he's GonNa hold in he's GonNa spit the ball out there quickly and make big plays one thing ever in school history South Dakota state sold out their tickets and they have a sold out venues so it's Kinda cool to bring some excitement got the bucket list checked off he looked like a guy that negotiated the pocket and look like a quarterback that new his answers for the first time this season against a salty penn state in a tough atmosphere the warriors Okay WanNa go in there and they are going to take joy if they can beat them and these are their their matchup disadvantages and they don't have the defender Klay Thompson was stuffed bet on Auburn because they're all fence and last time we saw Bo Nixon a big spotty it wasn't great but I'll tell you this there is nobody that LSU is played that has the monsters upfront on Saturday night tomorrow night should we like his chances to finally get a second win against a top ten team I do I like Michigan Game and they go like fifty three yards or something and it was a zone read with Peter's running his own read who's nothing like just fields and so the weather might get sloppy and that might change conditions but I think Michigan's in a really good spot because I think they have an off it's the first time I've seen this season where I believe their offense has indentity of who they are and who they might be going get you out of here on this you're in Brookings South Dakota for North Dakota State and South Dakota State South Dakota looks very sounds steroids and you talk about this Wisconsin Oftens Jack Cohn in the run game has been very average it's really really good defenses so can he you know what's interesting Tony You bring those numbers right about Jim Harbaugh how bad they struggle you know what Brian Kelly's records on the road against ranked opponents now as I liked what I saw from Michigan a week ago was the first time I saw an offense of identity they go seven for nine on third down for one hundred plus yards for say Patterson they're gonNA have to find a couple of turnovers in play clean on offense and not and not have any turnovers and maybe they have a chance but I think on the same page with you Wisconsin trying to houses on this day four years ago cousins led the Redskins bad from twenty four nothing deficit to beat the bucks after that win cousins famously ran through the tunnel streaming homes and it's the bucks opening night win over the rockets a big deal Tony do about one st is don't you it's main you told me the Code Tin Oo that's not good who I mean no so I I just think it's interesting we're on horrible all the time and and rightfully so he deserves criticism Juan Soto one of the reasons Washington nationals don't Miss Bryce Harper is one Soto has become a big star and then dependable left handed hitter the last two years every second when I was twelve I saw the heads I've nothing like that's the one thing in the United States continental United States I'd like to see the heads because the whole world will watch it if I don't stay nobody will remember what mls is unquote the thing about that quote is he might be right now Tony they played last year in the playoffs and South Dakota lost the last person to beat North Dakota State was South Dakota state so instate rival it'd be cool atmosphere how about this I be a guy that leads them in in scores a bunch of points start really an offense you know bill for that but the recipe we've seen for for upsets this season and this is GonNa happen suggest popped eight and said quote this was unintentional mistake and unfortunately I put something in my body that was completely unaware of unquote and you'll pardon my cynicism if I don't believe him or anybody else who says this only he's in the middle of a young players is pretty impressive I think yet eighteen fourteen and four blocked shots in the opener now he goes away or with Ohio state's not going to be it's not going to be good enough and their defense I don't think in hold on house down the whole time so I expect Ohio state the win by seventeen twenty plus and we don't go to a ton of smaller schools and schools in smaller divisions and most people pay attention just to the top and may two but this is a robbery that's been cooled for the last several years into South Dakota I don't know if you guys have but I'm I'm down to six now and the states of having we'll we'll yeah we'll bond's a lot closer caution is the right call yes the Patriots traded Michael Bennett to the cowboys for seven is that surprising no they had already suspended him for a game that was it for him the Ali are they gonNA keep Ryndam Sodo enroll blaze together can't that be your nucleus nuclear hope they keep them happy anniversary kirk the three after the game the Galaxy Stars Lon wondered aloud about his future here's his quote I have another two months on my contract if I stayed and MLS is how in Charleston Ho hold on there let's get to crazy so he you know he's a little anxious so you're you're putting voice in reason to that number one overall pick by the Phoenix Suns has been suspended for twenty five games testing positive for diuretic diuretic some commonly used performance enhancing drugs like everyone else just a muscle memory last one jazz and I know you like them at the Lakers tonight we got if the Lakers don't win this game Tony at Owen one they'll be panic one of the things I was like how did they only know a score and you watch the first play it's a seventy yard RPO slant like okay Ohio State is going to do that but they have better players and then you watch a long touchdown run late game soda became the youngest one of the youngest players in Major League baseball history to do this or that he bats fourth and he and Atta meeting seemed to be in the middle of every nets a young matthew the task I said when you see Uncle Tony if he's trying to run trip him trip them and sit on him until the guards get you like that apparently didn't like it enough to keep cousins AFC Alex Smith break his leg and keys case keenum get evaluated for St not picking against the Lakers at home tonight I'm not crazy out of time trying to better the next time I'm Tony Kornheiser I'm Mike Wilbon have a great weekend it mark than I am still still six away now we're seeing the heads if you're in South Dakota go see the heads thank you David thank you dave appreciate it man ah I would like to see that for him love happy trails to the playoffs in the La Galaxy to galaxy loss last night in the L. Traffic match up to L. AFC yes they're thinking as you can catch David in the whole College Game Day team starting at nine am tomorrow let's take one last break still to come the cheats make your decision about Patrick interesting result college football tonight USC at Colorado who you got I'm all your role we remember. USC USC was great. Of course you're going to pick USC Russian and Dwayne Haskins be too young and too Erin at the moment the redskins stink like Gavin. I want to see Alice myth come back and play oh just lying and after that encouraging opening night win go come on big finish quick let's look out for Sunday's game against the packers at the right call minded been riot or something five or seven years ago or even further back in the ninety more come on now and a bonus happy trails to the Andrea Eight last year eh itself an older that come on take it off twenty first birthday the bucks beat the rockets in Houston was that a big deal hardened didn't shoot onto bullheaded triple double and didn't play the last minute the found out not a big deal though you know Nice results.

Tony Hose Steve Kerr Auburn Los Angeles Clippers steph curry football Lsu Wisconsin kirk cousins trae Kevin Durant Illinois Atlanta Basketball USC Mike Low Glen Robinson NBA Golden State Warriors
Youth Movement

NFL Live

48:33 min | 1 year ago

Youth Movement

"NFL Live ready to roll on a football Friday pro bowl running backs are banged up around the league will sort out who's starting and who's sitting this week league chiefs Texans date later but first week six kicked off last night in New England the undefeated patriots hosting the giants both teams banged up a grinding it out on a miserable Sunday showcase deshaun Watson accurate mahomes will break it down find out why the chiefs could be on upset alert some saints at the Jags you don't like injuries pop up during the week Suzanne Alvin Kamara was added to the injury report on Thursday because of an ankle issue he was limited one on you and Adam tag team this rash of star running backs who have missed orbin limited in practice this week due to injury the biggest question yesterday they faced the books over in London Christian McCaffrey went through practice this morning head coach Ron Rivera said he's five it sounds like more of a rest maintenance if they needed to so it sounds like they're managing and again we'll find out today where they listed on the injury report about David Johnson against the Falcons not yet all night it's our Thursday night heater it's the eleventh all time regular season meeting between the pats and the giants Patriots lead the all-time series did Alvin Kamara was added to the injury report mid week same is true of Chris Carson with a shoulder injury limited during practice on Thursday he's such a physical marks on this list Todd Gurley and David Johnson both those players missed practice on Wednesday and Thursday Adam get us going here Christian McCaffrey is they faced the box at this week's who's the seems like there is a chance in a game that all of a sudden is one that people are seemingly given the texts better chance to win on Sunday in Kansas City. We'll get to that it has not practiced the last two days suzy he is nursing a quad injury. Sean mcvay made it sound yesterday like they couldn't practiced in yesterday's issue with Christian McCaffrey not going to be an issue for him on Sunday morning at nine thirty eastern he is expected to play against the buccaneers field ABC American and matchups this week so the show here with field Yates Damien Woody and also Adam Schefter is the along for the ride I'm Susie call verse guys let's get I recall that will of course he has been suffering that clavicle injury all the way back in week one limited participant practice all week last week he has been limited so far he did not he's not one hundred percent certain but there's at least a chance with David Jones Attivo Chris Carson be ready to go against the Browns Susan your field mentioned the no clear indication whether or not he will play if for some reason he sits Latavius Murray's the next man up in the world is in that back at huge matchup rams niners what about Todd Girls Smith where you guys are as an offense running we'll see for six no so try to seven not saying Hansen touchdown they got it on that one welcome to the giants Golden Tate Radi back with rose under pressure he's GonNa get sac and the ball is competition hasn't won a game like the redskins and the dolphins than the jets but they are six however as we sort of dive into the Patriot side this the defense and special teams really picked up that offense how concerned about the offense. Listen I'm a little concern let's one back you worry about her shoulder injury with Chris Carson if there's any questions about his availability for any backup b. let's add a wide receiver to the mix the chiefs it just seems so far this week because of a back issue susie but GM steve kind was on the radio in Arizona this morning express some optimism about Johnson plane by the Patriots we tend to judge them around Thanksgiving because that's when they want to be playing their best football but when you watch the game last night you a little underwhelmed by some of the things that you saw of the seven Patriots team that went sixteen o three of the other four teams in the top five reach the Super Bowl so we should point out that some of that hatred offensively early been slow getting out of the gates now that could be due to injuries on offense whether it'd be offers Lon or their past catches the defensive touchdown of the night patriots twenty-eight and the giants fourteen bill to be honest because I didn't want to lose the football it's picked up by the giants what a play by golden the giants are extra point away from football game off and Josh Gordon is where do they stand not the star power the giants without but how about the volume of injuries last night the Patriots were down to one personnel group that's all they had the pieces for so scary really scary missing out on GEICO's easy to use mobile app you can manage Baker policy whenever laver looks she was back on a stationary bike needs to be an indication this is not something that was super serious or major it was typically a player is not right in the stationary bike says a lot you patriots now six no have outscored their opponents by one hundred forty two points that's the third best point differential through six games in the Super Bowl era just ahead for a touchdown by the giants that legs latch need look pretty nasty at the time some good news here although we did not return to the game went to the blue medical attention it off the left side and Tom Brady over his left guard as a touchdown New England patriots break it open thirty five fourteen and the Patriots are six you know what you're sudden guys like Jacoby Myers guttural chefs who only played on special teams up to this point where plane because Josh Gordon as you see right here try to make a tackle on that fumble return tall we can just bury deep in the ground happy Gyco we download the industry-leading GEICO APP today to the kick off week six last night and Fox you told sweaty and feel it a lot is made about how banged up the giants were but you could look at the Patriots roster and say almost as much and then Josh Gordon goes down thin received the giants and patriots here are four key plays really stood out from the game second quarter giants down fourteen nothing Daniel Jones downfield to golden tate of baubles but hangs on and or even on the sidelines but another injury piling up for the Patriots mceal Harry the first round pick already on a star ah would you bet against them it'd be so earlier we focused on the Patriots let's turn the attention to the giants how are you feeling about this performance of your in that locker room six games to fourth block clock catches thirty seconds I think it was a loss for a second communication between him and Julian Edelman calls interception and then the third simple third and south starting seven it was a simple dismissed fire by brady great great sign for the Patriots Up Twenty one fourteen Jones drops back to pass men Kyle van Noy picks it up the offense is getting done the defense circumstances why did you learn there are those that say that ninety percent of the game is played between the ears for quarterbacks and think about Daniel Jones last night first of all the confidence is built by becoming the only it's the first touchdown patriots have given up so far this season confusing I forgot what passing touchdowns against the Patriots the season pretty ridiculous against Bill Belichick how would it actually feel okay knowing the okay saquon no saquon Barkley no every single sterling shepard like they had defenses to face perhaps it's tough task is you'll see just for me looks scheme diversity the variety of package you'll see on defense how deep the Patriots some encouraging moments at least for the giants choosy felt like they were in the game for most of the game I know that it's amazing the Patriots Win by twenty one and people think the pacers this johnny on the spot all of these turnovers that's what that's a five year opportunistic patriots up twenty eight fourteen later in the fourth is team feels like it's on its way didn't feel that way earlier in the year but it certainly does right now watching them and I thought they gave the Patriots last night about all new gotTa been in some trouble eavesdrops he throws a long fall off the catch I ain't GonNa go staff Brady you know what if the receiving core is thin count on joining that'll flying squirrel writer suzy a great a great route and Brady leaves it up and that'll be goes up there or to get it's really the pivotal play for this passing game last night down to the three a couple of plays later in the drive second and goal and maybe Brady thought you know what maybe that'll do it myself a little bit tonight addicts curse it is are just very lifelike and what is its head keeps spinning safety safety flips his hip in this particular situation and he's trying to draw away from the safety so you can take a big hit from the Patriots and when we roll the tape here you're gonNA see a couple of things you know the first play this interceptor Tom Brady you look down the field there's a lot to be learned from the mental side Lice Particular Jones and get Damian's points surly a moral victory but there is some growth to be had from last night's defeat Adam do you agree with that but they're going to have to get guys healthy and just figure this thing offensively because guess what you're going to have the chief since a model for medical teams coming down the road and it's GonNa be featuring two of the games youngest and most dynamic quarterbacks few quarterbacks have started their careers better than the two meeting at Arrowhead on Sunday Patrick Mahomes and amounted hurt for to England throw it in the right caught in the flat by helmet nowhere to go Jeannie Collins Wall came loose big noise they see the score and looks like a blow out a one sided but it wasn't the giants legitimately were in that game I had a chance to do the unthinkable and they had on Watson each rank in the top five for most passing touchdown through players I thirty games and neither them and even played thirty yet watson the twenty listen you don't want as a play you don't ever want to save more victories but considering the giants had to work at the work with going into foxborough with the rookie quarterback Iraq was a touchdown pass against the Patriots so far this season think about the looks he saw last night it wasn't necessarily the kitchen sink from the Patriots but the face a bill belichick injury Hopkins will follow I think his weapons give up it gives them a little bit of an edge in this one man that's crazy it's crazy to think that the sean a chance to do the unthinkable without these key parts are moving forward saquon Barkley probably going to be back the next game I don't know that Sterling Shepherd will I think have an England Ruby Plethora guys down and that game was close in the fourth quarter as it was asked you know if I'm if I'm the giants I'm thinking to myself okay we did okay do it in sort of a take your pick style remember this is not about a career it's just about this game but is kind of cool that it's the first time these two quarterbacks are going head to head so let's start with the situation where these are probably the two best quarterbacks newly Shawn Watson is Great Patrick Mahomes is that much greater my mind and these are two quarterbacks in dominate the League for create more homes is only at twenty two this huge matchup deserves our Sunday or Sunday showcase we'll break it down by position and addition was the word they use earlier these guys are Houdini and some other David Copperfield or something Adam what do you make of the the two magicians facing each other Sunday I should say if for some reason is unable to go on Sunday I'm willing to donate my ankle the Patrick's that can play in this there is no real threat of him missing the game on aggravated Kelsey arguably the best tight end in football right now miekel Hormann plenty of speed if they get tyreek hill back and there's a chance he could play on Sunday obviously he's the best the cardinals so looking up as the Friday edition of NFL live rolls on. It's our Sunday showcase Texans at chiefs Damian the quarterback so you're gonNA take care you made you made a key point now career but just this game I'm GonNa go with the Shawn Watson this unwanted the need these are two great quarterbacks here and we're talking about the fact that this could be a future brady manning like match up. I don't doubt that that could be the case great. Dj Reader Defensive Lineman for the Houston. Texans has a chance to be guys thanks a bunch of money that nobody is talking about. Jj Watt is sort of the straw that stirs the drink ended up along that offensive line so Damian new defensive coordinator for the chiefs this season Steve Spagnolo how do you think they've looked so far have you seen an improvement when all else failed just call your number and go with the quarterback sneak has been working for Malaya he just took to twitter now he wants to lead the League in rushing touchdowns wing Goldman might be so they're going to be getting reinforcements here and this is a team that Dangle Jones released brooks life and energy to to where people can watch them and think the scale higher numbers indicate better matchups the redskins dolphins game is the first to have zero point zero matchup dominant moments but I don't WanNa let this go on sick. Jj Watt is great. He's got a fellow defensive lineman not many people are paying attention to fit is also seven yards on ten carries the chiefs Butler not but you had mahomes ankles then maybe works for Detroit out here on Sunday but I'm GonNa give the edge of the chiefs because a little bit more diversity both in terms of the backfield with Damian Williams it very effective fast catcher and of course this guy right here Damian's GonNa pick this one later in the show Seattle homes faces countdown we talking about this one the winless redskins offensive line should be able to get fresher patch homes who himself is not only gimpy but the offensive line for the chief is Adam reported earlier on this week they signed Stephan was new ski off the street they are and city chiefs in this situation you've got defense I've got defense and no surprise here Suzie I'm GonNa go with the Houston Texans and plenty of focus has always on. Jj Watt who remains an effective player has hey the winless dolphins on Sunday this is a rough one espn has met called matchup quality which measures each game on a zero to one hundred with the moon of the sky was so out there Jones on a first and ten play fake and take a deep shot down the right side for tate who makes the Golfing Susie have you seen how bad the dolphins on light they're bad as much as we pile on the redskins this team is yeah this is a tough watch there are four teams that haven't won a game yet and the NFL yet which means they're probably all in the running for number one overall pick in the one could handle at home that's not a spot that row teams usually accelerate and for a little while they're looking for the giants that are legitimate chance to win that game and the giants get to rest up a little bit Andy Reid put these guys put these guys a situation where there one on one with a lot of people and that's where they can hurt you take in the passing game so I wanNA give the edge to the took this thing is pretty bad I mean this we got the schedule posted up right there I mean listen they don't have a lot of world world beat his right now but awfully long time choosy looks like Brady Manning so we'll be no surprise if these two quarterback and field what about their pass catching weapons again focusing in alternate with the metric I began stop laughing I've never seen a week six matchup game I feel like there's just be a sad face of mood. NFL draft so Damian Studio think is going to get the number one overall pick in the draft redskins you think the Redskins are gonNA wind up with a number one oh receiver behalf on the roster not look like they'll have Sammy Watkins on Sunday Genn De'andre Hopkinson will fuller that's that's no slouch of a duo there that's intere- Caesar that Patrick homes even has any kind of competition a note on Patrick mahomes forbidden practice both Wednesday and Thursday because that ankle injury suffered last night for me is this this chiefs defense still hold Chris Chris Jones the banged up I I don't think he's GonNa play in game he's God that has the Interior Pass rush and what do you think's GonNa take this is a hard one it really is I want to go with the Redskins I think the give a heavy dose of in the offense imperfectly are here what about the opposite of all of that what about a really great personal match let's let's get back on this is a bad team they're bad team so it's GonNa be a long hard road for those players on their roster you think to Tonga by Lois track with one that I think has a lot of juice to it so the eagles run defense has been amazing so far this season just sixty three yards allowed I get some very good back to I would add new Moldovan is not in their boy it could be the floodgates opened on this on the sixty third run over six yard per carry allowing people to rush for like but not as much production in the titans by his candidacy Damian onto the running backs I'm GonNa go with the chiefs running backs and it took us because I trust eighteen yard nearly six yards per carry and Susan I don't know if you've heard but the vikings liked to run the football a lot not throw at that much the eagles run defense shift category Adam what do you think would be the biggest mismatch I think we're looking at the Ravens run game against the Cincinnati Defense in a game in which Baltimore oh I'm on with the risk twenty four seventeen the Sunday showed earlier issues the Sunday show right Adrian Peterson to help out to help out case keenum who will be the quarterback and I trust anything that happened with the Miami Dolphins right now last week and this is something that's been since week one and you can pretty much count on being there the rest of the season but you know teams are going to have pressure I know he's still finds a way to do some watching that game teammates they they are concerned I wonder if they should beat the dolphins should be sending clips each Sunday you're going to sly Gordon slide all the way over to my left right here because defense can really care you I think this game is going to be one where they grind title they did it again to lady on bell last week really limiting ham this run defense even what some injuries including the one to me Jackson and Timmy Jernigan has been awesome so far this season an nfl live from ESPN Ravens reporter Jameson Hensley Ravens Safety Earl Thomas was fine twenty one thousand dollars by the NFL for his hit on steelers quarterback still a work in progress we see what the top matthew brings he's very versatile he's always around the football but if the chiefs going to win the win offense because out the eagles that they get the better of Delvin cook a note on the Vikings offensive line starting guard Josh Klein is out Garrett Brad bear their starting center he's been banged up appealed gates with updates around the league field you've got one minute on the clock thank you susie and we hope to have David Johnson on the field this Sunday he of course missed practice on Wednesday good field as we continue here with quarterback depth across the League being tested and stretched thin some teams like the jets and steel others are down to their third string but quarterback who once led the niners to a super bowl can't get a look Colin Kaepernick reps released an all encompassing it has been one of the best warning backs and football if not for the brilliance of Christian McCaffrey meeting talking about Davos Cook even more than we already have the season's second the NFL and and Rudolf that knocked him out of the game and into the Concussion Protocol Thomas will appeal it in case you're just checking in with NFL live it's time to go on so perhaps a little bit more vulnerable than usual tip the scales in favor of the Philadelphia Eagles run deep has been awesome this year and Adam has the final a massive boom for the chiefs against the Texans coming off an offensive explosion they probably will not have Sammy Watkins back though he is officially doubtful for the Game Jalen Ramsey is Shawn Watson I think when you look at the cancer chiefs their little their beat up on the office line we saw the patron Honolulu harbor with the leg injury Shawn Watson has the despite other false statements to the media to the contrary the statement made quite a few compelling points at what are you hearing about statement detailing the quarterback talents and status part of the statement released by his agent said this not a single team has brought Colin Yeah but for the bengals defense keep up this year and if the Ravens get a lead on Sunday you may see a heavy dose of all these players running the football right at Cincinnati try to continue their winning ways after the first one of the season is past week against the Cincinnati bengals meanwhile perhaps he mills major injury of the week in terms of in in for a workout Seattle Colin in for a visit but did not work them out no other NFL team has interviewed or worked out Colin in the past three seasons looks like he could get deleted if Baltimore gets lead you know what we're going to see that day we're going to see Mark Ingram we're gonNA see Gus Edwards we're GonNa see Lamar Jackson aw afternoon long all right it's an eye on those four bengals that red category of winless teams which is a good setup what's coming next chance nobody wants to work them out nobody wants to set up a visit and I think his agents wanted to clear the record and lay out the facts as they see them is that basically teams are not looking at them now again I think real smart enough to realize what's going on here nobody needs to say anything about it teams don't WanNa go near dates right now is tyreek hill who Andy Reid the head coach of the teeth called a game time decision for Sunday is a shoulder issue suffered all the way back in week one certainly having tyreek hill back running the football against bengals defense that at times struggled this season with that offense Geno Atkins one of the best players in football does a tremendous job kapernick is going to be a historical figure that we're going to look back on years from now I think they wanted people to know the facts that existed around the case which is Thursday because of a back issue GM steep climb went on radio this morning said he is hopeful optimistic about John's chances playing on Sunday they certainly could use them him right now he's a very polarizing figure but I think there's no question that he can come in and these better than some of the quarterbacks in the league right now and nobody wants to give me that are indisputable that basically nobody's worked out here's what's happened here's the situation he wants to play and again it's more of the same with that anybody questionable on Sunday susie because of course of that back if she went Moore's being say Barclays seems to have a good chance of returning a week seven back on the practice field today for the giants f their loss last night the Patriots improved to six and last night but do they have a potential Achilles heel on offense are former Patriot points out the problem and it's arson why he can't even get a look especially with all the quarterback injuries well says you'll see this in relation to the statement I think that his agents released this because they feel like Sousse what we they still have to get out there and play this rough so the makings up like a six six tie doesn't it we're calling this one the impossible match of Damon announced just thirty interceptions in his career cabinet last played in the twenty sixteen season at the age of twenty nine Damian showing an interest and these numbers are indisputable on the field capper nick led the forty niners to Super Bowl forty-seven he went twenty eight and thirty as a starter through seventy two his teammates and coaches are thrilled but cautious he is not superman there's Bob and get open when it's time to pass the ball so for me it's all about trust when I do hit I know them not in harm's you know game status but also if the team decides to promote a Paxton Lynch from the practice squad to provide some death behind depth behind starting quarterback Devlin Hodges soon we all know what's going on in this particular situation I just hope that history remembers the sacrifice good see is clearly sacrifices career he has been limited in practice each day so far this week because of that concussion seems unlikely he would play on Sunday we'll get more information I would think not just by Friday today in terms of official us all right let's move onto more injury updates and we talked about Earl Thomas with the hit on Mason Rudolph you'll be fine house rudolf making progress teams they always say they WANNA do wasn't the best instruments team as far as trying to win football games and here it is you have a plan calling cabinet who's but he he hardly ever falls with another bad game so I'm counting Philip rivers to bounce back in this particular game against the against the Pittsburgh steelers AH accomplished quite a bit in the national football league and understand his last year they go quite as well with the forty niners team but when you look at some of the guys around you're just sitting here thinking okay here's a guy who's still still young for the quarterback position eight can't even get a sniff the workout imagine yourself saying that you gave me the season probably not Elvin Hodges Paxton Lynch and the steelers and they'll face the charger so where do you like it in this game injuring more for their employees because it safe darn of his back but field what about the cowboys and their injuries if there's GonNa be a game time decision ankle injury that cost him last week and then Lyle Collins left that game last week because of a knee injury we'll see whether or not he is able to Zac Taylor insisted that green would not be moved by the October twenty ninth trade deadline this is pretty concise year Taylor said quote I've heard the speculate at wide receiver. Aj Green has played since the ankle surgery in July practiced in pads Thursday big step still isn't game ready for the winless bengals Thursday what's his future look like in Cincinnati good question Susie as for the first one I would say he's minimum a couple of weeks away we my estimation at this point in time the WHO teams of Sun to to become backup and who will play some of these guys who just never even heard of guys who part of the AF and how about seahawks Ed Brown take their more with the seahawks listened to browns are desperate team no question after that at the Asian trading that Guy Adam two things first off a timetable for agreed to return to game action and to Russell Wilson no way way the jets welcome back Sam Darnold returns from a long four weeks of sitting out with mononucleosis face the cowboys play on Sunday that normally dominant offensive line could have a pair of tackles missing but sorry Susie but make a difference that's a lot of humiliated by the forty niners but everyone saw were Russell Wilson did so you think i WanNa really pick again his practice on Friday as well certainly something that gives you pause about his availability for Sunday that being said head coach John Harbaugh listing questionable he's not necessarily these teams both these teams are beat their beat up one of those charges twenty three seventeen rooms had bag game last week against the broncos back on track defensively they gotta start imposing their will and this will be the perfect team for them to really impose their will on okay so speaking of that need to do a better job protecting the quarterback multiplying not worry about guys hit me or anything guys that fronts thing I'm trusting the guys Mendi question that arises then is if the bengals are continuing to be winless why is AJ green in the last year of his contract coming back the bengals always to put the franchise tag on him limit him from going somewhere else I do think that other teams recognize the type of player in talent that Aj Green is there would be I would like to be out there but it also has to be smart about his future especially if the season has completely slipped away from this team as it looks like it's doing I do think there's a chance green is missed twelve games the last two seasons Sunday we'll make thirteen what's coming next here on NFL live it's Friday in a regular part of the lineup here on Friday nfl live Damian's defined as a laughably poor performance I think we'll see some of that this week feel bengals ravens what about Marcus Brown missed practice on Wednesday and Thursday as you see there Susan Yeah Yeah I mean it should be good we should not happen dying on field so we did we need I am if you were to hit the free agent market probably would be the top free agent out there if he did hit the free agent market the question is whether the bengals would allow him to do that but then came teams like the packers and the saints and things got real and started a fire play when there are other receivers like Julio Jones and Michael Thomas Making twenty million dollars a year or north of that figure it's hard to figure that now agent wants to it's he'll be back but I also think it could be to the point where he says you know what this is not worth it comeback now with everything that's at stake in regards to his long-term future with the bengals usually caused by a lack of planning preparations for talent and today the cowboys the whole team win it all erased Damian swatted injury won't make a difference it will make a difference I gotta cowboys went in Thirty Thirty five twenty four listen I do think Donald coming back we'll give the jets here I think more cooper is going to be fine Susan Ankle and quad to he was obviously awesome last week. Zack Martin has been limited in practice this week standout guard for them tyrant listen just off the quarterback match belong to two things in Georges Fabre so that's who I'm rolling with all right waiting for both these teams to get healthy this considering the quarterback play that they've gotten but I think between Zeke I think didn't Zeke going and getting plex pass back on track for for for and here's the final Chris gone he does he blows the cowboys suffered their first loss becomes very tricky situation both

chiefs giants Chris Carson redskins Adam Schefter NFL Jj Watt Christian McCaffrey giants Patriots League Damian David Johnson Golden Tate Radi Dangle Jones Ron Rivera Aj Green Shawn Watson Suzanne Alvin Kamara Sean mcvay
Mini-Ep 136: Fan Service

Forever35

39:57 min | 11 months ago

Mini-Ep 136: Fan Service

"Today's episode is brought to you by hellofresh buying groceries without a plan for the ingredients is something sure. We're all guilty of because it's just so much easier than meal planning, right? But the terrible consequence of buying without planning is throwing away on US produce, which is why companies like hellofresh were started to help people eat better and help you eat more sustainably over ninety percent of their ingredients are sourced directly from the growers. So both recipes and ingredients receive are the freshest they can be I am obsessed with their Zucchini mushroom, BIM BAP. I've made it a couple times own since they sent it to me even an dream about often really do hellofresh is America's number one meal kits service if you're thinking of. Trying it out. Do it not only? Does it help you save time? Money could buy with cucumbers in the back of the fridge and effort but hellofresh donated over two and a half million meals and twenty, one, thousand, nine hundred and is stepping up again in twenty twenty to help communities during the cove nineteen crisis go to hellofresh dot com slash eighty forever and use code eighty forever to get a total of eighty dollars off your first month including free shipping on your first box. Additional restrictions apply please visit hellofresh dot com for details. I love to our white shirt, but it is so easy to get all those little stains in your clothes that make them look dirty even when they're not, it's like, I attract stains like little spaghetti spots like red wine spots like even makeup from pulling my shirt off over my head, and that's why I'm so excited about oxy clean white revived laundry whitener and stain remover has forty percent more whitening power than chlorine bleach per load but without the negatives of chlorine bleach like did you know that not all whites can be bleached? No wonder I've had to replace so many white shirts. oxy clean is going to save me the trouble and the money I'd spend replacing that clothing and almost excited to get a stain. Sounds Weird but I'm always excited to get a state and so I can pull the clean out and just watch it lift the stain right out of the fabric you can add it to every load with your detergent for brilliant weights. It's color safe to, and if you have a tough stain, just do a pre soak before you throw it in the wash to bring back your brilliant whites, you have got to try oxy clean white revive laundry whiter stain remover for yourself to work your magic with oxy clean go to oxy clean dot com slash try me an order free sample that's clean dot com slash t. r. y. m. e., for free stain fighting sample while supplies last. Hello and welcome to forever thirty-five a podcast about the things we do to take care of ourselves I'm Doria freer well, hello there Kate Spencer and we are not experts but we are two friends who like to talk a lot about serums and this is a mini episode where we hear from you we share your comments and thoughts and we do answer your questions to the best of our ability. But we ask that you please remember we are not experts. Okay. We're just podcast host. And we always encourage you to seek support first and foremost from doctor and or mental health professional as needed, and if you'd like to reach us our voicemail and text number is seventy, one, five, nine, one, zero, three, nine, zero are know fabric thirty-five podcast at G. Dot Com, and you can always visit our website for over thirty five podcast dot com for links to everything we mentioned on the show you can follow us on twitter of thirty five pod on Instagram for three podcast. And you can join our forever thirty five facebook group at facebook dot, com slash group slash forever three, five podcast, the password there is serums. And our sister podcast, she thinks spotted also has a. FACEBOOK group at FACEBOOK DOT COM. Slash group slash G. Thinks. That is true story. I bought overalls inspired by that group and I love. Them. It's a great group. It's very fun. Caroline knows how to have fun. I, would say. She does we'll always being informative. Yes I bought a mosquito mosquito killing tool. Thanks to Caroline's advice. Doesn't how does it work I? Haven't I haven't plugged yet but I'm very excited to try it but I feel like, I, take deep advantage of the fact that like we Carolina we work with Carolina 'cause I'm always texting her being like what's the thing? That I need to get the does this like I do this to her many I I definitely take advantage of having her phone number in my address book. Sorry Caroline. Apologies Caroline but you know everything you know everything. What not to spend money on Gosh. So K.. What's going on? Okay truthfully I texted you about two minutes ago before we started recording and I confessed that I'm feeling deep rage. And trying to kind of like, manage it and you very you very good friendly were like in a good friend way we're like, why are you doing this to yourself today? My rage is deep. and. But like also, what's also going on in my life is that my skin is very bombed. So like I'm trying to focus on the fact, my skin feels go. And I noticed you mentioned in your. Notes for the show just like we were experiencing fire season here in. California. And it just feels like a time of deep grief all around. and. So we talked about this at length on our show but I'm just kind of like I'm kind of in that space right now. Yeah. And that's how it's just it's it's hard. I feel grief is so weird when it's You know like I've written a whole book about grief, but it was grieving like an individual. And like the life I lost with my parents but like the broad like this large kind of all encompassing grief. For humanity is a different beast. I don't know it's a lot to kind of grapple with. It is. It really is are you feeling that way about the fire fire stuff? Yeah. The fire stuff is like really getting to me I. Mean we are. You know we're like at the height of. His I don't even think we're at the height, but we're we're deepened fire season here in California and actually it's all along the West. Coast? Of People in Oregon have lost their homes and I'm just devastated all these people who have died who have lost their homes. Feeling like. We're running out of time to do anything about this and it's really scary and I signed up for the sunrise movement even though it might be the oldest person there. You know the the the Youth Movement for the green new deal and against climate change. But I do think they are the organization that's kind of most effectively organizing against climate change and for the green new deal and they're really great about. Explicitly connecting climate change with the need to elect politicians who believe in climate change and are in favor of the green new deal. So, donated to them I'm going to. Hopefully get a little more involved with them and just kind of do. What I can overhear. It can feel. So kind of like what change can I actually make an individual but I do think it is. So I do think that's so important. Okay. You've inspired me I'm going to do the same thing. Oh. Yea. When you sign up, they ask you for your age. Literally like am I going to going to pop up being like sorry. You're too old. Everyone can be involved in supporting the green new deal. But they are they are explicitly on their website they like I'm a. Youth Movement. Like I'm definitely not a youth anymore have you had the kind of depressing experience of what you have to scroll down for your year like on the Internet when you put it. And you're like, wow, I'm scrolling for a long time. Yeah leased. In Yeah you should not be that long and now it's like we. Yeah. Well that's really I think that's I really appreciate that that's the choice you made. Thank you for inspiring me. Thanks, Kate. Anyway. Sorry to take it to the dark place but. I think figuring out the ways in which we? Like grapple with these massively devastating things that are going around us and still figure out how to. You know nurture like take a minute for ourselves. Because if we're not caring like if you aren't able to care for your just do some act of kindness to yourself, it's going to be very hard to help make change for others. Totally you know. Yes. Yes. I fully fully agree with that. You know it has been a thing that has been bringing me some joy lately I don't. I bought at Dusk Fan. It really cheers me up getting to talk to you on this podcast and I want you to know this is really just elevated. My mood of thank you, I, appreciate. A desk fan is at a tiny fan. Does it clip onto your desk? It is not clip on it's not tiny I would describe it as compact. Sounds like it's not like a little tiny. It is like a little friend. Yes, it is. It's white. It's aboard NATO. Oh yes. I love NATO and it has a little dial so you can really adjust the speed it's not like set speeds you know what I mean Lake has a little energy smart sticker on the front of it which like who knows what that means but I'm a fan literally Ha. Oh my God story. Those, really bad. ME. Level was you level bad I know I apologize to my? Gosh someone stopped me. No. But seriously this it's been. It's it's it's just a nice little. Nice little pick me up on my desk. We take a picture I want to see what it looks like and see how it fits on your desk while my desk is a mess cyclope. Judge but. Here I'll send you send you a picture right now. So you okay, you can see it. Thank, you can see how cute it is. See does your fan have a name yet? No okay. Stories. Fans cute. I can convey. Huge skeptical. I got a little. You're. You're talking about a fan here. It's A. Cute Fan. It's fun to look at this photo because there's There's like a hand cream next to the fan. What else can you spot in the picture? Care seems to be some sort of nail Polish next to the fan also or like a serum. Oh. Yes. Yes. No that is nail Polish that I got. When The publishers sent me a copy of Leicester the book that I mentioned a Ha- previous episode. As part of their marketing, they also created a the spoke nail Polish color. Cool called Luster. That's awesome and they sent that to me. Also, it's a very, pretty kind of Shimmery purple. Sounds it's really pretty I. Hope you be it a try I think I will do love fall like Purple Nail. Yeah Yeah. Yeah Well Let's take a brief break. Okay. Let's do that. We have been shining for a little bit and then we'll come back and we've got a bunch of wedding questions Lo and behold we do. All right. Right back the RB. Today's episode is brought to you by third love you know what I did today I put on my third love minimize her Bra I wore it all day, and then when evening time rolled around a changed out of it and I put on my third Love Lounge Bra because third love is the real deal when it comes to comfort whether it's my morning bra or my nighttime Bra, the straps don't dig Inter slide. The band doesn't cut into my skin and the cups are made with memory foam putting on my third love brought is like putting my. boobs Tibet I like to think of it as like I'm going off to work and they're just going down for a nice gentle nap. How much more comfortable could it get because third love creates better bras that focus on what matters keeping you comfortable. No shortcuts no substitution and if it doesn't fit no problem exchanges are free and if you don't like it you sixty days to return it for free and then all those bras are washed and donated to a woman in need third love nosers a perfect proffer everyone. So right now they're offering for over. Thirty five listeners fifteen percents off your first order to third dot com slash forever now to find your perfect fitting Bra and get fifteen percent off your first purchase. That's third love dot com slash forever for fifteen percent off today. Today's episode is brought to you by Rossi's fall is nearly here, and although we're not stepping out all that often that just means when we do, we should put our best foot forward and what better way to do that than by wearing Roth's comfortable washable and sustainable products. They have the shoes and bags you know in love. With the addition of their first ever adjustable sneaker called the lace up. It's super cute and knit from thread made from re purposed plastic water bottles. Yes. They've kept over sixty million single use plastic bottles out of landfills by making shoes that have been called the most comfortable shoes of all time plus who doesn't love a shoe. You can fully put in the washing machine when it's dirty smelly look mine have been both and I have washed my Cheetah print loafers quite a few times and every time they come out writer and Best of all effortlessly. Clean. Yes what they even have shoes for kids. That's right. Take it from my daughter check out the amazing shoes and bags available right now at Rossi's dot com slash forever thirty five that's Rossi's DOT COM R. O. T. H. Y. S. dot com slash forever thirty, five style and sustainability meet to create your new favorites had two rotties dot com slash thirty, five today. All right we are back. And we're GONNA kick things off with a voicemail. High cotton. It's stuff. Trust or calling in to say how chuckled I am? y'all have been enjoying the ten. My real question is. Also warning. All Community of CFS jobs got me not so athlete I. my question is under areas in three weeks and they are right in our own vows and I was wondering. If you'd have been reading or if you wrote your own career wedding and like hurting or anything, it really matches socks off and felt really. We're kind of started egress up here and I said, you know if your your listeners might have any suggestion. So, much for the Todd I love it. Usually every time it comes out he care. Well. Look at that Ti- SF JAZZ got knocked up. I mean, I listen to jazz. I'm not knocked up that's not going to happen to everybody write your mileage may vary yes. Yes. But I'm happy to know that you got it onto the. TSF. Jazz. deejays. Shows. We wrote our own vows. Did you write your own battles? No. I didn't I actively didn't want to the thought of being vulnerable in front of all those people just did not appeal to me at all those comedians. Comedians do a great wedding like they often write their own vows, and although I guess we also had a lot of comedians you are married to a comic. What are you like true on now? I was at your wedding, retract my statement. Yet we wrote our, vows. I. Don't I I feel like I wrote my think I wrote my vows like the morning of my wedding. Oh my gosh. I think. It was a very kind of last minute thing I've been. They'd been percolating for awhile but I what I wrote them. Very last minute. Just kind of think about like why you're marrying was person like what are their qualities that you love and why are you excited to spend the rest of Your Life Dory yeah I mean. I would do whatever feels true to you and not worry about what anyone else is going to think. I mean one thing that has always fascinating to me to wedding is when the Married couples prepare their own vows and one person's is like very short. The other person goes on for ten minutes. It's just you just see the people's personalities come through which I really love. Yes yes, and it's always incredibly memorable but I would say do it for you and not worry about how it's going to present in this wedding. that. You're and maybe also in times of Cova, do you are just getting married without hopefully anyone there so Maybe, it'll just be you and your partner hearing them. Yeah. I would say like. Just. Try to speak from the heart. and. Like Kate said, don't don't worry about how other people are going to perceive them. And since you are the jazz listener, you have to do your thousand French. So yes, crash. Being, sewer. Congratulations on all of it relations. Here's a text. Hey, Kate Dorey, can we talk about wedding gifts in the time of a global pandemic if the couple is going forward with a small ceremony now with plans for a larger celebration next year do I send a gift now or leader? What if the larger party never happens if I send something now and then show up to a future wedding, our future party empty-handed will they remember the gift getting giving around weddings? Is Absurd engagement party showers, the wedding itself come on, but I do want to celebrate my friends and family especially, those whose plans have been upended during this crazy time. My idea is to send a card and something small right now to acknowledge their formal ceremony. Then worry about the rest later but I'd love to hear your thoughts. This is a family wedding and my mom is sending a gift while my sister is doing nothing help. I feel like there aren't really rules around this. Know, what an interesting conundrum. That I'm sure other people I hadn't even thought about like wedding gift giving and the time of Corona but. Tisza. His thing I think I would ask the couple if they're registered anywhere and if they are to get them something off their registry and be done with it. Yes. But also like one gift is enough I think listener. Yes. Yes. Yes. That's what I mean. He does agree but I mean this listener is asking do I get one thing now and one thing later and what they forget and I think like if they forget that's on them, you know like the gesture, the honoring of their relationship, the giving whatever you can give in terms of a gift. That is that is enough and I agree with you, it is a lot showers engaging parties wet like it's a lot. Totally. And like that's not what it's ultimately about. But I understand that the pressures of needing to you know having to give gifts during these times so. I like this listeners idea of sending a card and then doing something bigger later, and if the big party never happens just send the bigger thing along. Yet but I I feel like. You can't really do you send a gift. You can't really go wrong. That is good etiquette Tori you're right. Yeah, they're not going to be like too early for this gift. I'm sure they'll initiate it totally. All, right. Shall I read this next email take it away. All right. I'm wondering if you have advice for being photographed my partner and I will be taking engagement photos soon and it's been leading to a lot of nerves and anxiety I've never liked being photographed i. feel like every time I see myself I noticed yet another physical trait that I just don't like or. Wish. I could change I. Know this is mostly in my head. I'm grateful lucky to have a partner who look at the same photo I'm hating on call it all the things I find beautiful but still any tips for feeling confident in photos for rocking good smile and how to enjoy the photos when we get them back without being so hard on myself. I relate to this email so much. I feel i. have written this email. Keep going keep going roll with us. I. Listen I totally feel you I've been dealing with this my entire life. It is the worst thing to then back on photos of myself from ten years ago and be like. Oh, that's such a cute picture and remember that when I saw the picture initially I was like A. Horrible. So, like what the fuck self. So I feel you I will say. I feel this has gotten I've gotten a little better about this lately ish. Partly because I actually think taking selfies helps And like. Figuring out like how you look. When you file a certain way like? When you like the way you look and how you've kind of positioned yourself when you smile that way does that make sense? Yeah. Make sense kind of practicing. I. Think it's fine to practice a a definitely I. think that's fine and to do whatever you think might help make you feel more comfortable or At ease for these for these photos. Totally. At but I do think it is good practice to go back and look at the photos of yourself that you hated because I do the same thing here I'm like look how beautiful I am ten years ago. Now I'm disgusting and then like right and that's not true. But I do feel sad sometimes looking at these old photos where I that I did not feel good about myself and and then seeing in hindsight. Beautiful or joyful or Nice I look and it's just kind of. Gut wrenching at all, and ultimately you know these photos. There to capture. You know this joyful time in your life and If you can focus on that as opposed to. Examining. Yourself and all the things that. Make. You feel less than that might help. But. It's really hard. It's really hard and. I'm sorry. You're feeling a lot of nerve endings -iety about this. And I also think like if you're in therapy, this is a great thing to discuss with your therapist. Definitely. And you know like in a practical sense, I, bet, there are many youtube tutorials about how to move photos because it is an art and I have I have some friends who are actors who have had to like learn how to pose on red carpets and there's like an actual ways of maneuvering manipulating your body. To take a better photo that like is a learned. Thing well. Sometimes. If you look at photos of famous people, you'll notice that they're making the exact same expression and all of their photos. And they've the same smile or they're like posed the exact same way they have practiced that. Yes. For Lopez, she has this kind of like open mouth stare that she does very well Yup. It's not like it's that's like. A physical, physically trained thing. Thousand percent and like I have no, do you have any idea how to pose them photos? I feel like everyone always turns to the side and puts a shoulder I that I'm standing with my arms to straight. You know what I will say though the few times that I've had like professional photos taken I've always felt like, okay they're making me get into the most awkward position like. Tilt Your Chin at thirty seven degree angle and then. Raise your right eyebrow and wiggle your left ear and flare nostrils and I'm like, okay and then I'm like, Oh, that actually looks pretty good. So sometimes you know since you're having these. Engagement photos taken like. You can tell the photographer like look I'm. I'm kind of nervous and you know I'm nervous about how I'm GonNa look at at love. Any tips for helping me like get into the right poses or whatever, and they will help you i. think that's a great great idea. Let the photographer know for sure it's their job to help you with it. Totally. All right. We'll take another break. I would say we should. Okay let's do that. This episode is sponsored by molecule. Did you know your indoor air can be up to five times worse than outdoor air according to the EPA and you know we're all spending more time inside and? Kind Kinda gross to think about all the pollutants in our air whether it's dirt bacteria pet dander. Allergens I'm I'm looking at my dog right now and I can just like We can both see the Dander just floating off of her and into my nose. But thankfully, there's molecule molecule air purifiers removed the widest variety of pollutants so whether you have a molecule or mini. Just a molecule air, you can make sure the air in your house is clean molecule destroys. Putin's with its patented tested vetted and proven PICO technology. So. Instead of collecting Putin's like other air purifiers molecule actually destroys them and I've got to molecule air mini in my bedroom. Right next to my bed it's quiet. It looks cool and honestly I feel better knowing it's working to keep my air clean especially right now during allergy season with the many wildfires we're having here in California. So for ten percent of your first air purifier order visit Mo L. E. K. U. L., E. DOT COM and at checkout enter forever thirty five that's ten percent off at M. O.. L.. E. K. U. L. E., DOT COM, and enter forever thirty five at checkout. Today's episode is brought to you by figs. You've heard me say before and I will say it again, I'll say in a thousand more times figs fabric is hands down the softest fabrics I've ever worn I wish I could say I wear more than figs Hoodie most days but unfortunately I cannot. It's so comfortable. So perfect for whatever life throws at me that it just makes sense to wear it almost every day and you know what? If it didn't get dirty? At honestly wear it all day every day as it is I probably wear it longer between washes than I should because of figs proprietary anti microbial, moisture, Wyking, anti-wrinkle, liquid repellant way too comfortable material seems to stay clean through it all which is all the more reason. They've also started making light weight breathable masks that have a replaceable. F. activated filter because figs is first and foremost here minus how important and amazing our healthcare workers are because fixed shows up for their community whether it's donating over thirty five thousand sets of scrubs to hospitals hardest hit by the coronavirus or donating one hundred thousand dollars to organizations support black Americans pursuing careers in medicine and figs wants you to wear the scrub. Deserve by enjoying fifteen percent off your first order using code forever fifteen at checkout, and if you're not working on the front lines, thank someone that is because figs will give you fifteen percent off to head to wear figs dot com w. e. a. r. F. I. G., S. DOT COM and enter code forever fifteen at checkout get ready to love your scrubs. All right. Okay, we're back we are. So we're reading an email and I need to apologize because I had wanted to read this email and it just kind of stuffed in the inbox and I forgot about it but. It's a very adorable email. It's from a kid. I have no idea how old we don't know how old this person is but. This is the message that we received a few weeks ago. OMG exclamation point exclamation point s mission my mission. I can't believe you might be reading this on your on your podcast. I am on my mom's account I am writing for two reasons one my mom is always listening to your podcast. So that is how I got the email to my mom's birthday is coming up August twenty eighth ps she is turning thirty five many exclamation points. ESPN. I am her older daughter. Happy Birthday mom people, elated birthday mom who was born on August twenty eighth and turned thirty five. I don't want to share the name that was given because it's a IT'S A. person. Under. Eighteen. Yeah So I don't know how to give clues to this mom that their daughter broke into their email account and wrote to us, but it was so. And so sweet, you'll agree mom with the daughter of an age that she could break into your email account. Your birthday was August twenty eighth and you turn thirty five. It's probably your daughter. We've got a cool kid. Thank you for listening to our show. Yeah. Thank you so much Sweet. It was so sweet. It was. Just. I loved it so much. Dorey. We got another voicemail from someone celebrating their and they were also really enjoying. The fantasy we acted out at Dory's hotel. So let's play. O. M.. G.. Lady Oh my Gosh nine zero one am in northern California seem to this morning many podcasts and Dorri. And and and your Kate. Fantasy vacation. Oh my gosh I'm sitting here a any here getting ready for Work I've had. Just really been kind of down on the death to my birthday was yesterday fifty, eight years young. but I think he is a particular thing that was so amazing. Again, I'm getting ready for work doing my routine I. think my make up I feel like it foils and serum and listening to this and going Oh. Wow. So perfect. You mean. You've made my F-. Day thank you so much. You guys have been listening to you for awhile I know what's forever thirty five and I'm fifty eight I relate relief. Really. So it's never too late. Okay. Thanks again, my name is sandy show. Oh. Okay. Bye Take Care have a great. Thank you Sandy. Peppy voicemail really kind of. Brightened my day. So Nice when my work it's recognized. We've received much feedback about. Dory's hotel. We'll share some more. Because it keeps rolling in it sure does. Lots of people suggesting we do this again. And again and again, and I don't I don't quite know how to capture Dory's hotel Dory's hotel even the name makes me laugh so. We did receive this text message switch. I guess it's a compliment and with the question but I think we should answer. OMG This fantasy vacation is like phone sex vary breathy was it planned or rehearsal question? Not. Rehearse. totally AD libbed. I did write on the episode dog. That, what exactly did I? Say it was just like I miss going to hotel miss going hotels like I've been having this fantasy about going to a hotel. And I just ran with it as one does look debris. Can't be stopped when she gets going fantasizing. A should I set up a one nine, hundred number. But you just describe hotels. Yes. So You can call in and I will I will describe your hotel fan like you can ask me for a specific hotel fantasy like you could say. I want like like a small in. On the Oregon Coast Oh that sounds delightful. They have muffins fresh muffins or yeah. Exactly. or You could say I want a resort in the Maldives and I'll be like okay. You just put on such as sexy hotel, voice. Hey that's mysexy hotel voice. You have one. We've very breathy established says, yeah. Yeah and I'll advertise on late night television. What if like I want a sensible? Affordable super clean. Those Kinda like. Like one stop Marriott's by the. C. Suite yes. Yeah. I know what you're I know what you're talking about I can do that too. That's in my repertoire and there's a free continental breakfast pretty good I, but you also have a kitchenette. Yes. So great you can steal the bananas from the IT's instant. thinking. I. Think you're thinking of A. Like a like a residents in I'm thinking like a garden scarred and sweet. You know what I'm talking about yes noticed that. How a sensible hotel and the C. Suite. So I think. We stayed in a hotel like at Disneyland I believe it was a residence in. But it was it was it had a kitchenette of. Kitchenette full kitchen. But it also had free breakfast. I can hear the saltiness in your voice now. A hotel with enough elevators. Oh and they're fast and they're fast and no, there's no in creepy and it with you know. So listen I can really just you're taking requests what I'm hearing really taking requests on my one nine, hundred number. Can you still set up a one night? Do those still exists I have no idea. I, mean what a? Horrible scam what a horrible scam because I could also set up my psychic hotline at the same time. Really really get into my side hustles here. I did see an advertisement for kind of like. A two thousand twenty, twenty psychic hotline type thing. I feel an APP. I can't remember, but it was jarring. It was it was like a full on commercial. and. List things are still out there. Wow. Yeah but you know nine hundred, nine, hundred numbers were like fan lines. All kinds of one, nine, hundred numbers. Yes, and then I, would call them and then my mom would get so mad because it would show up on the phone bill. We're like five dollars a minute Oh my God. Really called them I never I was. Scared to call them. Oh, I definitely did and I definitely got in trouble. Oh Wow. So tempting like the way or attempting were lured into call nine hundred numbers. Yes. Yes. Those were the days. You know I can't wait to do our eighty s nostalgia podcast where we just pick a topic and just wax poetic about it for twenty minutes at a time. Where are we GONNA do that? Do we talk about that? Brianna now, but like episode number one, nine, hundred numbers. Like the things that you're actually not really nostalgic for because they were scams. Yes. which like all of the eighties was a scam. Yes, it's true. Well. Stay tuned stay. Tuned everyone stay tuned for Dory's hotel, the podcast and then. Remember the eighties with two people with two women Kate. Great. Right. We're going to be the top of the apple podcast. With remember the eighty s with Kane during now, we do have kind of an eighties thing here in that we've received we put out the call we said we would do long distance dedications we live. Delilah Casey Kasem if people wanted them. Dorothy the people have spoken. Okay. No one wants them because only one person reached out with long distance dedication. All right. Okay. But we're going to read it. We are. So. What we need you to do is queue up the song leave on by Elton John so that you can play it immediately after this podcast. In K. Q. Dory. Yep I'm ready. Are you going to? I could also sing it for you? Okay So, here's this. This person writes I'm not sure if this is a joke or not but here goes nothing at why wrote back and I said it's not a joke. Long Distance Dedication Jessica Amiss laughing with you and watching our boys grow up together. I'm looking forward to whenever we can return to normal life. I. Love You from Your Number One. Oh so Jessica. This goes out to you. Lieven by Elton John. Sweet that is really really really sweet. So. That's how running the show today that is. Well it's been a pleasure. So many chuckles my mood is lifted. Glad I'M GONNA go back to feeling down I'm sure by the ended today but oh no. No, I'll just think of you and your little fan friend feel happy again. Okay okay. All right everybody thanks so much for listening. All right. Bye.

Kate K. Q. Dory Caroline FACEBOOK oxy G. Dot Com partner California Oregon California US America Elton John Rossi NATO G. Youth Movement Doria
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03:46 min | 1 year ago

Proposals To Ban Fracking Could Hurt Democrats In Key States

"Top Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren both call for a ban on fracking. This is the controversial technology that has helped create a major oil and gas boom which president trump often brags about on the campaign trail as voters in New Hampshire head to the polls today. NPR's Jeff Brady took a look at the debate over this divisive issue. Here's a message Bernie. Sanders was delivering even back during the 2016 campaign. We've got so put an end to that position. Is One reason. Olivia free. Wild was recently at the University of New Hampshire holding a clipboard and stopping students. Clementines I do. She's a volunteer with the New Hampshire Youth Movement and the Sunrise Movement which has endorsed Sanders. A student scrambled a class. I ask free. Walled about concerns than an anti fracking candidate could alienate moderate voters in the general election. She says she gets that that question. A lot especially from people in my parents generation. I just hear them being scared and I hear them not. Knowing the full scale tale of the crisis we're facing scientists warned that carbon emissions must be reduced quickly to avoid the worst effects of climate change for free walled and fellow activists. The solution and is a complete transition from fossil fuels. The oil industry has taken notice. We hear the noise. The energy debate of the chatter the American Petroleum Institute. TV Ad shows a millennial age man at a diner watching protesters in the street. Then it argues the oil and gas. The industry is part of the climate change solution to natural gas. The US is leading the way in reducing mission. That's true in the power. Our sector where natural gas is replacing carbon intensive coal fracking has made guest cheap and plentiful Mardi Durban with the US Chamber of Commerce Global Energy Institute says banning fracking would interrupt that progress and cost jobs that I five years. So you're going to lose. Nineteen million jobs around the country trie. That's based on a chamber. Study that predicts job losses well beyond oil and gas fracking ban supporters though. Imagine a much different future with a big big increase in renewable energy jobs. Durban and others in the oil industry aren't trying to change activists minds instead. They're focused on moderate and swing Ling voters. Who could decide the next election in a closely divided country. The middle of the electorate understands our needs for energy itself for it to be affordable for ought to be reliable and to clean. But there's a problem getting that message to moderate and swing voters now. Pollsters say they aren't really thinking about a candidate's climate. I'm it changed your energy policies. Mita Patel in suburban Philadelphia is a good example right now. She's undecided sure. Who is the other candidate that I'm comparing trump against Patel voted for trump in two thousand sixteen and Barack Obama before that asked about how a candidate's abuse on fracking will affect her choice. Tell says she's thinking more about the cost of health insurance now. That's the first thing because that does affect a lot more people people like energy and everything. It's going yes but everyday life is affected by health but in Pennsylvania natural gas is big business and trump won the state by less than a percentage point in two thousand sixteen democratic leaders worn a nominee that vows to ban fracking could lead to another trump. Win In this November. Jeffrey N._P._R. News.

trump Bernie Sanders Mita Patel US Chamber of Commerce Global New Hampshire Jeff Brady University of New Hampshire NPR president US Elizabeth Warren New Hampshire Youth Movement Durban
6am Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

03:18 min | 2 months ago

6am Newscast

"From news eight hundred. Seven in houston. I'm kyra buckley. Houston area public schools and government. Buildings will no longer be able to require face masks after june. Fourth governor greg. Abbott has issued an order banning mask mandates and texas school districts and government facilities harris county judge. Lena hidalgo had intended to require masks in county buildings but when the governor made the announcement she responded that she would use what power she had within the confines of the law to keep people safe. Meanwhile judge hidalgo says harris county will lower the official pandemic threat level for the first time this year news. Eighty eight sevens. Matt harrop tells us why they feel. It is finally safe do so. The threat level is now coated with the color orange. Instead of red signaling. We are now at the second highest threat. Level harris county judge. Lena hidalgo says there have been significant. Improvements to key indicators including a decline in cova patients in hospital i see us. We've seen a decline in the number of cases per day. All of our metrics. This is great news. And i want people to know. We're not here by accident. We're here because of your hard work because of the folks that are getting the vaccine over. Forty percent of harris county's population has gotten at least one dose of the covid nineteen vaccine according to state data a dog. Oh also opened up twenty buildings again to fifty percent capacity including libraries. I met heroin houston. Hundreds of pro palestinian demonstrators gathered outside the consulate general of israel and houston last night as violence continues in some parts of the middle east mohammed. Now bull see is with the palestinian youth movement in houston. he says. The rally was organized to support palestinians. Who went on strike from work in protest of the ongoing violence in gaza specifically costa two hundred palestinians have been killed Sixty of which for children those things to watch your own people being you know. Essentially murdered It's something that you know. it's hard to live with. a bluesy. Says most of his family on his mother's side is experiencing daily terror watching the videos of children being pulled from underneath rubble watching entire neighborhoods being white from the earth. This is all very close to me. Protests also took place in other u s cities and the world in addition to here in houston in a statement. Houston's israeli consulate tells us quote. The state of israel is responding to attacks against its innocent civilians carried out by the terrorist organization. Hamas great hope that stability and security will soon be returned to all of the residents of israel. There's a flash flood watch in effect until at least tomorrow afternoon for the houston area. Officials are warning of heavy rainfall that could impact travel and are urging drivers to stay off flooded roadways. The national weather service says to expect more rain throughout the day. There's also a river flood warning for harris county showers and thunderstorms likely highs in the low eighties. Today i'm kyra buckley and you're listening to news. Eighty eight seven support for. Npr comes from npr stations. Other contributors include cigna a global health.

harris county Lena hidalgo kyra buckley houston judge hidalgo Matt harrop middle east mohammed palestinian youth movement Houston Abbott cova greg israel texas gaza costa Hamas national weather service
Episode 526: Marc Goldberg, IDF paratrooper and author

SOFREP Radio

1:15:44 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 526: Marc Goldberg, IDF paratrooper and author

"Hi this is Lee Remedy and Mike Rotunda, and we are very excited to announce that we are finally doing a podcast. Yes, and the name is scientology. Fair game everybody Scientology Fair. Game. And thank you to all of you because we tweeted out like, should we do a podcast whatever overwhelming? Yes. Amazing response listened to. Scientology Fair game on the iheartradio APP apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts. Is it doesn't work. You're not using enough. You're listening to sulphur lady. Special Operations. Military males and straight talk with guys in the community. Back to Software Radio folks hosted Steve Geller joining me. We have a very special guest. Mark Goldberg If you don't know who marcus, he wrote a tremendous book which we've reviewed in highly recommend it's called beyond the green. Line and mark grew up in in London England Jewish descent. So when he was eighteen years old. A left England moved to Israel place he had never been joined the Israeli paratroopers and. took part in the. SECOND INTIFADA AND WE'RE GONNA get into all that. But before we do, we want to welcome to the podcast and we're very grateful that he could make the time for us today. So mark welcomed the software radio very happy to have you as our guests. Steve Really, happy to be and so much for having me. Great. Yeah and Again, your book was fascinating because. I have friends. Who have been to London I have friends of friends who are Jewish descent in London. Telling me a lot of the same stories that you had wrote about it in your book and I find that hard to believe that will not hard to believe but. It's it is still kind of difficult to fathom that we still have the antisemitism that you would think. That would have been. From Europe after the second world. War. But you know let's get into all this because I. You know our Listeners WanNa hear your story. Tell us about growing up in London. Well. Before I start I should I should say that had been to Israel before. Before, okay I had been I had been that for a bit. I've been there a few times. But. Yeah. But I was in London basically grew up in London in London is. Or the UK I kind of. Growing, up Jewish that attitude was kind of like. Discuss like you'll difference you know don't don't be very different from everyone else keep it to yourself. You know Yeah and kind of just starting kind of if you have. Something about is kind of from the prevailing culture. Best known to express it. Kind of the way I grew up. Yeah and I grew up more kind of identified more with identity as jude and cut presented more more the feeling that. I wasn't really free to kind of happily express that side of my density in the UK in. Yeah ended up going to Israel and join joined the army. And now that that had been a huge huge culture change. For for you you're going from London you Israel in as you put it out in your book you didn't speak very good Hebrew at the time. I didn't speak anything. But it's funny. The funny thing about culture. Actually when I first joined the army. my perception in my mind off was very British. kind of centric perception of one is supposed to be you have a drill sergeant he screaming at you all the time you have to stand to attention to Polish boobs yet the iron, your clothes. All that kind of stuff and the Israeli army. was nothing like that. And much more was like a youth. It was reminded me of the Jewish Youth Movement I had gone to when I was a kid actually Santana culture those some similarities, the things I expect it wasn't expecting about it. They were very much more like, for example, your first two weeks in the idea. A more like you've you've caught of some kind, it's more like, well, we've got a bunch of eighteen year olds who just conscripted the main we're going to ease them in very gently. We're GONNA have a very relaxed kind of regime as get used to wear a uniform and they get used to kind of being in the army. They don't even issue the weapon. Yeah. So the it was actually, it was actually easier than I thought once I was in it was it was quite comfortable. Yeah I found that part of the book fascinating because you know we. Love the idea of in we've seen their. Their history in battles since the day Israel became a nation in a back in the late forties and I had the same impression that you that this would be you know iron discipline you know sergeant screaming in your FA- When I was reading your book. That's what I was expecting to be reading You know that's something that was it was kind of I opener because you know as you put the first couple of weeks they kind of ease that end. To. Everyone. Gets I guess their own comfort level of being a soldier in you know now now you're kind of. Easing into that military lifestyle. Yeah Yeah, it was very much. Well, it has. You have to remember the actually in order to even start training with the unit that in you have to go through a couple of selections to get this. So the people. Will ready kind of proved to some extent they want it to be that. Not of the mindset you always kind of felt like actually. If I don't WanNa do this anymore if this is to halt I, can just say it's too hard. I don't do this anymore and they'll just get rid of me. You know I'll just be sent someplace else in the military and that actually kind of philosophy that they worked to is like. If, YOU'RE A if you're not up to it like if we don't think good enough but also if you would do this any more than than you just have to go in. It wasn't really about. The encouragement element of the drill sergeant as well that making you do things making the making what calder, where's the Israelis much like yeah. If you don't WanNa do this then by. An it's funny because that part of it after I became A. I was in the Army Special Forces, the Green Berets, and our selection course is exactly like that. I was an instructor at our selection course and you know it was pointed out to all of our cadre members. We won't discourage the candidates we won't encourage candidates. We just tell them what they need to do, and it's up to them how hard or how well or. Not. So well, they perform then you know our. I guess function is strictly to assess them and whether or not they'll be selected as part of the unit and that part of it I I definitely. Could you I guess relate to? Yeah I've read about that in some books and books SAS and that kind of mentality as well So. Yeah. It was interesting. It was definitely a shock that it was going to be like that I expected. Yeah. Like I said, I expected to be screened out from the Institute of. Stop you know had this economy movie is actually I. It was full metal jacket. In with the Marines they it stops in the Marine base and the nats it they're like screaming at you get off the bus do this. Is, accurate. Respecting happens with the bus arrived in the first base and instead the guy just saw guys are guys really lethargic. Get off the bus going just go for buses white by the bus I'm like, oh that. Yes. That's not the way. Yeah. Most of us who were in the American military were introduced to the military when I remember when my busk. Got To our basic training base. Before the bus even stopped the drill saga was jumping on and he was literally screaming in everyone's face in guys who are too slow. He was helping them off the bus if you get what I mean. Had that rose so surprised. This is very Jewish actually. So. So you know you went through the selection course for the idea of paratroopers and what can you tell us about that? Selection idea paratroopers was I had trying very hard stop. I E to there was one of the they have won a coup, the Magi Bush, and was just to the Patriots visiting once you're in, you do another one which is a longer and more difficult the one of the paratroopers again compared to the Western The US and British selection procedure the it was incredibly easy. It was like nothing it was about five hours long started at about four in the morning when it's still cool. And you know involved the usual kind of physical exertion and they really want to kind of put you through some kind of motivational test to go through that they can see that the people who are going to be a wasted time will will quit at during it but you know what it was. It wasn't that hard. I was actually disappointed because I. What really odd for? Any yeah. In it wasn't as difficult as I thought it I thought it would be. Yeah and I think that kind of reflects. Two things the reflects the fact that. The the difficult stuff is ahead of you anyway. The, not the in poetry betraying the push through tough stuff. Anyway. Kind of need you to be starting such a high standard 'cause you will get fit like during the training so It was more of a motivational test. I'm the other thing is you know what? The idea has a need for manpower in these units. Was Orchard my Pestle Opinion I. Think they don't want it to be that hall. They won't be too hard because they need people in. Yeah I think that's the balancing the balancing act that a lot of especially special operations units in an all services in all countries that they kind of have to bounce that today because you know on one hand they they WANNA keep the standards high and they want the very best people. But on the other hand, you know they need to fill the ranks. So it's kind of I. Know if we have a selection course in this is just from my perspective that too many people failed you know the or or decided to opt out. Our chain of command up at the higher headquarters used to get very upset with the instructors thinking that we were changing the standards of being higher. When in fact that sometimes you know certain classes, you might have a group of guys that absolutely excel in they come together as a as a group in when people do that, they tend to do much better and we've had other classes where no they they kind of opted out in every man for himself and when that happens in. Oh. It's. Collectively, they don't do as well. Yeah, and is a terrible experience for the people who are in actually like my teen really came together. And it was beautiful was naturally just beautiful like when you'll know that you can kind of its year against them. If you like you know, sorry the team together against the instructors and you're going to do it and you'll be in it with one another. But I must be terrible when it's a fragmented group of of soldiers who just don't even like each other and. Caught. Rely on each other compete talks and a lack hunting. Yep Go ahead I'm sorry. I was my second the selection that the I with to get to the tonight kind of final unit. I arrived at the unit was tougher for several days long. And that. Even though actually they have I don't know how is the US they had certain rules that they had to adhere to. In terms of the number of hours of sleep age soldier would get that. We will get fed that we you know that we would have to adhere to certain certain things. which again was a surprise from the actually because I expected it to be really brutal like really brutal but it wasn't like that it was quite professionally run. and they did kind of mental is what is physical challenges you had to pass. Those running running with stretches. A stretcher. White on the stretcher and then four of you would be under each going. You'd be running with a sandbag on your shower guy and you just keep going and going and you know it took a watches from us. So you never know when it's GONNA finish off. And then the other really intimidating thing actually is there like okay it's time to eat they throw ration pack. It's the crew though like ten of us in each hall selection, then they just throw one in the middle of the ten of you, and then they take notes on how you organize eating and how you organize the food with one rushing team. In looking for people who who's making the people food here's opening the tens for other people to eat who's just grabbing food and keeping it to themselves. You know grading you're holding very interesting take match. Absolutely and that that's you know that's a hallmark of I think all good special operations units and that's you know they wanna see who the team players are and if you're worried about, okay, we're GonNa make sure that everyone's taken care of and that's what they're looking for her leaders. You know that's you know I I remember reading that part of the book and a definitely struck a chord because that's the kind of things that we assess. You know as instructors in you're looking WHO's the Team players who who the guys that naturally, there's going to be some guys that might not be leaders per se but you know they're going to be good team members and there's nothing wrong with that either that not everyone's going to be a leader and not everyone can be a good one. But I you know I found that part of it is very interesting because again I, mean, that's you know when you're going through something like that, we used to tell our candidates the same thing. You're always being assessed. Just remember that everything you do and it might seem so ridiculous but you're being assessed. Because we assess everything and that part of where you guys were eating I thought was you know? That that's very interesting and see they watch how how the guys do and. So. As part of your training, obviously, you have to jump out of an airplane. What was that? Like for you I know everyone has different. You know remembrances that. Oh Yeah I wrote the book actually. You know what I say generally that I was petrified jumping island airplane sign and I was petrified jumpy plane every time I not just the first one but. The the things that I saw that first time. Amazing like you're in. You're in the Hercules. The doors are open everything's ready and everyone's jumping out and then suddenly some guy runs from the draw backwards to the back of the plane, just run these hooked up to the starting line. Runs cost. And then four of the jump masters shot shuttling mentioned. Jumped on him dragging. Through The. Ruins our goal like. Like. Action wants to get will get scheduled to get this. Yeah. Your because everyone's job story different but they're all great and I love that part. When you talked about in your book and to be perfectly honest, I've been afraid of heights all my life, and then of course, when they join special forces, what they make me, do they put me on a mountain team so I was climbing mountains and you know hanging off cliffs. But. I'm still to this day. My wife will laugh at me because I don't like getting on a ladder on the side of the house in. She's like for somebody who jumped out of airplanes, hundreds of times, and you don't get on a ladder and I was like I still don't like heights I've climbed up. Out of aircraft, but I still don't like heights but. Honestly, jumping. I guess because it was so high that didn't bother me. I used to actually like hanging out of the aircraft as a jump master. But no ladders are still a no go around here. I'm going to tell the story about Jumba like my. Jump. In the US where they graduate awkward while you'll, you'll qualify parachutes to stay. They Graduate Ach what you're jumping with new you have more equipment. Yes. Okay. Cool. So the Israelis do that as well first time he jumped have anything the next time you jump you have like a bag between your legs That's there in the third time I. Think he's a night. Whatever they just graduated. So this was the second time. And I had the bag in between my legs and I jumped out there airplane and. Use you count one, two three, and then you look up and you make sure the canopies deployed. So I can't one-two-three basically is a close designed county i. In the canopies open and I know that the Kennedys I, because I'm looking straight at it because the parachute cold his opened around my leg. And is holding me upside. Down with the bag in between my leg you know in what Bulls frankly just pushed down that and I'm like looking at like I have no idea what to do. Now what that what the heroin is during this? So obese I just screaming at the parachute. Let me go let me. Let. So I eventually I just I'm like, okay. Where is my leg like wearing? was handed out. Shopping. Grabbed the cold and kind of get my leg out and then you get your leg out like still hundreds of feet above the ground. So then I fell fell the right way up which was bad enough. And I was a little tangled. Had twisted but actually what was cool was that the training totally kick in The did you above your head you hope to codes and he pulled Paul and then you take like your leg around. An. Twisted the cold so I just did that instinctively. And then I pulled the believer to release the bag like two meters whatever below me and my you know I knew I was supposed to do that before I did is boys in my head guys. How. Do you know that this is not the release for the Hanis. opole this. He's GonNa snip out the whole power shoot and you're done like, how do you know that like I know I know that I know I know but. I'll given and I was like, yeah, finally, I'd like this I'm in big trouble. So I hope the lead learn. Had the bag deployed was will find. Wrong. and. One of the stories I wrote for software. We run a deployment wants to Paraguay and we were training alongside departure. Goyen. Are Airborne Brigade. In the drop zone ends at the edge of the base and then you actually the race track for the C. One thirty after he turns on the red light names making another, you go actually over the capital city of ASENCION. So it's like. You know you can't let anyone go out after the red light comes on because they'll be over big tall. Yeah. I had this one. Paraguayan kid he gets to the door. He starts to jump out and then halfway out the door decides no, I'm not doing this. So he's half in he's half in he's hanging with his right leg his right arm hanging out of the aircraft, the C one, thirty Hercules. One side is holding on to death grip inside the aircraft, and now the other jumpers are trying to get by him and jump over him. So I'm grabbing them pushing back nope nope. nope. No no go back. So I'm trying to take this kid and I'm like now by this time we're over the city. So this big tall buildings and everything, and it's like this is not the area to. To go out in a parachute, some I'm trying to pull him back in and I'm telling them look down I'm not putting you out over these buildings, not going to throw you out and he refused to move, and then the air force guys were petrified because they were like, hey, we can't. You know we can't let him hang like this. I was like, oh So the the Columbia, the Paraguayan General I should say. He was sitting right there. He was filming everything was his. I'm like. Well, there's only one way to get this guy in. So I grabbed the top of his helmet and pulled it back as far as I could and I punched him as hard as I could right now. and. It kind of stunned him for a second where it was like any guerrillas John and I picked them up and throw them in the seat in an I strapped him back in and. In the general laughing so hard. It was like I didn't know what you're going to do that kid he goes I thought you were going to throw them out I was like we can't you know apply had to get him in. It's a safety thing I can't let them hang. Hold jump for everyone else. Oh Yeah. So then we got him back to the front of the aircraft we we made another pass and then all the rest of the guys without exception, and then by the time, all the guys got on the ground I would tell them the airborne brigade commander will what happens. He came up to me and he was holding his hands in front of his face. He Goes Hey, whatever you do. Don't punch me. Okay. I apologize to him. I was like I didn't want to touch any of your soldiers, but it got to the point where. If? He ended up falling out you know he he probably would've killed so. He was like, no, no no you did the absolute right thing. He's like just don't punch me. All right. But my airborne story so. Yes I mean. So you know I think one of the crowning moments for everybody and I? You know again. Your book touched on something that you know. That hit on. You know that I remembered you parents can't do your graduation the see you get you bray and you're sober you know your wings and What was that like I was beautiful atmosphere find the army was so good to them as well. Actually made a big deal out of it. They were very happy to be there. and. Yeah, I mean I, I didn't write in the book didn't quite work that you have to graduations I. So. When off the six months you become a paratrooper. You get the Red Baron you have to do a ninety kilometer marched. Up to Jerusalem up to a place called. Hill. which is a big. Battle ground the paratroopers Fulton in nineteen, sixty seven. During the Six Day War and that's why you receive your bury, Your Red Beret and your. Young in your officially brought into the paratroop family if you like. And that was huge deal on my parents were there for that and it was it was it was amazing to receive the commanders Berry. was also was just a fantastic, actually an award for like they let you aradio hardcore on the ninety K. March. So you've your deserving of this watch the we will so give just want just to one of the recruits. When. They pass out I it. You know. I have to tell you i. mean you know right there was just a crowning moment isn't it's just beautiful. Yes and I'm that to me was another. I. Mean You know your Commander gave you his beret rather than you know a brand new one and that that's a huge sign of respect and then to get the watch in ninety K. what? What was that March like? Yeah So I have mixed feelings about it, it's very hard. It's nonstop and you do it like in. In company level or maybe maybe battalion level. So the love you're doing the same time which slows you down, which actually makes it harder because you don't sleep on the way and he or you're really having rest stops along the way, but you can't go as fast as maybe you'd like to get it down with because you're within this larger. Environment. and. Took his twenty three hours at do the ninety K. which was considered like medium. and actually I had. Look it's it's the easiest thing that you do in many ways because you notes the end like you at the end of this, my red berries waiting for me Brian. This is all I have to do. And with all the stuff that you've gone through beforehand, you know that you're able to do it as well. There's no real feeling. All I'm on I. Hope I can do this. There's no way that was gonNA fail kind of this at this moment. And Yeah I. Just I. Just I can't even I'm struggling to remember actually you know like I carried the radio, which I was like the least the least likely person to carry the radio because I couldn't even speak the language anyway. babbling. But that time but that was pretty good. But I was still you know the British guy. I was ready for. At least half of it on it was fine. On this I don't know if this is like this is strange psychological thing that happens to me. So happen to everyone on my team, is that the first time you carry a relatively heavy piece of equipment on one of these launches it basically kills you it just it's just destroys. You destroyed my back festival was just the stretcher and it was for forty five clones amount and it just yeah, it was very, very tough. I didn't give it up and it did it the whole time but after that moment which almost but bright me, I could carry basically anything without any problems do. On on the ninety picked up the radio I just had no issues. With my other equipment is really interesting thing actually. But yeah. So you know and the closer you get to Jerusalem until then you can actually see it and then you're in it and you're running on the Jerusalem streets and people who had civilians of Driving Austin there will be paying their homes. Amid you everyone's applauding and it's amazing and you just you know then you start running, they opened the stretches and then you run you run. All the way to the end an earful. Waiting they with food and. They just let you know. Yeah congratulations you're now. that. That's that's awesome. I had read somewhere. That They they used to do. I don't know if they still do it at times that I heard that the Israeli paratroopers used to take a I don't know if it was ultimately. Are just like a graduation ceremony type thing where they used to do it at night. At Masada, the is that still a thing with them. They used to do it. It's not a thing anymore. You have we every? Combat Soldier in the idea swear an oath. To protect the country, basically and the the paratroop business maybe a couple of other units used to Masada they moved it now to the. The Western Wall. And that's where I did my swearing in ceremonies well. At the Western Wall Yeah Yeah. That's Awesome place and for some years Jewish, I mean I, I've been to is her money times and. I still get. It's when when I go there and to our listeners who haven't been, it's it's it's an amazing place. It gives you goosebumps when you go there and you watch how the people you know they go up to the wall and say. A. Prayer or whatever the that they do. They're it's it's such a it's a powerful place and been there. What over two thousand years, right? Yeah. Yeah. It's yeah. It's a place that connects the Modin in the ancient Yup Began really. Hey My name's Katie stole my name's cody. Johnston. And I'm Robert Evans and we're here today to promote our show worst year ever. Ah podcast where We Talk About Twenty Twenty Aka the worst year ever our purview is wide end bleak. We talk about the election we talk about the administration we talk about protests, other things to which my co hosts will now describe to you. We talk about how to survive a horrible state violence we talk about how? To fight Nazis as part of a community and we talk about like you know election stuff with the politics and things. If you love politicians, you'll tolerate this show listen to worst year ever I'm a heart radio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. I am Lia remedy and I am joined by my render at. We are very excited to announce that we are continuing our journey with a new podcast called Scientology, fair game. What is fair? Video Games a term in scientology that is used to describe a was used to describe. The. Taking care of and that's the euphemism Tom Okay threats and enemies of scientology. What it really is is a series of writings and policies directives by L. Ron. Hubbard that lay out how you go about destroying someone who is an enemy of? Scientology. Listen to Scientology Fair game on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Yeah I can't it felt like. I don't know. Like I was intruding because I'm not Jewish but. Watching it unfold there when you know the people I was with in we're we're watching people do that. It's it's very I I thought it was along with certain other parts of Jerusalem. especially in the old parts, it's such a powerful place and as you said, it connects the old the new and It's part of your heritage there and I think that that's a neat place for the paratroopers to take their of. Yeah Yeah it is. It is pretty good. It's very powerful plants. Yeah. What were your parents like when they saw? Did, they notice a big change in you at your graduation. Yeah I think so I think it's very like in many ways in many instances. I kind of looked at him. I felt like what I you know I dragged his middle costs Jewish couple from London. To the some all me barracks. So you know. Backfield in in in a place, they've never you know jurist lab. Jerusalem, they would never have otherwise gone through. By these other Isreaeli parents who who will know exactly what they're doing and what's happening. But. It was great unit. They were great by them. So proud it was amazing. A really proud of me. And I was really proud to have been that. So yeah, I mean it was it was it was a very big deal. I remember when I graduated Special Forces training my parents came down for that as well and it was a big thing. Especially, my dad who served in World War Two which We spoke of offline there before we started. You know you know for them to see that it was it was pretty neat and. So. Then you know you you get to your your your unit you're in the is it a battalion or of Now, it's You know what it's theoretically it's a company is actually because it's It's a little bit smaller than a company is okay. And they had like a reconnaissance battalion. The battalion. The arrived, which is anti tank. Engine Engineering Element and then a reconnaissance element as well. and. Then altogether like the reconnaissance battalion. Okay, the end you're in the reconnaissance. Element right? Yeah. No I was in the element which is like anti-tank. Incident okay, but you know you took part in the The Second, Intifada? Yes. Again, that part of your book was fascinating again, you know because it wasn't what you expected to be doing not but there was a lot of really interesting A. Incidents that happened in I mentioned a couple of them in the review of the book and. One of them just struck me as so insane. But you see crazy stuff like this, all the time and There was a rock throwing incident where Palestinian you'd said climbed onto a roof on an apartment building and they. They were throwing everything they get their hands on. And they ended up throwing. A walking machine onto the armored car which you guys are riding in can you? Can you tell our listeners a little bit about this. Yeah. So I mean. We hit as Paul. degen will security operations only going during that period of time. The brigade as a whole would kind of. into the city would would do make arrests in do various kinds of piece of work in the city. Some, and sometimes, it will happen all in one go like everyone just descends. So this was one of those instances when you think an entire brigade had descended on a city in the West Bank. Nablus? Now what would happen during that because this these ready presence that had been kind of stunned throwing the likelihood of the youths come out and grabbed the rocks and they stopped burning tires and they stop throwing things no lethal semi lethal if you like equipment at soldiers. So we found ourselves on the side of a hill. Side like if you like to your left is just a slope downwards into the city Patio Roy is kind of houses built into one another. And so they on the roofs of these at these houses running from one to the other throwing down on us and I'll 'cause we responding with a non lethal amunition tig asked. Is Very intense situation actually And we were in the thick of this right in the thick of it and and we had called for tied into armored vehicles and we were listening to the things bombard. Vehicle and you kind of here. It's rain almost and then suddenly this this huge bang like. We have what was that and? We break out with a vehicle. You know we come out and what was it? And then the vicar moves and as it moves this washing machine, just kind of falls through. A. Even. Had belongings environment. And then this older guy steps into the middle of this furor that's going on and starts screaming at the roof. And we thought he. He He's supposed to be screaming at us with the Israeli liked invaders here right there during this. So why isn't he shouted US other than arabic-speaking the callers like piecing it out, and he's like he's screaming with the the guys who are the throwing these things at us because we they just through his washing machine. Google. Books. And the gloss right from beep drinking roughly the. Throwing, contents of people's homes onto the car and. And the The hoping ended with like like two minutes later I see right down the very end of the street like six or seven use they they kind of walk out in single file with their heads firmly fixed to the ground and they just walked down slope walk into somebody else's house and start the whole thing again with another truce. Slightly, go this. News ready Palestinian conflict in. At, the same time it's a dangerous situation but at at the same time, it's it's. Unintentionally hilarious I mean as I'm reading the book in these kids are throwing everything off the roof in it obviously from a pie, you know somebody getting killed and And then you know this washing machine of all things from. Way Up on this roof and then the old man as I'm reading, it's you know I'm trying to figure out what is the end yelling at them then turns out that was his possessions and Because you never think about this tiny thing like it doesn't it wouldn't even to you think about it like I had seen any of them. Like the new plenty of instances on the news with a camera crew is set off filming this kind of thing happening. But you don't you don't think like who are these people? What are they doing? How they doing it? WHO's tires right listening prize it's hard when they get that like who did they take them from? Like when? You think about it just doesn't occur to you but but yeah, then you when you're in it, you see it. And it makes you realize. You you come to an interesting conclusions about. Yeah I mean, again, that was. That was one of the unintentionally hilarious parts of a dangerous situation about at the same time. As soldiers, you see stuff like this, all the time and it it never fails to amaze you how crazy the world can be at times but. There was another episode that where you in an apartment, you're hunting for a wanted terrorist you had to watch over a family and. Volunteers from the United States in the UK were there and share with our listeners. That story. Yes. This was my first. If you mission. This was my first off the getting badged after getting Gordon Board into the unit is kind of a full fledged member up, and by the way you've just done a year's training. And then the first thing they tell you when you do often years Chinese, he don't know anything which. is also like a bed beside surprised like I'm here everyone like Shit just do what I tell you. It's off burke mission in they're like, yeah, we this is like. This, we're going to give you something easy to she like. Yeah. I mean I had been preparing for this for a year and then I think somewhere on two in the morning like we get dropped off somewhere in Nablus and we kind of navigate by foot. towards all target building on the mission had been to set up like an ambush position in one of the apartments in this building. You know to try and. An An. Find if there are any terraced running out to hit them. and I hadn't considered and I hadn't been trained for either actually the idea that someone if someone living in apartment than someone who's going to be have to be the one to look after that family while somebody else is the one on the ambush position you know obviously is a soldier where you want to do is build the embassy ambush position. Anyway. So we get in there and it's actually two apartments on one floor. The we we move into these apartments and has a couple they're living in one of them with their two children. And the two kids are asleep and they stay. And the kind of the MOM and dad end up sitting on the couch, and now we're in here and we will setup for ambush. So you know like one person stands guard and everyone else goes to bed justice asleep I should say you sleep on the floor in sleeping full kit and you'll big on everything else obesity. So. I get woken up. By another one in the in the squad and he says. The British hit league the British again. What is like Paul Revere from? Even need with British A. So I get up come outside and. The number of people in this apartment is like twenty. Now I'm like how how you know I went to sleep a few hours before they were four people two neighbors sleep I seen. Wake, up like the entire living room is filled with people they must have been the most popular people in the whole city. You know when when people heard that the Israeli soldiers there I get I assumed that they must have gone to this apartment to make sure that they were. Okay. And then because like all entry had been covert, we couldn't anyone go once they came in they read and they were stock. Because yeah. If we release them, then they would tell everyone else that everybody's ready soldiers in the building and then that could lead to a situation. So yes. Among these people have four four tourists actively or activists to from the UK and she from the USA. and. They've walked into this apartment in the allow doubt and so young. And you know that complaining and. A. When push comes to shove I end up getting into an argument with one of the English ones who studying Oxford. Cambridge, and like was doing some kind of internship in in in in Israel, in the West Bank. Program we just get into a debate about the Israeli. Palestinian. While we're in this burden, living is married guy all around us about water supplies the rebuilding of the town suicide bombers. These things while the sirens, the shooting a dying on outside the window. as a crisis situation and then. One of the girls can I just go downstairs and eastern like medication for blood pressure and I. Say let you. We we can't let you out because then everyone would not. We're here and she said, what are you talking about? The only reason I in here is because the people who were looking after us that that are Israeli. Soldiers in that apartment can you go inside image show everyone? Hey. Wait what? This was funded. Over NGO. Outed they even though. So anyway. So yeah. Crazy, times. The American girl in the book was very annoying. Off kept. Kept wanting to call the embassy as I don't know what would do. You. Oriented type of like people who don't like Americans drawers at American whining and complaining and. Over entitled. That was when. and. Calling Embassy now I'm like. No. She's just like, okay. I've been the. Guy Was just like Oh. Yeah. We will just each smoke weed man this whole conflict your way we just had joy. Go like yeah. Yeah, that's that's a that was a fine welcome to the unit. Incident, their writing. But what what the old timers were saying I mean I again heard the same thing I mean when I graduated of being a Green Beret, I got to the unit and. was considered myself a barrel chested freedom fighter, and you know I was ready to take on the whole world and my team sergeant let the air out of the balloon pretty quickly. It was like, yeah. Congratulations you graduated in now is when you actually start to learn shit. Yes. It hasn't ended. It's just begun yellow. Any. Dick next to me and you'll learn stuff. Every team in the same everyone is. I'm here now on the let non. Yup and. It's funny because you know we all speak different language but. The military, the same in a lot of places. And Yeah. That's why re reading this book I mean like I said it it it struck a chord on so many levels but the one of the things that was really interesting part was You guys were hunting a a one, a terrorist who is responsible for the debt savell lot. Israelis, as well as Palestinians and you guys had trapped him in a house, he had all kinds of ammunition. And you know I'm expecting this guy's going to. You know What they call them, what shall lead or modern? Dying the martyr's death in it didn't turn out that way and. Tell our listeners about that one as well. So, we referred to this guy's the Fox. He was like well known on the on the hit list of the top ten terrorists of of the area he was he was right up there. And he was so such a sensitive target actually. You, know the military kind of avoided his family then kind of left the areas where he felt comfortable alone in the hope that he would show law. And we had practiced for the operations go get him a lot. And we had been stood up to do it a lot and instant down lost second. If you imagine the experience that quite lows well, you're ready for the mission and everything is in place in your transplant is there. A been canceled. That happened over time and then one time. We stood up again and I remember saying the Deputy Commodity Unit. Yeah, WE'RE GONNA, we're about to get stood down like forget. It just looked at me. He's like Nana note this time. And He was right. So they we drove into numberous and that was like my operating area mainly. While I was while I was in the army. And Yeah. Me We dispersed according to plan. and. It was an apartment building. So. It wasn't a houses much bigger complex than that. And, they exited they everyone who? was in. Out and they were very clear. You know look is there anyone left in there? Sure. Is this guy here? Are you sure he's not hit with and then they went in and they sweep insides of finding An for some when I was outside, I was covering like a quarter of the building me in my MEA Julia in Hebrew, which is like four of you. And Yeah. So we will covering one push of the building. And I had this we'd. Image by the way, the Blues Brothers movie while I was doing it as you remember the that is the very end of the movie where they go, they want to pay the tax bill and they colin like all of the SWAT teams. Everywhere and everyone is. Abstaining they got snipers whatever and I was just like, yeah I'm one of those extras in this. Operation the next day like nothing to do here, the hours were taking by going like two in the morning three, four, five, six, seven, it was dawn. It was now it was not possible and it was it was the eat was was coming. The Sun had come up. And you know nothing was happening and I was like this is this is nothing like this was another a false alarm when we need to go back to base. And then suddenly. A hand just emerges from one of the windows and just closes a window. In in in the least dramatic way that anything has ever happened guard closed the window right I would be like, ooh, someone's closed the win somebody somebody in there sir. We've seen this and we reported it's the guys who were conducting sweep in the building and they go in. And they're like, can you sure Because they sweep of the of the a particular apartment where we hung locate the window and found anything. And so you know they're questioning it will let you hundred percent hundred sentences. Hopkins. So they go out. Of the apartment and they throw a grenade inside. And they throw this grenade inside the grenade goes off obesity causes. Damage in an and everything that grenade causes, and then suddenly they can hear voices. Two guys screaming inside officer of Seduction Benxi, coming out. That tourists actually there was the one we were looking for another one that we didn't WanNa know we didn't know he was dad who was also one of almost wanted. And they came out their hands up and they had had created like a fake cabinet situation in behind the cabinet they can start like a hole in the wall and that's where they will hiding. When they came out they they came out we found in their. weapons and ammunition. Effectively that they had not used. And then they hadn't tried to use, and soon with any actually if they had, they had just braved out a bit longer they might have gotten away with it because the sweeping team that didn't know where they were. Anyway they emerged. In a brought downstairs and just. It changed something in the way, and again in the way I looked at this whole conflict because you know we had been arresting suicide bombers, we had been engaging terrorists but this guy was these two guys actually with leaders they were big guys. And they were armed. But when push comes to shove and they were facing Israeli soldiers, they just surrendered. Audiology of modern and the whole idea of we love death like you love life was it just collapsed and these these guys didn't even care about their own ideology. Now for me, that was a big deal because I had kind of assumed that you know it was like my mirror image I had come from London, I, had come to fight in the idea for the Jewish people guy on the other side would was me but he was just born in different circumstances and he was doing different things. But when I saw that actually changed a little bit. And then he started crying and then he was begging someone to shoot him and I was like, why is he begging to shoot him? He could have. Gone like you know it doesn't. It's ridiculous Yeah. It turned out that the is like the guys who would be who would end up being murderous anyway the guys who would end up being on the wrong side of the law if there wasn't a warlike situation at the guys who end up kind of becoming terrorists. And sending all the people to go blow themselves up while running a protection racket in the city you know, and that was who he was. You know nothing special nothing ideologically driven just the guy who became psychopathy became a hero by virtue of the fact that he could kill his writings instead of instead of. Palestinians like a regular criminal and I really changed the way looked at things were it was just another thing another way cool. The Middle East is is different. And you know in the book, you talk about how you started to withdraw and In Oh. You had when I characterized as a classic case of PTSD Yeah I mean you you weren't You know when you were off duty in back in your apartment, and later with a family that you were living with an boots I, believe, yeah. you kind of which rue and you know it wasn't the same for you and when you weren't the guys in the unit and that's Off that was a really powerful moment in the book. Because it's something, a lot of soldiers everywhere going through today and I don't know how comfortable you are speaking about that part of your life. But if you care to, you can share some of that as well. Yeah. I think it's really. It's really important to talk about it actually because of. Because of the suicides from Addison for because of the trauma mother like former soldiers, Guy even acerbic soldiers. From the things that are done, I, think as important to talk about it And Yeah I mean during my dream, my actual service I didn't realize that anything was wrong I understood that I was very unhappy when I was in the army. Because Israel is kind of in that unique situation where you can be on the front line in the morning and you could be by the swimming pool in the in the afternoon the kibbutz in everything is very close, but but you can change. Atmosphere dimension really really easily. And I had a really hard time of fuss. That's what it was at a hard time coping with that sudden change I didn't like it like it was it was difficult to adjust, and by the time you stop to adjust. To. Civilian Environment it's time to go back to the me anyway. Let. You out for the weekend or something. So yeah. So reached the point author by eight months of kind of. Eight off drugs accepted into the unit I guess eight months of operations and they do them every night. Operations I just kinda withdrew. I didn't WANNA do any why I I I got some hashish and I took it back to my room on the kibbutz. On. The until the end of the weekend and then I put my youthful by I went back to the homie. Didn't to leave the Roma kind of didn't want anyone to speak to anyone will do anything. and. That's how wars and that's how it started. I didn't really notice if I actually. You do any kind of sneaks up on you. I really noticed it when I go out of the army is the more. You have a great feeling when you're with your teammates like when you with the people that you'll wait the army, they understand you one hundred percent and may have gone through the same things that you've gone through and you don't have to say anything to that like it's unspoken. You can just be together and kind of sharing in the same kind of hardship. But the moment that you're out of that environment. Suddenly feel less taken care of you feel more vulnerable. Nobody else really gets it nobody understands how you're feeling what what you want out life and you don't know what you would have life and everything. It's very deep and very philosophical and very difficult to explain yourself. And that started happening you know start happening while was still in the Army Inigo West when I got out Yeah I mean. When I finished all back to London. And I was with my family was probably the the worst thing I could have done because that really known understood what I was talking about. who I was at that point they will tweet on TV and they were talking about music and to the jobs in their lives, and I just had no. No connection and of ability to kind of connect, find anything that they were saying Larry Cat grew the most important band was that movement didn't care. The was the office it was on TV I reached I still don't care and could not understand why everyone was talking about stuff. And again it, it led me to withdraw. We'll get really I got very drunk. A. Drunken. Stone A lot. which again is kind of withdrawing its just withdrawal is just trying not to have to speak to anyone. Yeah. So that happens and that was happening at the same time I had kind of pressure to get a job and precious employed into kind of continue with my life and I really wasn't sure what life off the army would look like he's I'd never really considered life often the only actually. My original desires ambitions for myself was I was going to go in the army and stay there is a career. But I didn't I left after two years. And I was back in London and I wasn't sure how to proceed. So you know you just dig yourself into a hole. And that's kind of why describing the book. Yes and that was. That was something that I think a lot of soldiers in a regardless of what I'm year in a lot of guys are going through that today. You know they one minute they're in the military and then the next minute they're out and. You know they're they've Kinda lost without that structure without that. Support System around them where you know in you trust everyone that's around you and You know those members of your unit more intimately than a Lotta guys know their own families yeah. Yeah. Actually I was hoping when I was writing I was really hoping that the the my experience host only would connect with people kind of from other armies as well like the it would be a shed a civilised shed experience. that everyone could relate to because it is it's crazy if when you think about it, you know you've going through a they call it. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder I. Always Think Mike will how would How you supposed to like deal with what's the in order way of dealing with? You know what the right way having gone through traumatic stress. and. You can come out the side of it. I think in come out the other side of it being even grateful for the experience because you know as a learning experience about your own resilience that you can hit kind of the button but you can kind of come back off as well. You can get pastas you can move forward. and. There is a life often the military. Or there is a life off the off the battlezone if you like the united vote. For months wanted to do was go back. I didn't want to go to Israel I want to go back to Nablus. That was where I wanted to be back in that city doing you know never ending operations with the same guys for the rest of my life. I dreamed infanticide stop doing that nonstop. Until I realized it's just going you know. It was a period of my life. Not Finished Santi current move to the next period. There's very tall. So eventually, you ended a backup an Israel. Can You? Fill us in on that part of your life. When I left Israel off the only student Kinda miserable wasn't kind of You know it's easy to very black and white vision of a conflict when you're far away from it and then you're in it and it's very easy to lose kind of your own. Understanding of of. You know the difference between good and bad right and wrong at an enriched side. You're actually supposed to be on in a conflict. I'm why because you only see the little microcosm of what you were involved in united. See the big picture. So when I got out of the army, I kinda thought you know what I think. There's anything left me here I didn't really know what to do with myself, and like I said I was in a bad place I wanted to go back to be with my family. But having said that I always wanted to live that I always wanted to go back I hadn't turned my back when it completely I just left I kinda wanted to get back but I wanted to go back to the UK to just sort myself out. And get my head into a better place to return to Israel in a better way and I think that's just what I needed was just time away in order to regain my perspective, you know to. Jane to to see once again, a bigger picture, the having been is tiny microcosm of his tiny micro operator. Or tool of government policy. Yeah and it took a few years of Kinda going on this journey. But yeah after a while just realized that it's like, what will my expectations in the first place like what I really think that like you know the you can you can be involved in a counter insurgency at it not be like messy and then not be any civilians involves that that's not the the real like that and so I had to Ulta. Preconceptions in line with what had gone through an ulcer will my expectations have been once I did that I was I was felt comfortable going back to Israel again felt like I can go back go back there with a clear head and a better understanding of what's going on there. So I went back and I look back for like five years. I was backed by four. I met my wife out there and again came back to the UK off off the job in the UK. Became back here, and here we still are now wondering about going back to Israel again. Say. That part of the book you talk about returning Israel I thought it was. Excellent passage of the book where you said You were returning Nantou Paradise, a place of milk or honey. Or some kind of holy place. The Messiah was arriving to I was going back to the land in the country and my people dirty dusty imperfect but our own and I thought that was really really good part of the book. Because it explains it all in a kind of puts everything into perspective. Now is your wife as your wife is an Israeli, are a she from England as well? None she's Israeli. And mother is originally from Iraq and have father from Tunisia. And they kind of reflect that kind of Jewish experience. Of of the Middle East and experience and she was born in. Israel. Grew up there and then yeah, and then on. And then we came in, we come back to. How does she like living in England? She loves it. She, she absolutely loves actually. She loves the people standing in. Line Run here you know they just they need to go. They need to go somewhere they just wait in the line and Then and then they pay for whatever it is like. People. Don't Ross overly personal questions. You know plus people give you a person's face it you. Know. She, likes. Yet Israel is don't like standing in line I've noticed. I like nights my turn man. Why? A I noticed that when I was there and but it's such a wonderful place and I visited there quite a few times with work. And I definitely want to go back and because I've told my family about an as someone who loves history that country is it's like a living breathing museum as I put it because you can walk through Jerusalem parts of the country and everything was as it was two thousand years ago I mean. You know when the Romans re laid waste Jerusalem a lot of the ruins just where they left them. Yeah. It's an amazing place but. In in your book was Outstanding as I put it. I mean. You get the impression from reading it and it's you're kind of. Pulled right into it and I felt like we were sitting in a pub in you're telling me your story. View I absolutely love that line. Passage. Because that's how I felt when I was reading it I I wasn't being recited to I wasn't reading some dry commentary out you know. A person's you know experiences I was Kinda pulled in, and that's what made the book so easy to in quick to read. Once, I started reading it. I couldn't put it down. And like I. I, missed a couple of meals because my wife was like we gotta eat now go ahead. In this, I'm not putting this down until it's done. Either by the way for Greenbrier be saying this to me about my experience in about my writing about that book. It for me is as good as it gets right doesn't get better than this like you with all of your military experience. You'll of things that you've done to to kind of look at my experience, give it kind of validation. To be able to Recognized within your own training. Some of those things really makes me feel special actually make. Makes me very really feel like it's done and and and and I really respect your audience service and I'm I'm just incredibly proud of that review actually Very well, deserved my friend. I mean I like I said when they asked me if I would review it I was like sure I love reading. Everyone's experience because like I said, we're all different but yet we're all the same. Yeah. I. Mean. You know we we all have our you know our own experiences but you know we can we all speak the same language basically when it comes down to it in the that's what I love about books like this in. Their respective there I mean I thought that was a tremendous book and I again I mean you you there's the hours of boredom the the sheer terror at times, and then the ridiculousness of a guy throwing as washing machine off the roof i. mean it's all there there. You know and I. Really Appreciate Your Time Today and again thank you for your book. It's definitely in my collection of You know I've already shared with a couple other people I, told them they need to read this. So amazing really appreciate that. Very much pretty happy to do this reading lots and lots of different by the way. y'All GONNA keep reading. Yeah but so are you writing anything Now that's coming out or are you going to continue writing or is? What your plant workable Looking, write to write a novel about we were talking before about I had this relative who served in the British Secret Service What will one in the nineteen twenties and I'm looking to write kind of a fictional account based on him. On what he did. He was arrested in France China prison espionage. I think he's a great character. So. Yes. So watch this space. That's that's awesome. Well, we look forward to reading that in the future so. Keep us in mind for that and Yeah. Again, Mark Thank you very much for your for your time for your patients today and for you for sharing your experiences what this low program. Steve, thanks very much for having me. Okay and for everyone. Make sure you add this to your reading lists. It's Called beyond the Green Line by Margot. Tremendous spoke about his experiences in the Israeli counterinsurgency. and. It's a great human story as well. So for Myself Steve Ouster during Mark Goldberg all of us here at Safra Radio Software Radio on time on target will be back with another podcast real soon. Then the meantime keep reading those articles folks and make sure you read mark's book again beyond the Green. Line Used in listening to surf. I heart radio we bring you the best podcasts from the Ron Burgundy show to the breakfast club to stuff you should know really today's biggest names but each of these shows started with an idea and now we want yours we're looking to you for the next great podcasts simply go to next great podcast dot com to get the details and submit your pitch. We'll select up to ten semifinalists and give them a thousand dollars to produce a pilot then listeners from across the world will vote on their favourite to decide the next great podcasts enter today at next great podcast dot com that's next great podcast DOT COM. Why shouldn't the next great podcast come from you? Hi. This is Leah Rumney End Mike Grimm the and we are very excited to announce that we are finally doing a podcast. Yes, and the name is scientology. Fair Game Everybody Scientology Fair Game. And thank you to all of you because we tweeted out like, should we do a podcast whatever overwhelming? Yes. Amazing Response Listened to Scientology Fair game on the iheartradio APP apple podcast or wherever you listen to podcasts.

London army Israel United States UK battalion Army Special Forces instructor Jerusalem Nablus Guy Europe Paul Revere Mark Goldberg reconnaissance battalion London England Jewish Steve Really Jewish Youth Movement
"Why we spend so much time on social media"

Hello Gen Z

19:18 min | 1 year ago

"Why we spend so much time on social media"

"How would you describe yourself as a member of Jansy? I would describe myself as someone that is very rebellious and. Does not approve of the categorization. So don't want to speak for the generation itself and made that characteristic of Gen Z. members. But I'd like to also give. Another opinion about the situation. Yeah. What do you want to say that I that I don't like you at all I I don't see the purpose of it and it's being done by other generations. Hi Everyone, and welcome to Hello Gen Z.. A podcast about America's youngest generation. I'm Christie Tom and I may be handling that was punched Martinez and he has a point. It may seem obvious but not all members of Gen e love the name Jazzy or what's being said about them or even the idea of being lumped in with so many other people in the first place I'm a millennial and I certainly don't love all the things that genetics and baby boomers have had to say about my generation. Yeah, we know what? It's like to be characterized by someone else. So on this podcast were handing over the might generation Z. to explain themselves and explain what makes Z. John's e even if they disagree about it. This episode is about identity and belonging young people have always felt the push and pull of wanting to fit in also to stand out and that's true of Gen Z.. But they're coming of age story is a lot different than what we saw with previous generations. So I probably spend like. Four hours a day on. INSTAGRAM. Just like I can't help it. It's so addicting. INSTAGRAM's the best. Gen Z. spends more than seven hours on screens each day, and that doesn't include Schoolwork Pew Research found that ninety five percent of teens have access to a smartphone and forty five percent say they're almost constantly online all screen time. Changed, what it means to be a teenager. A. Twenty Seventeen Study in the Journal Child Development found that teens today are way less likely to drink or go on dates or get driver's licenses that study points to increase Internet use as a possible reason for this. Olivia Seltzer is a sixteen year old from Santa Barbara California who started a daily newsletter by an for John's e called the cram. Here's why she says her generations spend so much time online i. like what they're counted. All of my close friends I would say. Like. Ninety percent of some live thousands of miles away from me like ninety percent of them I met either through an all my program or through just generally social media and connecting as like other activists. And they live. Far, away from me and I hope that I'll be able to meet some awesome day bath I might not. But that doesn't matter because we're still able to have they very engaging conversations. What's going on around the world? We think this really speaks to. Jazzy. We social media are medium for rechange making. For. For our social lives but for so many aspects of for even like for informing ourselves. So many people on themselves and get their information through social media, which obviously that has its cons but it also has a presence because I know a lot of people who've been really activate if things that they have brought on social media. So I think that the fact that it just it's this window into. So much of the world that's available to US otherwise I think that is really nature factor in why we spent so much time and social media. Gen Z. say they often find more fulfilling connected online than they do even in person if you go to their social media profiles, find a curated expression of who they are whether it's the causes they support or how they identify by race gender or otherwise. One of the key things that sets Gen Z. apart from other generations is how familiar they are with gender neutral pronouns and how often they use pronouns introducing themselves. You see this person and also on their social media profiles whether it's she her hers, he him his day them. There's there are others to you. They encouraged us to talk about on this podcast. Here's Nina Salam. I noticed that a lot of older people are like extremely uncomfortable and people go around and say the pronouns and that's something Jesse kind of normalizes drippy normalized. My opinion we can all work together. You just have to get over the stereotypes you have of young people like Oh, they're just going to be on their phones politically correct we don't want that like. We will work with you, and maybe we'll get offended at some things you say, but all you have to do is learn from that. One of three members of Gen Z. say they know someone who uses gender neutral pronouns one out of formal meal say the same thing. But an older generations, it's far less common. We talked to a nineteen year old who's Trans who goes by the name 'em like the letter m. they use the pronouns, they them theirs. Yeah. So I WANNA start off by just describing pronouns are and what place they have like in our society So pronouns are a way that you refer to a person outside of using their name and usually it's in the third person is or when someone is not there it's also very indicative of gender So for example Abby what are your pronouns? She her hers. Great. So you are holding paper right now, and if you were to drop the paper, we would say, Oh, abby dropped her paper So we these things come naturally and then so my pronouns are they them. So if I were to drop by phone, it'd be like Oh am dropped their phone There are plenty of other pronouns but specifically ones that has been around forever that people doubt and aren't really as educated on them eight. Option it's actually been around since Shakespeare. He utilized that Pronoun to refer to other people. We also do it without realizing. So if someone is on the phone and like you see that someone else's on the phone like Oh, who is that what do they want? So it comes naturally but people don't really think about it they they feel genderless because their clothing and appearance are fluid I just do what I do and I just feel like. A genderless Amorphous blob floating through the universe. So like for me like it's non binary and like the. Like, ability to not be associated with gender at all amas very encouraging to people who are new to this idea and says, it's okay to get it wrong. As long as you're trying realistically, no one's ever done learning. So reassuring them that like it's okay that this is like not something or super good with like there's a lot of things that I'm not good with and like Trans people mess up each other's pronounce occasionally So that also helps them but just dispelling myths and rumors and like really assisting them in that is what I've been using more with older generations. So. You See Gen Z. Sharing Pronouns on social media and in-person when they introduce themselves and gender neutral pronouns in general or catching on elsewhere to California. Now allows people who are applying for ID cards and driver's licenses to mark non binary instead of male or female. M uses their social media profiles to educate and discussed gender and identity like many members of Gen Z.. Do this generation puts it all out there on social media for better or for worse? When the Internet is at its Best Gen Z. finds community through music and Youtube Stars they love and causes they want to rally around and even to connect to people who share the racial and ethnic backgrounds. Crystal Sung is. From escondido California who found to facebook groups that make her feel more connected to other Asian Americans. One is called Subtle Asian traits and the other is subtle. Asian dating. So the first one, the mean group, it's a lot of it is celebrating cultural pride in. It's like Oh. Wow. I didn't even realize that was Asian thing until I saw that joke. A lot of it is just. Using humor as a way to deal with things that we faced in in an just in a more light hearted way celebrator heritage. And then with subtle Asian dating Like the idea of auctioning is a little bit more problematic but the whole idea arises from the fact that it's really hard to find people at the same culture as you to be your significant other and that kind of diversity within Asian American groups is often glossed over. So that kind of Gives everyone in the group and opportunity to really go into that in me. Other people of the same heritage she says, there are a lot of Asian American celebrities in the group to. Them it Kinda really brought all of us together and made his. Main we prouder than ever before my hurt inch seeing other people. Experienced those same things and realizing that universality. So there's a lot of fun to be had online that's fairly obvious. Generation Z. uses social media to watch makeup tutorials, prank each other and make funny videos, but there's a dark side to. Right, we've seen teams get radicalized online and bring extreme points of view they learned in online forums and websites into real life. Nina Sallie Mae has seen some of her own classmates make racist jokes online and she wasn't the only person who told us that. They spend all this time like fortune read it because they find it edgy they find it. Funny. It's really rough. 'cause I have like people I think of friends in there like look at this racist name I'm like Oh never mind and it's like you wouldn't find it funny unless you had that implicit bias because if someone showed you a joke was no like. Not, like that didn't make any sense. You wouldn't laugh at it. So when people laugh at things that are making racist jokes, obviously they have some sort of like. Belief in the so it goes beyond jokes and memes right here in San Diego. County. A nineteen year old pathway gunmen attacked a synagogue in twenty nineteen killing one person and injuring two including a rabbi after posting an anti-semitic Manifesto Online. Emily. Johnson who campaigned to be the Mayor of power at age twenty in twenty eighteen remembers how it affected her community. It was definitely hard. I think. Kind of the worst part about it was. Nobody really thought happening in a community like Palais. and that's everybody says that where they never think it will happen to them. but it was. It was definitely really hard and frustrating because it feels like it's been. Years and years and years of people saying you know we need to fix this we need to change things and then it rocks your own community inner like why are we still not doing anything? Yeah when you say people talking for years and years about fixing things are you talking more about gun control or you talking about the sort of online heat culture that this particular person was a part of? I would say both I would say a lot of bullets I mean and nobody was surprised that there was. I wouldn't say nobody I think a lot of people who are members of my inority groups weren't surprised to hear that there were like racist and antisemitic people in power. We all were kind of. Aware. But the fact that he had posted almost a manifesto on the internet and nobody did anything it's. It. It doesn't invoke any feeling other than anger for me. Researchers are watching closely to see what affects social media have on mental health especially for young people who are on it all the time. The rates of anxiety and depression and suicide are higher in this generation than in previous ones. These are issues faced by every generation. Jazzy is a lot more open to talking about it. You might be thinking well I'm on social media all the time in my mental health is fine and of course, older generations used social media to in fact, they created it but no other generation was walking around with smartphones and twenty four, seven access to social media in their formative years. Jean twins is a nationally known researcher at San Diego State University who studies generations and wrote a book about generation Z., which she refers to as the Gen. she says the explosion in popularity of smartphones coincided with a big increase mental health issues. There were some rather sudden trends. showed up in these data sets. primarily around twenty eleven or twenty twelve. Dad For example, happiness among young people had been rising for a while and then it started to fall Depression. We send this. Constant, it's the early nineties or so that suddenly started to rise. So the steam which had been on the rise started to fall sort of all these kind of sudden changes. That really pointed toward. This is a new generation. And execution started to fall optimism fell by the wayside. The most sudden shift I had ever seen compared to previous generations. Psychological well-being has decreased when it comes to factors like self esteem and life satisfaction. As, we interviewed members of generation, Z. for this podcast so. One of the topics they had the strongest opinions about actually a few told us. They had either taken a step back or they were considering limiting their social media use for mental health reasons. They go back and forth between appreciating it as a tool to communicate information and feeling overwhelmed by it. Gill I tour is a host of a popular podcast called teenagers therapy which many members of Gen Z. say helps them feel less alone. I think when you Are when you feel like you're part of a community. That's when the Internet and being connected helps if you're involved like are followers. You know many of them feel like they're part of our community and they are they're you know they're we consider them our friends because they know so much about as that's you know that's what makes a friend and A fuel. They're part of something part of a movement part of a campaign part of a story. And that's when you really. When? The Internet. Really helps you feel connected and when it helps, you feel distant alone is when you're not part of something and you see like you go on talk and you see these frank groups having fun and having you know the time of life as teenagers and experiencing dreams and you know just living their best life. That's what makes you feel alone and you compare yourself like, what what do I have what am I involved in? Who are my friends? So. The way, the the line between that is just. How you involve how involved you are in the Internet I guess what you feel like you're part of if you find something you like community whatever might be if you find your niche whether that be a band an you know an art and you involve yourself in that. That's when you'll feel connected. So there's the pressure of sharing who you are and being authentic and connecting with others, but there's also the heaviness of so much information and feeling like you have to do something to get involved. There's so many organizations and causes jazzy to get involved with. A quick search of the word youth on Instagram and you'll find all kinds of highly organized beautifully designed well, informed organizations by an for Gen Z. where they find a common purpose. Some examples are used for border aid dear Asian Youth Palestinian Youth Movement Black Youth Project, and use over guns. So the Internet and social media are complicated again at best it creates a sense of community where young people can find like minded friends sometimes with the same super specific interests but it's worse as a shadowy place where teens become radicalized. But it's such a huge part of Jesse's experience. In some ways they really do live on their and while a lot of them say it can be overwhelming. They still say it's worth it to try and be involved in spend as much time online as they do. Okay. So my name is rose says he's I'm from New Jersey and I've been to a human activists since I was around two years old her Rosa really puts herself out there by using Tiktok to draw attention to issues around the world. But she says despite some of the negativity she's experienced online that won't stop her from staying engaged in speaking out. I'm really happy that we have more information because I don't WanNa be like the people before us saying like, Oh Rayong let us live life. I don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa do that. That's that's another source of another lost generation in my opinion I think. Information Power Change starts with the youth not only does Gen Z. find the Internet comforting place to express their identities but it helps them feel a sense of belonging as a generation. Here's a Libya talking about how connecting with Gen Z. Through her newsletter has given her hope for the future when it doesn't always feel hopeful to be able to truly thrive in. I'm like this for there is so much to be hopeless about you have to find the positives and you have to be continuously optimistic and you have to always able to find hoping the little things and in hoping each other as a generation and I think that that's been. A really incredible thing to to feel like we kind of like stand united against whatever problems facing and knowing that we like this big support system of young people all of us do. Whenever something happens sir. Z. is a part of the UT podcast network. It's a mini series with new episodes each Thursday. If you like this episode, please share with family friends, educators, coaches, whoever needs to say hello to Jesse. Rate US in your favorite listening up, we'd love to see your reviews. For more on generations Eve please go to union trip dot com slash Hello Gen. Z. we have all episodes there as well as commentaries from members Enzi. Ticks identity. Matthew t hall is our project editor and Beto Alvarez. Is Creative. I Abby Hamlin and Christie totten wrote produced edited. Thanks for listening.

INSTAGRAM Depression Abby Hamlin Z. John Jesse America Jansy Christie Tom researcher Shakespeare Martinez Youtube Schoolwork Pew Research Journal Child Development San Diego Asian Youth Palestinian Youth Nina Salam
4: Boots To Suits

Motive

41:14 min | 10 months ago

4: Boots To Suits

"This WBZ PODCAST is supported by hey dot com. E mails broken it's a mess but not anymore introducing hey dot com it's a radical new take on email. Try It free at H. E. Y., dot? com. We should warn you before you listen to this podcast. It's about the organized white supremacy movement. This episode includes descriptions of violence and racial slurs on bleeped. I'm Tom Metzger, your host for racing reason the number one show of its type on cable access TV throughout the United States. In Nineteen eighty-four, a white supremacist named Tom Metzger launched television show that came to err on public access channels in more than sixty cities across the US lots of people riding but not too many people fighting. Thank you out there and remember. Free speech Whitey. Metzker had once been the head of California's Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. But by the early eighties across America the clans membership was declining metzger. Saw The writing on the wall and left the K. K. K.. they didn't have the ability to reach size a lot of the American public quite public and I felt that the actions of the clan were. Passe, signed to. Metzger is still around he still racist and he's still actively promotes a racist agenda. Despite that, we decided to speak to him. Because in the nineteen eighties, Metzger played perhaps the most important role of anyone in charting the direction of the White Supremacist Movement in America. Metzker was always thinking about how the movement should evolve to gain broader acceptance among regular white Americans and what he did then explains a lot about where we are now. Back in the early eighties, Metzker was looking for new ideas and new blood. So he opened his racist umbrella wide. I, the traditional gracious groups rejected the skin. And I just them on. They were young. We were strong and had guts I would have to do is educate them send them in the right direction. and. So I became known as the Godfather these skinheads. Just who are the skinheads or do they come from by nineteen eighty, eight news reports across the country were warning Americans about a hate movement that was in snaring their children. There are disturbing signs that racism is once again taking hold in America especially among our young people. Teenagers from city streets they call themselves. Skinheads are now being recruited by old line. White supremacist. They described these young racists as fringe degenerates with Weird Tattoos, shoved heads and dangerous new, Gospel skinheads, hard hardcore, young white Americans who preach real hatred through violence may be the most frightening phenomenon of all. The news media may not have portrayed Neo Nazi skinheads in a flattering light but for leaders like metzker penny coverage was good. He wanted the movement to go national and the biggest boost he could wish her was when daytime talk shows came knocking. It was a mutually parasitic relationship, a ratings bonanza for the shows and a platform that Neo Nazi skinheads never could have imagined. That's when people started to pay attention to this thing it was like real coming out. So to speak of that movement from WBZ Chicago, I'M AT UCF and this is motive. Boots to. Suits. I actually for a long time thought that. Through the process of conversation I could break down barriers of you know racism or homophobia or. Ideas that people had that were discriminatory towards other people from the very launch of her nationally syndicated show. Oprah Winfrey tackled some of the topics that Americans still struggle to discuss. She spoke with. WBZ FOR THE MAKING OPRAH PODCAST in two thousand sixteen and it was the revelatory moment with the skinheads actually on the show. That I realized the power of the platform. In February nineteen eight Oprah invited racists from California into her Chicago Studios one of them was Tom Metzger. They call me on the phone and set it up. And Slimy out here, pay my way. Up In hotel. Metzger monthly newspaper Chronicle the event with full page photo spread in one picture Metzker son, and some of his skinhead followers are marching through Chicago's O'hare airport see kiling. In another, the caption claims to show to of metzker associates in a limo smiling on their way to quote an exclusive party of twenty five racists in Chicago's Best Hotel. All over. CHICAGO. Other people connected to the skinhead scene. We're getting ready for Oprah to one of them was David speers an anti-racist activists. You know the morning comes and Oprah sends a Towncar to come and get me. Oprah's producers filled the audience with people that shouldn't have been in the same room a man in an actual Nazi uniform, a Jewish business owner, antiracist skinheads, Neo Nazi skinheads somehow David Spears was seated in the middle of a cluster of white supremacists. It was very unnerving to be surrounded by these people who all know my name all know who I am. And, that I actively Organiz against them. So to put me surrounded by them, it was not comfortable. We're on the air okay. As the show began tensions were already high. My guest today called themselves skinheads they say their heads are shaved for battle and that they must save the white race from communist homosexuals from capitalists, blacks, and Jews even their Mu the first panel onstage was from the youth arm of Tom Metzger Organization called the youth movement. It was five skinheads and Metzker son John. Me Ask you this believe that only white people created this country. Why people built a majority of the things the great things you could tell by all the great civilizations room in Greece and and all the great civilizations that we have the languages and our art and music Greece, and Egypt and Africa. Who? Chairs down from John Metzger was his second in command at the in youth movement a lanky skinhead named Missoula. Say What? A, please please let him speak. Please let him speak at everything all the great poets. On, music cutters and. Billers, architects away blacks they still live in jungles of Africa you know. White people. This show is about forty minutes long, and from the start it's hard to watch. Here was the world's most successful black woman in media giving these young racists no, it also time and space to air their nastiness. Everything they say seems meant to diminish who and what she is and to provoker. The tension in the studio really starts building though when overturns the microphone to audience? Members. I don't understand. Why do why do you all feel that you're better than August. Issue here. Because I'm black, not not have a choice to match want to sit with you have to sit with me. After a black woman in the audience speaks overturns the Mike to a skinhead who is sitting in front, of Tom Metzger. I just heard what you said. You just said I don't sit with monkeys. You think because she's black because I'm black. We're we're we're monkeys is that it's a proven fact proven back. It's a proven fact that I'm a monkey. Oprah tries to defuse the moment by abruptly turning to a man decked out in a Nazi uniform that devolves into a shouting match between him and another audience member. The show goes on. Talk to jail skinhead leader Clark Motel when we come back back in a moment. Clark Martell, the man who many believe was the patient zero of the Organized Neo Nazi skinhead movement in America. Clark at this point was in jail awaiting trial for brutally attacking a strict land. But even from jail, Clark was given a platform on Oprah's nationally syndicated show. We have Clark. Mortell. Clark is in jail right now Clark. What happens when you try to leave the group? I'M NOT GONNA. Talk at all about any cases that are pending right now against me I wanted to talk about though mainly as first of all I, think that the struggle facing here in the United States and worldwide is not from our twenty Clark shared his vision for what America should be on Oprah's show, a white fascist state, and the whole idea behind the skinhead movement is nationalism and the only basis for nationalism is race. That's a solid Beta, nationalism it that is your culture that is your society your art everything that you are is your race. Your race and you don't stand by anything. Back from jail. But Tom, Metzger knew that most Americans wouldn't get behind fascism. He was the real leader of the racist on the Oprah Winfrey show that day. Even, if he didn't dress or talk like a skinhead or Nazi in his three piece suit Metzger shared a more populist message designed to appeal to a more respectable public. A white civil war against the elitists in Washington and traders and the fifth column Washington and these people the I was pretty good at what I did and most of the people had these shows they knew. I get my little thing in their get my little spiel in their look we put the system on notice and your bosses that they'd better start listening to the white workers in the streets you think we're going after. Thank you. Got To. Do a lot of people whereas jingoism right wing. Racial. You know hang your stuff. Well. I was able to get through to people. As you watch you realize what the problem is. Oprah seems ill prepared to challenge the racists lies and gas lighting. Instead she relies on audience members and a couple of experts who joined the show later to do that. But. It's not equal airtime and it appears to present the two sides as equally legitimate. Okay, you wanted to say what get? My Name is David Spears and I'd like to speak out these people are denying are violence. Okay. In the Audience Anti Racist activist David speers had been trying to get Oprah's I the whole time he was seeing the imbalance and knew that viewers at home we're losing the thread. Skinheads. Skinner allied with Tom. Metzger. Weinberger here, the action, the American. Nazi party so skinner gang running around that you gotta worry about. I started pointing out the. Audience and call in them by their name, all national network of white supremacists. That's the dangerous thing. Not The shave their heads in. The Danish. Nazis if they were a suit and tie like mets birthday have long they were getting very upset while I was talking you're right about one thing we are in a white civil war white civil war. and. Washington is the target is the crepes on Wall Street and Washington of our own race we don't blame them. And also these people say that we're against nationals I support black sit down sit down. I'll take a break I'll be right back. Mother. Cinnamon Toast Crunch Bakers. During a commercial break, I saw them signaling each other with their hands, making signs, saying gear, and that kind of thing. I went whoa I think I'm exposing them. I think I'm showing them and their vitriol, and they're dark side in trying to get them to see a different point of view. And they are using me. Close to the end of the show, viewers had watched nearly forty minutes of personal attacks and unvarnished racism I'll. I. Just want to tell you what happened during the commercial break. The cameras showed four of the six panellists chairs empty as were several seats in the audience. We asked. We asked our friend Mr Monkey common over here to leave. And some other people followed him the the rest of his supporters followed him. This is a been somewhat out of control. I would say and I will tell you that in all of my years of doing this I have never seen such a felt such evil nece and such hatred. All my life as she closed out the show Oprah looked defeated those of you who've baird with us in watch today I think very much standing. I went to the producers after that show instead this is it for me. I will not be used by anybody again for presenting darkness in the world. Eventually, two of the Neo Nazi skinheads from that infamous episode left the movement over had them back on the show more than two decades later. and. They confirmed for me that they used that tape and that show. To recruit other members. For their organization I could feel that happening that's what the signaling was. In metzker newspaper that came out after the show, a giddy headline read oprah invites skins slash a ym for Aryan youth movement. Then quote. A YM claims. Victory. Well he's got the best out of what we're talking about, and then we weren't embarrassed to talk about. It, got it out all over the country and you got a lot of male. Fourteen year old Christian Peach leany had skipped school to watch the episode at home and to him the show was not a trainwreck. I was. Struck. By it. It was a powerful moment to finally see. What I was newly part of being legitimised. and. It made me very proud that that was what I was part of. What did that do for the movement? Those daytime TV shows. I think put the movement on the map. Neo Nazi skinheads were all over the talk shows Geraldo Donahue Selah Jesse Raphael. montel Williams Jerry. Springer. But Christian said, the Oprah show was a turning point for the movement? What that did was propelled him forward to have thousands of people now wanted to look like that act like that be angry like that. Throughout this podcast, Christian has been working with me to uncover how young people are lured into the white supremacist movement. For him seeing racist heads on daytime TV was part of it. At this point. Christian. was kind of the last man standing of Chicago's organized Neo Nazi. Group cash. But this moment a moment when skinheads were getting national attention planted the seed of an idea. I saw it as an opportunity to grow. That was right around the time that I would have been kind of thinking about taking over and it was a moment where I saw this as not just a local initiative. A national initiative movement that have been growing? Motive is supported by better help a convenient and affordable online counselling service that can match you with a licensed therapist start communicating with your counselor in under forty eight hours via secure video phone chat or text more than one million people have taken charge of their mental health with the help of experienced better help counselors who specialize in issues like. Depression and stress our listeners get ten percent off the first month at better. H E L P dot com slash motive podcast talk to a therapist online and get help. You to hand in making sense of the news. Nowadays, you're not alone I'm Lisa Lopez from WBZ and I'm audie cornish from NPR's all things considered join us every weekday afternoon for consider this the first podcast ever to bring you a daily thorough head of the biggest stories in Chicago from WBZ alongside news from the rest of the world from NPR all in less than fifteen minutes together we'll help you make sense of today listen to consider this wherever you get your podcasts. A. Prison. That's when I got the key for the RV for the romantic violence box. When? Christian. Pizza. leaney, was fifteen years old his hero Clark Martell went to prison. Clarke had arguably started the first Neo Nazi skinhead crew in America, it went by cash and also by the name romantic violence. Christian getting the key to the romantic violence post office box felt like Clark was anointing him as an air. Still Very. Young. So I was trying to make him confident that I was taking care of the Po box that I was responding to people if anybody would communicate with him, I would transcribe those letters. And sending things out on his behalf Christian was also corresponding with Clarkin prison they'd write letters back and forth. Often Clark's would include drawings. Kirk was kind of a prolific. Illustrator. But the drawings that he would send back to me were of kind of these lewd images of skinhead women Sometimes they were naked they were almost always pornographic in. Nature. Despite the profound influence that Clark had had on Christian's life Christian. Never really knew Clark. Well, after all Clark was jailed only about six months after he recruited Christian. Over time the letters started to tarnish Christians view of his hero. We had a very dark. Side to him. I started to suspect that he was not mentally well, and I wrote to him for a couple of years you know and probably a couple of dozen letters back and forth to each other until I started to become really embarrassed to write them and I stopped. Christian distanced himself from Clark. But. He still saw value in resurrecting what Clarke had started in Chicago. Nobody. Had said you're taken over for Clark. Nobody said, you've inherited the throne they just weren't around them. I said I'm going to do this. Christian started rebuilding the Neo Nazi skinhead group from his parents basement. It was cash two point zero and it was file cabinets Dash Abed You know small apartment that was essentially my office for running this movement, and it was very much a Nazi frat boy dorm room with neon beer signs and. Swastika. Flags. Christian also formed his own band called American youth later that band dissolved and he formed another one called the final solution. The same name as Clark spanned from years earlier, people were coming to my concerts and things like that. And I started seeing people attracted to me I started to enjoy the power ministers organize. And he started to recruit. The kids Christian went after were younger than the crew. Clarke had assembled a few years earlier fourteen fifteen sixteen. He learned how to customize his sales pitch to them. If they were somebody who was bullied, it was about we can protect you if they were somebody who had been a victim of crime was about spinning. You see who did that to you was because of you know the blacks Jews or whatever. Mostly, I gotta say though it was about finding people who just needed a place to belong. We provided that family. And in the late Eighties Lou Island Illinois was a perfect place for Christian to start recruiting. It was demographically changing Blue Island itself was surrounded by neighborhoods that were predominantly black or predominantly. Latino and there was this kind of inherent fear of what you would call back then like there goes the neighborhood kind of feeling. For two decades, black residents had been leaving the city of Chicago and moving to the South and southwest suburbs by the late eighties tension over those changes manifested in the school system. Blue. Island was in a school district that encompassed several suburbs in nineteen eighty, eight blue island residents one most of the seats on that scoreboard and redrew the district boundaries. The result was that hundreds of students mostly black would no longer go to the blue island high school instead, those students would be bussed to schools in the suburbs. The Blue Island board members who did this made no bones about it they said it was the only way to keep the school from becoming majority black. This was the backdrop against which Christian was recruiting. So I. Think the third once this inherent fear of change which made recruiting and even acceptance of these type of out of the box racist ideas a little bit more appetizing for people. You made them afraid that they were gonNA lose that Whiteness. That pride. If they didn't act up and that they would find paradise if they did. It was kind of easy to spot. I kids who? We thought would be easy to recruit. After a while, we didn't have to do that anymore we started to look so cool I think to the people near that they started to kind of gravitate towards us. And then the new version of cash started growing on its own. We started throwing the best parties we had concerts in the backyard were girls who wanted to hang out and that became kind of the cool thing to do. Our parties were not all skinhead parties with guys wearing swastika flags they were that plus the quarterback of the football team plus the nerdy kids plus the donor kids plus the goth kids like it was A. Click and we were trying to indoctrinate people from those groups. Christians commitment to the cause deepened school stopped mattering. He'd get kicked out of one then shuffled to another until no school would take him anymore. His life was now cash his white power band and preparing for a race war. Tell me about the your personal stockpiling of weapons. I started collecting weapons probably around the age of sixteen. I think it started out with. A rifle that I bought at a gun show. Purchase some. AK47's. A handful of them, I remember having thousands of rounds of ammunition for my semiautomatic AK47 forty seven for my m one carbine rifle eventually then pistols a sawed off shotgun. Christian bottom with a fake ID. Actually. Had A backpack that was packed with survival gear that I could grab if I ever had to go on the run because I had committed a crime or if. There wasn't insurrection that that sprung up that I would need to head for the heels for. Another thing Christian did when he took over cash was to bring it into the larger National Neo Nazi. Skinhead Movement. When cash began in Chicago it was kind of on its own but now there were skinhead groups all over the US and they were joining up into national networks to grow the Army of white warriors who fight together in the coming race war. Christian brought cash into the most notorious of those networks, the hammer skins nation. Hammer. Skins were very much about like no drugs no infighting like you are the elite warriors of the, White. Power Movement. You're not like those other skinheads or those clan you the vanguard, the best of the best and it was different than what Clarke had done. So I saw that as an opportunity to like, yes, we're finally doing this. We're finally merging with this this larger brand. By the end of the Eighties Neo Nazi skinheads were recognized across the US as it true menace to public safety and order. In nineteen, eighty, nine, the anti-defamation League, a Jewish group that monitors antisemitic can hate activity reported that racist skinheads were now active in thirty one states and numbered in the thousands. Their ranks had grown fifty percent from two thousand to three thousand just in the prior year. They were responsible for a growing number of assaults on Jews, blacks, Latinos and gay. People. And they were involved in multiple murders five and nineteen eighty-eight, another three, nineteen, eighty-nine. The crime took place here on southeast thirty-first early Sunday morning, three black men all from Ethiopia were sitting in this car talking when one left Ted for his apartment another car pulled up three young white men jumped out and began beating him in November nineteen eighty-eight, twenty, seven year old Mulugeta Sarah was beaten to death with a baseball bat in front of his apartment in Portland Oregon by three Neo Nazi skinheads, all three were convicted. What happened next was critical in the story of the American. Neo. Nazi skinhead movement. I never been to Portland I didn't know the guys who were in Gaul. All good. Way of getting me. After the criminal trial, the southern poverty law center and anti hate group went after Tom Metzger and his son John. The metzker is ran war, the white ARYAN resistance and its skinhead arm the Aaron Youth. Movement. The civil rights lawyers believed they could show that the mets is bore some responsibility for the murder of Mulugeta Sarah. An example I think we'll illustrate. But what I'm talking about Elden Rosenthal was one of the lawyers working with the S P l? C. On the case in the classic situation of organized crime if a Mafia leader would say to one of his lieutenants I. Sure Wish we could get rid of so and so and Lieutenant with a wink and a nod goes out and murders so and so the Mafia leader would be responsible for the murder every bit as much as the guy that pulled the trigger. So. That's basically the theory that we used against war and Tom John Metzker To prove it they had a key witness from inside the Metzker is operation that was a skinhead named Dave. Manzella. You might remember that name along with the mets cours Dave was featured on the Oprah show and he was Tom Metzger handpicked leader for the Aryan Youth Movement. Dave testified that Thomas Ker had sent him to Portland with a letter of introduction to a local Neo Nazi skinhead group that included Sarah's attackers and he directly testified. That he had been sent with real clear. Instructions to recruit these skinheads into the White Aryan resistance and that they would go into parks together and they pick on a person of color and they would assault person, and after doing this a few times, he'd really gained the favor and the. Allegiance of these young Portland disaffected then. And lawyers made the case that that violence necessarily lead to the murder of Mulu Geddes era. This was a civil suit, not a criminal one. The mets weren't facing prison, but instead, they were facing the possibility of bankruptcy. The judgment was huge unprecedented, racist Tom, Metzger, his son and their phonetic wight area and resistance. Now, facing damages of some twelve million dollars, it was far more money than the mets could ever pay. But the lawsuit achieved its goal we basically put the organization. Out of business and Metzger ceased being one of the faces of white supremacy in the United States. For elden Rosenthal, it was the case of a lifetime. As the son of someone who escaped the Holocaust I grew up acutely aware of the the tenuousness of civilization. And I became a lawyer. Because I wanted to be a part of that group of folks that protects civilization through the use of law. One of the things Rosenthal remembers most clearly about the trial was meeting Mulu got US Arroz for a sixty year old farmer who had flown from Ethiopia to Portland to hear the verdict. And he asked me to explain to him who had killed his son. And I asked him if he recalled when Mussolini's army had invaded Ethiopia in the nineteen thirties. And I told him that the men that had killed. His son were just like. The men that Mussalini had brought to Ethiopia and he understood that. He understood that to mean that they were. Nazis. Around this time federal law enforcement was also turning up the heat on racist skinheads. The Department of Justice created a special skinhead task force in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine. Later that year, it charged five Dallas Hammer Skins with attacking black and Hispanic people and with vandalizing Jewish Institutions. The next year six Tulsa skinheads were charged with various hate crimes and eight skinheads were indicted in Nashville. By the Nineteen Ninety S, the high profile indictments and the downfall of the mets pitchers clarified one thing. The brazen violence, the outrageous displays daytime talk shows those weren't serving the movement well anymore. Totally. Get. Kicked by the COPS and everybody else the FBI. You GotTa do it a new way we gotta get away from. Tom Metzger Organization may have been finished, but just as he had always done, he adopted. He started preaching a new message to those who are still listening to him. He told them to trade their boots for. Suits. Era Off. Get a briefcase. Go to. College. Join a police department. Get into the government get into the places where he can do some good. Entry get the skinhead think. Would to college? Could job kind of career. Would into other areas of government and they're there right now. In. Two thousand six, an F. B.. I. Intelligence Assessment warned about White supremacists infiltrating law enforcement. In mentioned something called ghosts skins quote those who avoid overt displays of their beliefs to blend into society and covertly advance white supremacist causes. Despite that the F. B. I. has never publicly acknowledged Evert's to root out such officers or even to try to count them. Those efforts have fallen to civil rights, organizations, online activists, and investigative journalists who sift through social media to uncover racists in our public agencies. Last year the Center for investigative reporting found four, hundred current and former law enforcement officers in more than fifty agencies across the country were active in hate groups on facebook. In the early nineties just like Tom Metzger Christian Pizza Leaney was realizing that Neo Nazi skinheads shouldn't just change how they looked. They needed to modify their talking points. We started to encourage people to go into the neighborhoods where racist white Americans lived and recruit them if they didn't see us as extremist. So instead of talking about preserving the purity of the white race, the movement talked about securing. America's borders instead of calling blacks inferior. It raised the specter of urban crime and black on black violence. Instead of talking about evil Jews and the Zog Zionist. Government. It talked about a class of global elite controlling world affairs. If we started to talk their language in terms of religion, their Christian identity skinheads who were very good at that kind of stuff. If we started to talk to them about gun rights, there were kind of like you're more militant militia folks who were very good at convincing people to commend because of that if you were part of the clan and your culture was in the south was really easy to convince other racists southerners who didn't want to see black starting to get prominence in their cities and towns. It was always about making people afraid. The bulletin had gone out. It was time to blend in to look like regular Americans to act like law abiding citizens. But when they were in each other's company neo-nazi skinheads didn't hide who they were. In, one thousand nine, hundred, eighty, two Christian flew to Weimar Germany with his white power band. The final solution to perform at an illegal neo Nazi skinhead concert. One. So let song is a instrumental. There he met skinheads just like him but from other countries, darker Sharon Vermont. It was real now it wasn't just this local thing. We always had from day one. These connections overseas this made it real. We were now together and I think that was the first time that American. White supremacists from the youth movement actually started to build those face to face alliances with their counterparts overseas. Sick. But it was also in Germany that Christians started to have doubts after the concert ended these four thousand skinheads who were drunk who were high on the music who were amped up then went into the town of Mar, which is historically beautiful kind of hamlet they went out and they destroyed it. They started to you know cost townspeople they started to damage property they. tried. To Flip cars and essentially you know terrorized the small town and I gotta say that was one of the biggest instances where I it's suddenly didn't make sense to me why these you know proud white Germans were attacking other proud white Germans in the town indiscriminately, and suddenly like things didn't jive for me anymore that was a really big question mark for me like. The priest about protecting their homeland, but they got drunk and then went out and destroyed it. Of course never found the courage to talk about it. Because, you didn't do that. You didn't you didn't seem vulnerable among your other. You know fellow soldiers, fellow warriors you just moved on eating question things. But Christians doubts wouldn't go away. It's an illogical ideology. At some point, you question it at some point it hits a dead end and you have no choice. But to say, what am I doing? What am I done? I have some questions to. Next time on motive. So you spent years of your life dehumanizing black people and Jewish people and preaching unimaginable violence against them. Why should anyone give you the time of day? I don't think anybody should believe me easily I think that anybody who says that they spent their life hating dehumanizing people and then have changed the those people require a lot of scrutiny. Motive is a production of WBZ Chicago I'm Odette Yussef. The. Producer is Colin McNulty are Executive Producers Kevin Dawson Story Consultant Christian Pizza leany. Our intern is Hannah boomer shine Joe Dassault mixed the show original music by Stephen Jackson, and Jesse, dukes special thanks to listeners who spinal supportive wbz made this podcast possible.

John Metzger Chicago Oprah America Clark United States Tom Metzger Tom John Metzker mets Oprah Winfrey Clarke Clark Martell Tom Producer Washington Oprah David speers Christian Portland Aryan Youth Movement
Greta Thunberg and the rise of the youth climate movement

Front Burner

23:56 min | 1 year ago

Greta Thunberg and the rise of the youth climate movement

"This is a CBC podcast. Hello I'm Jay Puzzle She's a teenager from Sweden who skipped school and sparked a a global protest. Today Greta Tune Berg is instantly recognizable by her stern demeanor and singular message when it comes to climate change listen to the scientists but it was only last year that she was just a fifteen year old protesting outside Swedish parliament since then she's dressed rest down heads of state at the UN inspired millions of people to March in the global climate strike and been named Time Magazine's person of the year and this year. It wasn't just Greta. And the youth movement she inspired they were other large scale. Protests led by groups like extinction rebellion and government small small and large declaring climate emergencies. Today I'm talking to Sarah. Kaplan she reports on science and the environment for The Washington Post. We'll talk about Greta and in two thousand nineteen as a pivotal moment in the fight against climate. Change that's Today on front burner Hi Sarah Hey get to. Beer thinks much for taking the time we really really appreciate it. I know you're supposed to be a conference today. So thank you so much for making space for us. Yeah well. I'm actually at a conference. The American Geophysical Union meeting which is like the biggest gathering of climate scientists in the US. So it's sort of an appropriate conversation to be. This is like right where your head is. Yeah exactly so maybe we could start here. What do we know about Greta? Burg's beginnings her life before she became possibly the most famous climate activists in the world so she was kind of just like an ordinary Swedish schoolgirl. You know she. It's not like she had this background in activism before before beginning her strike her her mother is an opera singer so she had had sort of a cheese global presence but she you know. Her parents aren't activists either but in the summer of two thousand eighteen Sweden and a lot of of Europe was undergoing a really devastating heatwave and Tweeden was about to have its parliamentary elections and so Greta suggested to some other students at her school that they Try to hold a strike by the Parliamentary buildings To put pressure on the parliament. I meant to say the people are expecting you to act on climate and her fellow students were not interested. She couldn't get anyone else to join her. So That's interesting herself. So yes it felt like I was the only one who cared about the climate in ecological crisis. No one. I knew you cared about this and I felt like I was the only one and now I don't feel that anymore which I think is one of the things that make screw kind of unique. You can imagine a lot of teenagers if they can't get traction for something from their peers. They might say okay. Well I guess this isn't GonNa work right okay. If I'm alone I'm alone I'm alone. They might feel feel kind of deflated. Right yeah and I understand. Her parents to work kind of early converts to her activism to write. You know you mentioned her. Mom is an opera singer finger but I think she stopped flying. Yeah so Greta I mean she is a very steadfast in our principal so she doesn't eat meat she doesn't fly and she has converted her family to that as well They try to live the most sustainable lifestyle they can but I think another important thing about Grad is activism activism is that she has said she doesn't expect everyone to live the way she does making sacrifices that she does. She famously took a sailboat. Zero emission mission sailboat across the Atlantic to come to the US for the UN climate action summit in September then. She took the sailboat back. Get to Spain gene for for COP. Twenty five in Canada in Montreal and seasick and Is Not going to be comfortable with that. I can live with. Can we talk about how she got to that point where she was taking that sailboat. Essentially like across the world. You know you mentioned that you started all of this in two thousand eighteen as like a lone protester sorta protesting outside the Swedish parliament striking from her school. And then all all of a sudden she's addressing four million people in September at the global climate strike. And so how did she get there in just a year it was kinda slow and then fast asked Greta was striking. She began her strike. I think in late August two thousand eighteen but what really I think sort of brought her to the public's attention to global attention Kevin was her speech at cop twenty four which was the last United Nations Meeting To talk about sort of home going to tackle climate change achieve the goals of the Paris climate accord and it was really a barn burner and I think about her. Yes you know she said you say you love your children but you are allowing your children's future to burn the year two thousand and seventy eight. I will celebrate my seventy fifth birthday if I have children. Maybe they will spend the day with me. Maybe they will ask me about you. Maybe law school. You didn't do anything while there. It was time to and it was so stark unvarnished and like a call to not what is politically feasible or seems appealing but what sort of she believed sciences has to be done and I think that really especially in the context of all these kind of politicians and global thinkers curve talking a ruined talking earlier. Yeah Yeah exactly that. Her voice was really really stood out. And that definitely sparked people's attention attention and in the week. After that a bunch of other students strikers began doing the same thing in their communities so there was a girl Alexandria. VS In your in New York who began striking outside you and headquarters children in Australia and in DC and in all over the place face concern for the future is fueling worldwide protests from South Africa. Australia United Kingdom window in a moment many hope global tipping point because they saw in her Sort of a model. What they themselves could be And you mentioned before she's incredibly steadfast you know. What else is it about her that that has made her this figure head of this global youth movement so Greta has asperger's and she's described that as her superpower in some circumstances from sources it can definitely be an advantage and especially insult? Should be prices like this when we need to think outside the box we need to think outside outside our current system that we need people who think outside the box and who aren't like everyone else. It gives her the capacity to sort of speak the unvarnished truth to speak in sort of blunt terms. That a lot of people feel sort of more compelled to to ascribe by social niceties that Greta definitely doesn't have so you know I was talking to a sixteen year old. Who's you know attended climate strikes here in the states? She was saying that you know when you're a teenager jour- and you can't vote and you don't have a job and you don't have money so it's not like you can vote with your pocketbook. She was saying she felt a little powerless and then she saw Greta and what Greta has done is not just act as a role model for other kids but has actively said like. I'm not the only person pay attention onto the other. People pay attention to my peers plant into the scientists. She makes space She's not taking it all up. Which I think is a uniquely teenage girl way to tackle tackle this issue? The uniquely teenage girl way to tackle it I think that there's I spoke with a sociologist. Who Studies girl activism of his own? She says that the characteristics of activism led by teenage girls. Whether it's you know Malala Yousafzai or some of the teen girls of color in the US who have been advocating against environmental racism for decades And really lead some of those early movements that provide the foundation for what we see. Today Day they tend to be more collaborative they tend to be very creative And they tend to be willing to sort of follow one another's lead and you know maybe that's because of the way girls are socialized and I think that's you know it's like you look at these global climate strikes and it's not like Greta sitting there in Sweden orchestrating all of these things it's very very grassroots and organic and it's just that you know other kids have been inspired by her and have started their own thing in pushing their communities to declare common in emergencies or to implement more environmental regulations. Or whatever it is you know. They're all acting in the capacity that they dan sort of inspired by her but not like directed by her. And I think that's part of also the staying power of what we've seen over the past year and how it's been able to break up so fast talk about that a little bit more like who is organizing and attending these strikes. I know you've reported that it's overwhelmingly girls. You just mentioned teenage girls like with what's going on here so these strikes are are almost always orchestrated entirely by teenagers. No they get help from some of the kind of a Dole. Mainstream climate organizations wins. Like you know three fifty which bill mott Kevin's movements And the Climate Reality Project which is Al Gore's organization but you know all of the planning the organizing the strategizing like I've sat in on some of the phone calls between these kids and they last for like two hour conference calls That they have every week deciding. How are they going to do? They're an extra so it's it's really is them doing the heavy lifting And you're right. It is mostly teen girls and again. I think that has has to do partly with sort of the way. Girls are socialized in the way. environmentalism is maybe read more feminine issue. But I also think you know one of the things that I've found so fascinating talking to these girls and also talking to people who study social movements is that there is such a long history of teen girls it's really being at the forefront going back to sort of action at least in the US against environmental racism so the fact that power plants and incinerators are more often placed in communities of color where they tend to have reliable stating health impacts a lot of the early leaders of the sort of local protests against those those kinds of things were young women but another thing that the social scientists pointed out to me is that you know even though young women have always been doing this have always had an eye I towards justice and what needs to be changed We haven't really been willing to listen to them or we haven't had kind of an archetype for understand Dan right who they are. And these girls came of age you know reading Harry Potter and the Hunger Games and seeing people like Malala and now other sort of this notion that like you could be a young woman and Save the world because they have all these role models with maybe oh saw not leave. You saw I volunteer as tribute. I believe we have a volunteer. Yeah and I mean. This is literally one of the organizers. DC WHO. I spoke to said you know. She saw last fall A bunch of sunrise activists who sat in in protest at Nancy Pelosi's office the House Speaker Right And the Sunrise Movement for for those listening is the movement of the United States. It's sort of totes. The importance of the green deal right. Yeah Yeah Yeah really pushing for more aggressive. Climate Policies Polticians we hugh in one thousand young climate activists. The Sunrise Movement descended on Capitol Hill on Monday to demand a green new deal a plan for the US to become carbon neutral within a decade and create tens of millions of jobs in the renewable energy sector and she saw that protests since she saw the way. It's sort of grab people's attention. And she told me she felt like this was the moment in all of her. Favorite books are like the girl realizes she needs to step up and become a heroin and that's what she felt she needed to do and now she's you know organizing all of the DC strikes she goes and and protests in front of the Capitol every Friday. That is such a fascinating analysis. I hadn't heard before now and it makes so much sense when you think about these heroines that these young young girls have grown up with certainly different than even when I grew up with or were you you grew up with rate. I suppose we had like Nancy drew but certainly we didn't have the hunger games certainly. We didn't have any. Yeah you know the the pride they have and being outspoken and just fighting for what they think is right I mean I remember being a teen girl and I really had opinions and I was sort of. You know mildly but. I don't think that I ever thought that anyone would listen to me. Like I didn't have that confidence that they have and it's really really cool to see you know regardless of what you think about climate change. I think it's pretty awesome to see. And they do speak speak with US moral authority right because they are the ones who are going to inherit the planet that we shape over the next few decades right so I also wonder you know they have this moral authority because like they haven't been in the system. You Know Al Gore or Leonardo DiCaprio. You look at other people who've been very outspoken on climate they maybe maybe haven't partaken in all of the things that have caused these problems for climate because they're so young and perhaps gives them that authority. I am not a scientist. I don't have the proper education I'm only a messenger and it's not just authority. It's also sort of like an absolutism. Them You know anyone. If you're an adult you may feel really strongly about climate and think that the world needs to act on it also you. You have a job that you need to get to you have children. You need to feed. You know you've maybe think like will I vote. And so that's my contribution and these kids are you know they're not vested in the system than the status quo. The way sort of most many adults are right. You know what they see is at stake is their future not their present. I think that that also gives them a little bit more power incentive to say like yacht. It's going to be hard to change global economy. You'll be like it's what needs to be done so do it right away so much more weight you are failing us But the young people are starting to understand your betrayal. The eyes of all future generations are upon you. And if you choose to fail us I say we will never forgive you. I'm interested to hear your perspective here. Greta herself has become a real target of the right in the United States. So like the day after she was named Time's person of the year. Donald Trump mocked her on twitter and said that she had an anger. Management issue. Brazil's president in an scenario has called her abroad. It's incredible how sort of personal these attacks have gotten. And why do you think that's happening. You know I so. I spoke with Greta herself. Alf in September and one thing that she said that I thought was very astute. Was that hearing child. speak-out especially Ashley the way she speaks out hearing a child hold adults to account makes people feel very guilty and guilt. I think can drive guilt and fear. Your drives a lot of kind of vitriol rate. And the you know another thing that one of the climate activists in DC told me that she thinks that a lot of people blur more afraid of change than they are of climate change. You know the special report from the IPC on how we're GONNA limit warming to one point. Five degrees Celsius which is considered entered kind of the threshold for avoiding the worst sort of natural disasters and other climate impacts calls for a very very aggressive. Change a complete overhaul overhaul of the global system and that scares people and it scares people with power and wealth because they are doing really well in the current system you know part of the targeting beginning of these children is that they are the most effective activists that kind of climate movement has seen in decades right You know scientists saying the same thing for years the sort of traditional Greenpeace and three fifty and all of those groups have been saying the same thing for years and in you know Oh twelve months. The youth climate activists have really sparked this global conversation and push the needle far further than we've seen and you know I don't want to throw cold water run. What all these young people are doing? Obviously they have succeeded at sparking. This incredible global conversation. But I I would love to ask you. I do wonder I wonder sometimes if they can actually get the kind of real change that they're pushing for because we haven't necessarily seen that happen right from governments. You know Here in Canada and we've seen huge resistance over a nominal carbon tax president trump. He's removed himself from the Paris climate. I am an accord and when I look at other successful protest movements the labor movements in the pass it completely shut down industry civil rights movement. They also have these very repower full allies including the precourt like President Kennedy. The civil rights movement had this is not clear to me that this movement has that you know we were talking before that they're kind of outside the power structures that gives them the authority but is that also hindrance. You know that's a really good point. I wouldn't say that we haven't seen any change I think and maybe there hasn't been the kind of base most visible like national level changes. Yeah yeah so I mean Germany. We declared a climate emergency. There are some young Alaskan native activists they got their community declare climate emergency. There are a lot of local in state level legislation that has passed in the past year Often with backing from these young activists so I would not say that they are have not been effective active and I actually think that there is a lot of. There's a decent amount of research that suggests that climate activism does have an impact. There was a study that came out a couple of years ago. That found found states where there were more Environmental organizations like the footprint. You know people were more likely lead to elect politicians with higher ratings from environmental groups and then also if you adjust for income and size those states have of lower emissions right. There is a correlation between you know having people be active out in the streets calling for change and like seeing the carbon go down And and I think to There's no question that climate change became a voting issue in our last and recent election. which is the first first time I've ever seen that so it's fair to say the needle is moving? You wonder sometimes if it's moving fast enough and that may be at something else needs to to happen. Yeah do you think yeah. It's definitely not Do you think so. I guess my question is. Do you think that something else needs to happen to you. I think about other groups like extinction rebellion far more aggressive in their tactics like this is about civil disobedience. Do you think that that could be more effective or yeah. What do you think needs to happen? Twenty twenty you know any protest movement any active moves it's an ecosystem rate like during the civil rights movement we had Martin Luther King we had Max and we had you know there's often a whole spectrum of people who are pushing for a change at different levels in different ways and and it's usually the cumulative force of all of them that actually moves the needle so you have the youth climate movement who have this very powerful awful and inspiring and single-minded message you have groups like extinction rebellion which are very very aggressive town knicks. Their goal is to delake disrupt regular society. So they'll try to block traffic in cities right like that and then you know there's going the political route with the green new deal or politicians pushing for environmental legislation in the sort of traditional way. And I think that really change happens when you have all of those things working together The people with the most power to reduce emissions and to create the kind of global economic system that will be sustainable sustainable those are politicians. As big corporations by Matthew conversations with energy interests you're talking entrenched power structures. Yeah absolutely but they're not GONNA act unless people demand it and I think that the activism of the youth climate movement is is is increasing. The demand okay. Sarah Kaplan thank you so much for this conversation. Yeah thank you well. That's all for this holiday week. Front burner owner comes to you from. ABC News and CBC podcasts. The show is produced by imaging burchard. Elaine Chao Shannon Higgins Ashley Mac and mark up alone neo are sound designer. Is Derek Vandyke with help. This week. From Billy Heaton. Our Music is by Joseph Chaban boombox around the executive producer of front burner. Is Nick McCabe logos. And I'm your host Jamie Pozo. Hope you all are having a wonderful holiday and see you all next week. Longed for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts.

Greta Tune Berg United States scientist Sweden Sarah Kaplan UN DC Canada Al Gore Elaine Chao Shannon Higgins As bill mott Kevin American Geophysical Union DC Paris Burg Time Magazine president
Hour 2: Youth Movement

First Take

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Hour 2: Youth Movement

"The. Sport than a right now money at the Collins. The warriors improved a twenty and fourteen on the season. Just one game back of the nuggets for the top spot in the west thanks in part to big night from Klay Thompson who dropped forty three. Let's take you out west and show you the action. Nick sat warriors pick it up in the third quarter, Golden State up by thirteen Steph curry Beckham out with the ball and Kevin knocking the manual moody fall asleep, leaving Kevin looney all alone for the easy dunk. Chris Steph curry finished with fourteen assists now in the fourth quarter worries up by twenty and Klay Thompson as you mentioned was on fire. Thomson knocking down three pointer navy. It look so easy. Very next words possession, not down the long jumper. He finished his forty points twelve hundred forty point game after the game. Steve Kerr saying he's happy with were his team is at. We're having a lousy year. I think we're doing. Okay. So I'll fly down the backstretch, keeping, you know. Get some Olenin carry that new class. Now, let's get you back to I take. Steve Kerr such a likable guide. All right. So the Nixon Oakland no question to play the warriors onto wall. Frazier says he meant no disrespect to Durant when he said on Sirius XM NBA radio over the summer that Durant deserve an abstract on list of all time great players because of his success with Golden State, obviously joining that squad telling the new York Daily News, I also said he's one of the best in the world right up there with LeBron. And that he's probably going to be the best in the game. Well, the hall of fame guard felt the coverage of his comments were overblown. Steve name will Durant success with the warriors have an Astros because he joined that team with all those some people's minds. Yes, not mine. No one was harder on him than me when he selected to go to go to state, I went ballistic, and I was discussed that. I thought it was the week is we'll ever see superstar. Well, because I think that he is so great to go to a team fully loaded like that that just. Matter to me because remember you don't have to about stimulus package. You know, feel about that LeBron James and the Cavs go. No, I'm saying the warriors had just got here. But I'm just I'm still saying just being okay? Okay. See and they went and he went to the team that beat him a month later, except except you, but we're are stepped off the gas on that notion was when I saw him in the NBA finals go right at LeBron. He was clearly not there to ride anybody's coaches. He was clearly there to say this is a new era you did it to a lesser degree significantly less degree as far as I'm concerned when LeBron elected to go to Miami. But Kevin Durant, San okay, I want up to now. But it still comes down to me at you. And I'm right here. And watch me watch me bust that tail now LeBron average a triple double over thirty with a triple double. But Kevin Durant did average thirty five and eight in NBA finals with the NBA finals MVP. Here's where I think that guy's like wall cloud Frazier who I love. Daily and I for many years along with others. Here's my only problem with them. I have a problem with the move that Durant. Made at the time. I have never had a problem with his game. Yeah. I know he's a superstar. And I know that when he went to go to state he went as a superstar. It's not like he got and all of a sudden his game elevated the rent has been direct consistently to out his Brittany has more health. But in terms of his game what he brings to the table in terms of cystic -ly, if fishing city his level of production the way he plays the game it mirrors what he was doing when he was an okay, see? So to me when play his talk about him and used the word they asterik and all of that stuff, you're implying that the game. He displays for. Oh, now, it's that way. Because he's a go to say, no, you're a champion because you're Golden State but his game. Game. His ability to shoot handle score prolifically inefficiently that has always been Durant. And we should not forget that. You're missing your own point Walt Frazier with right? The first time he has no reason to apologize to anyone your point was tried to lead you there back to your original point. It was the weakest move ever. By superstar your words and chain. It was a week move. Because not only did he leave the team that just got beaten, by the deem. He joined but he joined a seventy three win team, and he is an elite MVP caliber player. And once he did that it was obvious to everyone alive on planet earth that there's no way the warriors could lose therefore winning a championship with that team is not meaningful the idea of winning championships is that it reveals something about you. You're if you're one of the greatest players of all time the level of your game. Your ability to lead what CLYDE Frazier game seven six. Nine seventy seasons. It was nineteen seventy championship. It's called sixty nine against the Los Angeles Lakers with Wilt Chamberlain and Jerry West with out with a hobbled. And then without it was read gave them thirty six nine teen and seven to win the championship that is not trying to I call it, reverse engineering. It's not, but but that's not trying to start from place winning championships makes me great. Therefore, all put myself in a position where I can't not win a championship. So people will call me great. That's that's why winning championship is meaningful. What CLYDE Frazier shows? You why championship oil? We're doing counting rings sometimes because that ring is significant. It speaks to CLYDE Frazier. Greatness. Kevin Durant rings, speak to the faculty when he is squad up beyond the point where he is a chance to lose. Then he shows up salute behinds two points out make specifically for the sole purpose of giving a response from. Hugh on this point number one. When we look at what you just said, the walk cli- Frazier say that about LeBron James when he went to Miami. Can we find that? Because I don't know what he said I don't recall asking because again, I had lunch with CLYDE the day the decision. Okay. That's fine. That's fine. But I'm saying I'm asking legitimate because I don't tell you what it said. Okay. All right. So tell me what he said about lebrons going to join Wade in Bosch number one. And number two, even though Steph curry and Klay Thompson and Draymond green had a title. But they lost the second year to Cleveland if we're gonna say that about the rent. What are we saying about them because they're three-time champions now too? Because of the rent, right? I will say quickly clog was devastated about him not going to the next. But was that was the focus as I time. I would say this more than anything. What Durant joining the warriors? Does. He's trying to cement his own legacy. In fact, he cemented LeBron's because that was clearly response to LeBron. He had taken maybe the best team in basketball that you're by the time the playoffs rolled around to oracle game seven and lost to the warriors. Lebron took a team went in and one and the warriors and Durant looked at each other. And said we got beat that guys. That's what it was about more than anything time. My final thought here though this converse. Sation in terms of him. Having an asterik is exactly why. Kevin Durant is gonna leave. The warriors also have clydes every color. Classic shots that promo. Presents eyewitness interviews with inanimate objects. This is Brian Bruno live on the scene of a recent windstorm here to describe the event a chest of drawers, there's a storm howling outside. So I thought I'd stay in watch around com. Five minutes into the flick a tree ranch slams through the window. Where are you hurt? Just gotta scratch on my chest. Your chest of drawers can't help you in a windstorm. But the geiko insurance agency can help you get covered for personal property damage. Co gyco to see how a forcible homeowners insurance can be. Right now is that the NFL month? The Collins Rams are getting set to host the Cowboys in a divisional match up on Saturday night LA has been without star running back Todd Gurley for the past two games as he continues to nurse a knee injury. Girly who wasn't a full participant in practice. Yesterday. Hasn't played in a month. Here's head coach Sean McVay with an update on this health status. We're going to get him going and he's gonna practice and we're gonna see how he feels. And I think a lot of it's going to be him getting out there trust in getting some of that movement. Some of you know, just put his foot in the ground doing some of the things that he's been accustomed to doing that knee respond. So this week will serve as a good chance to to get a gauge in like we've always said Todd does a great job communicating with us how he's feeling. And he's making good steps. And has this week goes we'll monitor that. Years girly would be up against Saturday. The Cowboys defense is three point eight yards per rush in the regular season. This best the NFL while only giving up a little more than two yards per rush before I contact and on the other side of the ball Ellie will have tangible stopping Zeke Elliot the Ramsey gave up a league worst five point one yards per rush this season and a lot of the second highest total QBR I'm passes through running backs. Now, let's get you back to I take. What's going on everybody? We'll for steak where live the Heineken river deck here at pier. Seventeen I cannot wait for playoff football this weekend. Anybody's game Todd Gurley. Zeke Elliott, Rick first and second scrimmage yards over the last two seasons on that note, we bring in our friend will Cain. Well, I want to start with you, which do do you think's going to have the bigger impact Goff and girly or you going Prescott in Elliott. Justice which way, I'm gonna go. Do you think I'm going to surprise you? It's not going to be at a fan. Promise you that question. It's. It's it's it's Dakyns Ige. And it's and it's I think it's quite clear. We don't know of tall girl is gonna play. He hasn't played this December sixteenth if he does play what kind of health is he bring to the game this as posited against the NFL's leading rusher. A guy who just rushed for a hundred thirty seven yards against the Seattle Seahawks. That's not seemingly a debate. Now. Don't get me wrong. Girlies very good. If you ask me, what am I more nervous about in this game Todd Gurley Jared Goff? I'm going to tell you Todd Gurley if he plays and then that brings me to Jared Goff that Prescott or Jared Goff. Now earlier this season. Everybody was on the Jared Goff trained. He was mentioned sort of like maybe third fourth and that MVP list max, I heard you talked about him at the time. You were blown away by him after the Kansas City Chiefs game. I remember. Specifically the words that you use them you talking about him dropping dines but something happened Jared Goff over the last month of the season specifically stretch games with Detroit and Philly in the bears was not just bad. He was one of the worst in the league Jared Goff over the last month season had sixteen. Touchdowns to twelve turnovers that's six interceptions and six fumbles at the same time. That Prescott was throwing nine touchdowns to foreigner sections with one fumble Dan Prescott has been leagues better than Jared Goff in the month of December. And then tack on one playoff game for Dak Prescott the duo Dakyns eek versus Jared Goff and Todd Gurley. It's a blow out. It's Dakyns Zeke actually do think it's a blow out. I think the Rams are gonna blow out the Cowboys. And I thought the Cowboys were properly favored against the Attal, but Seattle would beat them. Because Russell Wilson in the end would do his thing and Pete Carroll handcuffed him. And I thought that Garrett out coached Pete Carroll. Nakas Garrett was great. But because Pete Carroll was terrible. And I think it would take that kind of coaching performance out of McVeigh in order for the Cowboys to win in order for Dak and Zeke do be better and more significant here than Goff and girly. Now, the caveat is of course, girlies health, I'm assuming girlies healthier. In other words, he can be some. Semblance of his normal self because there is a hierarchy here. Zeke is great girlies a little bit better than Zeke. He was a little bit better than him in college. The prospect you thought it was a little more upside there, just a little I understand. It's like a hair's. These basically don't get better than Zeke when you do by a little bit. But girly is that little bit. And and in the pros it's played out that way, even when and it didn't look at first because girly didn't have the protection Zeke did, but we can see when they're both at their best a little bit better and Gough at his best is better than back. Although you're right about that trend to why is that trend taking place where the Rams have gone backwards. First of all Whitworth has been hurt that left tackle Whitworth. You saw what happened in Cincinnati when he left you saw what happened to Los Angeles. When he showed up and his absence has been big Secondly Cup has been gone. And that's a deal for the for the Rams, no doubt. But mainly girlies health has been compromised play action is not the same as a result. And the league has. Busted to McVay. So now the question is if girly is relatively healthy who do I believe in more McVeigh or Garrett and the answer is McVay, whatever adjustments the Dallas defense wants to make either leave in McVeigh's offensive mind, more than I believe in Garrett period as since I've seen golfing girly hit greater heights than back Zeke this year, and since I believe in their coach, I'm assuming health, and I'm telling you golf and girly over deck and Zeke, I can't believe I'm saying this, but actually agree. What will Cain on this? I think it's going to be back. And I think it's going to be Zeke. And here's the reason why max I think that with Jason Garin and Scotland Eoghan they're going to give you a Zeki Elliot all day every day. Remember that the Rams even though they're just a mediocre fourteenth against the past primarily most of the damage was incurred against them. When you have Marcus Peters there on an island bomb self because it keeps leave it. Bent out keeps leave seems to have a profound effect on this, man. He goes for his vice is good friends. He received seeks his. Council any gets it and keep leave in terms of his football accurate is elite in this game. And so when he is on the field for the Los Angeles Rams, obviously their past the it's going to be exponentially better as opposed to what it is when he is not there. So what do you do you run against them? Why do you want against them? It's not just because pass defense in terms of pitas and keep to leave out there it also neutralizes Amer Donald from going after the quarterback, the more you throw the more. Aaron Donald is unleashed the Dallas Cowboys don't want that. So they're doubly incentivized to make sure that they just give you a Zeki Elliot all day every day. I think in a game like this particularly southern California's supposed to rain in the morning, but as whether to be fine at evening, I think you're going to see nice beautiful weather conditions. You're going to give the ball Ezekiel Elliott about started at thirty five times that Dak Prescott is not going to need to throat. A football that much in order for the Rams to succeed. They're going to have to force that Prescott to throw the football and deer Dallas beat them with their parents and games. But that's easier said than done, and if I had to bet my money in terms of who's going to be the more effective dual it would be Dallas only because most of it will be on the shoulders of Iki. And we know what else you'll see Stephen there now lie not just good weather, but I- -ticipant you're going to see a lot of blue and silver in those stands. That's true. True. True. Tickets and all of that stuff. They say it's fifty percent. All crowd is going to be Dallas. Exactly. So this isn't just a witch duo is better game. We're playing here. We're not just playing a hierarchy and not think other of you are playing a match up game which impact on this game and match you see it through the prism of coaching. I don't because you're right. I would I would say Sean McVay is going to beat Jason Garrett in Scotland a hand in a coaching dul, but in a real matchup. Stephen the only things you left out was that the Rams are really bad against the run. And so now you're talking said that twenty third. So what you're talking about? I'm not trying to get you. You know, when I come at you. This isn't one of those moments. This is strength on weakness. So for the Cowboys they have the advantage in this duo matchup because they run against a bad run defense while the Cowboys are fifth against the run. And if girlies healthy, he's got. Zeke is going to have a big game. He's going to you can sign when his shit up a game. They're gonna feed him. He's gonna game if girlies healthy. He will also be very good. I believe will be much better than deck if girlies healthy guys. The Rams are not like the saints where it was like two thirds of the way the sees through the season. They haven't quite looked the same. I know the impression is to. Yup. Early in the season, the Rams were unbeatable and they've kind of fallen off I wanna point something out since that win against KC fifty four points, and they scored thirty they had a couple of losses with six and twenty three points girly wasn't right. Their last two games. They've scored thirty one and forty. Niners. I understand. I understand the defenses are different. But I don't think that's primarily about the defense. I think the Rams are finding their Mojo again. And when they are healthy, they're the best team in Vegas. Thanks to 'cause LA's favored by seven and cover nine percent chance. I was surprised by that line on because got to shut like the Rams by God help Zambelli sale stopped that. Let's stay in the association, shall we? Ladies and gentlemen, every front runners James harden and Janas onto Jacobo going head to head as hard and tries to extend his thirty point streak to fourteen games. The rockets have won twelve of their last fourteen games and hold the best record in the NBA. Since December eleventh, Meanwhile, Greek freak currently ranks in the top twenty and total points, rebounds, SIS and blocks only three players have ever accomplished, this feat since blocks became an official stat way before I was born max, which player would you want right now? Hardin Yoenis Jaanus, I admit, it's not easy. The way harden has been playing, but the answer is Janas both of them benefit from a great coaching in and coaches who take advantage of what they will. But what Janas does? Well is completely unstoppable. What hearten does? Well, is he does a lot? He just like everything you need to score efficiently. He does really well, but not like incredibly like the step back three hate Steph curry from free. He's a good three points. He's a creep three point shooter. But he can get his own shot, and he can hit it a good rate. He gets to the line. He's good free throw shooter and all that stuff. But we got us is completely unstoppable. Understand if you guard Jaanus one on one with anyone in the league, he's going to bang it on them. You know, what his percentage of hitting dunks is probably something like one hundred percent not like thirty seven or thirty eight percent on a three or a step back three or something? Like that. Not like eighty five percent on a free throw probably close to a hundred percent. If you put one guy on Janas, he is scoring certainly. And if you double him an open guy is going to shoot a three and a wide open three point shooter. Who's only okay or decent is actually better than a really good shooter. Who's not open look at the bucks space. Why do you think Brooke Lopez's and brogden? These guys are hitting forty-three approximately forty three percent from three brook Lopez's taking seven. Game because the floor is based everyone's wide open because of what they call the gravity around. Jaanus? You must double him or he bangs it on you. And if you if you do double on him he finds the open man now add in the defense, they're not comparable defensive players. So the answer's Jaanus. The Greek freak is something special. He something to behold, I take James harden. And then he did a week. I wouldn't even think about it James harden is the greatest scorer in the game of basketball right now. It's just that simple. He's stop you can slice it. Anyway, you want to he could get to the whole at will he's unstoppable in one on one. He shoots nearly forty percent from three point range. Okay. His mid range game is there. He's an eighty five percent three of free throw shooter. I'm sorry. And by the way that averaging eleven free throws per game. I think it gets the Boston Celtics late December. I think he had twenty seven free throws at one game. The mastery that he has now put on display. His ability to draw fouls the respected he gets from the officials his ball handling skills. His shooting ability his scoring ability. And by the way, we didn't even bring up the fact James Hardie could play point God anytime he wants to he can play point guard usually does for crowd. I love this man can do the water or the to spot. It doesn't matter. He's just as if not more leader. I don't even know what position to pick at when I look at the Greek freak. He's a point guard Greek freak is phenomenal. Here's the problem. Levin percent from three point range at some point. And Tom what they're gonna do is collapse on him and their him the shoe perimeter shot. I'm just talking about out. Hold on. I'm just saying collectively they'll collapse on him. They'll go if they have, you know, stuff like that. That's no answer for James hard. Okay. How ridiculous what you're saying? Is ridiculous ridiculous really nasty hosing that knee be if when they make the playoffs this year that maybe there will be talking about anything about. Well, you're saying they're eventually going to do to talk about the regular the game. Eventually someone is going to do this. You're saying, and then you're not gonna be able to win when you need to the honest because they'll do what they did hit with Ben Simmons in the playoffs for example last year. Okay. What I'm saying is that's a maybe we'll see he does have to answer that question. Our and play with James harden. It's not a maybe we know talking about his game. I'm not you can have a game and not show up. Right. So if you're talking to me, all right, Matt Stephen A. He hasn't shown up in the playoffs to to the degree that he showed up at regular season. Here's what I'm doing. Max look Kirk gold's berry has his game Kirk goals berry who's who's into the analytics, Stephen has a brilliant piece on ESPN dot com. Right now because anyone could come up with the analytics or even the formulas and crunch the numbers. He contextualized it that what harden is doing because he does everything. Well, but the way he doesn't shoot the three spectacularly I wanna be clear set is not bad. It's not he's not close to Steph curry if Dan they wanted Al if then Tony got his hands on Steph curry, you wouldn't be James Hardie rouse. The greatest ever others shoot the three better than harden. Yes. Thirty nine percent is not incredible good three point. You also an excellent free throw shooter. He can get to the line. Very well, he does the things that are that people want in the modern MBA really well, and he does it all really well on the offensive end. And so so what goals berries point is is that we've been tempting the harden approach with a player for years. So harden is not as the superstar. We deserve. Like the rules are set up in a way that guy's gonna play. Just like this. The question is does that kind of ice. Oh ball work, when you need it to you're wondering, if antenna Copos does when you need it to we know for a fact harden has not been able to get it to work when he's needed to know what we know for a fact is that hard and shot hasn't dropped which is why try to teach you basketball, but you just refuse to listen to what I'm saying to you there when you're watching a guy sometimes it's not about what you can't do about. What hasn't happened? What I mean by that is if you're shot is in fall, and that's entirely different than being put on the lack of when we saw Damian Lillard against holiday, even though Damian Lillard was doubled a lot of the top. There were tons. We do holiday against the we saw bigger guard who was imposing who had defensive promising. He said damn he got him on lock when you never say that about heart human being that just on a basketball court it gets audit. And you say he locked. Shot's not falling talk. When he gets his shot. You're talking about him purely as a score when you say who you'd rather have. It's not just as the score. Now. Harden gets a lot of assists. But in fact, whose presence on the team makes their team better, in fact, and Tinton COPA. 'cause no matter what you want to do when the time comes how you gonna force him to shoot. A if your mind match. Yeah. A couple of weeks ago, you said booted holders the best pickup off faith. The Kupa was there last year. Right. But you did have booted hose and guess what at hardened played in the league for years before he wound up with Dan on twenty nine a game. Last four year with the land. Not the last four he has not put up the numbers pre-bus twenty seven mortar less for counting points scored. There's points. Assists percentages true field goal percentage. Affective field on this show before he became the coach Houston, and you were raving about heart. I'm just saying argument is that what I'm saying. What I'm saying to you is that I'm talking about the elite hearted there. We have been are you arguing that's what I want are you arguing dantonio hasn't made a difference for heart. No, I'm not saying he made heart and better. No, no. Here's what I'm saying. The system. The people are round Harding right has made has helped hearted, but heart has only made hardened better. No, we were gonna show look better because the system works on that same or for booting, but what I'm seeing from Greek freak. Yeah. I didn't see until booted got here should better better. Got better Auden has been doing this. No, not doing this not this. He was not an MVP before dantonio showed. Okay. I went to the conference finals what was hard and do not gain. Everyone's talking about he's taking it to another level. What are you talking about? I got you got you hard and ranks fortieth and three point shooting percentage. I have one question playoffs. Clutch situations game on the line. You gotta be big time in big moments. I'm going on rather have harden. In a situation. Yes. Would you harden? The Greek freak Hardin right now is the poster child for choker and team sports. I hope he does. I hope it doesn't stay at with Matt right now making money. All right. Let's start New York is Kristaps Porzingis has been out with the tortoise Yeltsin's last February is in close to returning to the court in the team said that he will be reevaluated next month. Now in a story on the ringer on teams that are thought to be interested in Christmas presents the Spurs are viewed as a team with high interest. The unicorn will be a restricted free agent this summer in can match any offer. So should they should they match any offer? The next represents I'm with humanitarian, and I don't I don't think they should be consigned to this feat for the rest of his grew. Because they want the American dream and with the Knicks. You got to let them go. You gotta let them go. They're going to ruin his career. This is such a bad organization. And by the way, right now, they got a hell of a coach, and they have a solid GM and they have. Even the PR department is much different than it used to be a half to acknowledge the changes they've made. But you've even heard Dolan recently comment about never tanking and every single one of his impulses is the wrong impulse. And they will almost certainly ruin Kristaps Porzingis. And so this is a team that I root for for I thirty eight years of my life where I finally said had enough. You know, what you know, what porzingas would do Popovich would do if you could get his hands on porzingas porzingas has the chance you can't see this only about five or six players a chance to be the best player in basketball that one day. He can have some time as as recognized best player in basketball. Let him pursue that opportunity because I do not trust the Knicks with a commodity as precious as porzingas personally wished that ESPN would send you to LA. You don't deserve to be in New York anymore. You're a traitor. Okay. And somebody needs to call you out. You're a traitor. You know, whether it's. The process and ignoring the fans now here, you are the New York. Knicks fan base has been subjected to this this oh our wanna use the word. Okay. Other than a three year gap in which they had a winning record and went to the playoffs in fourteen or fifteen of the last eighteen years. Not only have the New York. Knicks miss the playoffs. They have they made the playoffs. One of those years. They they haven't had a winning Redken fifteen the last eighteen years and here you are. I don't know whether you Oprah or you or you you dear Abby, dammit, Gayle king Oprah's friend, who I know very well. And it's one of the sweetest women on the planet of let me tell you something, you ain't you think about zingers hell zingers? I don't give a damn about his feelings. Get him to check cast it and get on a damn corner. Played basketball. You're seven feet, you could shoot the lane. The last time we saw you your average twenty two and eight. Okay. All right. A new shoot nearly forty percent for point register for the field and long. Exactly, this is the bottom line. The upside is there we're in the business of trying to accumulate talent. If you're an NBA team. So you don't give a damn about his spills? So max Kellerman a native New Yorker supposedly knick fan. Got di. Living at Louisville. Living in New York, you're sitting up here and you're saying to New York City, but get job. But I wanna think about this. How would it has busy saying? Tech play Bill. Simmons has a theory euro out after forty years to switch allegiance from team if they don't give you a championship. I bring that. It's been forty six years for the Knicks your allow Semin set your in my in my on. No, no, no, I and also I don't think you need forty years even thinking for you the one that brought him up, especially if you you live in New York, you deserve the best in the Yankees. You deserve the reason upset at Cashman. He's a great GM. But he's not the best in the business. He's losing to the Red Sox in the same division out of the question out of the question. New york. Yankees fans deserve the best New York Giants fans among the best franchises. They can do better. They should be the best franchise. The New York. Knicks are laughing stock. I encourage New Yorkers to start sniffing around for other teams. I would say the lessons that I learned in my in my Seder, Stephen at Passover where where we related to old what they call negro spirituals who related back to the to the exits where they said where let my people go. That's right. We've seen that around the pattern. Let my people go. Yes. You need to let Porzingis go. Let him go and be great somewhere. Don't have this franchise ruin him. And I would say Knicks fans also allowed to leave unto favorite, please go to commercial. Here's the deal thirty four days after becoming US offensive coordinator. Click Kingsbury was named head coach of the cardinals on Tuesday. Kingsbury becomes the eighth coach hired under the age of forty five. Joining Sean McDermott that Patricia my Sean McVeigh Matt Nagy Kyle Shanahan and Matt. Stomach socks were joining us. Now, speaking of the youth movement doing dominate going good. I feel I might look young feel. It's all up here age ain't nothing. But a number maxim looking at you for this one is this youth movement were staying in the NFL a good thing. Yes. Of course. I mean what you don't want. There are coach Bruce Arians, right? Who should get other head coaching jobs because they're excellent coaches. And then there are guys. And I'm critical of the giants a lot when I say the worst kind of impulses of their conservative attitude like there are lots of good impulses about conservative attitudes things that have always worked. You know? They don't you don't just abandon them. For example. If you should have a good offensive line things like that. But but coaches who give GM's and coaches GM's give ownership the feeling that they used to have from coaches GM's. That's not that's like lazy thinking, that's that's that's not good. It's a bad impulsive conservatism. The right coaches right now are the offense of coordinators, especially with those big twelve. Type of concepts, and you that you could argue that that's lazy thinking that. Offensive coordinators are good coaches, young coaches copy. No, that's Lisi thinking if you just take cliff Kingsbury for, but if you are looking for the kinds of guys who were get like, for example, Lincoln Riley is going to be a head coach in the NFL one day. You think there's going to be a bidding war for him? And you think that's the right idea because I do that. So is every every was acting. That's the right idea by that that might be a whole nother debate. But I don't necessarily think this idea that chasing the office of mining head. Coach is smart because whatever choirs the basic sessile offense coordinator or offense of innovator is different scale than what it requires to manage a team. And if you're hiring guy because you think that he's an offense of innovator. And you think that's gonna give you sustained success you're wrong, unless you believe he is so smart that he's going to be smarter than everyone every noble say, but you're not arguing that that that talent is mutually exclusive with other leadership abilities. You're just arguing that you can't only look at that. Talent I agree with that that seems to be the definitive one. So rarely do we find people talking about they hire guy because of his people skills when an actual -ality, which more important to being a head coaches is having good people skills and learn how to manage a room and understanding how what buttons to push on the leaders on your team. That's what makes us successful head coach coming out with a new scheme like they're they're certainly that you can compete on football in all sports that you can't anymore. Like, you're not gonna be able to out strong your opponent. Everyone's got strengthened condition in state of the art. You're not gonna be able to consistently out coach your opponent. I think that culture is a way that you can sustain success and going after some office of coordinator because he's a hot name because someone else found a young office coordinator is a mistake. And I think you brought up the cardinals they are headed for just three things you said, but go ahead, Stephen before I say anything else, and obviously all seriousness absolutely no shot at you whatsoever. But I've been watching our Kelly's documentary on lifetime AJ is a hell of a lot more than enough of these days and let me. Exact point to say. I don't even get me started. On a lifetime channel right now disturbing. Let me let me move on back to what we were talking about my mind is not wear where you're talking about. Max disagreed with anything any off said, that's just not on my mind. Right. And there was my mind the pipeline talking about a youth movement in coaching any brothers gonna get hired and fell more than seventy percent black. With the firing of five black coaches at the end of the season. The number is now down to black coaches in the National Football League. Mike Tomlin in Pittsburgh, Anthony land in Los Angeles with the charges. The other thirty teams know black coaches one African American GM went to my standing the guy Miami. If I remember gravity, I believe, that's it. So league seventy percent black to black coaches, one black GM and oh woman already GM. And by the way, when we talk about a pipeline since they wanna bring college coaches into the mix. I don't see any brothers in college in that pop line that could end up in the National Football League. They ain't thinking about Kevin someone poor, you know, hermit with. I who we miss daily here had to go back to the state to get another job. I mean, let's go Loxley Alabama's office coordinator. And by talk about giving him a job. Shore Jay's Franklin so when we're talking about we got a whole bunch of cats out there, we got a whole bunch of we got we got more than a few brothers in the National Football League. Who have really really worked their way up the ladder looking for an opportunity. I doubt they're going to get a look we noted brothers in college. And getting a look so it just seems like this boy club. All right with new names coming out the watt zoo. Every I mean Kingsbury listen, God bless them. I wish him nothing about the best. You wanted to five hundred Texas Tech national championship on your resume and winning record on your resume. Okay. But you Glenn the head coaching job the head head coaching job in the National Football League with the Zona car. I mean. Obviously friends Jon Gruden you got John Lynch who didn't have any NFL front office experience before he got a job. I'm noticing a trend that's going into wrong direction. We're taking a step way way back and evidently people need to be made to feel uncomfortable before antennas get raised. So I'm just getting started. I brought this up yesterday. And we talked about it earlier today. Dominic and love to get you to weigh in on this because it relates let's tabled argument will do that another day from earlier, but it relates to this argument. Once a I think there's a kind of soft racism going on here that may not even be conscious to the people decision making positions once upon a time black men were not allowed to be quarterbacks base of ask Warren Moon, you know, okay? And the real kind of what was really going on. There is the idea was they're not cerebral enough to play quarterback. And what is the hot coaching trend? Now, it's the. Cerebral off innovative ofensive coordinator, who's getting the jobs, and in terms of the people skills now, I think there's been an acceptance. Oh, look at this African American head coaches can have people skills to be a head coach do, but maybe there is some perception among decision-makers that African American men are not cut out for the kind of cerebral innovative approach to offense and therefore don't wind up in the pipeline to become head coaches thought Kurd to me recently. No, I agree. And I think that's something that's subconscious that's happening to everyone, but your point about the pipeline. And I'm not sure honestly, how impact that because that is how could you know, it's knowable throughout all of our lives. But I think that is important when you talk about the pipeline is important understand. They getting a coaching job often the entry level coaching job is free. Like, you're working for free. It's volunteer or it's some sort of underpay that you can't live off and disproportionately black man cannot afford or black people cannot afford to work for free, and this job just like most other jobs are a lot based on relationships and. Standing who you feel comfortable with? And you brought up college football college football is worse than the NFL. When it comes in not only getting much more head coaches opportunities, but gang fraternities to work say something because I need your input on this. I wanna I want. I need your response to this is bad as college football is. And I know it's exponentially worse than the NFL because there's plenty of black folks got opera tunes. NFL sunday. We I get that. But was really really alarming is that this are Rooney rule in NFL, and this is still happening. So what that says to me is that y'all give a dam because there's a rule in place that has been Plaisted let bomblets to Rooney himself, and you have a committee that has implemented this rule into the National Football League specifically to address the concerns of inequality and don't give a damn who you referred to the NFL because I think that's unfair legal. I'm not talking about the legal talk about it. And if the NFL Rooney I'm just talking about the entity I'm saying, I'm not talking about the NFL league office. I'm. Saying the NFL as an entity you have this rule in place. And now we've been talking from political perspective everybody's debate and whether or not we're going in a wrong direction. Well, guess what? It's transcended the sports because right now what the NASA football it's going in the wrong direction. And somebody needs to tell them that I'm telling you, I if you want me to I'll get your list of qualified black candidate give me twenty four hours. We'll go up on that board, Molly. And I'll have a list of you tomorrow sometime candidate. I think it's a good point. And the reason I wanted to clarify that you're not going at the league office right time NFL like the NFL has all these rules. They've Byzantine rules complicated. Rules for the action on the field for for social issues off the field. And oftentimes there criticized because the other night on a pass play at all my you want another rule to cover that that eventuality that might happen. One day right like and the gets criticized for not having another and hear hear the league actually has. A rule in place to try to deal with this issue. I don't think they should be. Word for the culture. That's assuming one rule is dressed one problem. That's assuming that there are not multiple problems causing this issue. Right. Like getting black candidates in front of owners is different than in front of GM's. And also the GM role is included also but getting them in front of them. I don't think is a problem having enough of them. I think is an issue. I think you could definitely make a list, but I don't think there are enough legitimate. Yes. No, I understand. I don't think that there are enough legitimate candidates at this point. And that's a problem with the pipeline. I think this problem or this issue has multiple problems in one room, one of the reasons that may be is because until recently African American men were not really encouraged actively discouraged from being quarterbacks. A lot of the offense coordinator used to be quartered knows it nine argue in the history, and I get that. But the relevancy to the moment here is that at some point in time, the belief was that this was progress. And now, I'm making the argument they taking the step back. If you got a guy like listen. I brought up maniac who I respect. No experience as a black man getting that opportunity. John Lynch, whichever Cisco there's a black man getting opportunity Kingsbury losing record is a black man. Getting that, particularly when you have black churches in college football who did a better job that. I mean, you've got to be kidding me. And then now we got this Bruce Aaron marriage spec for Bruce areas happy for he deserves it. But black man can sit up there and go like this. I don't want that job. I don't want any job, but Cleveland, and you go out and recruit. Baseball manager Joe matter to recruit. I want. On your argument here because we discussed this argue about this as it relates to white privilege often where I say, white privilege. I'm not giving that up I hope to do the right thing with it. I will just insist that everyone is so privileged. In other words, if and I'm privilege is about is about being treated with respect as a person. Then I think everyone should push back to your statement there. We know that's not gonna happen for what I'm asking. You is this because I disagree that because unqualified white candidates get chances therefore unqualified black chances. I'm arguing that they're getting chances instead of more qualified black. That's what I'm saying. I'm saying that they are qualified bland with that who are getting passed by black because of nepotism on the part of white their white contemporaries who, cultivate, relationships, and as a result get opportunities that will never come out way. But you wanna sit up there and live in a peaceful society. We don't want friction. We don't want to. We want peace. We want everybody to hug one another and say Koumba. Yeah. But you screwing people over right in front of their face that you think that's cool. Hell, no. It's for those who through for those who might be at home thinking, I really feel sorry for this guy who's making five hundred thousand he won't now be making a million five million. It's not really so much about these jobs per se. It's it's as a reflection of what's happening. That's that's sports. Oftentimes is reflection of what's happening and on everything was happening. But people want us to stick sports. So this is a definite Spoilsports issue. This is this is the injustice of our leagues that we need to talk about if you wanna go outside of that. I'm sure Stephen A. And and you are also quipped to talk about that. But in sports this exists, and I think the examples that he brought up are important because they show the extreme it's hard to get people to believe something when you're talking about incremental difference. It's hard to get somebody to care when you say like Amina, Conroy to story a couple years ago that said white coaches are one hundred and fourteen percent more likely to get promoted to coordinators, then black coaches of with equal resumes. This research was done. By a Georgetown, professor like that's real stuff that you can point to. But that doesn't get people's attention as much as the disparity of hiring happens with the Portland. And I'll come to you with this because our in U2., Molly to to to a different degree. This is the stuff that I I'm sorry from speaking for you. But I think I will in the sense. This is what really really rates on nerves right now. You got you got folks watching this show. You know, what some of them folks are saying. It's the race thing here. We why can't we talk sports? Why does he have to bring the rate? So basically what you're saying? Is you wanna be comfortable you want? I'm not talking about you. Of course, max, I'm just talking to you. But I'm not talking about you saying you've got folks out there that literally look at me look at look at Dominy, and they'll be like out. Why do we have to bring this? 'cause you're not the one sitting in this seat constantly exposed to the unfairness and the inequalities. And the fact is when you don't sit up there and address the issue of fairness in our society and built if sports can't live by the credo Ameritech was here. What hope is the ridge ridding idea of white privilege was that white people walk around with like a backpack of privilege that is invisible to them. And so you can understand why someone who's watching may who doesn't really fully is not fully aware of the privilege because its really relative. To others and they're not living other people's lives. You can understand where they go. Wait a minute. I'm not doing so great my life. I'm being told that I am privileged that makes me feel bad. What do you mean? I'm privilege. I the things people have hard lives. So they don't wanna hear it and sports when they see million that millionaire athletes complaining about it. But the fact is it exists and the idea of it is to become aware of it. This is this is the work that white people have to do who may be feeling the way you just described you have to be come aware of it. And once you're aware of it, you're much more sensitized to that kind of issue. Well, I'm says Fisher. Official please go ahead is when we're talking about owners and jams, and there's no diversity there. And they're the decision makers, isn't that really the major issue here is the major issue. But here's the thing about relationship is like when you bring up a Mike MAG right in Gruden bringing him in and Mike MAC, I worked with the NFL network class act knows. His. But if it was a black guy. Let me let me tell you where the problem lies. And I'm glad you brought up Oakland. That wasn't Davis that made that call. He's the owner. That's Jon Gruden that may call. So what I'm what I'm trying to say to you is. Of course, you're going to have a situation where you have owners who don't engage in address the issues of diversity with the level of fervor we'd prefer, but they do they are plenty of owners. And I truly truly believe this. There are plenty of like if you're Robert Kraft biltrite. Go ahead at hand football operator. He's not thinking about all that other stuff. So I'm gonna look if I see an absence of a quality anywhere. And I'm looking at the New England Patriots. I'm looking right at Bill Belichick in terms of football operations because I know that Mr. cramp put him it control. You got these coaches, and he's. Relationships within themselves that are separate and apart from the owners. Ultimately, fixes it. And by the way, let me preface this by saying Justice postponed is Justice denied I'm not saying we should wait for this to fix it. But it will eventually fix it self in this sense. The New York Yankees wants a time. We're like the practically the last baseball team to integrate, but they were saying they had one black layer from the Elston Howard who won the MVP. That's what it and they were saying, but look we're winning the World Series every year doing like, but you know, what started to happen. They started to not win anymore because they were shutting out a huge pool of qualified candidates over time. What will happen is the teams that don't do a good enough? Job of listening to an inspecting. All the candidates will do worse. They will be at a competitive disadvantage, and I'm not saying you wait for that to happen. But that will eventually asked one more thing because you brought up an interesting point earlier, and I wanna make sure I'm comprehending it properly, but also feel like this trend of the youth movement, and the offensive mind is hurting this process more. So because when you're talking about a Matt leflore he played some quarterback if you're talking about Kingsbury he played quarterback and to your. Point that it was predominantly white players playing quarterback. And now that's the position. There's only one black play caller Byron left while he just they just let him go there in Vienna. Me in in Kansas City, which is a black quarterback of the time where they were very very few right in be enemies. Not the play caller. I think being a play collar matters and black coaches don't get the opportunity to be off the coordinators as readily as they get that between the court, and I'm gonna give you an I want you to respond to this seven repeated seventy percent plus are the players in the National Football League. Black to black coaches one black GM zero black ownership. I mean black folks got money it shows that we spend you got a group together you can get an NFL team. If they let you in that good old, boys club. My question to you is this when we talk about protesting, or what have you is legitimate? As that may be do you find yourself ever questioning one? During why NFL players don't take stand in addressing the of issues that I just brought up. It would be nice to see somebody that plays in the NFL Mitchell. What are mentioned? No. I completely understand that it would be nice. But I think that each individual player has their own concerns to worry about that is probably what it comes down to. And I think they also are they are in those relationships. Also like they've been exposed to certain people also, and those are the people that they feel comfortable with. I do think that it's important to recognize that then I don't think I don't agree with what you were saying about time, we'll fix this. Because they'll be competitive disadvantage because the ecosystem is closed. I'm not saying I'm not saying wait for that. I know. But I know you're not saying, but I'm saying that that won't actually I don't see that happen. Including extent in baseball. You may be right. I want to answer. What Molly what you brought up about the quarterbacks. I brought it up earlier. I think they're two separate things that are happening and. Put related one is the offense coordinator who are the ones getting the job used to be quarterback Blackman weren't really allowed to be quarterback. And so now there are fewer offensive coordinators. The other is the kind of softer racism that led to the fact that they couldn't be quarterbacks has been transferred over and perhaps is influencing the thinking about letting them be ofensive coordinators. The stereotype that there can't be tough enough as gone. But now the cerebral thing is. Joke with you. You want resumes for players, and you're consistent resumes for coaches as well, so so it's the same across the board dominate great to have you with us your insight. We'll talk to you soon that was fun. Everybody heavy stuff. But a good conversation. We'll do it again tomorrow. Thanks facing the podcast gets. I take weekdays ten AM eastern on ESPN.

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6pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:19 min | 2 months ago

6pm Newscast

"Points today this is. Npr live from news. Eighty eight seven in houston on game monitor. There are protests in cities globally as he israeli palestinian conflict continues to escalate. And that includes here in. Houston we now go live to. Matt harrop was outside houston's israeli consulate and matt. What's happening there this afternoon. Oh yes there. There's a protest. That's been organized by the palestinian youth movement and other pro palestinian groups here locally standing on a street corner as protesters are holding up signs towards traffic and playing music. I'd say about one hundred people here right now. People are trickling in. I spoke with one of the protest leaders. Muhammed the ball seat jail. He said they're ear organizing solidarity with a general strike declared in palestine today over israeli attacks on gaza. Dale he says. Many palestinians essentially did not go to work today and protest of the violence. Muhammed tells me quote watching entire neighborhoods being wiped out. All of these things are creating a sense of tear gail mohammed tells me he does have family over there and one thing that's particularly troubling to him is that the violence started over the holiday of ramadan. Obviously a sacred holiday s for the rest of the nike l. Muhammed tells me he's expecting hundreds more to show up your outside the consulate. There won't be any marching today. Just holding up signs store traffic. Who are honking their horns and seem to support the protesters gail. That's news eddie. Gate sevens matt harrop harris county has now lowered its covert threat level county. Judge selena says more people are getting vaccinated and fewer in the hospital. So they're lowering the threat level from red to orange. I'm confident i really trust that if folks continue to get vaccinated that we're gonna be on the way out of this. It's really in our hands. Stay data shows over. Forty percent of harris county. Residents have gotten at least one dose of the vaccine. He doll goes actions. Commas governor greg abbott issues and executive order barring school districts in government workers from requiring people to wear a mask a flash flood watch remains in effect for greater houston sixty percent chance of rain. This evening right now. Seventy nine degrees on the h. campus. I'm gay lauder news eddie. Eight seven support for npr comes from npr stations. Other contributors include yaro and pamela.

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College Hoops Returns

Outside the Lines

24:51 min | 2 years ago

College Hoops Returns

"I think smoking always affected my daily life because I was a closet smoker. It really sort of controlled my entire day. My boss is the one that recommended jewel. So I decided to give it a try. You don't get any of the odor of smoking. There's no ash all over your car. I would say give it a try get the flavor and satisfaction of smoking without the mess of cigarette. Asher lingering odor. Switch to Joel check OJ dot com slash sports. If you don't smoke Vate don't start warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. The college basketball season tips off tonight. Fans. Need one in dunks to compete? Just you know, those fifty but the ball desserts on the credits like that. Magic Johnson his management style has not been patient wealth. Gotta do a better job people impossible that you ain't nobody has the raised eyebrow. These days when another allegation comes in involving a student athlete. How can I help somebody educate and learn and develop if I don't have the context of their life. What you see your perception of abbey sporting events. Get this. Welcome to outside the lines. I'm Kate Fagin after a turbulent offseason. College basketball returns to the court. And that's today's big story from studios Z since we last saw college hoops in action. A federal jury returned a verdict. Convicting three men connected in pay for play schemes the first of three trials with documents naming some of the game's biggest players and programs, including Kansas, Duke. Michigan state and Kentucky all teams hitting the court tonight. In addition, the NBA's G league announced one hundred and twenty five thousand dollar contract option for top level talent as an alternative to spending one season in college. Of course that option came too late for the nation's top three prospects, all of whom will wear the Duke jersey for the first time tonight. What remains to be seen is how much the drama around the game might actually change the game here to offer. His perspective is ESPN basketball analyst, Jay Williams who joins us from Indianapolis before tonight. State farm champions classic J. Let's start with Duke. What does this star studded freshman class mean for Duke? Well, on paper K is the best class at Duke or ever had. Now dukes has some pretty amazing classes. But when you land the number one and number two and number three prospect in the nation at all commit to the same team. That is unprecedented. We haven't seen that before and a one and done era. And also, it will be the most relevant Duke has ever been in the history of the game for that program. They are highlights twenty four seven three sixty five and it starts with a guy like Zion. Williamson who will be everywhere social media star you combine with the likes of RJ bear who might be the first pick in the draft a guy like Cam reddish, who's a silky smooth guard. Trae Jones who also is a point guard can lead his team in so many different ways. This team is everything they're gonna live up to be. But with hype comes a lot of hypothetical. So we'll see what they have in store. RJ? From a broader perspective. How do you see the off season the FBI investigations conviction actually impacting the business of college basketball? Well, I love that use the terminology the business of college basketball because it is a business for everybody else. But the players frankly, I'm pretty shocked. This stuff has been going on for such a long time in our game. And people have known about it. You hear stories going all the way back to some of the oldest coaches in the game. And the fact that these will be considered federal crimes just kind of leaves me not knowing what to say. When you hear terms like bribery being used? Well, that's bribery. I see bribery happening in business every single day. The reality is that you know, none of these coaches are being held to blame here. So we have certain players at this sit out we have other individuals who potentially even after the pills process might have to go to jail for federal crimes, but we're not seeing any coaches with the exception of Rick Pitino and that was his third strike on something that wasn't this. So this all kind of leaves me flabbergasted, and the reality is I I don't know if bans actually care about it. Now, we have to watch it every single day we talk about every single day. But I think man perspective unless they want to use it by saying, hey, your school's cheater or your coach teats, and then they move on because it benefits their own school. It seems like nobody really cares. Yeah. Why do you think that is that fans don't seem to care about the revealing of this underbelly? Now, I know we're not supposed to talk about politics when I'm going to tip toe into this area. Anyway, it kind of reminds me there's a there's a headline that came out today that said, you know, Trump is making voting great again. And it's almost why with today's midterm elections. We're seeing record-setting numbers for people coming out to vote because there was something so disruptive in that vertical. It woke everybody up. We're having something that disruptive in our vertical, but it's not opening everybody's eyes. So I don't even know if a major coach goes down if you know, Mark Emrick goes out, Mark Emmett goes down with something. I'm not saying that's going to say that's going to happen. But something like that happens to that the green will that be enough to shift people's thoughts about what's actually occurring. But the the the realistic matter of this whole thing is that fans when they come home, they want this to be their escape they want to be entertained. They wanna sit back and watch their team and enjoy their team, and that's it. So until something disruptive to that nature. Skate. We're not gonna have any moment. One thing that was attempting to disrupt was the G leagues offer of one hundred twenty five K for top prospects. We got about thirty seconds left. But I wanted your opinion on how you see the top high school talent responding to that G league offer. Well, look content is moving down. And what I mean? But we have contracts for NCWA conserve is for NBA. And now high school is the next thing you're seeing companies like overtime really take over in that market. If I'm a high school kid, if I can create my own brand and have one hundred or two hundred thousand Instagram followers. Why would I hold out? I mean, I would do to Darius Bazeley, right? What you get potentially a new balance deal for fourteen million dollars or overseas or more make money as soon as possible or just train and get ready for the NBA draft. All right. Thanks J. Shaved today. Thanks. Kate lobs it into Murray. He gets down the lane leans in riverside, layup. Remain. Oh, he is. He did sell to remember that. Resolution said about forty points, but the ball desserts gonna crowd. That was curry Irving in the seconds after the Celtics loss to the Denver, Nuggets frustrated after the nuggets Jamal Murray took a last second shot to attempt to reach fifty points, a shot that Irving believed was in poor form of us. Just one of the NBA's many storylines ten games into the season. We've got interim coaches and gangbusters scoring. And of course, there's always the Lakers. We are now joined by ESPN NBA analyst Ryan Hollins who happens to have spent a season with curry Irving wall with the Cleveland Cavaliers Ryan, what do you make of that end of game reaction, by Irving. I love it because career having is a guy who's so talented that it was tough at times to get him motivated for to play basketball because the game comes so easy to him. So that he was actually frustrated in irritated by something happened. This is absolute greatest thing to happen for the Boston Celtics in curry to see him motivated and loving to play basketball again, and really frustrated and keep in mind. Curry Irving is a guy himself who can go out is score a fifty points or forty points at the basketball game. So this is a guy who's not capable of doing what Jamal Murray had done in this situation. This is a guy very very capable of say come on young fellow act. Like you've been there before I know you're excited, but there's levels so this and there's rule so the game you got Murray putting up forty eight which is a huge number on par with the kind of big numbers that have been going up across the league for these first ten games. It's been eye-popping on pace for the highest scoring season since nineteen seventy seventy one with you. Watching these games. What do you think accounts for the jump? Well, the one thing that they've changed is obviously the perimeter rules. You can't put your hands on the defender, and there's been an emphasis to level things out in post why the post players had beginning so penalize that you can grab and hold guys in the post. And now, you restrict their emotion you essentially penalize guys for being big. But now in the post they're calling it just as tight as they are on the perimeter. I was joking last night with corden McGinty. I said coy the way you got to the free throw line, you'd average thirty points a game in today's NBA. So if you know how to create an advantage the NBA is turning into a true game of skill. And if you can shoot it you can drive it, and you are physical. You can have a fill Dan today's NBA I've never seen so many guys averaging eighteen in nineteen points a game. But it's great for entertainment. I love seeing the buckets in scoring. All right. So it's been a busy week in Cleveland for many reasons and one of them being that Larry drew he agreed to coach a Cavaliers for the rest of the. Now when you look at Cleveland place that you've been what do you see going on here? Well last season they stepped in and try to have somewhat of a youth movement through the playoffs and Tyron Lou tried to insert the young guys like the Jordan Clarkson, the nance's of the real into the system, and it just wasn't working. And you saw toward the end of the Cavaliers playoff run. Tyrod Lou made a push and said, I'm going with my veterans. These young guys are going to sit. I have to win the way that I know I'm going to win and they were very successful doing such and you see the battle again as the season started entire rule. Tyron Lou, I think they just agree to disagree and said I had to be the coach that I can be in. It's not forcing young guys into the lineup. So the Cavaliers are moving forward with this this youth movement, so to speak, and I think they started to do that Koby Altman and company last year. But now they're going go and Tyron Lou has chosen not to be a part of it. You seem JR Smith speaking out Kevin love could be on the chopping. Block korver. So all those veterans are essentially going to be out of Cleveland, and they're starting over all right here in L A, Ryan. So I gotta ask you in LA question. Of course. So Magic Johnson has said Luke Walton job as Lakers coach is safe. You're watching this team closely. What have you seen from Walton's coaching and should his job be safe? Well, the one thing is that Luke Walton is done a good job. But he has a lineup in a roster with the Los Angeles Lakers with a group of young guys who need more firm coaching. They need to be more held accountable. You're running a veteran system inch which worked in Golden State. But these young guys still need to learn a bit more in. This is a firm reason let me come back to LeBron James a Y LeBron James chose Los Angeles. Because you have a GM in the name of Magic Johnson who's willing to speak up who's willing to deliver those tough messages to Luke Walton of sorts so right now this they're meeting their speaking was nothing out of the ordinary nothing different. They. They are supporting Luke Walton, but this is necessarily a cause for concern. Because Luke Walton you gotta notice and you got to see that they are not producing and he is at the helm of the ship. All right. Thanks, ryan. Predate your time today. No problem anytime. All right coming up, huge news from one of the most important stories of the year. That's next. My name is Lauren. I'm thirty three. I didn't want my identity to be the smoking mom my first experience with jewel. I do remember being like this is good. It's it's it's like a cigarette. But not I don't miss smoking at all. Like, I can officially say it grosses me out jewel is the tobacco alternative that delivers nicotine satisfaction without cigarette. Asher lingering odor. Make the switch and J U L dot com slash sports. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. I was told to be quiet, and I think that when somebody in high power is telling you to be quiet. You know when right when they realize you are abused. I think that that is a threat, and especially when their first concern should be to make sure I'm okay to get information for me to see if my other teammates were abused to see what else I knew to get to the bottom of it. He was say gymnastics just said, we're handling this. We got this like stop asking us questions. Don't talk about it because you're going to tip off the investigation. So I didn't want to jeopardize anything. Come to find out. They didn't report it right away. That was Allie. Raise men on January sixteenth from outside the lines talking about USA gymnastics role today. The US Olympic Committee has begun the process of revoking USA gymnastics status as the sports governing body. This move comes in the wake of the sexual abuse scandal that has rocked the sport with former national team trainer. Larry Nassar, serving forty two one hundred seventy five years in prison and also after USA gymnastics, many failed attempts to create a healthy and functioning organization here to help us understand the impact of this move is USA today investigative reporter Rachel accent. Rachel, why did the USOC reach this decision? I think this has been a longtime coming in their letter to the gymnastics community that they wrote that the new leadership that's been in place, his struggle to change the culture rebuild the leadership and serve the membership. Feel remember the USOC wrote to them in January and mandated a series of changes said you must do these things or we will come to this point, USA gymnastics. Continued to flounder and make some fairly questionable decisions even with new leadership. And so that's why we're here. Now, what are the next steps in terms of revoking this? What will we see happen next? So there'll be a process that plays out under the USOC's bylaws, the USOC will appoint a three person panel that it will designate from various councils, and that will be chaired by USOC board member they will have a hearing where the USA gymnastics, can you know, sort of present its arguments, and obviously the USOC we'll have made its case that panel will issue report with recommendation of with a recommendation of what should happen to the USOC board of directors USOC CEO, Sarah, Hersh Lynn can also issue a report to that board. And then based on those documents the board. We'll make a decision. That's final most notably the US's bylaws don't outline a timeline for this. So we certainly don't expect it to take forever. But there's nothing that says. It's going to happen tomorrow or next week or how that process plays out in terms of timing. It's easy to think of USA gymnastics as just our Olympic team. But obviously, there are thousands of athletes all around the country who fall under the umbrella of USA gymnastics, if this goes all the way through and USA gymnastics is has its revoked from the USOC committee. What does it mean for the sport? That's potentially huge ramifications. Certainly USA gymnastics could continue functioning as an organization just without that recognition. But part of what being the Olympic and gbi confers as a cafe in a credibility that draws people into that grassroots pipeline as you mentioned thousands of athletes. The USA gymnastics is one of the biggest end GB's with more than one hundred fifty thousand members. And so if that's not the entity I would expect that we would see people leaving the organization, you know, certainly in the interim while this process plays out the elite level the teams that are competing at worlds. And at the Olympics are going to be fine. USA gymnastics will continue sort of functioning as it has been in regards to them. But it's really the the grass roots that there are a lot of questions about how that could be affected. If it does lose its NGO status, if we're seeing some byles right now on the screen, and she along with so many other of our economy gymnasts were at the heart of making sure that so much of this. Show is brought to light what role can be stars play in ensuring. The next iteration of this organization is healthy. Well, I think part of what has gotten us here today has been the voices of survivors like Simone biles. You just head alley Razman on earlier who have really pushed for changed and said the organization is not there yet. They're not showing us that they get this cul culture needs to change. You know, Simone biles in a tweet lead to decisions that close the curly ranch and led to. Interim CEO Mary Bono, leaving the organization after five days last month. They have a powerful voice, and they know it, and it's certainly clear the USOC is listening or at thanks for your time today. Rachel. A new analysis done by outside the lines shows that student athletes are about three times more likely than other students to be accused of sexual misconduct or domestic violence at power five conference schools. This analysis comes in the aftermath of numerous scandals coming from high profile athletic departments in the last few years, including Baylor in Michigan state. In order to provide background and context on the findings. We are now joined by ESPN investigative reporter poll Levin, Paula what is the main takeaway from this analysis. Well, I think there's two things one is athletes are more likely to be accused in these types of cases than regular students. And although that's not terribly surprising. I think it's interesting to see just how much more likely they are to be named in these complaints. And then the question is will, you know, why is that why why are they being accused of these things more often? And I think a lot of people would say, well, this has to do with the culture among student athletes. There's a small percentage of people who say, well, they're being targeted. But I think the larger voice there is that there's something that needs to be done to address the behavior that these athletes are engaging in and the second takeaway from this study, I think is is looking at not just the numbers that we have. But that the numbers that we don't have and the number of schools that are suffering from a major lack of transparency and not providing these numbers to us, and, you know, leaving students, and parents and athletes and alumni in. Dark about how much of a problem. They really have yet. It's not the sexiest to ask how data is compiled. But I do think it's really interesting for outsiders to understand how this process works and some of the obstacles you face. So how was it compiled? Well, very slowly painstakingly over about eight months. I mean, Kate, I if you just go back to even just the previous conversation you had with Rachel about the gymnastics issue. I think when you look at entities that handle reports of sexual assault sexual misconduct. There is a real demand from the public to be more accountable and to provide these numbers and whether it's university governing body whatnot. And in our case. I mean, it took several months for us to get these schools to hand over the numbers. When I first asked for this information back in March, Kate, I think maybe four schools actually said, yeah, we'll give you this. We ended up getting to thirty two schools. But that was after I logged I think the other day six hundred emails hundreds of phone calls going back and forth. Saying, hey, this is an interest. That's of issue to the public that you really need to have a better accounting for how many complaints are being made against your student, athletes and even students in. Because for a lot of these schools, Kate, they couldn't even tell us. How many complaints have been made against students much less even the narrower subset of student athletes. Are you released this analysis on Friday? So there's been a bit of time for it to breathe what has the reaction been since? Then. I think there's been a lot of reaction from individual of fans or students from particular school saying, hey, you know, I was really disappointed to see how high the percentage was at my school. You know, can you address this? But honestly, what I saw more of people posting who either students or alumni at particular schools that didn't give us information saying, hey, you know, what's up here what we should have this. We should have this information. So and and I think it has someone advanced the conversation again saying look, we need to do something to address this. Because one thing we do point out in this in the story is that this hasn't changed over over several decades. This is still a problem and the numbers indicate that it it's still going on. All right. Thanks call. Appreciate your time. And you can read more about paula's investigation on ESPN dot com are coming up. What happens when you lower your guard in an Uber. That's next. -nology truth brought to you by cold. Truth teenagers can communicate entirely in emojis. How why birthday party pizza slice kitten sucker bulb pineapple truth? It's so easy to switch them. Save on car insurance at geiko dot com. What are you talking about paperclips shoulder? Shrug high five wizard hat what gogo fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Tonight on ESPN. We tip off the college basketball season with the eighth annual state farm's champion classic four of the top teams in the nation number ten Michigan state and more on Kansas in the early game at seven and its fourth ranked Duke number two Kentucky will they're also available live on the ESPN app. You can watch anywhere. A cautionary tale emerging from the NHL as seven Ottawa Senators climbed into the back of an Uber last week and had the kind of candid conversation smack talking coaches assessing team effectiveness that athletes usually reserved for spaces far away from recording devices. Here's a quick sample of what went down in that Phoenix. Uber. What he wrote? Video action. Ever teach you anything just commentate happening. Here's a Simpson's heat. Here's the other thing too. We don't change anything over so lighting meeting like fiction. Three weeks side note on the kind of Uber passenger whose goals to get from point to point b without exchanging any words, in fact, when I see that a driver approaching has a stellar four point nine two rating, but is known for great conversation. I consider cancelling the right? I mean, I don't cancel it. But I consider it. So a lot of things to dig into here in the big questions swirling around the release of this video is whether or not it's a violation of privacy, many Uber's have amounted camera and in notification underneath obviously these passengers the Ottawa Senators said they were unaware they were being taped are. But what's also really fascinating about. This whole story was how it brought to light. What I assume is an age old practice athletes out on the town, speaking freely on recorded leaving rumors in their wake all across the city. I mean, don't we assume most of the New York Knicks and the nineties and the Yankees and the eighties got into cabs and chatted up the driver. Now here we have that exact scenario, but given the time in which we live instead of hearing. Third hand. I don't know. Like, all right. So Vinnie says Charles Oakley was in his caveat other day and Charles is fed up with how weak the Knicks are on the boards. Now, we have a four minute video that confirms everything everyone in Ottawa probably already thought about the team. But no players were willing to say on the record. I mean that is until they didn't know they were on the record that will do it for outside the lines today. NFL live is next. If you're a smoker, you know, switching isn't easy. You've tried vapes. And e six they just didn't deliver the satisfaction you expected but jewel is different. It's not an e cigarette it's vapor product that actually satisfies plus jewelers simple to use. And there's no cigarette. Ash, no lingering odor as a smoker, you expect a certain nicotine experienced right jewel delivers give jewelry. Trae check. O? J U L dot com slash sports. Switch and be satisfied. Yes. You can't do both. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical.

basketball NBA US Olympic Committee USA nicotine Kate Fagin ESPN Luke Walton Duke Michigan Ryan Hollins Cavaliers Asher Magic Johnson Los Angeles Lakers Ottawa Rachel accent Trae Jones Duke Simone biles
No trade secrets | Giants are embracing the future | Salvaging the Steelers

The Stinkin' Truth with Mark Schlereth

30:11 min | 2 years ago

No trade secrets | Giants are embracing the future | Salvaging the Steelers

"It's the stink in truth podcast with marks Laura. Hey we'll stick podcast march. Learn longside my partner. Mike Evans Scott the hub producing the show Mike I I mean it's been a little I've been on the road but I apologize but here we are so weak to in the books and you know what the thing about that. It is not only the Games. There's always the games talk about but there's always news. There's stuff going on right now. That's incredible. We've hit this this situation around the league that I don't think we've ever hit before with all the trade stuff and all the things that are going down yeah you got Mak- Fitzpatrick Hits dealt Jalen Ramsey does he want to or not want to be traded then how about Steve Young coming out the other day on as part of ESPN's Monday night broadcast saying hey I'm seeing happening in the NFL what goes on in the NBA. The NBA has all the power of the players have all the power you know that NFL players are insanely jealous of the NBA because of the guaranteed contracts and the money they make the power that they have to say hey. I'm not happy here or I'd rather be there. I'd rather be there playing with that friend of mine and that's how we go and set up Kyrie Irving and Kevin Durant why Leonard and Paul George Are we starting to see kind of a shift when it comes comes to NFL players. Maybe trying to exert some of their own power. I think there's kind of this perfect storm scenario that's going on right now in the NFL and you're one hundred percent right like in my day nobody ever got traded. It just was it just didn't happen and now teams are more apt to trade players and it's it's really interesting so kind of squeaky. Wheel gets the Oil Syndrome that we're in right now. You don't like where you're at complain about it. You know go to the officials officials about or go to your club about it and wine your way out of town and it was so funny because you know you look at you look the Ramsey trade right you what's going on right now. The potential of him being traded they sing Kansas City right now but the bottom line is this he came out and was adamant yeah well. I didn't leak this news. Well who the hell went out and said we WANNA trade. Was it your camp. I know you didn't leak it but you're the one that wants out okay. So what's the organization supposed to keep it a secret for you like are they supposed to say okay. We understand right now that you're not happy and maybe your coach yelled at. You and you don't like that and you can't handle that so we'll keep your little secret and we'll try to work behind the scenes to work a trade for you right because I don't WanNa look like the bad guy. I don't WanNa look like the guy who did something that I did. You ask for your people last four so all of a sudden we're supposed to keep it a secret like the organizations supposed to sweep your dirty little secret under the rug and hope it so they look bad. No they've got a franchise to run. They've got tickets to sell. They've got to sell to the to the constituents if you will their fan base that were trying to win win and you don't want to be here so you're the one that wants out you wind about it. They're going to grant you. Your wish. Here's the crazy thing that's happening right now. One eight players are more empowered than they've ever been right. They just are and they don't WanNA fight through it with an organization that they look at like hey man this. This could take three or four years the average career last three or four years. I want mine now so here. I go let me get to New England. Let me get the Kansas City. Let me get somewhere where I you can actually win and maybe when a championship so players are pushing you know that narrative they're going out. They're forcing these things with Antonio Brown and Levy John Bell and now make offense Patrick and you know and and Jalen Ramsey so these things are starting to happen. I think the other thing that's interesting. Mike is we saw what Oakland did last year and the perception that what they did is working so what they did you remember when all of a sudden Khalil Mack during training gap got traded to the Chicago bears and like two days later Jon Jon Gruden was like it's really order fine pass rushers so anyhow they get this blow to pick for not only Khalil Mack but also get it for Amari Cooper right this load of picks and what they've done overnight seemingly is they've gotten way younger one. They look like they're away more talented football team too and all all those things. I think are true and three. They're managing their caps situation. They've paid their quarterback now. They've got a bunch of young guys that don't cost them anything and the other thing you're selling. You're selling the future hey man. The future is bright right. Hey Yeah we're not going to be great great right now but look at all this young talent. We've got because what people believe because they've been sold. This bill of goods is that the draft and draft capital little is the most valuable thing in America and it is from managing your cap. There's no question about that but did you know and I got this. Somebody sent this to me and I I. I never checked to verify but you know I believe it to be true because everything I read on twitter true. I think yeah it's Pretty Much Gospel but the whole thing and this is somebody who sent it to me that I know that I have. I trust seventy. Five percent of every first rounder drafted seventy five percent of them. Do not sign a second contract with the team that drafted them so you're telling me that seventy five percent. Senate guys you take in the first round. Don't ever get to your second contract with that team either because of injury they can't play. They get shipped of somewhere else. Whatever the case may be so. Why do we covet first rounder so much. Why do we covet unknown commodities over known MM COMMODITIES RIGHT. I would much rather have a player that I know Trent Williams right now. I mean we live in Denver. We watch something every week. I don't say his name many more number seventy two. You can look it up every week. We Watch this third. Just I mean he's got more tackles anybody on our defense right down in Denver. We we watch this guy do the same thing over and over and over and over again and yet we covered our draft pick so much that we won't give a first rounder up for Trent Williams. Williams has been to seven straight pro bowls and dispenses justice at the left tackle position like that makes no sense to me I would much rather have known commodity and know that Hey I'm gonna get four really good. He's thirty one. I'll get four really good years out of seventy five percent of the guys get four years in the draft the first round and then you ship there as out of town like what the Hell's the difference difference what but but draft picks you know what they represent they represent hope and they represent built in patients and if you're a coach a general manager manager that buys you time. It's it's yeah it's the ultimate kick the can down the road strategy. I think it's one of the biggest cons in all pro. Sports is the youth movement because what the youth movement is yeah some workout some bear fruit most of them don't vast majority of them don't but it buys franchises times like Jim Croce relating job security. I could save time in a bottle. Yes it's first thing I'd do is take a bunch of first round congratuations because you're right. I mean like Youth Movement to me. When I hear you moving. I think bowel movement like Ooh. You've movement you know and just hang tight. Everything's GonNa be okay and the fans have been the fans have been duped and look what caused the draft is right me shoot. We moved from city to city now right a million people come out to watch the draft me it's incredible and you're one hundred percent right occasionally. It works out but more often than not based on the numbers. It doesn't mean it it it just flat doesn't and so I again I believe in players I believe in if you've got a great commodity that's that's the guy you pay and you move down the road with that guy and you try to build around that particular player well. The giants have gone down that road. Now I mean they've. We've now flipped over to the future. The future the future right ally Manny benched Daniel Jones takes over now. It's all about Daniel Jones Saquon Saquon Barkley. Let these are the two future cornerstones now. Let's go out and watch this kid play and no matter how bad he may look and they'll probably look bad. He's a rookie right but guess what you can do as a team as a fan base and say hey come on. Don't put you too much into what just went down. Don't Marino attention to those two interceptions. He's young right. He's gotta develop. You know learning on the job right. I see a lot of love like people WanNa make similarities or comparisons to like Kansas City. Hey worked in Kansas City right. You know we got the mentor the older quarterback bag Blah Blah Blah and I'm like wait. One was a playoff team and remember Patrick. Mahomes didn't play his rookie year. It was Alex Smith who played played Alex Smith who mentored him and they were a playoff roster with Alex Smith. Now Smith is a really smart guy and he's a very good quarterback. and I hope someday he makes it back or at least I hope you know he gets his health back from that broken leg that vicious broken leg he suffered last year with the redskins but the bottom line completely different scenario Dario here. You're talking about a giant team. That absolutely sucks. Do you know in the first two games might the New York giants have given up drives lives of seventy yards or more on defense nine times. I am time nine times. That's not a righteous defense. No it is not a righteous. I just defense that they're awful so what you're what you're selling your fan base now and what you're doing is buying yourself time as a general manager and coaching staff is hey. We're not very good but at least when we are good and we put the pieces in place because we're working on it right now. We've got some young guys who are going to be good players. Once they figure it out Daniel Jones have all this baptism by fire to lean on and you know a year from now or two years from now we're going to be be competing for for the NFC east title and so again because it's not like Eli Manning's playing bad football like your average in the NFL fell. You're trying to get like if you get usually the goal chart is one drive of sixty plus yards for score. I'm not talking about a touchdown. I'm just a score. Can you drive it sixty plus yards for score. They've given up nine drives of seventy plus yards for scores into games. I mean that is historic bad defense. It's as bad as you can get and so I mean I understand. They're not going anywhere and you know this whole. Experiment would Dave cattleman their general managers that hey we may sit for three years or two games one or the other right. I mean it's like what they did with Blake. Bortles out worked out. Hey this guy's GonNa sit his rookie year three or four games into it. He's starting and you know he's backing up in with the rams now. The good news is though is that there has been a shift you have to in that when you draft these young quarterbacks it does buy you a certain amount of time and patience sure but it's not like it used to be it used to me when you had a young quarterback. Hey It's a five year plan type thing. Remember now how these quarterbacks young quarterbacks pretty much had to show within in two years that the arrows going in a certain direction yeah you really have about a new year window to show that okay. We're onto something here otherwise teams. I think after two years start to look at it and think hey we've got to reassess what we're doing in here because think about what is sold the idea behind drafting a quarterback in the first round you get that fifth year option remind if a quarterback is worth his salt halt he's. GonNa be extended long before he gets the year five. Look at Wentz look at Golf and look at the quarterbacks who have gone to that fifth year. Who is it Jameis Winston Marcus Mariota. Two quarterbacks where the teams right now like. We think we know these guys aren't the answer. There are probably aren't plot. Hey we got him one more year. Let's hope that maybe just maybe something will click yeah even though deep down we know it probably won't yeah the quarterback order back. God's actually sprinkle some magic fairy dust on them and all of a sudden they can play it just is not going to happen. You know it's it's you're right. They've got it figured out the if you get the fifth year option you know the your option means. We know you're not good but we don't have a better option right. That's all that means and so now. We're in the quarterback market. do we decide to wait for free agency and and see if there's a guy that at the end of his career that maybe we can get for for next next to nothing. You know like the broncos did with Joe FLACCO or you know. Do we go young. Do we go young in the draft and and you know roll the dice on on that crap shoot that it is you know come on. I mean Josh Rosen. Hey the most accomplished core. This is the most pro ready alls I heard from draft. Knicks most pro ready quarterback in Football Josh Rosen. He's on a second team and like nobody nobody believes and and they're quote unquote tanking for two. Woah in Miami right so come on I mean that's just the way it one thing we've always talked about you and I is and I I just don't get it. I don't understand why teams that have legitimate should make championship aspirations leave themselves so thin at the backup quarterback position and take what happened this past week. You've got two teams definitely the saints and Pittsburgh you know the start for Pittsburgh's been disappointing but there's still a belief that Pittsburgh is is a a good team but yet they're both out turning to backup quarterbacks and can their seasons be salvaged with Mason Rudolph in Pittsburgh and teddy heady bridgewater slash taste hill in New Orleans interested Emmy. I think it's really interesting. I think they I think obviously obviously both teams like their backup situation. We don't know anything about Rudolph because you know big. Ben Is the only one that plays they're so he's GonNa get his opportunity. Teddy Bridgewater is a great story after ten years tearing up almost losing his leg on an ACL injury right it was torn so poorly and I think he tore a you know an artery or something else that was a mess and I've been told by people on the inside that know that there was not once but twice they were like minutes away from amputating his leg like that's how bad that that was At least that's kind of the story. I got like there was there was hard line decisions assist very much like Alex Smith or the same type of thing was going on. There were minutes away or hours away from deciding amputate in minutes may be an exaggeration but you know what I'm I'm saying. It was very serious so I'm glad that he's GonNa get his opportunity. I don't know that they almost would rather go with tastes them hill and I think as them hills. GonNa get a lot moron. I mean they move breeze out to play receiver to bring tastes them hill in in situations so there may be a lot more run there. I just feel oh like new. Orleans has better opportunity to whether that's storm then does Pittsburgh based upon the division with which they play where tampering and Carolina are both garbage. Obviously Atlanta was pretty good the other night against Philli but I just think that that for me that feels like they've got a better opportunity to win in New Orleans and whether that storm with the combination of Teddy Bridgewater and and take some hill. I'm always interested. 'cause you get you have unique perspective getting a chance to call games for. Fox and it's it's cool you get to go around. The League you get to talk to all kinds of coach is front office types players. I think you you really get a chance to get a real will firm handle on what's going on in the NFL right so you just did Chicago Denver Takeaways from the whole week the build up the game itself broadcast. I guess my first question is something something that happened. That I think has impact around the rest of the league was roughing the passer call against Bradley Chubb on the final drive. The Chicago ended that of course you'll go that is very controversial here in Denver plenty of people walking around believing that cost the Broncos game sure and and and not only that Peter King and his money more quarterback wrote about the call and about you know about that call the rubbing the pastor but what I said and one of the things I said and I can't remember exactly what I said but he said I talked to him. I I talked to him on Monday. Peter he said the disdain in your voice for the way that that play was called. He goes was epic but I'd say if you're going to legislate contact contact sport like this. This sports GONNA die. I think there's a gladiator nature of this that we we love and I keep thinking. Are we hiring officials that just really know the rule book but have never really witnessed football that don't really. I understand the game because I'd like to thank Mike that I can discern the difference between malicious intent and tackle like if I hit a quarterback and then I wrap them up in bear hug him and then pick him up and drive his ass into the ground. I think that almost one hundred percent of the time or pretty close to I can look at that and go yeah. That's a penalty but I also think that if a quarterback just gets hit because does he plays football nothing I can discern the difference between malicious intent and driving guys around and just trying to hit a guy and the Chicago bears. Everybody complains here in Denver but Chicago had two of those same two times that happened to them. One was on a on a loyd tackle. That was it was ridiculous. I mean it was just a tackle on Noah Fan. A tight end not even a quarterback and he got call for that and I'm like you know Leonard Floyd is you gotta be kidding me right and the other was in Eddie Goldman hit on the quarterback that was I mean it was astronaut and so this is something the NFL has got. We have got to get officials. That actually understand football. Yeah let me stop you right there. You'll get this on the officials but understand these officials every time they're out there and they're watching one of these kind of plays what is in the back of their minds sure what has been drilled and repeated into their protect. Our French absolute leak yeah comes wral river on Aquinas comes from Dean Blandino types protect a quarterback protect the quarterback err. We're on the side of caution err on the side of protecting the quarterback so you can say all you want. These officials need to be able to discern come on that was that wasn't malicious but in their mind right all they're hearing is protected. quarterback protected quarterback protect the quarterback so. I'm one hundred percent with you. They hear it all the time and it's that's a leak thing and the League league wants to have its cake and eat it too right. I mean that's the they they talk out of both sides of the mouth. I've always thought this and I've said this for years. I wish we would just as a league embrace. Embrace it embrace the fact that it's a a sport that is played by men who have a screw loose and have been touched by the hand. God athletically and most of you can't play it and instead of letting the nation dictate the the Narrative of Oh my goodness you know we've got to protect our. I'm all for safety and all for protecting is but there's one hundred percent likelihood that you're going to get hurt. If you play this game you're going to get hurt and I want it to be as safe as it can but it's not safe in any way shape or form and that's why you know I I always he's loved guy. That stops you in the airport said Yeah you know they told me gone pro. If it wasn't for this need no you wouldn't because you're a pussy like that's what I WANNA say. You wouldn't tomato and I'm just telling you wouldn't so you saying that was just you know I do. Stop Stop Your Pussy right right now. Go catch your flight right here right. Yeah you got a flight to catch and another cheeseburger right. You wouldn't have made it so let go that. Let go of that pipe dream. We all like to get get trapped in the Halcyon days of our youth right a lot of L. Bundy's walking around in the seventh grade at one play. I made that one time with the NERF ball Marian going pro big wasn't for this trick knee tricked me yeah so I I I just want the NFL to embrace what we are and we're making it as safe as we can but it's it's never going to be safe and we just let people who have an agenda against the game right we let them create a narrative and then were so scared like oh are we better than it's ever been. ooh Look and we really care and no head trauma and I'm like I just want you to go. Fuck you guys or the. NFL Bell and we whip ass yeah but I think you're you're talking about two different arguments here when it comes. Hey screw. You got sorry apologize. That's threat when it comes to when it comes to trying to advance the idea that NFL football is safe. You're right. I completely completely agree with you there. They're trying to appease people but when it comes to this special treatment of the quarterbacks that's that's from the league. That's owner owner. That's not outside influences. That's inside saying hey these are our money tickets. These are these are franchises franchises. We have to protect them. No matter what especially in a time in which you yourself have said offensive line play never been as bad right as it is in this league but so here you could combine everything then you're gonNA put these guys in bubble wrap and any hit on them is going to result in a flag but here's in this is the crazy thing. It's it's this self fulfilling only prophecy because what they've done is they put so much value on the quarterback position and what they've been doing is they take average guys paying thirty million dollars a year right and then they're like. Oh Shit we better protect our thirty million dollar your investment even though the guy can't play and so what you've done on his you've created this pay structure in which now I have to protect the guy and he might not even be able to play as opposed is to hey you know like if you look at the general pay scale of how things have gone and they've gone up as as the cap has gone up but I'm sure you look at what quarterbacks used to get paid compared to the rest of the team compared to what quarterback now get paid to. I mean I'm sure it's gone up exponentially from percentage standpoint but you've created this this thing yourself and you can't help yourself. The media owners cannot help themselves they they they cut it the players and they cover it the quarterback and they overpay. I mean they're talking about listen. Everybody's like Dak Prescott got. You CAN'T PAY DASH press off thirty million dollars a year you kidding me and then I'm watching Carson. Wentz put and you paid him thirty four million dollars. Well Shit Damn Right. You're paying Dak Prescott paying four million a year. I don't take time last should start. He's off to yeah so I mean it's just as the the whole thing is. It just spiraled barreled out of control and I don't know I don't know there's at this point. You've gone down this this slippery slope. It's not like you really back in. I don't think you like a little historical. All stuff rise your little historical respect of this the perfect way to lead into our moneymaker picks which are back for another year okay. We've missed the first two weeks. I'm GonNa let you go first. 'cause you eat out how think by like a game or two last year. You beat me sure of course it barely a tie honest to God. I think a tie early on in the season ended up being the difference for you so don't don't sleep on those ties for the first time since nineteen eighty-seven quick what was happening in the NFL nineteen eighty-seven strike you strike year for the first time since one thousand nine hundred eighty seven there will be two teams favored by twenty plus points. The cowboys are a twenty one and a half point favorite over Miami New England is a twenty two and a half point favorite over the jets first time I'm since one thousand nine hundred sixty seven Razi so the dolphins were there replacement players and the jets why they still have a decent defense defense but their quarterback situation who's is is is dreadful so I'll let you go first three picks. Go ahead in honor. Your moneymaker maker picks in honor of the statistics that you have just thrown my way because why would I think you're gonNA take both because I've got. I'm ballsy ballsy. Damn balls like I just need a big angler gene. You're all balls balls guys one hundred percent so my hoo-ha picks of the week. I'm taking the cowboys given the twenty one and a half points over the Miami Emme dolphins who have rolled over and I'm digging the Patriot for you. I'm Daycare Sadri. It's twenty two and a half over the jets. I will take the Patriots. That's awesome that is where I'm going and then my third and final moneymaker pick I'm going to take the rams on the road over the browns aww minus three mostly just because I'm rooting for the Browns to to just crumble you want him humbled I do. I just feel like it's all commercials and it's all you know and and you know come on you beat at home or on the road you'd be jets team that is you were counting the semi Cya Trevor Simian to like how that guy is like made a peanut brittle but he's GonNa play play by crap office if there's no there's no question but you don't have some guys have the ability to dodge contact. You know even if they get hit. It's not that they never seemed to get really like get hit. Hard Lord Dude that dude is like a crash test dummies like they should like his next job. He should work for one of the you know like the General Motors and then you strap them up in the car and say hey trevor good luck. We hope you don't tie and then just push the button I aw that's Trevor Simian so he had the horrible Ankle Injury Trevor Hope you get well but by the way Trevor Glorious mullet and I mean that Glorious Glorious Warrior Laureus All right so good for you because if you hadn't done it I was going to do it. How's IT GONNA take Dallas in Yeah I was. I I liked good for you. Go opposite go up. Oh no you like the PIC says he doesn't have boll balls like you do. Here's where I'll go. I'M GONNA take indie minus minus. Two okay over Atlanta Na Atlanta just good at home the other day but on the road. I don't trust him in K. Indie Jacoby percents that looking too bad right. Give me a Seattle at home. That was one of my other minus four like them. I mean over New Orleans very good football team but come on the uncertainty quarterback that they're dealing with right now. I'll take I'll take Seattle at home and I'm not ready to bury this team just yet. I still think they have pride right. I think they have culture. I actually Mason Rudolph a lot. I'm GONNA take Pittsburgh plus to six and a half at San Francisco against the Garoppolos. Really I think I think circle the wagon. I think San Francisco's a lot better team than you're probably giving them credit not saying they don't win. I'm just saying I'm GonNa Take Pittsburgh to the show a lot of pride this week Gimme. Hey listen you could change I'm going to go this is the game then you game game pride primal love. Pigskin all right now they are money your fix next week a week three of the NFL which one for us week one for us week three in the NFL right there you go for everybody involved in the drew podcast. We appreciate your listening. We'll be back with you next next week for a couple of podcasts this week only one because I'm too damn busy that is it here from from Denver Colorado. Thank you so much for listening and we will be back with you next week.

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Episode 13: The World is a Stage

Chief Yuya: Learn the Calculations, Insights, and the Lifestyle of a Royal Man

33:00 min | 3 years ago

Episode 13: The World is a Stage

"Ah Right here we go another podcast chief your calculations incites in the lifestyle of royal man and <hes> welcome as always all the view first time listener listeners and to all of you traditional and historical listeners welcome back <hes> necessity. We're going to be dealing with the idea of staging and what I mean by stating I'm not speaking about you know <hes> creating a scheme or creating a strategy although it could be considered that but what really looking at at your existence to this world and on this this road of life as you playing part on a stages in the term in his new idea that we hear sometimes in it's that the world is a stage and everybody plays a role you know by and and this is true. The world is is one gigantic stage and we're all playing certain character in a certain role on that stage but you know on top of that you know the world is also a place where you can choose choose the stage that you want to be on and you can decide if you're going to be a player or if you're going to be an audience member and in some senses that may make it a little bit more simple for others <hes> either. You're going to be a producer or you're going to be a consumer sumer. Consuming eat up with those who are on the stage or giving out to you or are you going to jump on stage and jump behind the curtain and start to craft a reality for others to enjoy and to tune into so the idea that the world is a stage and we all play a part is what we're going to be dealing with today and how the part that you choose to play can either bring great success to your life into your journey in great balancing or it can completely take you under or sometimes even how you can recruit others into your acne to your movie and to your play and they can be the downfall of your entire journey through this this incarnation all right so certainly hold hold on and it's GonNa be fun as always in <hes> you know I trust that you'll be able to get something that was shed some light on <hes>. Maybe something that you're going through in life. It's something that you've been feeling or experiencing tonight so I got the idea for this segment because I'm I was thinking about <hes> a song you know sometimes you get a song in your head you get attuned and it just keeps kind of reverberating define yourself either singing it <unk> over and over or humming it over and over you know and then maybe you might even come face to face with. Maybe you know you turn on your radio something in his playing or you see you know <hes> I don't know a file file or a C._D.. Or you seating streaming APP or whatever but <hes> there's a there's a song that I've always loved that I've love always loved music harmony of it and the lyricism of it <hes> and it's you know as very simple song but <hes> there's an idea that's presented that <hes> really kind of made me you know when I first heard the song Kinda you know. Put me in a certain space in and I like you know when art is able to do that when it's able to get you into a into a certain mental space where you cannot impose it on your own life and maybe it's the life that you have to come or something experiences that you've already had right and that's what really staging is supposed to do. You know we all play a optical character and those character serve as examples sometimes of righteousness for others to follow or they may serve as examples of what happens once you fall off the path of righteousness but either way. We're all living examples of one another. Were all if you're listening to me right right now when you hear writing with me right now then we're in the same production together you see so we choose to productions. We Wanna be a part of and even when we get when we auditioned for the role received role we make a decision if that's what we if we want to be what we WANNA WANNA do or not. That's what life is choosing. Is this the character and a half so you know <hes> you're auditioning for the role was when you you know you were that sperm cell and you swimming for that egg swimming fertilize that egg and you know you made it you went out you you beat it in and then you came into the world came into existence you were birth you know in manifested on this plane and then you make a decision okay. If what I came into this part I came into this cool. Maybe I'm under study. Maybe they got me playing. You know <hes> Gangsta number three. They got me playing you know woman in blue walking by with flowers or whatever it is but maybe I want to try to fight for a different kind of part. Maybe I WANNA go to a different type of production and do something different and expanding diversify. The original character came into and recall that character development when we start picking different consciousness but what I wanNa do before I even get into that I want us to take a listen to this song. Listen to the song you know sometimes like to do that. When I do these segments and then we're gonNA come back and we going to build on this idea? Even more all right here we go. <music> and the Ah uh-huh <music> <music> cool so you know willfully that that piece kind of puts you in the right mindset and on the right mind frame for what it is that we're building on in the session and of course <hes> like I said you know the idea. The concept of the whole world is stage and everybody plays a part and you know that particular Gustav by the fantastic four you know not not the cartoon comic characters just fantastic four with there actually was a singing group <hes> by the name of the fantastic four and <hes> <hes> you know that particular song by the fantastic and I said very very simplistic in terms of what's being said but you know very powerful in terms of the idea because his aligning there where he speaks about you know one day you you went out without your makeup on and I saw the real you so you know he's saying every the whole world's a stage and you know everybody. Kinda plays plays their part you know and as a result you know I fell in love with. Do you know I I I fell in love what it is that you present it to me. You know he started saying you know <hes> the stage is set curtain goes up and <hes> you know he starts off to summer saying seen as a broken heart. You know what I mean so he's kind of he's kind of setting the tone for things that happen but one of the things he said is that you know you let you you reggie lines perfectly and he was like it was just like the the words came. He said you read them so perfectly. Vaguely like the words came straight from your heart is believed you you know he said but the world's a stage and everybody plays it part and then that's when he says you know but then you forgot your makeup and a last I saw the real you and I saw your heart. was you know just a costume and your eyes reveal that you know we were through it was done you know so the the idea there about sometimes the mask and things that not only that the people put on that but that we what we put on and what we what we accept interns of sometimes we're accept people who will play a role because we're so excited and we're so desirous of having a certain production hyphen without being aware if we have qualified and bona fide talent around us you know sometimes people do that even in terms of trying to create families they want families and they want communities or you know wants certain ideas could even be a business idea. They want it to work so badly that they'll pull right from their pool of people who are around them and say okay well. You know what <hes> you're going to be. This and you're going to be that and you're going to serve this purpose and you're going to serve that purpose just because. They've they want so bad for this production to be real for this idea to be real. You know <hes> for what it is that they want complete in what they want to be victorious and doing and sometimes with their attempting is noble you know so because it's a noble thing they begin to defend what it is that they believe you see and they'll they'll defend certain ideas even the person because of what they believe and and so it's like a play within a play you know it's like a movie within a movie or dream within a dream when a person decides that they want to successive successfully go from point eight to point B. and we need you know certain individuals around them in order to fight the good fight of will or to make certain things happen and without really qualifying the stage is does the stage has had the integrity to support what it is that I'm doing you know do the people who are around me have not only the same vision you know have I have. I really sought for clarity here. You know to make sure that the people that I'm pulling into this actually I wanna be into it and then also have I made sure from from a righteous perspective. If everyone has the integrity to stay steadfast in what it is that we're saying we're here to do and you know the the idea of steadfast this means. It's like it's like a nautical term but you know it just means to be in a certain direction and to stay stay firm resolute. You know an unwavering in that particular direction right so that's all <music> all steadfast is so when you're holding something steadfast you have a fixed direction and you're not moving for me. You're not veering from you're not deviating from it you see and a lot of times people don't have that inside of them in because we're so we're so you know desires or something and of course desire bring suffering desires the root of suffering in fact just like you know <hes>. If you want to gain patience you know patients. Suffering is the root out of patients so as always is always a row arose and then of course there's always an attached thorn but having that desire of course is what brings that greatest suffering you know and sometimes the desire our judgment can become clouded and corrupted and even perverse to a degree where we can't see what stage we're actually on you might be on the stage of clowns and you overhear trying to perform serious dramatic <unk> peace and you're on the comedic stage and the people who are around you are only capable of comedy. That's the only purpose they really have come to serve and your life or maybe you know they have auditioned patient over born into the parts of the other drama potato. Stay fast to the divine purpose to their core purpose. They didn't enhance their core purpose. They didn't try to study what the rules are. The regulations are of their own character so that way they could push those boundaries and learn more about themselves and be more of themselves to be you might not be around people like that who are progressive. You may have chosen to place yourself in the company of clouds or low vibrational gracious people or just individuals who who are more interested in a different sort of production than you are you see and in that you know sometimes we become corrupt in our own endeavors because then now we spend more time trying to sustain our circle or trying to bring our circle up to a certain space you know it's like being an actor on the stage and you're you're an actor or actress but you're also the gaffer offer you also wanted to grips. You know so you're you're building the stage. You're maintaining the stage. You know when lights are going out or some of the equipment is going out your repairing it and you're producing and you're directing the you know the a whole production while at the same time trying to perform in it and usually you end up being part of the audience in that sense to you know because you're going to have those experiences looking outside because you're so desires of a certain production certain experience in your life in certain reality that is really you're just in love with the idea that that you just want to see it happen. You WanNa you know in that desire to see it. Happen is really the desire to be the audience really to sit in the audience of your own life and see yourself do certain things is but you can't act in something and at the same time be the maintenance crew for the entire production as well. You know you can't Lubo but that's what happens when you put yourself within a circle of individuals within a circle of people who are not the right actors who are not derived constituents for what it is seeking to achieve and life or if you if you fall for the delusion that there's only one stage a here in New York every we have Broadway. We have off Broadway. You know so you can do some great things off Broadway. I've seen some amazing plays. Claes that were not on Broadway. You know I've seen some great plays that were done in high schools. You know by by young people high school students who really you know put a supreme effort to put on a great production you now I've gone into Central Park and did the whole Shakespeare in the park. You know I pretty much do that. Every year and it's different places you can go to go watch Shakespearean apart but I love Shakespeare in the park. You know it's not Broadway though you know it's not like George Pinson's you know <hes> Broadway didn't make it to Broadway but does that mean. That's the only stage is that the only arena very similar to <hes>. I know what I was often told as a young person <hes> as a young melanoma man man if I wanted to make it in this world which was the white man's world that I would have to work twice as hard or three times as hard in order to make it and that was you know that was supposed to be a word of warning and a word of encouragement you know and obviously obviously preparation you know be prepared to work twice as hard you know because there's so many things that are stacked against you and me. I've I've never been interested in being anyone's <music>. Let's just say hockey by. I've never been interested in being anyone's concubine so you know that that didn't work for me. So I said wait a minute. You mean to tell me that in order for me to achieve success in this world that I have to now go petition partition another man who might not even be better than me you know he may not be smarter than me. He may not be wiser than me. He may not be stronger than me. You know he may not <hes> be as ferocious wishes. I am or creative as I am spirituals. I am you know his he might not have you know genitals that are as beautifully sculpted as my as mine are even have anything on me but I have to go so in run on his treadmill and run twice as fast as he and his offspring so at a very young age I said <hes>. Why would I do that that stupid in if you WANNA play the right man's arena while I'll just play in a different arena who says that that's the only arena to play in who said that that's the only place that you can achieve great success in great wealth in life so it's no different when you think about not only the stage that shoe place yourself onto our born into but also even a circle of people that you put around you you know sometimes at very circle can be your downfall? You know great example. If you look at what happened on the Nineteen Thirties in Nazi Germany when Adolf Hitler was coming into power you know one of the things that he did you know in order to to strengthen the whole that he had over the German people was that offer one he began to eradicate most of the programs that existed for young people you know so like one of the things that he got rid of. I was the boy scouts right so he got rid of the boy scouts and a lot of other different organizations nations that kind of <hes> elicited allegiance to anything but what it was that he was creating you know and he created a youth movement that was huge you know at at the height of his of his as youth moving they were like two three million young people inside of his youth movement and then eventually what happened was the boys were recruited for the army so as early as seventeen sixteen seventeen years old they with the ones that went in because every all of them were in the moving wanted to be moving they will be recruited and sent away to go fight on allies and typically they were they were like a part of suicide squad. They they were sitting on a young sixteen seventeen year old German soldiers on suicide missions but nonetheless <hes> one of the things that was established early on was that sense of loyalty to Adolf Hitler. You know there was this sense of I live die in breathe Adolf Hitler the fuhrer so in that sense you know there were young people who if their parents had a different feeling about something or maybe showed a certain level of of <hes> DISA- legions to Adolf Hitler the children turn them in you know the children the children became like foot soldiers inside of their own homes and we remove themselves from the authority of their parents is an any other organization that existed that could have maybe disrupted erupted that line of authority that you know <hes> Adolf Hitler wanted you know amongst those those young recruits or those young volunteers you know anything that may have interrupted that you know he he did away with you know he did away with with very quickly you know <hes> and this is a system that worked for him. You know for for a very long time and he also recruited young girls and they also had a job to serve as well but the point I'm saying is that you know the sixteen fifteen sixteen seventeen <hes> euro euro young people in the also had the younger <hes> division where the children were like between eight and fourteen. Thing you know but like I said at the height there was like actually there was more than three million thinking when but at the height of almost ten million almost ten million <hes> of what they call the Hitler youth you know but my point that I'm saying that that if the parents are not completely allegiant to what was happening you know <hes> in terms of this this movement they were now sleeping with the enemy you see so the parents may have had one idea on based on their mind in terms of the stage that they were sending for their children and what it is that they were seeking to establish amongst their family and their family imperative you know things like that but they had people in their circle there very children they had actors who were who were on stage who were seeking to sabotage the production you see so the value of your circle can can either bring you great success in the sense that it can it can allow you to resolutely fight with dedication towards what it is that you're seeking to achieve in life even beyond what you may imagine because when you have different people who were on your team and your production and everyone's thinking with the same enthusiasm about achieving same a similar goal then people start to bring in their own creative energy and and enhancing embellish you know like we say you know ad-lib you know and film but Ad-lib upon what is being given you know but they're able to anticipate paid what needs to happen is but when you don't have that then you have a situation that you know really undermines which doing an end you know everyone around you susceptible to that again. If you you WANNA use the example of you know what Germany had created in what he called the People's Army people from sixteen sixty that was the age range drafted into the army <music> so imagine that you know sometimes if you look at grandma GRANDPA like they're harmless but <hes> they can serve a great <hes> impacting you know presence they can have a great impacting presence on what it is that we WANNA do or they can turn into would be saboteurs and quickly undermined what it is that we're trying to advance in our world and in our life I am take a break. We'll quick you know spring. Do some housekeeping Avid Pasco podcast then I'll come back on this subject alright for reading's GonNa let you guys know ask Oh Cyrus Dot COM WANNA spiritual reading Aso's K. O S I R I s that goes for readings and spiritual work of course people are gonNA still try they've been doing going into my inbox and social media running their problem down to me insane. What should I do and you noticing? You're not getting replies as I warned recently am not replying to those anymore. I was nice before but it's not nice to try to to do that so housekeeping lasko Cyrus Dot com that begins everything you want initiations readings whatever you have to get a consultation I I'm not going to consult with you over instagram. We're not doing that. I'm not one of those all right. I N for the monthly coaching ongoing coaching Cyrus Life Dot Com to go to get my books. The best thing to do is you can go to Amazon go to Amazon and putting my name and you'll see a list of books that will come up people have been asking me. How can I get books the same way you get everybody on the planet Amazon they've taken over? It's over now folks. They've taken over. Amazon is the plug all right so if you want any books you gotta go to Amazon. <hes> people have been asking about how classes how can I start your class Saddulah House Dot Com as a D. U. L. U. H.. O. U. S. E. DOT COM all right red rapids still on the works and thank you off who've been sending in donations. We have urban counting. All of them have been helping US immensely so please definitely keep sending them in. You know <hes> we put up some low video clips and stuff you know so make sure you're following also read rap on Social Media Augean particular but we also have red rat facebook account but definitely make sure you're following them because that's where we put up the videos and interviews we've been doing information about him and any changes and stuff like that so please follow that movement through social media and you know we got some newsletters coming out as well. What's an information in them? You know <hes> but definitely please. We still need people. You know. It's an ongoing thing so people want to contribute their time continued contribute monetarily. You know contribute products. Which is the best you know and I know some people don't feel so great about going and buying? I know some of the men so if you want to contribute monetarily that's fine too but definitely go to a new life global dot org forward slash red rap for you. Women who want to be a part of the ministry make sure you go to on new life global dot org forward slash eight and you w Embi we are collating and going through all of the applications now some have put an advocate okay now with next. The slow up slow up kate being reviewed. Okay <hes> have patients. Okay have some patients. You'RE GONNA get a lot more that way. Just understanding understand that it's a process. It's not that you just click yeah. I'm in and you're rain so we're going through now because we're making sure that the women's ministry is a very beautiful peaceful experience for everyone involved. You know going forward. We're definitely doing some serious. Reengineering in in the in the women's ministry another piece <hes> we're looking at putting together <hes> some art projects as well man so I notice a lot of people who are heavy into music and who are involved in. I knew all of you singers especially we sing is you musicians. You rappers producers. You know especially singers and producers <hes> you know if you would like to contribute to the work that we're doing and you want more information on that. Please reach out at organizer at Anew Life Global Dot O._R._G.. Organizer at a new life global dot org and they'll they'll forward you know to the to the right place. We need to go. Also there is a <hes> weapons firearm class that <hes> you know Oh sister knows doing down in Atlanta but it's called guided hand while she she destination for organization but it's GonNa trigger happy firearm and it's a firearm instructional course and just basically me handguns basic handguns one one and it's going to be on the thirteenth of October Saturday between two and four thirty PM and it's at a one Oh nine north eighty five parkway. Excuse me Fayetteville Georgia and it's <hes> second location ringed range. You know where it's at the gun safe location all right the entrance fee on fee for the class is eighty dollars all right and that includes range time to ammo you target <music> gear you protective gear and firearm rental all right so <hes> if you're interested in that you can check out <hes> Aisha Basu you know on our instagram. I'll put a post up of it on my storyline so you can check it out but she's the one she also has an organization by the name of Art Pyramid builders but Aisha's the one who's putting is her and another sister who actually doing the class Marchelle which is if you look at the flyers. She's the she's the one actually on the Flyer but again Basu Shera you know that's that's all right okay so we've been talking about stages and and what we stage for ourselves and and in you know most importantly who it is that we you know the people sometimes that we surround ourselves with you know. Sometimes you know just in funding in resell some just cool with person of always been cool with this person that person and sometimes we don't realize you know that we're playing out part playing a role in and <hes> often that the individuals that we put ourselves around may have been corrupted if they may have lost their sense of uprightness so this sense of steadfastness from the very beginning or sometimes you our sold out for some trinkets and don't even notice people who are involved in your production. They've actually really been sent there to say you are very similar to <hes> the one to thirty six you know when you deal with with your lessons you Oh yeah the C one hundred thirty six in the nation and <hes> you know we're we're told that <hes> there's over a little bit over seventeen million you know <hes> Muslims in woodenness of North America and and <hes> you know the question goes off. You mean to tell me that some of the seventeen million don't know that they're Muslims and the answer is yes. Sir and you know responses I can't I can hardly believe that unless they are deaf dumb and blind and the answers they were made deaf dumb and blind when they were babies and can a devil fool Muslim no not nowadays so. Do you mean to tell me that the devil fool them three hundred seventy nine years ago yes traded maiden entered orientation saying that they receive more goal for the Labor Labor Labor more than they receive it in their own country right so you're familiar with the one to thirty six of course you. Can you know what I'm talking about but the idea they're against that sometimes people are something righteous and don't even know it because they've been made into. There's something very different from since they were babies you see so the word the Muslim just means one who follows the will of Allah you know so one who follows the divine path the path of peace in the path of righteousness naturally but they can be made at person could be made deaf dumb and blind from when they're babies you know because again they're brought into a certain stage and their character can be distorted he'd be covered up because sometimes they may sell themselves out for luxury for comfort or someone might sell them out for more goal. Which of course is never ever delivered all right so that's been our segment? Thank you for following long and willfully got something that you can do something with all right. This is chief you you can always follow Alami in social media at teeth. You're all whores go to heaven as documentary. That's coming forth soon. If you're in a life known anyone who's in the life who wants to be featured definitely reach out to us on a I G. I black eye films.

Adolf Hitler Amazon producer Aisha Basu North America New York People's Army Germany Gustav Basu Shera Labor Labor Labor US hockey Claes George Pinson Shakespeare Central Park Art Pyramid
Jose Antonio Vargas: Coming Out As Undocumented

LGBTQ&A

26:49 min | 7 months ago

Jose Antonio Vargas: Coming Out As Undocumented

"One of my issues with queer media is that we have a tendency to celebrate and up lift all of the same people. Pride month comes around and every magazine. Every website writes about more or less the same by people. And i totally guilty of this too. I try not to be but it still happens. This is a problem because we leave out people from the conversation or making a real difference in the community in world. Jose antonio vargas is one of those people. He is a kilter prize winner. One of the leading voices for undocumented people in the author of the bestselling book dear notes of an undocumented citizen. Also he's gay. I have been following his work and didn't even realize that until i read his book talking to him. That kinda makes sense as you here today. Not as part of his life but he's still very much figuring out now. I wanted to bring you the specific interview today for two big reasons. One it originally aired last year on the luminary app so you not yet heard it and to. We're taking a short winter. Break offer a couple of weeks just a heads up there and i wanted to leave you with an interview. That is one of my favorites. Jose story shows how deeply deeply complicated. Everything concerning immigration system is from the system itself to how we talk about it and covered in the news while the trump administration has exasperated. Many of these issues. These are things that existed before he took office and we'll continue after they are not going to be magically solve the new administration and i think that jose's insights experience are particularly valuable to here. Let's do it from the advocate magazine in partnership with glad. I'm jeffrey masters and this is lgbtq. And so you grew up in america and didn't know you're undocumented until you went to get your license sixteen yes so four years. After arriving here i went to the mvp. Because i think my friends for an arvin was getting tired of dragging me around driving miss daisy. And so he was. Lake may be time to go to the and i lived at the library. I mean that's where. I spent a lot of my the amount of the public library and i saw the library to get a driver's license. You need to do these things like bring a student. Id evan bring proof of identification. Which was the green card or a passport so yeah. I biked from my house to the dmv. I get called to the booth after waiting in line. And then that's when the woman said to me that the green card that i brought was fake and my first instinct. When she told me that was to think. I am not mexican because even back then. This was ninety seven whenever anybody said anything about fake papers anything about documentation. The radio the television shows the newspaper said he was all about mexican people. So that was my first instinct was to think i'm not mexican. Which is a horrible thing but again. That's where the power of media is so is so important right back then again. This is ninety seven back then. That was already part of the psyche. That whenever you thought about fake papers or quote unquote legal people lose by mexican people and also. You're a sixteen. I was sixteen. That's kind of started this whole thing and for my grandfather. I confronted him afterwards. Of course and my grandfather said yeah. It's fake you're not supposed to show that to people. And that's when basically the plan that he and my mother and my grandmother had concocted kind of expose itself to me. That's when i found out what their plan was. And so that was over twenty years ago long time ago and i bring that up because yes then there's been no change or resolution in your immigration status. That is such a long period of time to live with that stress and ambiguity. And that's what. I was getting out into the book when i was really interested in the main question i had was. Why might this messed up. Why do i have a hard time having relationships with people why why is it that it seems as if i have created borders walls lake with the way i treat my own friends like i've on thirty eight years old and never had a boyfriend like what is that about. I've never been in a committed relationship with anybody because what was the point. I was going to get deported. I was gonna leave i. I always had this feeling that everything was temporary. Nothing was permanent and so even that that was the way even had sex with people. you know. it's like okay we're done. I'll see you later. What are you still doing here. What am i still doing like get out. It's so interesting hearing you say all this because you also say that coming out as undocumented with such a bigger deal than coming out as gay. Because i think i had the privilege of living where i live you know like i was in mountain view which is what an hour south of san francisco in incredibly accepting family that but then i had a very accepting school. They kind of balance each other out so my catholic filipino families. Like what is this gay thing you're supposed to get married to a woman in. Bu citizen out to the argue that now that have come out the documented thing. I'm trying to understand the gay thing. Because i never really. I'm the hundred percent. I think i went to a gay pride parade. Maybe once in my life not twice. I went to the one in new york too. But i didn't wanna be there like i don't know what gay practice like. I'm still kind of confused by gay pride. Because maybe because i haven't dealt with my in many ways i came out but i came out in two thousand nine hundred ninety nine. It was a few months after the matthew. Shepard killing tragedy. I came out of necessity because if i had not come out as gay then. My grandfather's plan was for me to marry a woman who's a us citizen and try to get my papers that way so coming out that first time was like a way of saying. No one lie was enough. I'm not gonna lie about this. But because i've been in the closet about the undocumented thing i would argue that i'm probably still in the closet about the gaping because i'm still dealing with that like i don't know what that really is for me. There's nothing sense it does. Is that the reason. Why your website and your book doesn't mention being gay on the back cover or the inside flap or even realize do i not mention it. Not once on the amazon page on your amazon patriot book. There's not gay. Lgbtq queer nothing is mentioned once. Not joking no jeff. I did not know this. I thought that was a choice. Made by your like pr mark. Oh god no no no. No no i mean i'm wow okay. Well let's this is probably why i can't get into a relationship because i can't i just like totally opened up this whole i don't do i don't i i I been accused. I remember when i first started doing this eight years ago. I did rachel. Rachel maddow show pretty early on as she. She's incredible of course. And i remembered getting an email from mike analogy leader. Who a no. Because when i was at the washington post i was actually a reporter. Who wrote a a lot about lgbtq issues right. i was one to. I think there was like three of us at the washington at the time. Who is openly gay. You reported on the epidemic reported a lot on these things. So i was really open about that but this this guy that i knew sent me a note after the regional matter interview saying you're not advocating for gay people like you. Don't you time being gay enough. And i was like. I'm pretty gay to me. So like i don't know what that means I don't think. I responded because they know what to say. But now that you're mentioning that in being undocumented being this quote unquote illegal person has visited defining question in my life that i think everything else. I can't see being gay without seeing being undocumented workers and mind you this is the undocumented youth movement has been led by so many. Lgbtq people know. there's been so many trans women right. Jenny set for example famously. I mean i remember seeing that video of said you know us. Yeah jinnah said at the white house with president. Obama being surrounded by mostly white. Lgbtq people and she genocide was holding president obama accountable for his deputation detention and detention policies. And everybody was like not the right time not the right place. You know that was interesting for me getting to know the movement but it's interesting. I think i'm still. Maybe that's what the forties are going to be about. I'm thirty eight two more years. I was excited to talk to you. Because one i think that our immigration system is so fucked up but i bought your book because i wanted to hear about an undocumented experience from someone undocumented and then i it was a delight to see that you were also gay because you know about it extensively in the book. It's not hidden by any means. No you now. I think about it. I think about it from a global perspective. The fact that so many. Lgbtq people have escape where they're at because where they're at is not welcoming criminalizes their sexuality and again you know. I haven't seen the world right only america so i'm trying to do projects and do things that allow me to. At least be creatively free. And the way. I think of the world like i may not be able to go to the uk. But i want to understand. How does the uk treat immigrants in algebra people. I'm surprised that you don't have that many gay friends you said just because i think we would understand experience of not feeling at home not feeling safe not knowing what our future will hold. I mean maybe that's the deeper. It almost feels as if i'm still in this process of really getting to know myself in the context of what this is. There's a line in that book. That when i wrote it out so scared after writing at that actually. I think i left the computer screen. A long ashok remember the line. Yeah home is not something. I should have to earn after i wrote that line. I'm reliving into computer. Go like you know what the top i had. I had this quote from tony. Morrison was like one of my oracle's and i keep i have to. I have put at the very top of the computer. So that whenever. I feel like i'm going to my reporter mode where i'm better talking about other people that are myself. I have to remind myself that. Oh this is actually my book. So i mean my do not be scared of i mean i feel i think so. The quote is i stood at the border stood at the edge and claimed it a central and forced the world to move tour. I was so this idea of not writing about myself to appease people or to convince people or to justify my humanity or to prove that i'm worthy or to you know any any sort of legislation about undocumented. People probably get the democrats are going to say. Oh yeah earned citizenship. What have fucking earned. What have you aren't right. Reminding myself that. I actually have a right to exist because my physical bodies here. I take up space. That is actually an inherent human rights that no government can really dictate that line of home. Something i should have to earn was cathartic for me. It was it was catharsis that really from. He was life changing. I have made now different choices about my life because you know. I don't know if you could tell this. Jeff when you're reading the book i wrote the book i was gonna leave. That's why it ends it ends. I wrote it thinking. I'm gonna write this book. I haven't advanced abs. You know some money. i'll see you later. Let me go see mexico. 'cause you know everything's on mexican so let me at least mexico. The book ends fairly unambiguously. I wanted that i wanted to sense of. I think i'm going to go. And then i finished the book and then i'm realizing that i'm not only. Am i not done but home is already here. And it's not a physical space. I thought that. I thought it's a physical space. You rent a house. You buy furniture. Home is actually all of these people in my life. That have made me feel at home. And i made an effort in the book to really name them. And you know what. I recurring theme in your book. Is the the kindness of strangers people. You have some amazing listen. Chapter called strangers rate. That's about that and that started with the woman the dmv. Yeah i didn't even know her name. Curly hair glasses. white woman. I i have no idea what her name. That story a very differently. She could have reported me and it could have been arrested right then and there and i bring that up because when you say this is a book about an undocumented person. I don't think the first thing you would think of is like. Oh i bet people are so kind to him. I've he's been helped along the way so that was really important to me just because i think that is the context that were missing. And that's why to me. This has to be a question of community right. Like what is the community that you built for yourself. Who are the people who have welcomed you. Why why do they think you belong. I think i'm so used to cutting my identities into pieces. Because that's what i've had to do to survive. That's what had to try to pass that. Now i'm just grappling with looking at myself holistically and saying that i'm undocumented. I'm gay and filipino. Like all of that is part of. Ym it's not everything that i am but all of that. Make up my dna right. And i think that's something that all of us that the lifelong process you know but at least to look at yourself and say what am i not asking myself. What am i afraid of. Why why why am i doing what i'm doing. And that's why with all of the the rhetoric and the hateful language around immigration today. Something i can't figure out is that all that is in direct contrast to what we know in our personal lives since all of us immigrants right everyone has experienced imigrants and we are not able to like say that these things don't add up when these negative things in the news but this is why define american divine american let me just say. It was completely inspired by the lgbtq movement meaning belgium btcu movement. That was about changing hearts and minds the movement that was about. How do we change the culture in which people talk about an issue and make it about people so a lot of what we do is consult on television shows and movies into how much into how they portray accurately humanely immigrants including undocumented. People so when you see an undocumented character on tv. it's mostly because divine american. Talk to the show. So when we see nico santos absolutely actually what gay filipino. What happened with that was we found out that there was a character an undocumented gay filipino. And we're like. Oh that sounds interesting. So we contacted them superstar at nbc and then we went to the writer's room because originally that character they were trying to figure out how to make that character legal. And we're like you can't make legal when when you can you tell us because skill and so that's how that's how that character i loved it. That character has been allowed to show the complexity of this identity when the writers were saying. We want to make him legal. Can you explain. Just that's not as easy as thing is people th- actually that is probably as i get asked two questions lot why one. Why haven't they deported you. I have no idea right as you know in the ball. I actually talked about when. I called ice myself and saying i haven't heard from you. I'm here what's up. I mean could it. Just be your famous protecting you. I mean my fame. Whatever it is is not enough to you know. Keep me from getting detained in texas for years ago when obama was president. Away that i deal with this of of my privilege is making sure that i'm consistent and disciplined in saying that. I'm not here to be an exception but is not my job like i don't know why. Why is it that you know in his anti-immigrant era. Why am i still here. I have noted the other question that for me is probably more important is. Why can't these eleven million people can get legal. You know we get questions. From journalists surf. Journalists themselves know how undocumented people that there's no process for undocumented people to legalize their status. There's no easy process then. We're really in trouble because you would need to go back to the philippines for at least two years ten years. Excuse me you baseball tenure bar. Thanks to what. Bill clinton signed into law in the mid one thousand nine hundred s right like if i were mexican and if i had crossed the border more than twice. I'm ben for life we meet so many undocumented mexicans who are married to you a citizen women and even though they're married woman even though they have a us citizen kids. They can't adjust your status because they've crossed the border more than twice. We made immigration system so complicated on purpose causing a phobia. That and i think it's it's a lot of course also economic policies right if you look at it from a political perspective and look i was. I was a political reporter. I know how this works. In many ways. It serves the republican and democrats purpose to keep this initiative and not to solve it. Just keep saying vote for us. We're going to protect immigrants. That's way for me using the lgbtq model as a as a framework right you cannot change the politics of an issue unless you change the culture in which people talk and discuss in view what the issue is if you were to look at a actually surveys and opinion polls that have been done for so many. Progressives immigration is not even in the top five of their priorities right. The vitamins always up there. Legalizing marijuana is their immigration. I think we're like six or seven on the list now. My new country i. I'm a journalist numbers in the next fifty years. According to the pew research center there are forty five million immigrants in america today. Forty five million eleven million undocumented together there was forty five million people. According to the pew research center will constitute eight percent of the total us population growth in the next fifty years that a massive number meaning immigration reform is way above way beyond policies and politics. It's about what does your classroom look like. Who's buying groceries. Who's starting businesses. How potato and television in movies so this is really about defining american right. That's why we didn't call organization defined immigrant and there are so many words for immigrants like an undocumented illegal alien refugees and migrants. What is your preferred term for your experience. So i look Anything doesn't say legal. Because people can't be legal. I mean just from just from a purely grammatical and moralistic sense. Like people cannot be illegal. Don't we know history enough to know that when we do that like that's how actually the holocaust get the happen when we think a group of people right are quote unquote illegal so that but for me. Undocumented is interesting because it it exposes his idea that people's lives are limited and defined by papers housed north carolina and the elderly. Black women grabbed me and says mr vargas. I gotta go talk to you okay. She opened up this crumpled piece of paper from her purse and she said this is a bill of sale. I'd never seen one before the bill. Zales she gives my great. Great grandmother landed in charleston and was given this bill of sale saying that she slave. So can you connect the pieces of paper that she got. This crumbled oldies paper to the pieces of papers. That you and your people can't seem to get then she goes. This is bigger than papers. Mr vargas think bigger. She walked away. And i was like i was literally gobsmack but is i felt like some some bomb just exploded in my head so that was really important for me. It really made me realize that. The construction of papers the construction of laws. This has always been about who has power to do it gave. You will know all about this people's power to say. Oh i'm sorry. Sodomy is against the law the power to say. Oh you can't do that right and so we'll get to define that. What she said was earth shattering for me because it made me realize that i really needed to connect dots you know. I was thinking about why. I was thinking why did not know that immigration system was so complicated and lex and i realized that part of our national history. This national story tell is about ellis island. That's where my great grandmother came to this country and she gotha bone and she signed her name and she was welcomed in. That process is so easy. And that's the process that is often taught in history classes. You know unless you're native american unless you're an enslaved african who was held captive and forced to come to build this country. You're an immigrant. Came from somewhere. And i think that has to be part of the conversation you know and i would argue. What what you're saying what we are living through. What we're facing is the fact that we have never faced the full force of our history americans are you know what would james baldwin say you know. White people are trapped in history that they do not understand. And i think i hope i hate that free silver lining but i just hope one of the reaction of what's happening is that all of us would wanna understand our history much fuller. That's why in the book. Sure you notice that the word on the cover is underlying citizen. I did not call myself. Undocumented american not call myself undocumented immigrant. i wanted to give myself permission to know that. I'm a part of a global movement of people of which there are two hundred and fifty six million migrants. I wonder how many of those by the way or lgbtq trying to escape where they come from because they come from doesn't accept them so now what the citizen mean. What does it mean to be a citizen. How do we. How do the people fighting for the black lives matter movement. Lgbtq movement the metoo movement the income inequality movement the immigrant freedom movement. What do we all have in common. How do i sit here in front of you claim myself. Stand up straight. Sit up straight all the while knowing that. I'm never the only person in the room. We all share a space. Whether or not we like it. So you've said that defining home is going to be the work of your lifetime. How aware do you currently define it. Well home is. How do i honor all these people that have made me feel home. Probably the most rewarding happen so far is the school district attended as a kid ended up naming this element school after me. Which is like bananas. And i was sure that it was not going to happen. They're not going to name a school an elementary school. But then to my surprise it happened and to my surprise i was assuming that there will be people from my community who would say no for various reasons because there's started thinking because they may be against whatever but what they cannot do is they can't deny them from there. That's where i'm from. I learn how to write because of the mountain view public library. I am an educated because of crittenden middle school amount of you high school all of the people who have been my mentors and who who. I've been part of a conspiracy of kindness and generosity. Are everybody from mountain view. So that's where i'm from. That's home and so now and thank you for saying that the work of my life is trying to really interrogate what that means for other people. How do we how do we create policies. How do we have conversations that lead to people feeling like they have a home. A friend reminded me what a blessing it is to know what my purposes right he was saying purpose equals power right. I'm very fortunate to have realized. And to have the skills to do what i need to do but to do it in my way of amazing last question as a two parter. Okay in terms of your future. Oh and like immigration et cetera. What is the best case scenario. And what is the most likely scenario The most likely scenario was. Nothing's going to happen and you'll live like this forever. You know forever since forever. Salako i try to make it up one day and say okay. I'm done. I really wanna go see the world and i'll see you later. I'm and you know. I wanna give myself permission to do that right. Like i don't need to make like i have to actually realize what is best for myself. The greatest one of the greatest difficulties life. James baldwin says is to say yes to yourself. So i'm giving myself permission to always say yes to myself. And then what is the best case. Scenario basket scenario is our government will figure out a way to legalize and stabilizes that as of eleven million undocumented people. I will have the papers right to go. See my mom in the philippines and my sister and brother never met. He's twenty and then to see the world. I can't wait to do that. Like i can't wait to lake. I cannot wait to see the world and air and breathed a different kind of air. Like i can't wait to lake experienced something beyond what we know thankfully after the book. I'm realizing that. There's time like i don't need to be in a rush all the time. I mean giving myself time that it's okay you know. I'm only thirty eight. Which i know for some gay people was like hell old but for me thankfully we're asia asian so we h well so thankfully you know i'm not old to myself and they're still a lot of time and that is jose antonio vargas once again. His book is called dear america notes of an undocumented citizens now as a reminder. We're taking a winter break. We will be back in a few short weeks and until then confined me. Connect on social media. I'm on twitter and instagram. At jeff masters. One the podcast is on there at lgbtq pod. We love hearing from you in senior suggestions for guests every week. So thank you so much for that and give him come in or brought to you by the advocate magazine in partnership with glad. Come check out. All of our work at advocate dot com glad dot org and lgbtq podcast dot com. All right. we'll see in the new year. I can't wait.

jose antonio vargas jeffrey masters mike analogy us arvin Obama amazon nico santos Rachel maddow jinnah evan Shepard mexico Jose jose pew research center uk washington post
Pride & Protest

HISTORY This Week

25:33 min | 1 year ago

Pride & Protest

"The History this week. June, twenty, eighth, Nineteen, seventy. I'm Sally Helm People have begun to gather in lower. Manhattan Sheridan Square. They're carrying signs under their arms unfurling banners. Setting the stage for a celebration. The Christopher Street Liberation Day parade. What would become simply pride? This crowd is just about a block away from the stonewall in. They're almost exactly one year earlier. A very different scene played out. New York City police officers raided the stonewall in the middle of the night. And a crowd of where people are thought that. So called stonewall riots sparked a year of intense organizing. And now. About a thousand people have gathered in the same spot. And they begin to March. Chanting, say it loud game is proud. Estimates vary, but by the time the parade reaches central. Front there are as many as ten to twenty thousand people there. A lot has changed in a year. Today. stonewalled, deprive. How did a night of rebellion outside a bar become two nights than three, then a year of protests and organizing, and then a massive movement, a movement that has changed what it means to be. We're in this country. Hey history fans keep up with all the great shows and documentaries history by signing up for e mail updates. Head to history dot com slash email to get updates right to your inbox. Be the first to know about premieres sweepstakes, free bendable shows, and so much more keep up with the curse of Oak Island Pawn Stars, American pickers, groundbreaking documentaries and more sign up today at history dot com slash email. For, this episode, we talked to two people One is Jason. Baumann who works with lgbtq plus history collections at the New York Public Library. He's also edited a book about Stonewall. That includes a lot of personal narratives asking the question. How did it feel you know? What did it mean to people to be there? And why does everybody want to say they were there you know. Everybody wants to say they were at stonewall. We also talked to someone who was indeed at stonewall and has dedicated his life to lgbtq activism Mark Siegel I seem to have somehow been lucky enough to be at the pivotal part of almost everything that's ever happened in the struggle. LGBT McKee rights. When he was a kid growing up in the nineteen fifties and sixties, sequel couldn't have predicted where his life would take him. If you were growing up my time. You didn't let anyone know the your guy. When I was growing from Philadelphia, I thought I was the only gay person. Philadelphia tell us a bit about what those years were like. When you knew that you weren't telling people, you felt you had to hide it. The word that came up in my mind was anguish I knew I was supposed to be all those bad things they talked about. But I wasn't. It didn't make any sense to me. So that created his anguish inside of me and I think most gay people have that. Yet no totally I'm by, and I came out and I was eighteen, and it's really similar to what you're describing. I feel that you know even obviously in those decades it's changed a lot but I'm still I'm so jealous of the Japanese. It's changed even more since. I'm not. Jealous of them. Celebrating them. Yeah, totally, that's a healthier read. Think about it. I'll get there. Of course there are still many queer people today who feel voting wish or who feel that they can't safely be who they are, and that comes from a long history of oppression. Jason Baumann reminded us in the fifties and sixties. Being Queer was actually illegal. The thing that I'm always trying to get people to understand you could serve life in prison for homosexuality. In addition it was classified as a mental illness, so you were facing both incarceration or in facing institutionalization. Therapy. It was very terrifying but even in those years you can see the seeds of stonewall if you look close. In nineteen, fifty nine out of popular clear hang out spot in Los Angeles called Cooper doughnuts, cops arrest three queer people just for being they are. That causes an anti police riot ten years before stonewall. Something similar happens at Philadelphia's comptons cafe in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six, and in nineteen, sixty, seven at the black cat in La. That time, queer patrons are arrested on new, Year's Eve and demonstrators returned to the black cat six weeks later for more organized protests with about five hundred people word traveled slower than than it does now, but what cat or in Cooper donut? Those things were reported on in this growing LGBT Pratt. They produce a magazine past all around the country. There were activists groups organizing calling for change. The most famous where the mattachine society and the daughters billets they called for things like the rate to employment there were some demonstrations including in Mark Segel's backyard in Philadelphia demonstrations for gay rights took place once a year every July fourth from nineteen, sixty five through nineteen sixty. I grew up in Philadelphia. I was a game in I didn't know they were happening. That's how invisible we were a people. The tactics at these demonstrations were relatively conservative. There was even dress code, suit and tie. They wanted to fit into the one thousand nine hundred fifty society. The way people, my generation look it, but she didn't even really know that he was a part of this generation until he left Philadelphia that happened when he was eighteen during his senior year of high school in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, i. don't even my graduation I got out for maintenance before month before graduation and just laughed. I could not wait. He got on the train to New York City told my. My parents don't school there, which is not true. He would excited to venture out on his own, but also scared. What are you doing? Where are you going? You're going into the void. There's nothing there you have nothing wings. We don't know anybody. You don't have any money coming in you. No place to live I guess I believed I believe that there was a better life and it was whip people like myself. Would find them in New York. Sequel ended up finding a room at the YMCA. His first week in New, York. He sought out the mattachine society. Knew about them from a TV interview. He'd seen with one of their members. So he went to their office, I was eighteen at the time and I was kindly asked leave because they were afraid. Thing would be rated for roughing the morals of a minor. But at that visit he met a young man named Marty. Robinson who was frustrated. MATTACHINE member. Mardi made the point clear that day. These are ridiculous rules heaped out that our community needed a radical shift. Robinson and sequel became friends. But it was hard at first for sequel to find that big community he was looking for. Of course. There's no neon sign. pointy this way to the gay people. Then clampdown Christopher Street. And got on Christopher Street. It was like Nevada. People people like me. People that I can talk to. Looking back now is sort of like guess. Magic over the sense that I immediately. I don't think I've ever immediately anywhere else before that. Early on sequel discovered a prominent queer hangout. Spot Christopher, street the stonewall and. Doorman, they would let in charge. You usually get in. If you were a regular like I was unique can get charged or. which at one point I would? Leave it. It's amazing out. My image of it differs with people who brew up in New York to live there for a long while their image of it was it was in. Or water down drinks blah, Blah Blah. was there a mob connection at Stone Ovalles, God? Would you emerson yes such? As, we've learned. The mob owned it. Jason, Baumann said it kind of made sense that there was a connection between the stonewall and organized crime. Could be homosexual at that time was to be a criminal, and so of course bars catered to criminals would be owned by the Mafia. At the stonewall and other bars like it, there was a constant threat of police raids. Seagal, says you were used to getting rated, and it usually was very simple. They will come in. They would take the be my part of people and leaves. It was illegal to dance with someone of the same sex. It was illegal to wear clothing that didn't match your assigned gender, and it was illegal to serve drinks to queer. People. But I feel this din really put a damper on things. He loved the stonewall. Me It was fabulous because I could go in. There is the only place where I could go and be myself at the stonewall people of all races and ages and gender identities came together to have a good time I could talk with my friends. I could scream I could shell more important than most important thing I. could do is eighteen years old dance. I. Started going to the stonewall every night. and. He was there on the night of June. Twenty, eighth, nineteen, sixty nine just six weeks after he arrived in New York. I was in the back of the bar. Talking to friends head. The lights flickered on and all. I asked about what's going on. And they said very nonchalant were being rated. Within hours the course of mark sequels life. And of the movement. Would Change, forever. If you are enjoying history this week, you should check out flashback a new podcast from the iheartradio podcast network, and Ozzy. The creators of the Chart Topping Webby nominated podcast the thread, the law of unintended consequences is a simple, but often misunderstood her rule of the universe. Flashback explores the reasons. Some of our best laid plans have gone awry from policy making too personal lives from the courtroom to the environment, and it reveals those surprising stories that the history books never told you about Ozzy's. Sean Roswell takes on a journey through history that will change how you look at the world today. Listen to flashback on the. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. I WANNA! Tell you about another podcast I think you'll like. It's the last archive from Harvard. Historian a New Yorker Writer. Jill Lepore. Lepore asks the question. Killed troops. She looks for clues in events across the twentieth century from a brutal death in Vermont to the invention of the lie detector to the release of the polio vaccine. This show is unlike anything you've heard before its history animated by archival tapes and documents, intrepid field, reporting and old timey radio, drama reenactments. The last archive unfurled like classic. Nineteen Thirties gumshoe mystery, but it takes on the big issues of today. Wouldn't you like to know who killed truth? Subscribe, in Apple, podcasts or wherever you listen brought to you by Pushkin Industries. When police raided bars like the stonewall, they usually gave the owners a heads up, but not that night in June. What made this light differ was the bar wasn't made aware those going to be arraigned. They came in. They push people around. They started harassing people. They took money from people. It was by one. People have described the cops smashing the jukebox beating people up on the dance floor. They check Segel's ID see that he's eighteen. Which is the legal drinking age at the time? And they let him go. So I walked across the street and I was just perplexed. What what the hell was that I had never seen anything like that in my life before and run by one is people came out? We began to talk about what happens. I began to stand of Cops curfew-like Baker literal. beat us. Take our money. Do Anything they wish and I guess me that began a boiling point which lasted all that night realizing that everything I thought for the last eighteen years of my life was being brought to the attention of my my eyes by those tweets, they were representing every single piece of oppression. I'd ever gone through. Sequel is one of the first on the streets, but more and more people are pouring out at the stonewall. And people already on the street. Join the crowd, too. They're all getting restless frustrated. Angry. The police are dragging people to vans, beating them with batons, especially targeting anyone wearing clothes that the cops don't think are gender conforming. But. Point the people outside realize that. The cops are pinned inside the stone. We realized that we had them entrap the bar. We were incarcerating them. It became very clear was that we were in control, which were control of our street, meeting our neighbors Christie's streaming for the very first time. Seagal said. It's hard to tell the next part of the story in clear chronological order, it's arrive. We're all doing different things at different times, and it went on. It seems in my mind forever all dice. I remember seeing across the street watching things being thrown I? throwing. Remember. I remember things being thrown. CAN BOTTLES COINS? There's brick. There was no brick road because there's no area Jason Baumann has read many many accounts of Stonewall, and he says this problem of memory is very common. For example to Trans Women of Color, Sylvia Rivera and Marsha p Johnson are often credited with starting things beginning to push back against the police, and it's true that they were hugely important that night, and were hugely important activists in the years that followed, but in an interview Johnson. Herself said that she didn't get to the stonewall until later that night. Bouwman says this kind of thing comes up in many accounts. I think. It's very hard to do that. Kind of blow by blow. It's it's funny for me. Having been in like having been part of major demonstrations I, don't remember every single thing that happened the stories of Stonewall as varied and chaotic as the night itself. It's just the nature of memory, but many things are clear. The cops barricaded themselves in the bar, waiting out the angry crowd. Someone set the front of the bar on fire. Reinforcements arrived the NYPD's riot control. And after a few hours, the crowd began to break up and then at some point during all of this Marty Robinson shows up. Sequel remembers seeing Robinson. The Guy He'd met the mattachine office his first week. New York. Not The show up! He shows up with a piece of chalk and he says go up and down. Christopher Street and right tomorrow night the wall. So I, did that I wrote on the street, and I stood up wall all the way from seventh avenue down to the river. And the next night. People do show up at stonewall. And the night after that when people would say, well I was at go. More involvement still might actually is. What did you do the following night or did you do the following week? What is due next month? Would you do next year to me? The people who followed through on that are what created the movement. We have today. A protest movement against police violence that becomes a movement against broader forces of oppression, not unlike what we're seeing today in the wake of the killing of George Floyd Russ. We realized that oppressed people are human. This will happened older, an older and older and older again. In nineteen, sixty nine organizers began to take action. especially younger people, Siegel said, some of the older organizers were actually. By violence. If you look at the pictures after the ride pictures Obsta Stonewall, there's a door, and then there's two black walls all on one side of the Black Wall you see people saying Oh. cleese being respectful to our neighborhood that was written by Mattachine. On the other side you saw people writing. We're going to organize and fight back. That was gay liberation from. that. Show you specifically the split in the Community A. Quick note here there are splits like this that persist to this day including over the question of naming. Should this be called a riot? Men and Siegel both used that word, but other people call it an uprising, a rebellion a revolution. Whatever you call it. This event fit in many ways with the mood of the Times. This was the nineteen sixties protest movements were rippling through the country. Civil rights black power feminism antiwar. Authorities being questioned all levels of society during time period, those people on the streets in front on Stonewall were able to be inspired to fight back themselves. It's part of this growing civil unrest of this growing youth movement and this growing resistance to authority Mark Siegel. Felt that connection immediately. To Civil Rights Marches Kid with his grandmother, and after Stonewall, I said to myself. This is what I'm GonNa do with the rest of my life. I don't know hand GonNa do it. Thing as being an act. But that's what I wanted to do. That was going to be my causes life. Other people felt it to all of us were galvanized the first time gathering get together as a community and that get together became. A group called gay. Liberation Front. Gay Liberation. Even. The name was revolutionary. Other activist groups had avoided the word gay, but these young people embraced it, and they started taking action in all kinds of ways. We're every single night on Christie Street and handed out leaflets, talking about gay, liberation, front or the event. We're going to have with the panels on the dance. We created the First Trans Organization. We created the first community center that ever existed. We created legal organizations medical organization. We created the First Gay Youth Organization Gay Youth of New York. The energy of that night at stonewall turned into a solid year of organizing conversation and community building. And the following June, there was a very public anniversary celebration of Stonewall the very first pride parade. But it wasn't called the pride parade yet. It was named for what had happened the year before on Christopher Street Christie. Street Liberation A. March Committee was exactly what we were going to have. A marked from the anniversary of Christopher Street out of Christopher Street all the way to Central Park. We're celebrating what we create in that whole first year, which was we had created, and now Jimmy community where none had. Before. And number two. We want people to take pride in themselves, and what we created map first year, and to show the world that we pride ourselves and the way we can do that with by being visible. Queer people had never done something quite like this before, not on this scale and the march could be dangerous. I up to be a Marshall, and we did was take civil disobedience classes and learnt how to protect the marchers. If we were talked because we were sure we, we were going to be attacked on June twenty eighth nineteen, seventy one year to the day after stonewall began, marchers started to gather right near the stonewall. Visa mostly independent organizations all across the country. There's there's somewhere between sixty and seventy five independent groups. Watch us. More and more people showed up. More and more banners came. Our member, climbing a pole, and I climbed the Pole, and as far back as I could see, people were still coming out of Christopher Street. And I had chill down my back. It was just amazing. I. Say that t now getting chill again I was amazed at the spirit that we all have which was so happy so proud so full pride. He were so. You got to like this out and proud. Being here today. Beautiful fantastic. lgbtq plus movement had arrived. It had joined the other huge protest movements of the era. Stone row, and the beginning of pride made it harder for the US to ignore such a significant part of its population. When I look back at it now. It seems almost unbelievable to me that we can be such A. Invisible part of society. We are so out there now. Of course as we've said, that's not true for all queer. People today. And Siegel understands even as he was getting involved in all this activists work marshalling the first pride March. He hadn't come out to his parents. Finally called them to tell them though he says he now wishes he done it in person. You GotTa realize that I was present. Gay Youth and I was canceled other people to come out. But of course I call my parents, and my father wasn't shocked to surprised and said Yeah. What else is new your talk to your mother? My mother only concerned was which he said to me and I can remember datum, which was i. just worry about you being when you get old. I wish my mother was. Alive to hear me, say mom. I'm old. Happily married man. I think for me. You'll be very happy. Sequel can feel the distance traveled. I went from someone who's a street kid to being invited by President Obama to dance at the white. House with my husband. I could've never ever expected something like that. Because at that time you could never think of a happy ending for Gabor's. Now. How? How. Things listening to history this week for more moments throughout history that are also worth watching. Check your local TV listings to find out what's on history today. This episode was produced by Ben Dickstein history. This week is also produced by mckanie Lynn Julia. mcgruder and Meka valley home. Our editor and sound designer is Chris Yellow are executive producers are Jesse cats and Ted Butler. Don't forget to subscribe rate and review history this week. Where ever you get your podcasts and we will see you next week.

stonewall New York City Jason Baumann Mark Siegel Marty Robinson Philadelphia New York mattachine society Mark Segel New York Public Library Seagal Stonewall Sally Helm First Gay Youth Organization G Oak Island Pawn US York Christopher Street Christopher Street Christie Los Angeles
Ep. 88 - The Climate Crisis

The Breakdown with Shaun King

13:39 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 88 - The Climate Crisis

"For most of my life i've fought primarily against issues like police brutality and white supremacy and mass ass incarceration and i still do when i always will be fighting against those things and there's a tendency for some people think that global warming and environmentalism originalism and climate change issues that those are white issues for privileged white people and today i need to unpack and explain explain where that notion comes from and then i want to help us understand why the climate crisis needs to be high on all of our list list of the things that we care for and fight for every single day. This is shaun king and you're listening to the the breakdown breakdown breakdown. You know the saying that it's hard to see the forest for the trees as a kid. I didn't really know what that meant. You know what what it means is. Sometimes it's hard to see the big picture. It's hard to see the whole forest. When all you can see we are the trees or the details that are right in front of your face and on this podcast i speak a lot about police brutality i speak about mass incarceration and white supremacy and bigotry and voting rights and civil rights and all of the issues that fall under those banners and i i need to make a point today about that but about something that's necessary that we need to talk about that needs to be understood understood because just like it's hard to see the forest for the trees. It is so hard damn near impossible sometimes for people in communities that are being ravaged by police brutality to sometimes look ten twenty thirty years in the future and focus on what the environment will be like ten years from now fifteen twenty thirty fifty years from now when you are facing down police brutality. It's hard to think about what what this planet will look like if we don't change emission standards. Do you understand what i'm saying. It's hard when you are facing being daily discrimination to think about what is going to look like if we don't have clean energy. It's hard to care about how the carbon footprint of corporations when a police officer has their literal foot on your neck. Do you understand what i'm saying thing that when hate crimes are exploding across the country it can be difficult to focus on the rising temperature of the ocean when your mother is in jail because of a speeding ticket that she just can't afford to pay and now she languishes in jail because of a cash bail she also can't afford to pay in. You are a young person a teenager and i've seen this all over the country and you don't want to tell your teachers that your mother is in jail basically because she's poor and can't afford to pay a ticket and how can she of course afford to pay bail if she couldn't afford award to pay the ticket you don't wanna tell your teachers that your mother. Your single mother is now in jail because you're worried. If you tell anybody that you're going to be sent to a group home is hard for you to focus on the climate crisis when you are worried that ice may knock knock on your door at any given moment in separate and deport your family it can be difficult to find the mental any emotional space to care about almost anything else and so some of what some of what's happened all the way back to the nineteen sixties while black and brown communities were literally fighting just to survive some of what happened is all the way back then and environmental movement began emerging that was super white and and super privileged and often super aloof in disconnected from the pain problems and struggles google's of every day black and brown folk from the nineteen sixties all the way really until the past few years the primary voices is the primary organizations and funders talking about climate change and global warming have been privileged white full not because people and communities of color don't care it's not that but because our movements have become deeply segregated and the systems and structures fighting for the environment have been own most exclusively white for generations so today. I have really one thing that i want to unpack in one simple action step for us all right. Let me break this down breaking it down. This tendency to think that fighting for the environment is a wife thing runs runs very deep and again. It's mainly been fueled by just how white and how privileged and how disconnected acted the environmental movement itself has been for nearly sixty years is also fueled though by the fact that it can be hard for any of us to fight for the thing that we don't really see with our eyes when we are so burdened by the problems that are right right in front of our faces but i need us to understand something the climate crisis that we are facing right now it's upon us is going to hit people of color and communities and nations of color. I in it's going to hit them. The hardest with droughts with floods and with natural disasters like we are seeing right now in the bahamas the hurricane there has basically destroyed huge swaths of the entire nation entire communities have been leveled. There airports in their crucial businesses in public systems have been destroyed in what i saw just moments ago is that nobody can really even get to the bahamas to help. It's exactly what we saw. In puerto rico where thousands of people died and to this day now years later people in puerto rico still don't have clean water still don't have electricity we saw this this with hurricane harvey and houston and we saw it with hurricane katrina in new orleans when those levees broke in new orleans guests who who lived in the lowest lying communities. Guess who's neighborhoods were destroyed and guess who's neighborhood survived. You can draw the lines signs literally right down ratio and economic boundaries in all over the world environmental injustice hits. It's a poor communities and communities of color. The hardest over and over and over again waste is regularly dumped in dan or near those communities dangerous power plants and factories are often built in or near communities where people don't have have lobbyists on speed dial to block such things and i'm saying all of this because i want all of us to understand that that every aspect of the climate crisis is going to hit communities of color and poor communities hard and i understand that it's difficult for us to focus on an impending crisis when we have so many other burdens i get it. I'm i'm making this mental and emotional shift myself but we need to make some real shifts as a people as communities to begin understanding ending that the climate crisis belongs to all of us. We all need to be at the table. We all need to make i'm sure that we have input to the plans and solutions that are being considered are being built in this movement in this 'cause needs to be integrated to grade it on every possible level which takes me to a very simple action step. I have for us today. Touched take take action. Still there is a youth movement that is fighting the climate crisis prices and i want all of them to know just how amazingly proud i am. I am just now getting to the point where i now fully accept that i am no longer a part of any youth a generation or any youth demographic like i am now often the old man in the room but i am so so amazingly proud of young people all over the country and around the world are doing join the fight back against the climate crisis and today there is one particular organization they are many but there is one particular organization that i want you to follow follow and know about. I want you to follow who they follow amplify who they amplify because i believe in the organization is called the sun rise movement movement the sunrise movement just go now to google and search sunrise movement. That's sunrises one word go to google and search sunrise movement different and you can go to their website and see them. If you search for sunrise movement on twitter follow them there sunrise movement on instagram. You can follow them. They're aweso search sunrise movement on facebook and follow them there or just go directly to those platforms or search for them on google and follow them on on instagram twitter and facebook learn from them learn what they're doing learn how they are putting their bodies and lives on the line to amplify the issues of the climate crisis but i want you to know the leaders in the founders because they are so brilliant so brave so incredibly diverse in every way gene and they perhaps more than any organization i see speak of the climate crisis in the intersection away that it needs to be addressed so everywhere you can please. I also encourage you to donate support to them. I believe in the sun rise movement. I love and respect them and they're actually forcing this issue to be addressed on the highest possible levels right breaking up bring the vermont. Bring them and bring the bring. Thank you all for making it all the way through this episode of the breakdown. If you haven't already subscribed to this podcast we'll be right back here every single day. I'll be right back here tomorrow. Breaking down important news stories in issues and we'd love for you to subscribe on your favorite podcast asked apps like apple podcast or spotify. If i chance you're listening to this on instagram please subscribe on apple podcasts or spotify on any podcast app the to use of course please share this podcast with your friends and family next big goals to get to one hundred thousand subscribers and we're just not going to get there without you. Thank you so much to the nearly thirty thousand founding members of the northstar whose generosity even makes this podcast possible. Will we love you all and appreciate you so very much and if you love this podcast and you want to support our work for you to see the show notes and transcripts reach episode and we love it. If you consider becoming a founding member of our community you can do that right now. The northstar dot com. They're not only have our podcast but hundreds hundreds of original articles and stories and commentaries from some of the leading scholars and thinkers in journalists in the world lastly wanna give a shoutout to our associate producer asandra sandra and our pod casting director and singer producer willis for their hard work on this and every episode take care about it.

google bahamas shaun king founding member new orleans spotify puerto rico apple facebook twitter producer hurricane katrina officer vermont houston
International Women's Day!

The Women

1:04:09 hr | 1 year ago

International Women's Day!

"Now more than ever teams must come together and work together to solve big challenges and Trello is here to help Trello part of Atlassian is collaborative. Sweet is an APP with an easy to understand visual format plus tons of features that make working with your team functional and fun with Trello. You can work with your team wherever you are whether it's at home or in an office keep your workflow going from wherever you are with. Trello Trello for free and learn more at TRELLO DOT com. That's T. R. E. L. L. O. DOT COM. She'll come on the employment dignity. Freedom that's what our revolution want. Welcome to the women are production of iheartradio and myself your host. Rosary every episode. I sit down with one person who has journey into extraordinary and as this is the week of International Women's Day we're expanding our regular episode and I'm speaking several women from around the world. Is Shabby being young and being female doubled? Senator Alice Higgins and Senator Collect Kelleher. You sexually active woman was a subversive act in itself. -secutive director of the UNFPA NATALIYA CANAL OF. It's really really important to remember that. The same hands the build a problem can dismantle the problem Jaffna Vicar Almanac the UN youth on Voi-. But that really made me shift my mindset about the way that we look at humanitarian settings to really acknowledged resilient young below but how resourceful they are in times of crisis Mary the Crown Princess of Denmark every minute a woman dies during pregnancy or giving birth as a result of complications. That could otherwise have been prevented from Tunisia to Ireland Panama and the US to Sri Lanka Denmark and Australia. I had the opportunity to interview these incredible Tortoise Forces from around the globe in Nairobi Kenya. We all attended the Nairobi. Summit last fall were more than ten thousand people came together to demand and work towards gender equality the United Nations Population Fund or UNFPA along with the nations of Kenya. Denmark Co hosted the event. It was the twenty fifth anniversary of the Nineteen ninety-four meeting in Cairo. Where more than one? Hundred and seventy government's committed to making women's reproductive health and rights a priority and national and global development efforts. This agenda on gender equality is often referred to as the International Conference on Population and Development or the ICPD. I had the opportunity attentive. You six women in front of live audiences and in this episode. You'll hear excerpts from the interviews. My name is a Chevy. I'm the African Union Commission. Special Envoy in Youth Shabby is the first ever African Union Special Envoy on Youth I grip and Tunisia and between two thousand ten and two thousand eleven. She was live tweeting and blogging about her accounts as a teenager witnessing and participating in her country's revolution I started. The political blog called proudly Uson because I was frustrated with mainstream narrative of the media that calls it the Arab spring just revolution the Arab awakening. As if we were sleeping we just woke up to raise. Our Rights is a recipient of the gates award. She's a fulbright scholar and she's the founder of Africa Youth Movement. She's been traveling across the continent for the past decade. Training Thousands of people on Activism and leadership is committed to mobilising Africa's youth to act as a collective to fight poverty and corruption and to demand innovation and representation. We spoke in front of a live audience. Can you tell us more about The African Youth Movement that you've been so a part of and you really have mobilized a big part of your work you traveled around the continent training and supporting many to join the movement or to articulate their feelings. Irv find their voice can tell us a little bit more about that. You know after the revolution I have found my African identity when volunteer and the refugee camp on the being boarded when I met migrants from different African countries with the most youthful generation. We are sixty five percent and they're thirty. African continent were the youngest in the word. And so it didn't make sense to me to things that are mixed one is why is that? We have the same challenges. On the continent unemployment corruption. You know you name it. Inequality we're not uniting around these issues to have collective solutions and the second thing is we have this demographic power where the most youthful population. So why are we not uniting? In one voice that would be more more powerful because if we decide to create a political party we will win the elections. Yes we are sixty percent of our relation if we decide all of us to vote anyone and we can vote anyone out. We can so so. The part of creating that movement is solidarity that we should come together as generation defined our mission as a generation and work together to Find Solutions Africa. Not as an individual tiny countries. We need to put Africa I before our national or regional interests. And that's the idea because at the end of the day if Africa developed is a whole continent we. We will be a global player. We will advance as a continent. We will trade with each other. And I am the African Union and I think I am the African Union a very historic moment because we just entered into force the cfda the continental free-trade area which makes African the largest trade bloc in the words which makes a free movement a possibility so the Africa. We want his body less. It has the African passport. It's e-governance E citizenship. It's studying in Pan African universities among our countries. So all of that would not possible if Africans do not meet and know each other and know each other challenges and united around wide respecting our diversity around collective action when you're mobilizing such power and such a force and the strength of your generation as you pointed out. There's such a strong youth contingency on the continent. What was an obstacle that you experienced advocating for young people which you didn't expect? And how did you tackle it? I didn't expect I expected everything because being young and being females double crime in every single room. I think I want to live in a word where I'm not the only young and female in a in a in a table of decision making we still have the story of African Youth in conflict as perpetrators of violence. And that's why they're not invited to the table and I think what I'm excited about is that we ought to say that we're not asking for permission anymore. We're not asking to be given a space. We all going to occupy the space. But I think also part of what I do. At the African Union is to promote this intergenerational cool leadership so it's not also saying that you the generation do not understand our issues and you need to get out and we WANNA take over or the eligible saying you ought to threat and you are dangerous glass and you go to the street and you challenge. The status quo is to say it's time for leadership we cannot inherit system. We don't understand and you cannot lead with our understanding our reality and from our perspective intergenerational co leadership is essential for Africa so averages of Africa leadership sixty sex this is according to more Abraham Index every age of the publishing twenty five. We HAVE FORTY YEARS OF GENERATION GAP. The leadership right does not reflect our population and the and the solution is not to just. Yes to challenge the status quo and to say we need to have more young people involved and participating but also to say we need to Co lead. We need young people in parliamentarian seats. We need young people in Governance. We need young people in public and private sector not just as volunteers in political parties. Not just as youth wings but in leadership. What are you think are some of the biggest challenges that are facing the youth uniting on the continent? How can we overcome that? And what's next for you? What you want to tackle. I think the biggest See I always say our generation defined what we want in the revolution which started in Tunisia. Children Hariri Komo Attorney Employment Dignity Freedom. That's what our revolution. Our generation wants in the fifties and sixties. They always say. Our mission was political freedom because we were fighting colonialism today. We want the same. African that liberated US fifty sixty years ago to liberate us from poverty liberties from corruption to liberate us from bad governance deliberations from gender inequality. But if I want to like put everything in one thing is inequality whether it's gender whether it's economic whether it's the governor's excluding level what's next and how do we deal with. That is as I said to look at each other as citizens in a borderless space because if we talk about identity young people today do not recognize too much the national we think beyond you know we are more open to multiculturalism. We are more open to spaces where we can learn from each other. We can innovate. So let's use that space. Let's channel the energy of young people who are angry. Legitimately angry about the situation today of climate crisis and inequality to channel that energy into a positive action whether it's in policy whether it's grassroots work whether it's in governance. What do we do at the African Union? We have a range of issues that we work on that he's defined by our agenda two thousand sixty three. It has seven aspiration. It is clear about what we want. As Africa and seven aspiration six is about a continent driven by its youth and women so we have all the frameworks we need. We have African Charter. I don't know how many people know about the African Youth Charter. I see many African youth year adopted into thousand in six one of the most progressive documents on youth in the whole words so Africa is actually leading. And it's thinking ahead a futuristic way. All what we need to do is to use those instruments to work at the national level at the grassroots level to reach our collective goal you know. Seventy percent of Africa's offline so you have that the digital power to make noise at the media level to make noise to add the social media level to make Africa story become the mainstream. You send that your father has been a big supporter of yours and a huge inspiration to you. Can you describe that relationship and what you both do to nurture that. My father is a feminist but he doesn't identify such. I guess like many fathers. I think what my father did is. He allowed me to make my own choices so I grew up in a fairly Muslim conservative family. Out Religiously Conservative and so. I think I disagreed with my father in many things and we argue. He's he's a military guy. Spent his forty years in the army but he just allowed me to make my own choices even if we disagreed because of he used his privilege as the head of the family in the extended. Family to back me up. During the revolution and activism activism is not easy for parents to accept when they know that you ought at risk and you are the front line of making change duty. I didn't see my father for ten months. He didn't know anything about what I was doing if I was on the streets because he was in charge of the refugee comes on the Libyan borders when Libya Revolution started and so we had about a million refugees on the camp. I WOULD. I would call him and hide. And be like yeah. I'm studying revolution happened in my graduation here and so it was like end of December. We were preparing for exams and so it call him. I'm studying I'm home. He would never hear you know protest but after ten months and after we already made the change in Tunisia he. We had a moment and enter generation moment. What he said you did the revolution you did the change you as a generation. We have waited so long for making a change and for bringing a new spirit a new ways of of looking at the future and how we construct our country's so this is my relationship with father now. He retired just two years ago which is good now. Have more time to argue with him on politics in Tunisia. But he's he's a great support to me to continue activism globally. You can follow is work and learn more about the African Union on twitter at Iowa underscores shabby that's a way underscore. C. H. E. B. B. I when people told their stories and people saw. This is a difficult decision. Women make these are the real circumstances. A lot of those who are seeking abortion. It's not just teenagers. It's it's mothers who already have children. They're making a decision for their family and nine. Hundred eighty-three Ireland adopted the Eighth Amendment to its constitution which made abortion illegal. Alice agains and collect. Kelleher became senators in two thousand sixteen. So the repeal on the eighth amendment was one of their major campaigns. There are two examples of women who took positions in government in Ireland and used their own voices and their most personal stories to reach across the aisle and the church to ensure equal rights for women and to expand access to save healthcare. Okay so My Name is Alice Mary Higgins. I'm an independent senator in Ireland and I'm part of the civil engagement group and also worked on equality issues economic justice issues on environmental issues before going into the Senate and 2016. Alice Mary Higgins is an Irish independent politician. Her father is the current president of Ireland. Collect Kelleher as an Irish independent politician. She's a former social worker and previously. She was the CEO of the Alzheimer's Society of Ireland. I'm from rural Ireland changes a social worker and I've had many roles in the NGO sector very surprisingly to me. I was nominated by the ministry. To Be Senator Senator Higgins and Senator Kelleher worked on an initiative to break the stigma women from across. Ireland came forward with their own stories and out of the fold neighbors. Mom's sisters told their families about maybe a difficult decision they had made or someone that they had helped and it wasn't just families. Having these honest conversations even politicians came forward and shared their stories whether personal or someone close to them and oftentimes they even went to their conservative colleagues homes to talk to them one on one about the urgency of expanding women's health care. I know a lot of the referendum was one around kitchen tables for people talked on a as well remember meeting older men in rural Ireland. Who The cliche would tell us that they weren't going to support this referendum. But what they told me was. I never knew the reality of my mother's experience. I never knew the reality of my wife or my sister's experience are even my daughter but now my granddaughter is telling me what her life is like and she's telling me the decisions she's making and I want to support her because I love her and may twenty eighteen. The Irish people voted by two thirds majority referendum to repeal the eighth amendment so it was amazing to be in parliament at the moment. When that changed I spoke to Senator Higgins and Senator Kelleher in front of a live audience and they ropy of sexual reproductive. Health and rights has been for so long in the private sphere and has been taboo to talk about one of I think that what's reflective and both of your work and your journeys is really trying to tackle conversationally. What is taboo? And what isn't so you can really championed the rights and the advancement of sexual reproductive health. Senator Kelly her. You wrote a very personal article Prior to announce your advocacy to repeal the ban on abortion. And you wrote about a time when you were twenty one which you tell the audience about that experience where you were with your life and what were you thinking about well. Arlington the. Ac's were were very dark place. In many ways we had you know the death of a young woman giving birth in in a grotto you had the Kerry babies which was a famous case where a woman was accused of. It was actually an investigation into police corruption. But the woman went on trial. She was accused falsely of killing a baby so I was actually working in truly at the time so it to be a woman to be a young woman to be a sexually. Active woman was a subversive act in itself. And it was a very dark place. I remember getting my conception from the Irish Family Planning Clinic Kentucky Street. But you would literally kind of sneaking in case you're neighbor would see you so it was. It was a difficult time and then women were getting pregnant. Friends of mine got pregnant. We all had the telephone number because it was in cosmopolitan so that you knew that you could get to London if you need to. And then at one point in Ireland there was a ban on even giving information act which was really really. It was the the ultimate conduct theocratic states blocking even the very access to information and then. I went to London when I was twenty six and a group of us and we got involved with an informed with Nash. Work where we would meet women who had come from Ireland. And we'd meet them and train stations and they come and stay on our houses and we'd help them with the decision that they had made to have an abortion. But you were just under the radar all of the time and you didn't really talk about abortion in mixed company because you didn't trust that you could trust the people that you were speaking with so the whole kind of opening up the conversation from me but also for everybody else. When I was involved in the campaign women were coming up I was. I had a picture and Patrick Street in Cork and he's to give out leaflets. There and like women came up to me and told me stories. They'd never told anybody else in the course of the abortion so there was a great lifting of the lead on the reality of women's lives my life other people's lives and I think that was the great change and I think we were all so amazed at the scale of the vote in favor because we were all afraid to speak to each other about it. We didn't know that so many people felt similarly so that was a really a wonderful thing Senator Higgins. Could you lose a little bit? More context of really what is going on or what was going on in Ireland in terms of women's reproductive healthcare prior to the ban. I think one of the most important things was people starting to to break the silence of what was really powerful and really important. Were people starting to tell their stories the case that I campaigned on back when I was nine hundred ninety. S was the x case. And then we had you know. We have the Y. Case and we had people B. and C. and D. and these almost anonymised stories of of women who are having to go through the courts and seek their rights and that story and a real face of a real person how did huge impact and since then there was an extraordinary people found ways to tell their stories. I was mentioning a story. I think I really liked was in her shoes. Where young people young women in particular led this? They photographed fees and told their stories. Because of course when something's illegal you can't tell your story so then you just have the cliches version. The propaganda for abortion is and when people told their stories and people will. This is a difficult decision. Women make these are the real circumstances. A lot of those who are seeking abortion. It's not just teenagers. It's it's mothers who already have children. They're making a decision for their family. All of that reality of experience and again there were one or two individuals who came and told their stories in the media and that was incredibly important and powerful including those who had to seek abortion for fatal fetal abnormalities. For example we can listen to the reality of medical decision. Making that happens in a crisis situation. We can listen to the reality of women's lives and make a compassionate decision so the recommendations that those hundred people mate we're far further than we might have taught. They said they recognized for example that you can't decide that rape in itself. How does a woman proved out in twelve weeks that we needed to give that twelve weeks space for women to be able without judgment to access abortion for example and then in the Iraq this committee when it came to the parliament and we had another conversation? Cross party conversation an extraordinary women parliamentarians from a lot of different Paris. He's made sure that the focus was on giving the reality. That's abortion does happen just because it's happening in the UK. It's still happening just because it's happening in secret. It's still happening and that really. The conversation isn't about whether or not you as a person like the idea of abortion whether you would ever have one. The question is whether you want to have an honest stayce where every citizen can be honest about their experience where people have honest conversations with their doctors. Even that conversation previously had been constrained where women couldn't speak to their doctors. Doctors couldn't really know people are giving advice in the most obtuse way so it was just about honesty and that came out in the campaign and it came out in the conversations. I mean what you both are talking about. Really there is on one hand. It's a burden on the other hand. It's a relief to hear these really personal stories because you can't use the slogan or a campaign or a party identity when it comes to an individual you know. The image of women taking photographs of their shoes and sharing their stories or of older women wives. Mothers and sisters finally being honest with their husbands who maybe have been Protected from the harsh realities of not being able to get good medical care and not being able to exercise your right now. The first woman that stayed with me in London when you had come from Ireland like she was a mother of six children and was this. This was in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven and she was so knocked the stereotype that she young feckless women going off and getting pregnant she was she was a mother of six children. She her husband was just made on employed. They couldn't afford the seventh child and she was the first woman. Stay with us and then we had women from all sorts of backgrounds. We had a woman who is the niece of Bishop and was absolutely frightened to death. I mean I even hesitate even saying it now. In case in some ways I'd compromise her identity so none of the stereotypes applied you know in that work that we did with the Irish women's abortion support group in London. And as you say once you got beyond the pro-choice and the anti choice and the stereotypes and people grappled with the real real stories of real women in different situations different times. Then the whole conversation changed. How do you give advice to those who are in legislation who may lose their seat by advocating for women's health and women's right to choose and also what was the most compelling argument for faith leaders? I mean really. The Catholic churches power in Ireland has waned so the difference between nineteen eighty. Three and two thousand eighteen was the weren't powers in the land in the way that they might have been before but wouldn't have had this way that they had before As I said I'm not a practicing Catholic anymore but many people are and it gave people courage so I think you have to assess where the faith leaders are at so in terms of the issue on on faith. I think one of the key things was that this is not actually about your faith. It's women and women's pregnancies aren't they are obviously within the Catholic Church symbolically-important they're not symbols. They're real realities that go through months and go through so I think for people to see that. This isn't a badge. The very fact of knowing that it was a real reality that happens within women within their bodies. That made a difference. But you could have your faith and you could be somebody who says. I know. I won't make that choice. That's different from relating to others and from stop there so you might say for a lot of people and this relates to the rural area as well. One of the most powerful things we saw in the committee was not those who went in already knowing their view on this or we had some including some older men women from rural constituencies who came. Who heard the evidence and who said? I have changed my mind. I still have my faith. It's still I still even regard myself as pro-life ever but I am not going to stop stand in the way of medical care of essential rights for women you can follow senator. Alice HAGENS ON TWITTER AT A. L. I. C. E. E. I R. E. and Senator Collect Kelleher at co L. E. T. T. K. E. L. L. E. H. E. A. Have you heard about this company? Making stylish shoes for women and girls out of recycled plastic. Water bottles I like them a lot. Roth. These are stylish and sustainable. And they're the perfect plots or ankle boots for life on the go. You WanNa know why I like them. 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Unfpa is the UN's sexual and reproductive health agency and their mission is to deliver a world where every pregnancy is wanted. Every childbirth is safe and every person's potential fulfilled they do census data and they provide care to women and youth and over one hundred fifty and they train healthcare workers around the world the unit. Pa was one of Nairobi. Summit's three Co hosts and I actually had the opportunity to interview. It's executive director the executive director of the UNFPA. As Dr Natalie Cam. She actually has a degree in medicine and public health. She's worked in philanthropy and she's done some extraordinary work championing the rights of girls and women over the past few decades and most currently leading the NFPA THE UNFPA is committed to delivering healthcare in some of the world's most remote places whether that's flying in contraception via drones or talking to a midwife in Mongolia and as the executive director of the PA. Dr Keenum is also one of the under secretary generals of the United Nations. So why don't you introduce yourself and tell us what you do and why it's important to rose? I just want to thank you for leading US through this exercise. It's a little awkward bearing your soul to one and all but I think it's important. It's really great to have felt the support. The fact that you made your way here. I lead the United Nations Population Fund. The initials do not match the name. In fact the Population Fund still works on population we do census advising in over one hundred and fifty five locations but our brand is really the United Nation Sexual and reproductive health agency as the executive director of the agency. I I have a nickname that comes with the job which is e and I also have the power of being an under secretary general to Antonio Gutierrez who as secretary general has said that he is a proud feminist and part of his goal is to bring gender equity into the United Nations? So well I look at my own fantastic colleagues and their three thousand plus another two thousand consulting service over these one hundred and fifty plus locations. I also expected to look upward and to help the secretary. General achieve the three truly noble purposes of the United Nations which was founded on the principle of dialogue and World Peace. We have three pillars and one of them is peace and security sustainable development is how we would phrase the second pillar now and the fundamental pillar is human rights. The other thing I should say is that in leading this agency puts me into direct contact with some of the worst most horrible problems that you can ever imagine but also with some of the best most wonderful heroic people who are in a island community somewhere or they're at the top of the mountain that you've got to take the horse of the donkey to reach and so you're also really privileged with being touched by the understanding that any one of us really can make a difference. This gives me a lot of courage and it certainly has been an eye-opener. It's a job where you learn something literally every minute. I believe that in nineteen seventy five. You attended a conference in Mexico City that actually impacted you in a very powerful way. What was that experience? Well yes in one thousand nine hundred seventy five. I took a bus. I took a train basically walked to Mexico. City where The First World Conference on women was taking place and it was amazing because I'm from Panama. I've had the experience of an emigrant child. And at that time I was actually in one of the premier academic institutions of the world. I was a scholarship student at Harvard. University where I was studying history and science and specifically the history of Latin American Africa and For Science I was interested in tropical medicine. There was an atmosphere of carrying solidarity wanting to solve problems. You know when I got to see that Mahyco. It was exciting. I didn't now I'm a world traveler at. It's getting to be a bit much. But then I really hadn't travelled but I did feel that this exhortation to do something practical meant something to me as a medical student You are the first Latin American Africa. Send it to lead your department. Unfpa do you think that this experience influences the type of leader that you are? Oh yes I do I do. I think it's important for my experience as a woman as a national that's in the MTA woman as an immigrant after the woman And as somebody who is like I said earlier acutely tuned into discrimination. You know I am very willing to advocate on behalf of anybody else. The African Union claims African descendants is the sixth region right now. Africa is the richest continent on the face of the earth. It also has huge human treasure in terms of human capacity but the mismatch of inequality that the sustainable development goals talk about is very prevalent here with all the privileges of being of African descent. Parenthetically I always remind everyone that as far as we know the first humans coming out of Africa we all claim a piece of our African descent but in the modern construct of being African. It really gives you the advantage of instant connection and also the advantage of paying attention to how it is that you can make things better. Women also described the experience because you know when we walk into the room. No-one necessarily things that you're the executive director so I'm really happy to represent for that dynamic and it's really really important to remember that the same hands build a problem can dismantle. The problem for many people go into medicine. It's because they have a calling or because they had maybe a formative experience in their youth seeing the power of healing. Did you have such a thing or what was it called you to medicine initially so I've thought about this question. I really don't know I think yes. My father died. When I was young I was six years old. I remember certain things surrounding that. I have always had a high degree of awareness of things. That are unfair. You know like when you do those psychological profiles. I'm like off the charts for justice. I really want things to be fair and I also am very interested in the. I'm glad use the word healing. The idea of healing is that you're attuned to so many different dimensions of wellbeing and I think that Many of us have the but we haven't had the opportunity to express it so I think healing and all its dimensions was attractive to me. Because it's a way of making things right for people who otherwise might not feel whole for me I'm proud that UNCO is leader on innovation in our field sexual and reproductive health and rights so within the United Nations right. Now we're trying to think of. How do you capitalize accelerate progress? And all these other things that were saying and doing the same old things. The same old ways is highly unlikely to get us. Two zero zero zero right so zero zero zero four the rubric that we use in terms of transformative change. We know that sex is difficult to talk about. We know that young people are actually discouraged from getting truthful information that you were I might share. It's looking at problem solving in a new way and so the three zeroes that UNFPA is putting forth has been a collaborative activity. The first zero is to ensure that there is zero unmet need for contraception because the evidence is abundant that girls and I'm talking about an adolescent girl who can even be a married woman really at the age of thirteen or fourteen depending on what country you come from should have within her power to decide about her own fertility the term that we use family planning some young people even reject. Because they don't want to plan a family they simply do not wish to go pregnant right now. So again I think for us. The unmet need symbolizes the power that a woman has to own her body the power that a girl has to say no and hopefully the power that the health system is going to have to be friendly when a young person comes in the Second. Zero is to end death in childbirth. This is to me like a human rights issue and the third one. Of course we're going to need huge innovation to overcome and that's to put an end to gender-based violence. So-called domestic violence is so prevalent. It's the biggest crime face of the earth but these resources are on an unequal spectrum. Look this world has more money than ever in human history. It's incredible how much money there is a financial and yet we have never had so much poverty and inequality. I will say that the only advice that I ever give anyone is to know yourself. What do you want to do? What is your capacity? What is your limit? And what is your bottom line? You know you have to engage with your own self before you can trust someone else to bring you anything or do anything with you and so ultimately you also have to know that you can't fight every fight you know. You can't like pick fights with people if you're somebody who's going to stop rape in conflict. This is really difficult. It's going to be bruising for your own psychology if you're kind of brittle and you know jumpy. How are you going to help some woman who comes in with a horrible problem? You know what I mean for you to do your job with courage. You have to know yourself and to know who you're going to trust with your worst fears for gender based violence. I want us to figure out. What are we going to do to really attack that third zero and come up with innovative collaborative solutions? That are GonNa work in your backyard. You can follow the executive director Dr Natalie Canal on twitter at. At A. Y. E. S. H. E. Maybe this is TMI. But I just got the new seamless Lounge Bra from third love and it is extremely comfortable. It's light I don't even notice I'm wearing it. Third love uses the measurements of millions of women to Design Bras with all day comfort and support. Get sixty days to wash it and where it and if you don't love it returns are always free. 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Systemic change is for you to institute that change from within Jaffna Vic Romania Co was appointed by the UN secretary general to be the UN youth on Voi- she's originally from Sri Lanka and travels all over the world to bring the UN to young people. We spoke in front of a live audience zero. My Name Is Jeff. Might be crimen. I and I am the UN Secretary General in Voyeur on youth my job is to bring the United Nations closer to young people and bringing young people closer to the U. N. So to do that. I advice the UN Secretary General of in it comes to matters related to young people. I also represent team in meetings conferences and other platforms that about young people and do matter young people's lives so I've worker costs all areas of. Un's work so. I walk in sustainable development. I work on peace and security. I've Akon Human Rights and humanitarian action. As well I was asked by the Secretary General I started to help set the vision for the United Nations system to be better at working not just for young deeper but working with young people. You are originally from Sri Lanka yet. You travel all over the world for your job. What do you think you bring with you when you do travel and when you do sit at the table to have your voice heard from your home country. I usually bring two or three stories. I usually batteries when I need. Good luck and that's why. Carry them with me wherever I go. No I think it's an interesting question because it's the first time in the last two years that I was asked this question. I think for me being someone who was born to a war. My Country Sri Lanka through thirty alone conflict and I was born to a conflict and I live. Nineteen years of my life in conflict-affected country in a war torn country basically leaving through the fear of getting killed on our way to school or not. Maybe I won't be able to see my parents when I come back from school home. Because they were bomb blasts in buses trains schools markets and everywhere and that insecurity. I think also helped spark my creativity and also helped me understand and stoops me understand a lot of the time I communicate with young people who live in conflict settings humanitarian sittings the insecurities that they suffer it so I think he has a lot for me. It was unfortunate that I was born into a war torn country but at the same time. I think that has helped me be gone dead and and really helped me understand. Young people struggles. I also think it's really important when we talk about places that have conflict that we also remember that complete opposite side of the life and the beauty that goes on especially in the private sphere within our personal relationships with our friends or our families. Could you give us an idea of what your home was like when you were growing up? Yeah so I. I was born into a working class family so I come from the south of Sri Lanka from Bent Odor. My mother used to teach and my father works for the Port Authority. In Sri Lanka. My parents worked really hard to raise three girls. I have two younger sisters. I mean it was challenging. United it is a Patriarca Society. So an example. I haven't shed this publicly much before but my paternal grandparents did not speak to my mother until me and my sisters were in early twenties because my mother could not give them sons who will take the name of family forward so but my parents I think they never let that kind of discrimination or agony. Get to us. They always shielded US and encouraged us to be our best education education. Education is the only thing I would here at home like from the moment. Up to the moment I go to bed as I said. My parents are not super though they didn't do any like politics or any high level jobs but every night when we had dinner we used to watch news and then we would discuss what we saw in the news and my parents would always also encourage us to tell or analyze what we saw like but I also think in certain cases in certain ways I was also shield from certain things like now when I learn about climate change now when I learn about discrimination or gender based violence. I now understand that. Oh my God. I experienced that because when I was growing up anything better than living in the war right so you always Think that anything is fine. As long as you're not subjected to the conflict or violence so that as long as you're safe so for an example when I started learning about street harassment or sexual harassment literally every day in my life in the school bus. I have been subjected to some kind of harassment like ninety eight percent of Sri Lankan women have gone through St Talisma but sexual harassment in public spaces and I have the experience but at that point. I didn't know that I was living. You know and every night on the news vis vis we've seen how farmers commit suicide but now I know it was because climate change and it was because they have. The farming patents was changing the harvest Petra. Changing and these farmers couldn't get enough reduce. Dave basically couldn't pay back the loan so they were their own lives but it didn't really make much since then but now when I listened to the stories of other young people from other parts of the world when I read more when I learn more it kind of clicks and I think Oh my God this was that this is what happened to me. This is what happened to my friend. Your missions take you like I said all over the world. Is there a trip that you went on recently? That especially moved you. That made you really see the impact that young people can have on the world. Yeah I mean In the last two plus years I've been to more than forty countries and honestly every country's unique but this common thread that is common to all of it it. Is that the young people that I meet so progressive forward looking. They want to achieve tangible concrete changes in their own countries but I think one of the missions that moved me a lot with. Iv sedated. I've into Gaza and because of the blockade young people that are suffering from various very very challenging issues unemployment. Seventy percent eighty percent the risk of onerous coolest being closed due to lack of funding. So a lot of challenges but They said they had something special. Show me and they took me in this A building that was like bombed or shelled. So you could. It's a ruined building and under that building. There's like this basement. I go like this dark tunnel and exit the tunnel and I entered into a room and I see fifty sixty young people sitting in this really cool area coding. So that again code warning on the computer on their computers they call themselves. Gus Bikes so because I'm employment dates in Gaza so high. These two young Palestinians who used to live in New Jersey moved back to Gaza and they started this lab that these young people come learn to code learn to develop software. I learned to do things online. And they find gigs online and they worked for companies based out of Washington. Dc Indonesia Nairobi. And that's how they earn a living. That's how they find employment that's how they contribute to society to their families so when we think about Gaza we have this very great picture of a bombed place suffering from blockade. Like people are desperate looking for food and water and opportunities but that really made me shift my mindset about the way that we look at humanitarian settings to really acknowledge how resilient young people but also not just how resilient they are but how resourceful they are in times of crisis so it was a moment that I was shocked. I started talking to them. I started sitting down with them and sort of going through what they were doing. But I think that is one of the best experiences I was privileged enough to have in this position so many of us. We know exactly the change. We want to see in the world but we're not exactly sure what that role looks like or what that job looks like or what that organization looks like and one of the resounding themes that. I feel like I've heard from interviews. Here is learning on the job like no one trains you to be president or to be a minister or maybe to be youth envoy as you go. Is there one skill? You feel? You've been developing that has really like made you flex made you stronger and your job. Yeah when I was in university I was very active in the youth counsel or CO founded a Utah Gas Station in Sri Lanka called Hashtag generation. Show I always learned things by doing them but also I found my passion by doing things not by not because I learned international relations. I was interested in the Global Youth Development Agenda. It was because I was doing youth work at the country level. I got interested in the Global Youth Development Agenda as you said you know when I was in high school or university job didn't even exist and there are so many jobs that will not exist today but there will be in five years ten years twenty five years so I think as young people but we really need to do is acquired that attitude so that we are open to learning. We are open to learn to learn. What do you think of that one action we can take or a chain either changing our vocabulary or change in the way that we implement change so via very good at staying outside of the system and complaining and protesting and your no holding leaders to account but I also think that it's so important that at least some of US China opinion the system? Try TO GET INTO THE SYSTEM. Try to get into the political parties. Try to get into the parliament. Tried to get into the cabinet and be that Voice of change from within. Because we've seen how so many movements come into being so many moments have been able to topple the government sometimes let or critically this go home. But then if you look at those instances and see did we actually sustain change or did we really make a difference? Did we really change the system? These cannot be changed by just trying to approach one issue one time we need systemic shift systemic shift of a stomach political change systemic economical change if we are to solve all these problems by twenty thirty and. I think the only way to bring about that transformation. Uh Systemic change is for you to institute that change from within you can follow Jaffna's work on twitter at Jaffna d-w j. a. y. a. h. m. a. d. w. But it's not just about being here. It's about being heard being listened to being taken seriously having space having place and being part of the decision making the policy development the programs whatever it may be is being part of the team on an equal standing. I had the opportunity to speak with Mary. The Crown Princess of Denmark. Her Royal Highness has been a patron of the UNFPA for almost a decade. Many may be familiar with the woman who met a prince and her home country of Australia and move to Scandinavia to assume royal duties but as a patron of UNFPA for the past decade. She's been a member of the High Level Taskforce the International Conference on Population and Development. She's undertaken field visits to UNFPA programs across five regions and she's participated in numerous events. Amplifying the voices of disadvantaged girls and women around the world as a patron of UNFPA. Her Royal. Highness has been a vocal advocate for some of the core issues to the advancement of gender equality agenda most notably as they relate to maternal health and youth and humanitarian issues when it comes to closing the gap on gender equality. Royal Highness has said that quote we must ensure that no one is left behind and all voices are heard and reflected in our solutions. I spoke with Her Royal Highness in front of a live audience in Nairobi. Now my story started about almost ten years ago when I was at a conference and I heard the words. When woman gets pregnant in my country she has one foot in the grave and these are the words of an obstetrician. Dr Congo obstetrician for Chedda and at that time I was shocked very disturbed to to learn that You know every every minute A woman dies during pregnancy or giving birth as a result of complications. That could otherwise have been prevented now. It saddens me also that today. Ten years on that yes. We have made progress. The numbers have been reduced. But there's still too many women over eight hundred a day that lose their life giving birth or being pregnant now. Maternal mortality is just one of the most paps is one of the horribly unjust as symptoms of inequality and lack of respect for the human rights of women and girls in two thousand and ten became patron of UNFPA. So I'm proud to be patron of an organization that enormous progress has been made in the last twenty five years but we are experiencing an increased opposition. Maybe a bit of organized better funded. That is why one question I keep asking myself is. Why is it so difficult to make progress on this agenda? What are the barriers that you in your work a facing a new barriers the barriers? That you've been fighting for a long time and the complexities of the arguments against what? Maybe I mean there's maybe some in this room that aren't totally With the ICPD Procam of of Action. We need to talk about it. We need to have an open dialogue about it. We need to extend conversations. We need to broaden the people we speak to because it's only together we can find a way forward and we have to be courageous about that and dare to do it and we also can maybe look at how we talk about these issues. Are we using the same existing language or are we which is important language stays at it? Is We not losing any language? But what is the context around the language? Are we speaking in the wrong type of context to the wrong type of audiences another thing which I am incredibly passionate about is youth involvement? But it's not just about being here. It's about being heard being listened to being taken seriously having space having a place and being part of the decision making the policy development the programs whatever it may be is being part of the team on an equal standing. I'M NOT GONNA call myself old but it from another type of leader to another type of leader because at age is not important and that's why we need to close that generation gap. What are the challenges that you face out there? When campaigning advocating or pushing for change. And how did you ever come that obstacle in my role I often get shielded from some of these challenges? One of the biggest challenges. I- experiences is on my travels and when you're in humanitarian situations in refugee camps one of the greatest things we can do to improve the situations there is to have agenda focus on how we make our humanitarian responses. And I know there is a good. There's a lot of thinking going on there how we can break down the silo mentality. Create crosser interdisciplinary teams so that when these camps are needed and begin to be built up they brought up from the ground with agenda. Focus and that can be. Unfpa's reproductive health center that is part of the solution because women continue to give birth also in crisis and this fight for gender equality especially as a human right. Can you give one example of when you've seen it done well and the positive impact it can have yes I've seen I've seen many examples of when good interventions work it some ensuring the sustainability of them that end the scale ability of them. That's often even harder Which one will I pick? I think I'd have to say toss tune in Senegal for their work with GM. I had the opportunity to visit. Teston village and as part of my trip to Senegal. I participated in a ceremony where fifty villages because it village alone. Can't say no because of intermarriage you'll traditions. So fifty of the villagers came together to announce that they will no longer cutler girls and that change came from a new place of knowledge as I said before but also the fact that they woke up one day with this new knowledge but also with a new fact that we have more men than women our village and the reason why we have more men than women is because we are cutting are women and girls and that was the realization. That was the point of no return where that practice although it has been so coach culturally important for us is no longer viable for where we want to go as a community as population in the future you can learn more about her royal highness in her work and follow the incredible work of the UNFPA on twitter at Unfpa you can also subscribe to their newsletter and meet more incredible women. Like Isaiah. Shembe Senator Higgins Senator Kelleher the executive director Natalie Khanum Jonathan Vic Romania and her royal highness every guest that participated in this special episode for the International Women's Day addition. I met at the Nairobi. Summit hosted by Denmark Kenya and the UNFPA The women is a production of I heart radio and myself. Your host rose read Holly Fry as our executive producer. This episode was mixed by Adrian. Wyllie special thanks to NORC kipness. Michael Freeman Sabinians. Then Casey Program and the Iheart team and especially gail read an a very special thanks to eighteen. Loya Mandera Paul and the team at Unfpa for making these interviews possible more podcast from my heart radio APP podcast or wherever you listen to your favorite shows and if you enjoy this episode share it with a friend we WANNA share these journeys the stories with as many women and girls as possible in twenty twenty and happy international Wednesday nineteen sixty one on the side of dark highway betty and Barney Hill. Kat Lights in the sky. I don't believe their story became internationally known. Some took it as fact other thought it was a fantasy but what really happened. That September night in rural New Hampshire. Join me toby. Ball for the inaugural season of stranger rivals a co-production of iheartradio in grim mild from Aaron Monkey. Strange arrivals debuts March thirty first. Listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Reverend Al Sharpton

Questlove Supreme

1:12:00 hr | 5 months ago

Reverend Al Sharpton

"You ever notice how some people have the best luck like some people come right out of college with a fresh shiny new job while the rest of us have worked for free at an internship and get a side job. Yeah some people always seem to get the best opportunities or the best deals with those days are over because now some people are all people are eighteen t because at all of their customers both new and existing the same great deals on guns up. Yes visit att. Dot com backslash best deals to learn more restrictions. Apply this african king of comedy. Michael blackson here to share some exclusive information about my must listen to new podcast. Michael blackson hosted by me. And we can't forget my co host. This chinese best friend. Thanks mike this right. Chinese best friend along with me is going to be the chain. Don't wanna bissett is going bosh. this second. You can find low filter with michael blassie on the iheartradio app on apple podcast away empha- and get your podcast. I love supreme is a production of iheartradio. There he is going nowhere was all right. I know you got tom. So i want to start the clock in the media trillion question ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to a another episode of ice supreme. Stephen house how. How are you. Congratulations on sundance. Although reverend now that's right revenue also star of summer so Congratulations but power to the people. The people got the power governor. Yes absolutely. I'm i'm a little off. The stuart montego from north catholic. Yes indeed north carolina. No one housing body doing yeah. It's like people saying philadel- ila fresh. Sure what is just you know. I'm no okay not people. We cannot call north carolina north cadillac. All right so our guest today House i let's see our guest today is is cut from a a rare cloth. The cloth of justice He's a gentleman who at the ripe age of four new. What is calling was. I believe that At the age of four my parents allowed me to watch soul train on chaperoned so give me some comparisons anyway. He was practically baptized in the civil rights movement. appointed as leader the youth movement from the one and only jet jesse jackson's operation breadbasket. Our guest today is literally black ghostbusters. The person is a person who you call. When it's time to put wheels white folks tripping in bringing justice name it. He's there literally on the front lines. The always exciting never loss of words or the right words always there on the front lines. Ladies and gentlemen welcome to cost lives supreme. The one and only reverend sharpton thank you. yes today. how are you today. i'm doing good. I'm doing very well. And congratulations on Summer so you really did a masterpiece on. Wow appreciate that But i gotta ask you and i. I'm a self admitted former reluctant leader. How how hard is it to still want to lead. Mvp on the front lines and always have the answers. Because there's many a day where i'm in. My version of leading is more like not even close. Make make having a lunch with somebody but not not to your level feel like once you decide that that's the path at your life is on. You got to see it through and what what makes you get out of bed every morning to fill this role. I think that i put it this way. Michael brown who was killed by police mother spoke one night as she says. Something clicked with me. She said mark twain. And you got a win. Lillard this whole battling ferguson. Enter the mother of victim to quote mark twain. Was like what what is she to do. And she said mark twain said something that she never forgot she said the two most important moments in your life is the moment you're born in the moment you find out why you were born and credits with me. I believe i was born to do what i do. I've been doing this since i was four. Like you saw preaching as a kid in a cost of church. I became jesse. I'm bill jones youth director twelve. So i don't know nothing else and even as i got older got around james brown. Another entertainment have kept going back. His james brown say he can make a living doing that. He'll be back out here. And i wouldn't go back because that's where biden comfort zone woods at as you have developed into a leader. You can drop the reluctant. You do it questioning yourself but you do it because you can't do anything else because that has become you and people look for you to do that and what you are. Ambiguous about that ambiguity is what attracts people because they know you have an agenda. You doing it from your heart. Wow okay i gotta take that. So there's never time where you feel like you're in a situation and you don't know the right words to say or okay. There's a moment let me back up. So there's a there's a moment that President obama told me about in which he knew that he was going to do that. The funeral service for in south carolina church in charleston. He knew he was going to do that. Service and with with a good eight day lead. He knew that You know he he. He crafted the perfect speech that he felt that was going to fit the tone and he said like three minutes into that speech he knew that wasn't the tone and he didn't know what to do and he just like took a breath and something said just start singing amazing grace and it was a risk for him but he did it and it opened the people up. So i'm just saying like in leading some. Oftentimes you have to think on your feet in real time. How how does that come to you. I think i come from a place where like we. We now have to watch our words. And i don't wanna get canceled. I don't want to say the wrong thing. So you know often get caught in my head and and and leading because you don't wanna say the wrong thing because the repercussions but how do you get over that. I thank you go with the flow and the energy and no matter how much you plan and all of us are worried about. If i say this wrong am i gonna hurt too. 'cause on her family. I'm representing hurt dog. But then you get an energy and you just flow. I'll give an example of an and an oil president. Obama told me the same survey amazing grace. I was in the audience that they worked. And i didn't know that he didn't plan a but when i walked onto polka to preach george floyd funeral. I had no plans of doing that. Whole thing of get your knee off our neck. It just came. As i was speaking. And i just went with and it worked and i just kept doing it then and i think that you've got to be disciplined enough to put some borders on yourself in your own mind but then three enough to say i'm were press can't inside these borders and let it flow of the advantage. I had estan as a bored preacher. The disadvantages before i could read and write. Well i i was preachy advantages. I never learned how to use a manuscript so i can't speak from a manuscript. That's why when. I started my msnbc show. Hottest thing in the world for me was to speak with a teleprompter. Because i never read a sermon hall said that live good man. I never used a manuscript until i started on. Msnbc fifty seven years old learning out of speaking in read it same. You're freestyle freestyle freestyle. Before your call it. We were still saying north cadillac. Used do you remember what you spoke about when you were four. What was your parents reaction to this like. Or whoever was in charge of you speaking. How do they know that. This four year old had the option of the right words to lead we at in the church. What they call the junior boy does kids. That would hand out the loop programs and helped seat people. It was cute little thing to keep kids involved once a yet eight. Have the a junior anniversary so adult supervisor said what do y'all wanna do it to brush and it was about ten of us. One of them was the guy. Linda being a pretty big singer. ronnie dyson. He was about running query in hair. He was a kid with me and watch the church brooke. He said that he wanted Read opponent system. Under saying. I said i wanna preach so. He left the dalai biza. Let them breach. Maybe god's gonna use them because this is a pentecostal church and my mother said i prayed. Guard use my son. My father said audiences craze but they let me preach preach data version by nine hundred people that put me on a box. 'cause he couldn't see me up on the rostrum and i've preached from saint john's fourteen chapter. Let nutjob be trouble and ask been preaching. Since by the time. I was seven i was doing a youth days and other churches. By the time. I was nine. They did the world's fair in new york and they put me up to preach four mayor jackson. That's why i loved a so-called ended up going to three cities with may the rest was history. That's how jesse number to me. I was called to one aboard. Wow okay how was gone being. I would listen to the ministers. Because we i grew up in turn across the church. We encourage all the time. And i would in many ways just preach with i heard out of memory and off and i could put together in my head. Wow d do you have any like the recordings of of your sermons as a kid you have. You kept nine. When i was nine. They did a forty five record. Lead preaching and this guy that was radio got time dot wheeler made erected. I have done a little forty five record. Elite was doing more. You know going back to what i read. Oh the preacher's dead and then you go through the holland and a shout and because you got away with it when you got old you had to say something way with a lot. We nine can you. Okay can you explain to me. I know that you're pentecostal. Preacher but what are the exact. What are the difference between can cost back coach. Jake that is or you know the various. Because i just don't like southern preaching was one thing. Yeah well i. I was abridged by southern trans of brooklyn kojic which i grew up until i was like fourteen than i want. Baptist coach was more grassroots. A with a james call gut bucket. We would do the singing. Shout lender hallelujah. Dan's baptist was a little more refined and methodist was even more refined. It was as a matter. Nile is a matter music. Like i remember wins in some big baptist church. When i was growing up. You wouldn't have drums She wouldn't have a is. That would sing. Emotional songs So when i go to baptist churches and met disturbed. Nbc and anthems. We didn't do that. All of out. Stuff with shirley caesar kinda singing and then got more refined with baptist sort of more cultural in class. Grassroots people were mortared pentecostals. And as i grew up gotten the civil rights movement when i was twelve they will all baptist and then later became i would read that. China's the baptists and they will learn it. We will all spirit. And that's probably why. I gravitated so james because james was a secular version of the holy roller with james. Do much different than we do in a quiet and the holiness church. Where are your parents from. You said they were from the south. Were mothers from dothan alabama. She passed my father was from eufaula alabama. Neither one of them is on the map. Wow we city is a joke. Don't do this dover. don't you follow you. Follow flood name. You follow follow follow. Okay okay as a musician. I do wanna know like right now as a record collector Kind of on my my my seventies gospel kick right now and i'm noticing that it's very hard to find rare to find like gospel records. That have like a certain group to it or certain soul to it. And i realize that a lot of it is that you know they thought it was sinful or whatever but you know it knowing that you're cut from the cloth of of the james brown Shadow if you will how i mean. How hard was it for kind of secular sounding music to finally break through to the black church where it wasn't considered a simple or that sort of thing because even when drumming and church like if i started playing to i would get looks from like the elders like you're playing at rap music. I knew that you're playing run dmc right now like that sort of thing blake how hard i remember that in the Early days of the sixties. When i was still like eight or nine and sam cooke Left the church co sam. Cooke started with what a of a gospel group left and started singing secular. They all he backslid. He's going to hell. And little richard would go in and out and after a while people would be in out ronnie was in and out. Ronnie dyson and people started getting comfortable that it was alright. It became all right because those kids got older and we didn't see the difference but it was a lot of tension. You're right if you if i would go to a political rally when i was twelve at backslid you in the world us proposed deal with going into heaven nothing on earth so streaming amuse. It was same in our socialite but this was the era where dot king got killed. It was the black power. I was still thirteen years old. And i wanted to be with my contemporaries and we were activists and many of them didn't stand activism. I did but that was a time where everybody was a member of something. You're either with us. With dr king or you with the panthers which will more militant or you join the nation la but everybody in new york something and your whole life was around what you remember love. You who were girls you dated was based on a wooden. What silo you in. And the church became had to make adjustments to that of because people started changing when i was first dot independent calls for women the wear lipstick or pants and i remember we went up. Yeah i remember. We went to detroit to a speaker youth convention and i saw my bishop so white come out at the motel with some slacks on. And i called my mother collecting madame washington's going to hell she's wearing gum connected to iraq wildfire ever buy something and then regretted pants. They fit great at the store. But after a while you avoid sitting in them. they're itchy. The windshield wipers are hard to find okay. We're talking about cars here. That's why carmax is introducing the love. 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The way it should be okay so at as of this recording were few days ahead of the passing of of the infamous Danny ray james brown's now some see his his his his I i guess you could say his His mouthpiece his paul revere can you talk at wool wins. The first time you met james brown. And what was that like when we when we were growing up when a grown up i was born in brooklyn i shared. My father had a successful business and he bought a house in hollis queens at that time. We thought queens. Hollis was like the suburbs and james brown had a big mansion in saint off and all the kids in the name golden stand outside the gate on the see james brown so he was my hero he. My father did his hand like brown. And but i never met so fast forward now known as a teenage preacher and i had a movement that you mentioned of course love appear came and johnny. You've moment same ages me and said he was from the south. He came to new york. You wanna go to columbia to go to law school and He joined my youth group. His name was ted. He ended up being james brown. Slow at about seven months after he was in our youth group to get in law school. He got killed in a car accident in all huge drive with some friends. It teddy got killed. James was having problems then Because he had endorsed this a seventy three. I'm eighteen now. And he had endorsed the year before. Richard nixon for president and a lot of the Brothers was mad at him for gone with nixon. You sell up and all and they pick it when he was at the problem. Seventy two when teddy got killed the next year. He came to new york about teddy. And the lead. This jack in new york in that time was hey expand on. Wwl adm this before fm kids for and right and hates span told him he said you want to do something In memory of your son this your son joined the youth group with this young preacher. You should do something for them and nobody will pick it you because everybody likes this little kid running around being a suit the rights guy and they set up for me to meet james brown at his office on seventeen hundred broadway and i wouldn't. I'm meeting god. That's why the whole background. I studied his gate. And james brown looked at me. And he look yuppie daddy and he started talking and you had no idea what he was talking about and wear. You know you do it until you do. Whatever and all of that and finally ship plan which was dismissing me. So we got outside. I totally youth with. I think he said he's going to do the show. So you know what to do. How pass out the prize from motown spam pumped it up and we did that the arc. Aol to downtown brooklyn. Which is now the albee square mall but it used to be. Did they had about two thousand seats and two shows was gonna sell out. Four thousand seats now added not ticketed. James brown and i didn't know that they were worried about what was going to happen. I went out and did everything he said. And he pulls up that night in in seventy three in the limousine and he jumps up and limousine driveway behind your backstage. It looks manage. Mr bobby mr bob it how do you do. Miss baba said they sold every ticket out. And there's about five people outside. He said what he said. Yeah and he told me you come at least son in behind james brian in the building and he went in combed his hair out. These talking and again. I don't know what he's saying and he is ready to go on stage. Danny raise introducing them to ban. It hit people screaming and he walks under stayed in the ways at my show now. Two years was miles and miles to come to see james. And i'm standing there between james brown and miles. They thought i died. And i show james. Stop the music. I think he doesn't try me or something. That was slowly stop told the van cut and they stock and he called me out. He's i wanna out. His young land made tonight happens. You've movie y'all help. My son was a pot. And i want him to lead us in fred memory of my son. So i'm like nerves used every pulpit but i've never been on a show business state. I walk up to the mike. And i looked at him. And he said freight gonna break. You know how to play. Don't and and came off. A james brown set for me dressing room after the show and he was sitting on the head drag because he would always have have until he died at every show he wrote his head back up and and i start talking to them and i'm trying to communicate with him and he's like the handwriting and all this noisy kept high. What you say. And i'll be back in august two or three weeks. I'm going to plan your career. And i met him in his office and he said we'll take you will be the california as the california said. Yeah and we went to california. Took me would underdo soul train. And he said away this day. Is that what you mean is young man. He's a teenager. I wanted to be giving you an award on soul train. But india paid back out and he said duncan you said we don't do water on this show and he said let's think payback and dog lee said. No you do that unless you let kidde giving me this award an hour i also drink. Aj brownies award. I was a big guy. Brooklyn there 'cause now all the girls they wouldn't give me a date because who wants to data preaching 'cause i was so tray with jay route and i became in many ways like teddy. 'cause i was saying based ambitious are in loss and he became the father that i didn't because my father left us when i was about twelve and back moved back to brooklyn we in the projects was on welfare. And james. start taking me around the world. And he kept saying. I want you to stay in the ministry. Brahmos your mother. You will lead the church seed. Send me on free to do my youth work setback for me. And he became like a father. Figure me. Wow wow that's an incredible story. I wouldn't know on now i now i get it now so i'm just curious. It's i know you guys had the father relationship but you politically you were growing and you were gone. Further and further apart. So you're just. How did that work did. Y'all have conversation. Did you not feel like we. We would argue. James brow was very conservative guy and to the right of of the right man from gusto george. He was a southern conservative and he didn't believe in not but he's always said we don't have that much jane ground always at one or two guns would not a regular country guy like that but we would debate an argue but he disliked him for me so he would always explain this guy's revenue more militant but as my son and he were taking your newsrooms and as i got known he would tell people. Y'all got except reps from the whites. Because he taking the crossover show. I never get later in his life. They gave him the kennedy center award and have me write the liner notes in the program. And when i got there that night to the kennedy center it was george. Bush was president and he was in the president's Whatever they call that where you sit up in the next to him. The box called the presidential box. Next game was cold and file and then there was the guest and james bond give revenue of the us so these people are nervous. Mr brown he'd been on. Oh let him. They always do fat. Mr brown reverend sharpton is running for president under democrats against mr bush. We can't do that. He says you got to do it tonight. And i'm sitting in a box. Now bush and bush's two or three people down so in the intermission. We all go into vip area. Only the president could go and honorees and their guests. And i come. Lynn and james jank james brown stood. There looked at me. President bush and george bush Brown honored to have you with us tonight. He says look. I know you got you off differences but his music today differences up calling took advantage. Jj brown he president. What are you going to do and george bush. Should i later like would laugh about that. Everytime i see george bush's tell anybody about jay grounded near you at at the kennedy center. Can i ask okay. So james brown won't be the first or the last. I mean i guess the paraphrase terms the rags to riches story that has probably more conservative. Leanings even though you know they say they're of the people by has more conservative leanings. And he said it out loud. Yeah well the thing is. Is that what i noticed. About this. this past election we just had the amount of rappers that were kind of going down the same This well this thing pull yourself up by the bootstraps in you. Know if i do you what do you think is the mindset that produces that i guess from him. It's like i'd. I worked hard to get here and everyone should file my path or is that like where he was coming from. I think that it is some of that of it. Is that and i were god. You can work out and some of that is that they just were afraid. You would interfere with where they were trying to go but the problem that they had with james is as conservatives serving as he was politically he had this real streak of black and he refused his music in black and he wouldn't apologize for blacklist. 'cause i go in places and they would tell them all. I was wondering one night. He went to the tonight show and they went to do the sound check and he did the sound check like he was at the apollo and guy told him that mr brown going to have to water it down out kind of audiences little kind of that. You know they wouldn't. It's too hard hit. And i never get in this way. I love james brown despite his politics and love him because he was like a father. He looked at the guy he said. If you want wanna semi debut should booked he said you go get. Jk rowling really in many ways what he would put in me. He said. I want you to be your own style. He said whatever you do. We used to ride around. He had about thirty to thirty three cars at his estate. We'd always be riding around one of his. I think one like a kid but a lot of these kids didn't hang around his daughters who still very young. And i want to hear all the stories all advice. 'cause he talked incessantly and his other sons. That would you know younger than me. But my almost mayes did they wanted to get away. They didn't want elections. I want it all of it. And we just ride around in the dock because it wasn't no street lights in the woods with james brown's status and he would be talking to me. I'm gonna be stopped one night and he said to me i wouldn't want twenty one twenty two. He's reverend because everybody was surname. He breathed in that respect thing. He's reverend. I want you to promise me one thing i said what's that he said. Promise me you'll never be one of the boys. He's i know you're preacher. No you civil rights but don't be like none of them be different. I always a diff- what i do my first two cards song. They noticed james brown. Nobody's unlikely he pulled up in a parking lot next to daddy grace church in augusta georgia and we just sat there. And i'm like what are we doing here. And after about a minute or two. You hit that. He said that But they haven't church inside. He's listened to that drum not listened and said yeah here he says that's where i learned the south. They on the one he said. I'm one three beat everybody else thunder to four beat learned out beyond the one. Set your own week. He said and if you set your own beat people always remember you and you own style. And when i started a lot of activism in your face kind of activism people you say all to bowl wide my marching and vincent while doing this you can put out a press. You make a statement from james brown. I developed my own style. I took a lot of flack. But bob father figure told me. I had to be different in bold. And i did that. And he used the lab saying revved. Just doing james brown and civil rights breslin bush. He's doing the raw stuff he's raw. I remember we were in his office. I'll tell you this store reason his office one day in nineteen eighty two and I've come down to disney. And he said. I hear your marching to try to get ducks. King birthday holiday gap. What i said you tight with republicans. Why don't you see if you can help us out. He's not president. Whatever i want. And he hit his intercon sector getaway other phones by myself. Yeah right to we go through the day out. Got something to eat comeback fall in the white house on the phone. Mr brown i looked at a little imprint. He picks up the phone and he talks to them in. He hangs up the phone. Since january fifteenth dot king birthday not is your holiday then get holiday but they agreed to meet with him that day. So i just use you as a showpiece. He said you're right. You said you'd gone with me. So i went back to new york january fourteen. He threw me to augusta to fly back to washington. I kept saying i can meet your watson. i'm going to ride with me so we are delta airlines. Because his private plane was in the shop in fit in riot. A new alternate reigning champs. So we sit in. First class is bartolozzi coach week. We sit there and he looks at me when the plane levels off. He's a reverend. I said yes sir. Is that what you're doing a favor. I said what's that he said. When we land going by. Bobby benefits. Grace bobby bennett. Was one of the famous flames would stop singing. But they still cool. And as old. Mr bennett okay. Because i met him a couple of times he'd come out to summit show. He said this benefit. I want him to tighten up my hair. I want him to do your hair like math. You won't do what he's wanting to do your hair like mine. And i i again. This is my father. My father never every nothing. All the abandoned sunday found the man that really felt. I was worthy of being like him. It was a real self identity. Thing bobby bennett did my half and became a started wearing the and we went met with ronald reagan. When we came back from the white house got in the plane. Hit back to gusta framed levels of again. He's more favorable. I said what's that he's i want you to wear your hair like that as long as a life. And that's why. I got the hairstyle from forget years later when he got trouble where he was old then went to jail. He would call me from jail about three times a week. And you have to call collect and he didn't call from south carolina correctional facility which seven. I'm halfway not bill. But i'd have to take his cough. He would never answer me at my kids work by then. I two daughters nothing. I was rather has your hair. 'cause he was checking can read it. And that's our flat from scituate brothers Species sacrificed for as long as father. My life i. I didn't catch is ask you since we're on the hair you've had this hairstyle for such a long time. Yeah now because it's still beautiful now those that no. Don't say those that say don't not the grease even you say edges a beautiful so whatever. It is what it is do you. I need to know. I think it's easier now because of social media and the internet. Okay but pre internet. Let's say Before nineteen ninety seven. I mean even though the internet was out then but it wasn't as viral if one needs to contact you for Assistant or your presence. How does one do that. And what is the thought process and the sort of decision making that you go through before you decide yes. I'm gonna take this on because i could. That ain't private. Let me start with How many calls do you get every day on an average to take a pause. Well be four ninety seven. I always since ninety one at office. And i got different. James would say you're not business you don't off always had a staff started with two or three now. We got offices in seven cities regional offices and the no government money we raise money and We have crisis developments that vet out case. Usually a lawyer will call because they want to help publicize like it started with vernon mason. Call me and say some happen Kid got killing howard beach. We vetted it. It gives us information. And i go and say we're going to do a march. We're going out in the neighborhood of now. Ben crump calls like he called me. When george floyd we want to reach and you know it has one of the things that was always crazy to me. They would always say while. Shoppers just wants publicity as what people call me. They want to blow it up. Nobody called me to keep a secret so we would. We would come in and we would decide that we thought it was legitimate and we'd rally people around it because if you don't create that kind of drama you will never create the media because it wasn't social media so other people said is shane thousand nine hundred eighty six to kill this boy michael gribbon howard beach because he was black and nobody knew what to do. I said well. Let's go out there. And they were saying it might have been a might a love triangle as i said if we march everybody what it is. What do you mean much as said we got to go out there and dramatize so i called the march. We went out there as we start marching down. The street made about five hundred of us. There must have been seven eight hundred white stuff coming out calling us inwards drawn bananas an everything at us and i said now everybody understand. It's a race thing. 'cause you bring it out and certain sections benson laid with us. They were going to make the case because they're going to react and that became on television. You had to remember. I didn't come out of georgia. Like dr king out of chicago with jesse on new york. You you compete with times. Square statue lived the empire state wall street. New york is everything so you got to be dramatic to get attention on your cause. So previously i was flamboyant days. You had to be in new york. You can't send out a press release in new york and get attention. You gotta do something. And that's what we would do. We would do things to grab the media attention. The outrages of it made the case which changed the racial profiling laws. But you had to. Be able to dramatize i i remember. We watching bentsen's political use of hawkins and they were on watermelons. Addison calling us. Words one of saturday's stab me. And i remember. I was watching lockdowns with usa vockins brother and he said now you right. They acting crazy. There's going to be wild on on Tv news tonight. They'll know now was ready to kill my brother. He said this is going to be great. I said yeah. We lived in ended his wife because they were crazy. Even got there. But that's what you have to do. You've got to be able to strategically to raise the level of britain that edge. You got to be real careful disciplined. And you've got to be ready to be different. People would not do that. It was me learning that the actors from james brown combining what i learned in the king movement and trying to bring it up north so the question that interested because one of the questions i have for you because you know you are a reverend and you said no. That's your call in but you. Are you know very much a celebrity as well. So how do you kind of walk that line between you know you're administering the calling but also having to be a public figure and if not an outright entertainer so to speak but you know like you said you have to get people's attention how. How have you walked that line throughout your career. Because i always am honest with myself. That i'm not a actor. I'm not a singer dancer. My celebrity came from my activism not activists of iran not a celebrity strata. Act like activists. I do what i believe in. And i won't do it if i don't believe me. I'm the kind of person that's very disciplined like that. And and i remind myself kit. You grown up broken home. A wealth in brooklyn that only god could have put me where i am and he put me there for a reason and i don't want to get him to drop me forgetting reason. I'm there when james brown and others tried to get me to just you can drop that you can do entertainment. Nah i gotta do. This is what. I'm never know you mr brown. It wasn't forgotten. I really believe when you Talk about you know doing you know. Get behind stuff that you believe in Do you think in any way like the toronto. The toronto brawley case. Did that change the way you were vet things In your career you know. How did that affect your where lawyers called me about broadening. And i was out there three or four months after you know. They started the case moving. I went on the lawyers word. And i believe and i believe this girl. Why would not you got to believe when people say thinking win them to error. But i learned from that to more carefully so that every month. Every is that every t's crossed to the best of your ability. You never know all the way what somebody do. Cause a year. After i got in brawley i serve for five. Kids accused of rape central pop. Then then confessed to. I ended up on. That one was wrong on broadly. It all happened within same year. So you take a leap of faith. But i learned not to take crazy leaks. Tried to let it as much as you can. And and be careful because you don't want to discredit the movement by getting in situations that blow up in your face like right now. We have three policemen indicted for a george floyd. We don't know what the jury is going to do when they go to trial. We went in and helped blow up. trayvon martin. Zimmerman got acquitted. And some people to say zimmerman. They said he was not guilty. But trayvon ma on this day so you got to be willing to stick in there and take the bad with the good but make sure your intentions are and right and that you as careful as you could be. Which is why. I've not had any cases like that since because i vetted even memorial brings it to me. I vetted as much as i can like. I'm a prosecutor. I wanna know every angle as the ford f series has been america's pickup truck leader for forty three years and counting. Front and center is a huge new available twelve inch sink force touchscreen and and available storable. Gearshift that actually folds down to make room for an available interior. Work service provides a desk light workspace or even a nice flat surface lunch to help make work more productive. The available pro power onboard gives you the ability to use your truck like a mobile generator. Power work tools at electric grew or that seventy inch. Tv at the center of your tailgate. Tough this smart can only be called. F one fifty check out the all new twenty twenty one ford f one fifty at ford dot com built ford proud built ford tough. Ford is a century. old family. Business takes pride in a things bills and the people it serves reminds me of my people. you know. Black people have been doing that since we landed in this country. Taking pride in the things that we build and the people in causes and institutions that we support and serve informed. Wants you to know that they are standing in solidarity with black and brown people. Actually let me read this correctly. Ford stanzas daria with all people especially black and brown people. Okay ford against injustice racism violence and hate and we're going to hold them to it because we are all built. Ford tough is the american way. We accept all these challenges and overcome that with confidence courage and eventually optimism. And i feel like we're at that point right now. Optimism so four wants to recognize appreciate the contributions of black people during black history month and beyond. Yes because as we all know it should start a black history month and take on the whole year because black history is american history. And if you're listening to this commercial you're probably an american to which means that black history is your history. Yes you go ahead and learn about those contributions we've been making and building for this nation so forth mission drive human progress through the freedom of movement gotta love that and nobody knows more about the freedom of movement than black people we continue to fight for freedom of movement we continue to celebrate the freedom of movement and the progress in forward movement of black people inspires in the world over. It's been proven so know that our history is your history that our fight is your fight and that our progress is your gress because when we remember recognize and respect we all move forward built. Ford crowd built ford tough. My question is there's there's you know we're going all over the place now in two thousand four when you decided what made you decide to try to run for president. In two thousand and four i would look at the fact that An eighty four. Eighty eight jesse at ron and had really move the party to toward the left with we believe and nobody had picked that up. And i'm looking at the fact that we adjust come out of the war on iraq and there were people that are had moved apply to the right clinton email well triangular and they were like almost centrist. And i get into debates to bring up racial profiling. The bring up police misconduct and how to one iraq was wrong so i ran to try to be on the stage to get a national of a hearing on our issues. And that's what. I did in the debates. I would bring up stuff that nobody would bring up with. They had to deal with rates they to do policing they had to deal with iraq. And i knew. I wasn't gonna win but at one because i made those Those issues become central. And a and i got a good vote and that that is when mainstream white america started saying that he not just some guy out the angry he really knows the issues but the the point was if we could get on the mainstream stage and alga issues. We could affect policy. And that's why. I rain. Can i ask you. It's interesting because the issue recently came up. I was watching a show about van jones. And i love the way you you ride your relationships because you were just talking earlier. About how of course ran against bush. Your relationship is not the same with bush was relationship is not the same with a lot of people right. Clinton's how do you walk this line. I mean in the van jones comparisons. Some people were saying well. Why are you in pitchers with this person. You know we don't that doesn't happen with al sharpton right like everything seems to be very planned out in a way but yet you still work together so can you kind of break that down because you gotta let him know is not personal but just like you got your beliefs. I have mine so Donald trump i knew in new york. I marched on about central park. Then he tried he was democrat win. Dinkins was in. But i would when trump one about a month after one he called. I'd been a morning. Joe that morning and joe actually about trump. He said you know you would woman any tried to be friendly. And i said well you gotta understand New yop to understand. Donald trump and explained trump was an outer boroughs guy in the keys on the money but he wasn't of the established you you were at the power spots so yet the chip on his shoulder that they that the talk avenue guys looked down on him and his father and he was able to translate that till the white blue collar working class. People who never once but he wasn't prodigy accepted rothschild's. Were able to sell it right so when i got off the show it is about december. I i think two thousand thirteen and what it got off to show no two thousand sixteen when he ran and I was in a board meeting of national action network organization and my cell phone rang. And i looked down. I didn't know the number. I don't silence. I let it ring ring against ask. Maybe something happened. So i picked up the phone whispered. I'm in a board meeting. Call later whoever desist. Because i didn't know number and said can you hold off with the president. Elect and i said can you hold on for the president elect saw put my finger like i'm in church and going to hall of of where we were. And trump comes. On al i saw in her smartening on morning. Joe you got me. you're right. i wasn't outside and look at me. now. I'm the president of the united states. Can you believe it. I said no. I am having a hard time believing a look at you. You gotta. Tv show but you're still marching. They never thought either. Water was would be anything he says. I want you to come to my life. But we're gonna talk. I said i'm not doing net. Says i'm not doing that. I said rich bread. You will not do the photo with me. We're not on a lot of people came to trump tower in those first months. Not me not. And the whole time he was in. He called me two or three times. And i wouldn't go to the white house and all because i understand from my background growing up in both the church and in show business optics are import everything and you get them to photo. They use it whatever way walk and i would not give him that photo. How how was it to see that photo when he had the whatever the fifty black freezers. Or what or did a unroll. How dismaying was it to see how easy it was to be. I'm assuming bob not know are yes but to see that. It was disheartening. Because you know that he's using you and knowing donald trump he probably didn't get people that much people get all enthralled. Just go to the white house and advantage. I love is by grown up around people like jesse james brown. How an impressive. I've been in the white house. I it's not going to white house lot of them. That never been invited before understand that. What the president. I mean they're going to be a new president in four years. Joe biden and i taught but joe biden will be gone in for years from the white house. I'll be out shopping as long as i live. I'm gonna stand for what i stand for. I'm not going to give that up for some temporary. Follow up. And i think and i tell a lot of those people that is don't play yourself like that they may you discard you and they don't need you. Any personal to cause is bigger than all of us. Were were there certain Preachers or or community leaders. That you knew that we're considering that you personally have to talk out of doing that. I've talked to a one or two. That i taught out of and i talked to one that i couldn't talk show and i won't give up their name. They have them. I know donald trump. Donald trump is a user. And he will drop you an and as soon as photos of which. He did look what he did. His own buddies led a lot of them get indicted and all he finds some of them. I mean that's who he is and you don't ever deal with a guy like he has no excuse forever. Can you please give the backstory. We idea the backstory behind. Somebody's pardons. i'm confused. Like i think that he felt that if he wants from them. Honest to god's relief is that he was looking out for him thinking that they would not sit up in jail and tell on him because now he can be prosecuted on a state level. And i told him out. I think he did that to couple the fact that he that he let no wayne kodak go and then the let twenty his boys go so he was trying to act of bow. Actually lie. I guess i am. I'm giving it to give it. The win situation was that he was on a private jet headed to miami and he had a things on him and of course the pilot winning karen mode and kind call the police ahead of time when he landed like with clients and they have guns on the plane so of course he gets nabbed he was already on probation. And what happens is His lawyer called up the governor florida and was like. Can you do whatever you whatever you can do. Just help us. So the governor gets him off and what happens is maybe a month before the elections wayne Pretty much Wayne's wayne's people got call Trump had said like. Give me any celebrity. Anyone any minute. I remember that i need. That's big in the black community in the car. And the governor remember what he did for wayne and it was sorta like a. You owe me thing. And what i believed happen. Was that wayne winning thinking. That was a one off photo app thing. Did the photo op thing. And then it was sort of like the bait and switch. Will you travel with me and and do the rest of the campaign. They were like no we. You said the one photo op thing. And then when that was broken trump got on the governor and the governor was like well i will just send your you know your part your probation and got to go back to jail and it was a it was a way bigger story Always i was curious to know your work with With younger activists. And what are some of the differences that you see between your generation and the younger generation of act was being know black lives matter just any of the youth organizations now and What are some of the some of the difficulties. You have in In dealing with the the youth activists are they more receptive to listen to. You know to take advice from an elder or do they just seem to be like. Oh no we wanna do it our own way. How how is that relationship for you. Somewhere down during the trae bond. Tease was tense. You know we don't want to listen to the old. God we wanna make on name and i kept telling them i said. Let me tell you some cameras gonna leave and we have to be organized and gradually. We started getting together. The three systems that started black lives matter. Gaza sister colors us at all. Three of them and i started talking a lot and they started. Seeing this thing was difficult. I started seeing this so we worked together. They do my tv show. We talk when. I did a book last year. Book totally virtually. Then you've got some that's out there. That's totally wild. Then you have others data sincere. And i tell them there's no difference in y'all want to do it your way. I want do a different ingest. Jesse did it. K- that's part of life. But we are all in the same callers. Might i must say last year. We call the big march in washington and we are in the middle of a pandemic. We had turned thousand people on k. And i told them. I don't i don't have to put no shame on. You ain't got to worry about the the anyway i can help. Y'all y'all can help me but you can't do. No violence stuff around me and most of them are not run and i won't do. I won't make you go to church. You throw a break. let's make compromising. We kind of get get the. I have a big youth department in my organization because i intend to. Somebody's going to take a mile organization. Go for a lot of the thing. I have my youth work with debt. You their same age. Somebody younger in national action network and the always been that you remember in history. Jesse was with dr king. Stokely carmichael was black. Powell was on the other side of the king thing. They're all the same age. John lewis jesse jackson stokely carmichael rap brown always the same age and there's always been differences in every generation so a lot of young accuracy. We speak for the you know you speak for some to some still go to church. Some youth the nonviolent idols before all elders everybody's got their pete's work your piece and let's try to make something happen and my thing is that is a big highway out here and as long as we don't switch lanes without a signal we will have an accent now. Just remind me. Sem malcolm extent was in aspects of what was going on. Sorry i'll tell you about see. I know we gotta go see spike lee called me and asked me to do that scene and i told you know that i was only eight years old. I've got killed. I'm just put you up correspondingly russell. Simmons and i grew up together new york getting on at around the same time as our generation spikes my respect by two years younger than me. So you seem them. Always mentioned in spite movies are denzel. Same as that's how generation. And i can t denzel about john. David getting more watched than you. Now because as you want to dance floor. Now now. I get it. Okay dance floor you times get off. Yes everybody leaves. I wanna know you know we live in a time now where you know the the the audacity of white supremacy is kinda proudly know rearing its head once again in ways that they haven't done since the twenties it my question isn't did you ever think it would ever come back to square one. I guess my question is how can we finally nip this properly in the would that we have not done thing. We're back at square one. I think that what we're seeing is a backlash like we never saw. There's always in history better back having slavery reconstruction and the backlash was the clan. I think what makes this different is the first time you had somebody in the white house that actually fan the flames to make the feel like nothing would happen to them. The more was on their side. And i think that the only way you're going to dip this in the bud is you're going to have to have some strong laws and you going have to make examples of them to go to jail if i had to tack and then others that feel that we will know how may feel this way. But i won't be able to behave won't do that. No more without my black folks stop crime. He's start walking some of them and they will start learning how to obey an ac like they got good sense and that that's what you gotta do and that's what i told by and you got to make examples can be no you know. Let's join hands and and sink combined going on what they did. They start with a george floyd or they start with demonize. Somebody like me. They run up in the capital and capital of the united states and was walking around looking calling for members of congress to hurt them. If y'all don't put this in a real focus of penalty they'll come after you because they don't care unless you make them here. Some of them left a real time other times like this You know even though you've worked your career as a nonviolent activist for the times like this really put that to the test for you like you know or or any other times in your career. Where the real nonviolent beliefs really tested. Yeah you've not violent. Don't mean you ah punk and angry but you you catch yourself. 'cause i also feel like the tickly like what we started this conversation. If i'm out the represent families. I can't let my emotions embarrassed them. So if i go off on somebody. I'm hurting their gardens travelling. I'm not just hurting now shopping. I'm hurting or george. Floyd tried not to list represent that but my jaw get tight. There's a lot of times. I even listen to talk radio because if i listened to some of the right wing radio would say i'll make my next speech because cousin everybody out your human but you gotta do surprenant keep telling yourself here for a reason not a season you gotta last it up. Hold these people. Oh thank you. Thank you ever oscars. What was your relationship. 'cause i guess i'm as i was born in seventy eight so my earliest memories of you believe it or not. We're from the morton down in june. You show he go out. So i mean he was like for. Yeah he would like this. Is like jerry springer before whatever but all right how much of that him Was that real. And because like you said you know in new york. I mean you worked a circuit. You see these guys all the time. How much of that of you and his relationship was like guys really didn't like each other and how much of it was kinda forwarded camera. What was i think after a while. We sorta understood that. He wanted me off for controversy. And i wanna him on. 'cause the mainstream shows wasn't booking us was lee using him to get out thing out there and i remember years later mike. Wallace did a thing with me. Early nineties on sixty minutes and he asks me. Why did you do one down there. I said 'cause you interview me. Soon as i start i live down here. No but we started really not liking each other but we kinda adjusted because i think it was equal. Use all right my final question. I have to say that your health regiment has been very inspirational to me in watching you. What was the decision to really. Get your your health game together and to get i guess. Get your your life right and how you keep it off doing their own or have you kept it off this stuff. You know at first do cartoons all about being a jogging suit and fat and that didn't bother me but as my daughter's older one day i was at the house and my youngest daughter. She was about five than ash. The she will go rian patted you on the said daddy you fat and that hurt me and i thought he wanted to lose weight and i lost a lot of weight and In night in two thousand one. I would let a protest puerto rico. You remember protests in the bombing. V8's and the judge gave me ninety days in jail and fast forty days. And i lost a lot of weight. And i felt that and i started saying you know what i'm changing my diet and keep it off so jail made me a to regiment. Some stop eating meat then. I pushed back on starches and sugars. And then i started feeling wanting to g i worked sixteen eighteen hour days and it just gave me more energy and right now i'll eat raw vegetables raw fruits. I may fish one day week but no lead at all. No chicken chicken preached patchy can place that you have to pass jesus. I was like wait a minute in church maybe among but and then a lot of people read. I lost weight do already lost the weight. I had no idea. I'd have a tv show but it's became a way of life and it doesn't bother me. That kind of willpower. I can sit down in front of people have to eat. it doesn't bother me at all. You are so amazing man. That's what's up dan. Sharpton you the shot. I just do you. I thank you for doing this for me. I know you schedules busy. You and thank you for being you. You better real cultural influence. Even though you hurt my feelings watch. Because i brought my daughter to thirty rock redwood and i was never by whole trend book to sit as london. Jump up the elders and they never act like roundly but they was traveling. You and i said disney grow some nerves that he's bigger than i ever arriving now. You just walk by. Thank you for doing this show. I appreciate it. Thank you so much love for real man. Oh i was just gonna remind everybody to make sure that they watch politics nation every saturday in something. Yes on behalf of team. Supreme is steve on pay. bill Wherever now appreciated this love supreme with you on the next around. We appreciate it thank you. Hey this is suga steve. Make sure you keep up with us on instagram. You l. s. Let us know should be next to sit down with us. Don't forget scribe to our podcasts. Supreme is production iheartradio for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite shows this episode is brought to you by ford. Ford is a century old family business. That takes pride and the things that builds and the people it serves. They think that we're all built for tough. Accepting challenges and overcoming them with confidence courage and him. There's no doubt that the weight of these challenges disproportionately falls on the african american community committed to listening learning and co creating solutions ford recognizes and appreciates the contributions of african americans during black history month and beyond celebrating key black cultural moments which is holidays events and historic occasions throughout the year. When we remember recognize and respect we all move forward. This is suga. Steve from quest love supreme. One awesome way to support the black community. Year round is by shopping. Black owned businesses with affirm discover brands like scotch porter. Fashion bomb daily luxury snob and many more. 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