35 Burst results for "Your First Company"

DoorDash Is Surging After its IPO

The KFBK Morning News

00:13 sec | 3 hrs ago

DoorDash Is Surging After its IPO

"Delivery piers ahead of its first quarterly earnings report. Since its December I Po San Francisco company accounted for 53% of US online food delivery and pick up in January. Stocks could open lower,

Po San Francisco United States
Gov. Abbott pledges ‘overhaul’ at ERCOT and stabilization of Texas power grid

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:45 sec | 4 hrs ago

Gov. Abbott pledges ‘overhaul’ at ERCOT and stabilization of Texas power grid

"Of Texas vowing to overhaul the state's electric grid operator after days of extreme winter weather crippled power for million's no power meant no heat and in some cases, no water for days. Governor Greg Abbott says the manager of power in the state came up way short. Cut repeatedly assured the state and the public. ERCOT was prepared. Those assurances turned out. To be false. He blamed power suppliers of all sources, but also said it was outrageous. That electric operator sent sky high utility bills to customers because demand soared. The state is Already investigating multiple electric providers about these spikes, But utility companies have said they're just following orders from utility regulators.

Governor Greg Abbott Ercot Texas
Women who lost jobs due to COVID turn to food delivery platforms

WBZ Morning News

00:36 sec | 5 hrs ago

Women who lost jobs due to COVID turn to food delivery platforms

"2.5 million women who lost their jobs in the past year because of the pandemic, are now turning to ride share companies to support their families. Services like you berates door Dash and instant Carter. Seeing an increase in driver's signing up for their platforms and a large percentage are women whose careers have been impacted by the pandemic. You berate says the number of women delivery partners more than doubled between April last year in January this year. Female drivers make up about half of other delivery partners at lift women make up more than 1/5 of all drivers at door dash 55% of the drivers are women.

Carter
A history of Mountweazels

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:38 min | 6 hrs ago

A history of Mountweazels

"Suppose. I wanted to start a company that sold maps i hire cartographers and spend a lot of time and money going out and gathering data. Because i'm just documenting something which exists in reality. The end result of all my hard work and investment is going to look just like other maps. That are out there already. So why couldn't i just skip all the effort and copy the maps which already exist. Sure i'll change the font and the colors but fundamentally the end result is going to be the same either way right. This is a big problem for any maker of reference products maps dictionaries and encyclopedias. You can't copyright facts but you can take steps to show that someone is a plagiarist or violating. Copyright they do this via copyright traps copyright traps are nothing more than false information which is putting reference material to catch people who copy their content. If you copy everything without checking you'll copy the false information which will be evidence of plagiarism. Promos famous example was in the nineteen seventy five new columbia encyclopedia. they created an entry for one lillian. Virginia mount weasel. They created a full entry in the encyclopedia for which was totally fiction. According to the entry lillian. Mount weasel was a photographer who was famous for her photos of south. Sierra me walk whatever that is according to the entry quote. Mount weasel died at thirty one in an explosion while on assignment for combustibles magazine unquote while there was no cases of anyone actually copying the mount weasel entry. The term amount weasel is now a term for a copyright trap. there's a million. Mt weasel facebook page and the lillian virginia mount weasel research center website which has fake interviews with people who knew her as well as fake copies of combustibles magazine while this is one of the best known examples of copyright trap. It's hardly the only one. The nineteen forty three edition of webster's twentieth century dictionary had an entry for junk attack spelled j. u. n. g. f. t. a. k. The entry read quote junk noun. Persian bird the male of which only had one wing on the right side and the female only one wing on the left side. Instead of the missing wings the male had hook of bone and the female an eyelid of bone and it was by uniting hook and eye that they were unable to fly each one alone had remained on the ground and quote. There's no pronunciation given so. I'm pretty sure i said it correctly because there is no way to say correctly. The new oxford american dictionary has a definition for the word espa valence. Their definition of the word is the wilful avoidance of one's official responsibilities. The thing is this fake word has actually found some usage and there is now an entry for in which which references the original new oxford american dictionary definition. Personally i think esco valence is a perfectly crumlin word problems. The heaviest users of copyright traps are matt makers in cartography copyright traps are known as trap streets trap streets are fictional street or locations which are used to check to see if someone is copying their map. They're usually very small streets or alleys of no importance as no one actually uses it as an address because it doesn't exist. There isn't too much of a problem if they appear on maps. The state of michigan put fake towns in ohio in their nineteen seventy-eight official roadmap. The towns were beata so spelled beat. Osu and go blue aka go blue. The colors of the university of michigan

Lillian Mount Weasel Lillian Virginia Mount Weasel New Columbia Sierra Virginia Webster Facebook Matt Michigan Ohio OSU University Of Michigan
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:10 min | 7 hrs ago

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

"And johnson. It's been shown that they're vaccine is effective at preventing hospitalizations and severe effects of covid. Nineteen this from scientists at the fda we're seeing about. I think it's sixty six percent effective when it comes to moderate to severe cases of covid nineteen so matthew. Tell a little bit more about what we're hearing with. His johnson and johnson vaccine right so what happened. Is that johnson. Johnson released data about a month ago. You know press release but the process for evaluating these vaccines is that they go through the fda and the fda really unique in the world independently looks at the data and re analyzes the data that the company produces and its own report and then hold a public meeting which will be happening friday and so the documents before the public meeting came out and they had some good news both some really clear data on hospitalizations and a general sense of approval from the fda researchers. Sometimes they're not as positive so it looks like this may be another option now. The big plus is on. This is one. It's a one shot dose. So you don't have to go back for a second jab in the arm and also doesn't need to be kept frozen like the pfizer derna vaccines do so shipping and handling of all of this will be a lot easier much easier to transport and that's a big advantage. It does not look like we're gonna have a huge amount of supply the start off with so it doesn't dramatically change how fast we're going to be any shots into people's arms but for a lot of people i think in a lot of experts i talked. You think this'll be a great option. It's one and done. I think some of the numbers. I saw the might have about four. That are produced right now. Ready to send out so it gets approved. They can get those out really quick but it wouldn't be until april possibly where they can really ramp up production to start distributing that right and will also be getting over that where they're hundreds of millions of doses of the two vaccines have the madonna and fayza biontech vaccines. That are expected to arrive in the us by july. So there's gonna be a lot more vaccine available. The jj supply will ramp up and we'll be getting more of those other two vaccines that leaves. There's a vaccine coming from nova vacs. We don't really know about how much will getting the early results issued press. Release again good and we're waiting for. Us results on the astra zeneca vaccine. Now some good news. With his johnson and johnson one is its effectiveness against these variants. That we've been hearing a lot about so it fared better than expected when it comes to those. I the way to interpret. That is we'd seen some results and the new results that they showed today look a bit better than what we'd seen in terms of variants. There's still does seem to be decreased. Efficacy against the south africa variant. Three five. Which is really the one that we're all worried about but it did look better than what we've seen previously and what j. j. has said it seems like with those variants. This vaccine is still preventing severe disease and hospitalization. Which are the key things. We've always wanted from vaccine here. The idea that you'd prevent a symptomatic infection or mild cases kind of bonus compared to just making sure that people end up in the hospital hospitalizations numbers were good on that front. What did we see when it comes to side effects. I saw that there were a few unexpected side effects. Although these are very rare you know but The expecting side effects the kind of pain in the arm the headache fatigue. That's pretty much in line with the other two vaccines. We have that right now. There were some rare events that occurred more often in the vaccine in the placebo group. Keeping in mind that forty thousand people were in this trial. There were fifteen serious blood clots including some. Dvd's in that exciting compared to ten in the placebo group. That's something the fda plans to monitor there was also some rini ears in the vaccine group and not in the placebo group. So that's kind of an odd one that will wanna watch again. This is really a prelude to friday win. Some of the top experts in the world are going to gather on zoom call and go over these data that the fda assembled we'll be live blogging that stat. That's when we really find out a lot about any medical product. It's it's one of the amazing things. The fda does now an interesting thing in all of this so public health officials might have a messaging problem when it comes to pumping the johnson and johnson. One out when we're seeing guys like pfizer maderna's say that their vaccine is ninety five percent effective against corona virus. Just listening to numbers right. This says sixty six percent. So what are they going to have a challenge in getting people to want to take this one over the other or you know how how to work out. It's really important to realize that particularly between those three vaccines. The getting vaccine is much better than not getting a vaccine. The change vaccine may be on par after a second dose and that study is being done but unlike visor during the second dose is going to be months after the first and then also slows down the study. She gotta wait right for people to get their second dose. So we're not expecting those data until kinda summerish but the big thing is for a lot of people. There was also the appeal of a single dose here. And i don't think we should understate that. And the effect on severe disease is big so the problem is gonna be the in the initial rollout. You really want people to take whatever vaccine. They're giving because being vaccinated is so much better than not being vaccinated. And that is part of the path to get in the world back to normal and public health. Authorities are absolutely going to have to articulate that now again because there's not going to be that much supply of this initially. They're going to have time for a learning curve right now. the demand for vaccines clearly outstrips supply. That's why you're hearing so many stories of people desperately logging on trying to get vaccine. What scott gottlieb used to run. The fda has raised the issue of you know. We're we're going to reach a point where the people who wanna get vaccinated we'll have been vaccinated and we're still going to need to vaccinate more people and that's when convincing people who are less sure to take vaccine in to take the vaccine that's available is going to become more of an issue last question briefly pfizer moderna vaccines are based on 'em a. What kind of platform is the johnson and johnson. When using this like theatrics annika vaccine is called an ad no virus which is a kind of virus that is used to the same kind of ideas marin a the instead of traditional vaccines were you inject the protein that your immune system sees and then learn to recognize an attack. These sneak something into your body that makes a lot of proteins. You make a lot more protein and then the body recognizes that an attack it in this case they're using this virus which is kind of a cold virus to sneak some genetic material in and that makes the spike protein from the sars virus which your body then learns to recognize and thereby has antibodies that attack the virus

Johnson FDA Astra Zeneca Pfizer Pfizer Maderna Matthew Nova Rini United States South Africa Headache Scott Gottlieb Marin Cold Virus
"A Touch of Disney" to open at company's California Adventure Park

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:09 min | 9 hrs ago

"A Touch of Disney" to open at company's California Adventure Park

"Closed. And dates are not yet announced. For all of the parks to reopen KCBS is Doug Sovereign says you'll be able to stroll shop and eat but not take any of those rides. Many a Californian is jonesing for the sights and sounds of Disneyland of Disney's California adventure. Despite intense lobbying by the company Governor Newsome and State health officials have not budged in the theme parks are not likely to reopen the full until released this summer. But with coronavirus numbers improving, they have won permission for a touch of Disney. Coming Thursdays through Monday's for at least two weeks. March 18th legal fifth What is a touch of Disney? Basically, it means you'll be able to walk through the different lands of California adventure, dining and shopping on our limited and socially distant basis. Mickey Mouse, Lightning, McQueen and other characters will waive it you and pose for photos from a safe distance. Everybody has to wear a mask. Even if you've gotten a covert vaccine tickets $75 each That does include a $25 food and beverage credit, and they must be purchased online in advance. No parades, no rides, but an immersion into the world of Disney and almost 1000 workers kept their jobs back. Doug Sovereign

Doug Sovereign Governor Newsome Disney Kcbs California Mickey Mouse Mcqueen
Overcoming AI Deployment Challenges In The Enterprise With Mahmoud Arram Of Bluecore

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:43 min | 10 hrs ago

Overcoming AI Deployment Challenges In The Enterprise With Mahmoud Arram Of Bluecore

"So mood. I wanna deal to dive in with here on this theme of our thursday interviews around making business case for a means. Different things to different people you know. All i know is when an executive is deciding to adopt a or not ex- deployment they're looking at a certain number of component parts to make that decision. What are those key parts for you. Thank you for having me. Yeah from from my perspective so our customers are brands and retailers. And i have found that is a bit of buzzword. Everyone right now. Has the i in their name including a company where i bought my standing desk from so it has lost. Its meaning i think when it came when it comes to business cases so the way i have been thinking about it is in terms of accelerating ghouls that the companies already have in the case of brands and retailers. What has been happening Especially in the pre covid world. Is that the cost of acquiring customers has been going considerably up. There's a lot of venture capital money. That's going into direct to consumer brands. Everyone is buying ads in order to acquire new customers. but then no-one has been thinking about retaining customers. Retaining customers is much more efficient and in order to retain customers and one of the elements you have to do. There is to communicate with them at the level that the like and the able to personalize content at least in the context of retail. Now a i can make that possible. And essentially what we replace existing workflows and outdated technology that makes retaining customers cost effective and makes a from a workflow perspective very expensive and all of that easy and we just happened to us to make that possible. Yes you're saying accentuating in existing already kind of present goal that said i guess. Different kinds of deployments they involve different factors here. So i'm thinking about what it looks like to apply to detect fraud or to build a chat bot where we've gotta get a pretty strong corpus of our own data together we've gotta clean and harmonize that stuff. We've gotta get cross functional teams to come together. Maybe make sense of that. Some applications like a security camera that detects people. Well it's pretrained. I don't need any interaction. You're buying it software. It's off the shelf end of story. But i would imagine for a deployment often. We do have those realistic considerations so we don't have to sell with the whizbang like a nimrod that like. Ai is cool for its own sake. I think safely squarely. That's for nimrods only in this. Podcast hopefully has very few of them tuning in certainly if they've been berated long enough with the messages that we've been sending to them in best practices but those considerations still feel real and feel like they're things that leadership is going to have to address. How is that presented on the table when people are saying. Hey or nay whether it's to your solution or something else. Yeah what we've seen is that there's a lot of digital transformation project out there especially in retail which is vertical that we focus on a minimum buzzword in there. Lots of consultancies. That are working on this. What we've noticed is that there are lots of these projects that have been going sideways. A lot of money has been spent on those and essentially a lot of the challenges that they've run into are around essentially what you were just saying. What is the collection. How do i collect even my own data at silos. It's in different parts. It's different databases you. You think about retail. It has a very complex data. Set that moves. The difference steve's In very different levels of structure can have real time interactions on your website. And then you have inventory movement in physical stores so usually you're getting that data all in one place in order to even run analysis like let alone execution on top of becomes a hard problem right and there are many cases in which is solves that solves the collection of data. I would say in on this case it would be machine learning and even the precursor of it which is how do i actually wrangle all of this data. Put it into one place. So that i can actually run workflows on it. It's so i would say usually that usually that is the consideration is how to solve the problem. Before you even embark on the part. That feels like. I mean if you're you know you're selling whether you're a service or a product you're selling into an enterprise. They're going to have to overcome that right. It's not you're not just going to be like well you can figure the api's and up. I'll show users how to use an internet. See you later guys. It's not really like that. We're going to have to dive into these silos to some degree. How do you present that without scaring people away. Hey look this is going to involve some integration here evolve harmonizing some stuff. This is gonna involve work in new ways and think it through new problems like you said we're identifying with a goal that we know is important to the client. I think that's tremendously sharp smart. You know more pressing than ever in this kobe era. But but how do we present the realities of what the planet look like without making it spooky. So let's easier said than done. The reality is in a lot of these digital transformation projects that included a component. The integration part is usually what fails everyone says. Oh yeah. I have the is. Of course you can put this system that system. And you can integrate oracle with adobe and the reality. Is you know companies lack either. The technical background to do this or usually everyone has such a snowflake off an implementation. There's so many new. You look at a marketing automation. There are five thousand different than theirs on the keep sheet so everyone has a very different permutation of systems on their staff and integrating all of those together. Especially if you are a new vendor on the stat is really really difficult so that is a very common failure which you have to overcome in order to be able to be successful. So there's success of being able to sell in their success at being able to actually deploy.

Steve Oracle Adobe
Women who lost jobs due to COVID-19 turn to food delivery platforms

KNX Evening News

00:36 sec | 11 hrs ago

Women who lost jobs due to COVID-19 turn to food delivery platforms

"Many of the nearly 2.5 million women who lost their jobs in this past year because of the Corona virus pandemic are now turning to ride sharing delivery companies to support their families. Services like you berates door Dash and instant Carter. Seeing an increase in driver's signing up for their platforms and a large percentage are women whose careers have been impacted by the pandemic. You berate says the number of women delivery partners more than doubled between April last year in January this year. Female drivers make up about half of other delivery partners at lift women make up more than 1/5 of all drivers at door dash 55% of the drivers

Carter
Texas energy supplier under fire

Jim Bohannon

00:38 sec | 13 hrs ago

Texas energy supplier under fire

"Of Texas is power grid ER got are expected to receive a lashing in the first public hearings about last week's power miss. Tomorrow Storms lead to millions to be without power and in some cases got thousands of dollars in electric bills. KTV tease Jack Think is in Dallas with what the company has said so far Cost CEO said during the first storm, power plants kept going off line while demand surged. You said nearly half about 48.6% of power generation was forced out at the worst point to prevent a blackout. They told companies to cut power for millions of customers. The CEO admitted communications problems at the time a new

Jack Think Texas Dallas
If You Sell Your Bitcoin, Michael Saylor and Jack Dorsey WILL Buy It

The Breakdown with NLW

04:37 min | 15 hrs ago

If You Sell Your Bitcoin, Michael Saylor and Jack Dorsey WILL Buy It

"Before powell spoke investors had started to get nervous in the us around the potential for an early unwinding of the fed's extremely aggressive approach to keeping rates low and stimulus etc. Because of this the market was getting out of stocks and into treasuries driving the yield of treasuries down and by the way if that sounded like greek to you. We're actually going to do a macro one show. And a bond specific show as part of that new kiddo show set as well either way powell gave testimony to the us senate banking committee on tuesday and said that the economic recovery remains uneven and far from complete and the path ahead is highly uncertain the bloomberg headline this morning about it said powell reiterates view that labor market has a long way to go. Pow pointed out that there are ten million fewer people employed. And that's a long way to go to maximum employment and this is really important the mandate the fed is actually two parts market stability. But it's also full employment the tools however that they have to achieve that full employment are limited and what we've seen is that asset prices tend to benefit before full employment is reached over the course of this year. We're likely to shift from the market stability part of that equation to the full employment part of that equation but it still promises a pretty aggressive approach from the fed powell also mentioned digital currencies saying it's a priority and that they'll be reaching out to congress about it in twenty twenty one so we'll have to come back to that soon next up on the brief today trouble in arc land i have discussed kathy would and arc pretty frequently here most recently in the episode last week i find it interesting. How a lot of the macro dynamics that are potentially interacting with bitcoin might be interacting with arc funds as well arc has seen a stratospheric rise over the last year but has been hammered. The past few days in fact it started a couple weeks ago as people started to get nervous about how concentrated arcs of some of their companies were remember. Our funds have specific feces around innovation. So there are frankly. Only so many companies they can buy if their fund owns to high percentage of those companies. The fear goes it could create risk in both directions that an issue in one company could create broader risk for arc or vice versa that arc could create new exhaustiveness risk for the companies themselves over the past few days however the concern has been less about that and more about this rise in treasury yields the innovation. Etf which is their flagship. Fell three sessions in a row. It had its worst today. Drops in september and again basically these yields were reflective as we just discussed of investors thinking that there was going to be pressure for rates to rise and for fed support on wind earlier than expected because of that they were moving out of the pricier parts of the market. I e tak. Now for her part. Kathy would said she wasn't worried said that she welcomed the correction and to be fair. She's gone from three billion assets under management in january twenty twenty two more than thirty in january twenty twenty one to more than sixty billion last week still. I think this is worth watching as a reflection of the bleeding edge of the markets. I don't think. Bitcoin is so correllated that you can watch these things move in tandem. But i do believe that. There's some proxy for how traditional investors might think about bitcoin at any given time based on the macro context lasts up on the today. Let's talk about the latest out of india. India as we've discussed has been very aggressive. Vis-a-vis crypto currencies with that seeming to only heightening right now a couple updates from the last few days rakesh ginger who's likened to an indian warren buffett. The billionaire investor he told. Cnbc never buy bitcoin that. Regulators should step in and ban cryptos in india and called bitcoin speculation of the highest order. So pretty much that. Warren buffett description is accurate at least when it comes to opinions on bitcoin at the same time however he also stated that india should focus on the creation of an official digital rupee. This was echoed by comments of reserve bank of india governor who reiterated that. The rbi has major concerns around cryptos but that they are working aggressively on a digital rupee. I wanted to point this out. Because i think it shows just how much india is going to really draw. This contrast between killing cryptos private cryptos and network cryptos while simultaneously trying to harness that momentum for an official central bank digital currency is that paradigm. That one can't survive while the other one does or are there different ways to look at

Powell FED Us Senate Banking Committee Bloomberg Kathy India Congress Rakesh Ginger Warren Buffett Treasury Bitcoin United States Reserve Bank Of India Cnbc
Thousands In Texas Still Don't Have Power As Lawmakers Investigate ERCOT

All Things Considered

03:34 min | 15 hrs ago

Thousands In Texas Still Don't Have Power As Lawmakers Investigate ERCOT

"Last week's mass power failure continues, and so does the political fall out. Have been resignations from the body that oversees the grid and lawmakers open their investigations tomorrow. Joining us now is Dominic Anthony Walsh of Texas. Public Radio. Hi there. Hi. First. How's the recovery going? How are people doing? So the majority of the state does have power and water back. But there are still thousands of residents, especially in the Texas Hill country, for example, who don't have power and their electric provider isn't sure when the power will be back. So for thousands of people of this crisis has stretched on for more than a week. And you know bodies are still being found. Local officials are saying it will be weeks till we know the full number of people who died in this disaster, but it's already in the dozens and is expected to climb to well over 100. And these are people who couldn't power medical equipment people who froze to death in their homes or in their cars, as well as people without housing, who froze to death outdoors, experiencing the worst of the conditions. Wow. So in the face of that staggering death toll, the hearings begin tomorrow and the actions of ERCOT, the body that manages the Texas grid are likely to be front and center. What do you expect to come up? Is gonna be a lot. But one key question. Why wasn't the power grid ready? But ERCOT, which again is at the center of all this doesn't actually own the physical infrastructure that provides power. Rather Okay, just oversees the flow of electricity. Here's Peter Crampton, now former member of their cots board. He spoke at his final board meeting earlier today. Cutlets flying a 7 47. It had not one but two engines experience catastrophic failure. And flew the damage playing for 103 hours before safely landing in the Hudson. In my mind the men and women in their car control room here out. So in this analogy, those engines that blew up could be power generating units owned by public and private power companies, not ERCOT again. Haircuts rule was to do an emergency landing. That's the order of so called Syria's of controlled blackouts. So that and even worse crash when it happened like the entire grid going off line, which, according to Urquhart, could take a weeks or months to repair. So far, Kat is likely to argue that they were just doing the best they could with a bad situation. Are there other places Lawmakers might look to hold people accountable. Absolutely. First, there is the Public Utility Commission of Texas. It oversees our cod and has a three member board appointed by Governor Greg Abbott. Second, there's the railroad Commission, which actually oversees the natural gas sector, not railroads and the natural gas sector failed to provide enough power during this crisis. Those two agencies, the Public Utility Commission and the railroad Commission have regulatory power. ERCOT does not. And of course, there is the state Legislature itself, which actually makes the laws that these agencies are supposed to enforce. One proposal mandate that all plants whether as against cold weather, and there's a debate around that who pays for the weatherization taxpayers or the company's And finally, people are already resigning. Tell us about why So Peter, cramped in who we heard earlier, along with a few other board members resigned after taking heat that because they didn't live in the state now did them living out of the state caused these blackouts. No, but Governor Greg Abbott was quick to welcome The news. In the short term market officials will face hearing from the state Legislature tomorrow, and there will be tough questions for them. But again, Ultimately there are other bodies that hold most of the power is actually mandate changes after all of this.

Ercot Dominic Anthony Walsh Texas Hill Peter Crampton Railroad Commission Texas Governor Greg Abbott Public Utility Commission Urquhart Public Utility Commission Of T Hudson Syria KAT Legislature Peter
F.D.A. Analyses Find Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Works Well

All Things Considered

03:31 min | 16 hrs ago

F.D.A. Analyses Find Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Works Well

"May soon be available in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration could decide as soon as this weekend to authorize a vaccine made by pharmaceutical giant Johnson and Johnson for emergency use. The FDA today released its evaluation of the new vaccine and NPR's Joe Palka joins us to describe what they found Hijo. Hi, Ari. So there were a lot of details in the FDA is evaluation, but bottom line. Was it positive or negative about it? Well, they don't exactly give conclusions like that. But general, you'd have to say that the analysis was positive. The FDA based its judgment on a large study involving some 40,000 participants that was carried out primarily in the United States, South Africa and Brazil. Now, this vaccine only requires a single shot, so participants either got the vaccine or a placebo. And what researchers found was that overall, the vaccine efficacy was about 66% in preventing moderate to severe cove in 19. And 85% against more serious disease. Stacy Schultz Terry is a professor of infectious diseases at ST Jude Children's Research Hospital, and she took a look at the FDA analysis. I did not see anything that would make me pause in recommending that somebody would go get this shot. Joe tell us more about that 66% number because a lot of people have zeroed in on that to say, Wait. Does this mean it's less effective than the Fizer and Madonna vaccines, which reported close to 95% of efficacy? Yeah, The numbers suggest that but you have to have a little context here. First of all, you have to remember that. Initially people would have been satisfied with the vaccine that was just 50% of efficacy. So this is the first vaccine to come. If this had been the first vaccine to come along, people would have been thrilled. Second vaccines behave differently when the rolled out to millions of people, and so there may be changes in the numbers going forward and third variants have popped up around the world. And Schultz Kerry says the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is the first to be tested against those and it did well, African see against the virus circulating in the U. S Good African see against thesis South African and the Brazilian variance as well. And the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is easier to store and distribute than the other two. Tell us about that. Well, yes, I mean, the first obvious thing is that the only requires one shot And that means people don't have to come back. You don't have to chase after them to make sure they get a second shot, so that makes logistic easier. And second of all, it's not as it's easier to store. It doesn't require these special freezers that the modern a vaccine requires. And so what happens next? We said there could be emergency authorization as soon as this weekend. Well, the process works like this. The FDA receives a bunch of material from the company and then they evaluated and that's what they released today and then before they make a decision, they convened a group called the Vaccine Advisory Committee. And they will meet on Friday to discuss and evaluate and two over the data, and by the end of the day, they'll issue some sort of a recommendation to the FDA and the FDA generally follows the recommendations of this advisory committee. And how much of a difference is this likely to make in the supply situation if there are three circulating rather than to now? Well, it's going to make a difference. Maybe not right away. There's going to be a few million three or four million doses released almost immediately if the vaccine is approved or authorized. 20 million. They expect by the end of March and 100 million by the end of June, so it's not going to solve the problem right away. But it will certainly help NPR's Joe

FDA Johnson Joe Palka Hijo Stacy Schultz Terry St Jude Children's Research Ho Fizer United States Schultz Kerry ARI NPR Brazil South Africa Madonna JOE Vaccine Advisory Committee
"A Touch of Disney" to open at company's California Adventure Park

WBZ Afternoon News

00:22 sec | 17 hrs ago

"A Touch of Disney" to open at company's California Adventure Park

"A pretty good day on Wall Street across the board, Let's see what happened in Bloomberg business. These theme parks in California have been closed for almost a year. But this afternoon, the mouse is unveiling a mini reopening plan. Starting March, 18th e Disneyland in California Adventure Parks will offer a limited capacity experience. It's calling a touch of Disney chops and outdoor dining will be open for a ticketed guests. Rides will not

California Adventure Parks California Disney
Interview With Kfir Yeshayahu

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:09 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Kfir Yeshayahu

"Our guest. Today is kafir yahoo. Who's the senior vice president of products. Advair atone so high kefir on. Thanks so much for joining us today. One it's gonna be with you today the We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at their tone of course so under the product invade on of busy building. I will which is the alternative system for high as well as accompanying tools to really solve some of the toughest problems in adoption today. In general one of those challenges that were focused on is open holder tising. Ai which is a fascinating topic for me. Having started with data science many many years ago. I've seen how data science was done in some of the most sophisticated data organizations in the world back in the israeli intelligence community. And i've been living the sort of evolution mini revolutions fe. I ever since in loud companies like microsoft and has of groups in the and others before joining the verizon i managed devops oriented boorda in. Aws the amazon cloud so my perspective on 'em at all is coming from both sides from day iside and Devops and now. I'm saying that the dan's in the space who both the perspective of on itself. And i don't own business units as well as Without many customers of the iowa who are in various stages of the junk. That's really very insightful. Because we've been definitely spending a lot of time talking about machine learning operations. Emily obstinate model management. And all these things that have you have to deal with once. The model is as building. People tend to think of of sort of all the work that has to go into training a model making the model happen which is definitely a lot of work. No doubt about it especially even the data preparation even before even build the model right. That's a lot of work but now that you know these models are out there in the wild in in production people are realizing the challenges of keeping these models relevant and high performance. And just doing what they're supposed to be doing. So maybe you could talk to us about what you see. Some organizational challenges as they tried to bring machine models into production of course so different studies and surveys though talking about some little between fifty to ninety two why blamed but fifty two nine hundred projects. Don't actually make it phone. Put that to production regardless of where you fall in the way. It's a pretty sad ratio. Now what makes it even wolves. Is that a project. Take a long time to demand often six months to a year. And you know they'll be walked by Most expensive in the organization we invade have experienced the same thing in the past the first day i projects and applications developed by our business units to literally month to complete. Now we're looking at fox and the stakes were sometimes too high to even start. The border. don't going directly a question about challenges until recently. A lot of the buzz in the industry was about talent shouted. I think this issue is is going away. The market is is balancing itself and good talent is coming from all sorts of different defections into the will. it did not cheap way more accessible than before. The challenges didn't have shifted in my opinion from talent gaps to both insistent cups. And i'll try to gonna show that in four different buckets. So one of them is is portions. How do i estimate the ally often. Ai project how do i define the budget endgame. That's very different than than traditional software projects. Why d- projects the second bucket is integration applications and and solutions in genoa. Now this may sound of sideways from from but it's out of the whole challenge of production izing. How with to play with the application. This is interesting for me especially from extent point because naive. Boches don't always walk because of the nature of the modern. They'll give you one of many examples. Ai models often produce results with degrees eleven of confidence.

Boorda Yahoo Verizon Amazon Emily Iowa DAN Microsoft FOX Genoa Boches
Audio Branding and Marketing with Audioburst founder and CEO Amir Hirsh

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

03:59 min | 1 d ago

Audio Branding and Marketing with Audioburst founder and CEO Amir Hirsh

"How can brands or marketers. Get involved in audio in your mind. You're at the forefront of where audio is going some curious where you think people should be getting involved so i like to think about it as Two types of activities. They should be included in thinking about it. As let's bit in in order and on audio okay. When i thought about in all your means they should start placing their message their brand their marketing activity within the audio dimension itself. So either if they can do it. Then i recommend produce their own podcast upload their own content so much like they've invested in creating blogs before in order to deliver the directly their message with no intermittent intimate in in between they should create a podcast where they can add their own voice in story through it. Because people would like to listen about your company if they're going to start in investigating into your product and they wanna hear about it and as audio breasts and others are gonna make all your more accessible and searchable you want your clips in your story to be heard than to be included so within the audio by producing it or by exactly like what we're doing right now being interviewed by making sure that your product is exposed to podcasters lead casses review. Your product. understand what you're doing interview you place your message within the stream of audio because it's going to be extremely popular and that's where people are going to learn and get information and would like to hear about your brand okay. That's the first level that they can do. The second is what i consider the on audio as audio becomes more and more popular more emotional people become more connected with it. It creates an opportunity to sponsor all your to support audio so and they don't have to appear in the content itself but they can place their brand around it in sponsoring playlist sponsoring podcast. Creating an audio event within their of third party of curation of content is relevant to their vertical and the topic but brought to you by this or that. So let's say that i'm an. We'll go back to the automotive industry. Let's emma brandon wants to emphasize car safety and safe a driving than perhaps i created this audio event of curation with podcasters around it or existing onto the we've selected and connected and we recommend our customers to listen to that kind of content all brought to you by my brand as an example saying goes for the running shoes same. We'll go for any other brand marketer that wants to create that brand affinity between their brand and the topic and the content that they're potential customers care about. That's the on audio marketing. So you don't have to produce it an appearance in it you can just curate. It and you can create stories around the be the content. Dj of your customer. That's the kind of refill and marketing activities can do around audio and it reminds me. I've said this before on the show but it reminds me of Frankly like going way back in time when there were only three or four. Tv stations and the advertisers or sponsors were more intimately involved in not just being on on air so to speak sponsoring or or helping but they many times helped to craft the program itself and the being in the show so to speak or in audio and there's elements to that i think based on what you described it. I mean it's just a much bigger ecosystem to play in now and so many more different applications to do it. But i think you nailed it in terms of like just being in the program in the audio or surrounding yourself around or on the audio. It's kind of an interesting way to break it apart.

Emma Brandon
The Power of Audio with Audioburst founder and CEO Amir Hirsh

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

07:38 min | 1 d ago

The Power of Audio with Audioburst founder and CEO Amir Hirsh

"Historically it's becoming more and more accessible but how can audio be more accessible so when we started audio your we analyzed. How come we as a personal fans of podcasts in your content and radio content as well thought that there's always all the answer that you want and all the content exists out there. How come he doesn't pick up on the internet. The hukou doesn't pick up on the new digital world and age the same as text and video n. there were several challenges that we've analyze and found them that what we've built around in order to solve his that audio in many aspects is not very easily discoverable. So you can't search audio. You can't came on your. You can't share argue a lot of the times. The audio content was one hour or forty. Five minute long of podcasts or radio show now is very accessible. You can't search for it. You can't look for specific clip or area that you'd like to listen instead of listening fully immersed into the whole show and you couldn't share any of it so what we've done in audio versus that we've built an ai engine that listens to vast amount of audio content. Have it be podcasts. Radio online videos that pretty much became slide with the audio content behind it and in an essence does three actions wanted analyzed it and cut it into short clips so we were able to take a long form show and cut it into the individual items that conversations the topics the questions that happened within it allowing users to get into specific point than sample what they're looking for the second is that we've index each clip that the we call burst we've added as much as possible transcriptions keywords entities source time a mood analytics number of speakers. There's plenty of dimensions that we've added to each clip like that so we'll be able to find it afterwards when the user can't and then we've added that delivery mechanism. Api layer and then on top of it as decay an imitable player for the web and libraries for and android to allow the different products and the different places where users are today to add an embiid audio layer to their products the main essence and misses that we wanted to do an auburn while making acceptable is making it extremely easy for products to add an audio layer and our dimension to what they're offering to their clients and to their users instead of asking the uses to come look for audio summer to come download an app or look for it online. We said no. I want the to be able to listen to their podcasts. Within the running up on the websites to be able to add the audio interview of the person mentioned within the article in the article itself and available that way. We're working on integration with podcasts. Search and audio playlist to be added to automotive to oem's and tier one. So when we drive. I want the or your car to greet you. Good morning. Allen here's the Traffic report and here's what happened in the news. And by the way. I know that you asked about tesla stock last night. Now i'm sorry a couple of days ago here is a couple of Analyst talking about it. That i've found over the night while you were sleeping. That kind of mechanism makes audio is easy and accessible to users wherever they are whenever they are just a touch away or command away or click away and that's the mission that we've done in august and it's quite the future picture. Frankly it's happening today. Alan i gotta tell you so. No no i know. I know it's it's amazing to me. I know you've you've been spending a ton of time building the tech in the meta data structures to make that possible and you talked about a few of the potential customers or ecosystem that you operate in like the news aggregate or the even the automotive industry. Can you go a little deeper for me. Like tell me a little bit more about like where audio burst operates today and like what are some additional use cases where you see your technology fitting in happy to one you remember. We started this conversation with you calling me crazy so i still need to convince you whether you know or futuristic or it's happening today. We were lucky enough happy enough to have multiple great partners invest in our company and work with us hand in hand to build this future. Earth with juristic thing. So you'll see among our investors for example samsung and hyundai and denso giants from the mobile and consumer electronics through the automotive and media world. That have joined with us in this effort to make this happen and that was an incredible. That is an incredible journey for us to do. Other birds today is live and via our player in. Api's and as decays in our have added all your to mobile apps such as flipboard the news break to websites of variety sizes of styles of and topics verticals with our impeccable player. And i think on the automotive that you said sounds of fridge ristic we have a few not live yet but few sees that we're working with leading oem's fortunately i'm not allowed to disclose on unique playlists to be added to their infotainment system to search engine behind voice activation. So you'll say hey name your Favorite car what's the latest on president by then or what's going on with the dallas cowboys or howled the markets of behaving today and you know the for time-to-time some of the existing voice activation will give you a robotic answer. A some clipper what auburn is offering them to dan. The what we're doing with them is the will provide you with the latest clip from professionally produced provider of the content from experts in the media world from the analysts from the best radio stations. Or podcast that will really give you an answer that you'll enjoy listening to that. You can stay focused on that you can listen for you know a few minutes of enrichment content while you dr. So and companies that were working with that are adding the sinking ability into smart earbuds. So you can do it in your car when you jog on when you run either from your app from earbud itself. These are exciting times. I can tell you. In the beginning. It took companies and customers of our some time to adapt and understand the message that we've done but twenty twenty really opened their eyes and saw how much the uses are dying to get talk content and podcasts and user errors. The case every brandon every company out there all of a sudden can become an audio media world and audio media provider. Because they don't need to be worrying about that layer they just add this became we handle everything for them and delight their users. It's pretty. I mean it's amazing. What the infrastructure that you've built behind the scenes if you will of these different applications at frankly proliferation i guess of where it could show up. I mean some amazing amazing platform that you're building from online news sites to encourage experiences to while on the go to your point. I mean i think that is the power of audio is that it can pretty much follow you throughout your day without interrupting. Whatever it is that you need to be doing at that moment in time or where you need to be going. that's amazing.

Auburn Denso Giants Tesla Analyst Allen Alan Hyundai Samsung Dallas Cowboys OEM DAN Brandon
High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:27 min | 1 d ago

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

"Investigation reveals. That a major half care provider in the. Us has been leading. People jumped the line to get covid. Nineteen vaccines it's called. one medical. The company is part of a growing segment of america's healthcare system a boutique primary healthcare provider. That promises boutique service for an annual fee. One medical went public last year and is now valued in the billions of dollars. Internal communications leaked to npr. Show that the provider is giving vaccine shots to people who aren't yet eligible tim. Mack of npr's investigations team has the story and joins us now. Good morning. good morning. What did you find in these internal communications so the documents show example after example of doctors and medical providers in several states raising the alarm about one medical practices so there are two categories of wrongdoing. Here i those connected to one. Medicals leadership were given appointments. That's friends and family who weren't otherwise eligible for the vaccine. The second category involves patients the documents that npr has obtained. Show that in january. They did not properly screen out in eligible patients and did not seek to verify the eligibility of their patients to receive the vaccine. And i mean were there and staffers who privately raised concerns about this practice. That's right They they did raise concerns about this practice internally both among colleagues into their leadership but the company management responded with a shrug Medical professionals inside the company expressed consternation and alarm as they came across patients. That were healthy that we're not healthcare. Workers getting vaccinated at a time where there is scarce availibility for it so they tried to come up with a way to cancel appointments for ineligible patients for example they were told by the company's director of clinical learning quote. We are not policing. The company's medical staff also raised moral objections that the company had to police. Because to not do so would be unethical. Here's gabriel lazaro munoz who teaches medical ethics at the baylor college of medicine explaining that logic for trying to focus on those individuals who are most likely to develop severe illness or death and to most likely to be exposed to the virus so the goal is to save as many lives as possible and with that we are also not valuing any life over another i mean is that the justification that the management of medical is giving. What are they saying. Well one medical has said that. It has not knowingly vaccinated patients who were disqualified from receiving the vaccine that it took steps to screen these patients and actually takes This issue very seriously that it had fired several staff for disregarding eligibility requirements. They also blamed the fog of war during this public health crisis but this does bring up the question of who's really responsible for vetting people right. I mean i is it. Healthcare providers medical staff in the moment. Are they supposed to just turn people away. What many of these decisions are decentralized. One of the major challenges of vaccine distribution is how local jurisdictions counties states all have different rules but many counties including some which provided one medical vaccine doses require medical providers to screen for in verify eligibility at the point of vaccination now multiple jurisdictions and government. regulators have taken notice of the problems at one medical washington. State's department of public health said they had halted vaccine allocations. The company after a complaint about ineligible. Vaccinations one county in california. Said they would not give more vaccine doses to one medical. After the company expressed the plan to vaccinate in eligible populations in los angeles county so they had worn the company numerous times by phone and email. Do you have any sense of the scope of this situation. I mean how many vaccine doses have been distributed to ineligible patients across the one medical network. Well it's hard to say one medical wind say how many doses it had administered But based on the health departments that have gone back to us. We know that it's likely to tens of thousands of doses have been administered by the company. However there's no way to know exactly how many of these doses might have been given to ineligible patients. Npr investigative correspondent. Tim mack. thank you thank you.

NPR Gabriel Lazaro Munoz Mack America Baylor College Of Medicine TIM Department Of Public Health Los Angeles County Washington California Tim Mack
Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

Data Skeptic

06:36 min | 3 d ago

Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

"Hello my name is native. And i'm a computer scientist. Gay as opposed to grow researcher at ebay university switzerland. I work on distributed computations. Specifically i work on. Algorithms concerning distribution optimization disrupted consensus and distributed collaborations systems soi robotics and online voting and in this particular eighty of research. I mainly focus on darwin's by indeed for owners many avi considered networks. There's some of the notes in the networks are militias adversarial or they're just forty. And how does this affect the oral fixation off the elegant now. This is something that's interesting to me in my engineering part of the brain working for big company. I'd say well we can control all of our nodes about some rogue employees or something. But i guess outside of a company the world really runs on bigger systems. How common are these sort of peer to peer distributed problems in people's everyday lives definitely. I made for example. Just consider our current situation which is the ongoing pandemic. Let's see your these. Scooby trackers right you have these scored trackers on your phones than you. Are gary these records with the sword these strikers in vancouver you go in close proximity to someone else that say who might annette it or who might in recent history being tested positive so this gives you a notification. Hey you know you gaming on equity this person and he was the best positive so you may want to take some precautions. Analysts say based on these kind of trackers companies and government started building policies. Just imagine how difficult it would be if someone starts messing around for example. Let's say be Falsely claimed themselves as high-risk saying that. I just hires Ever i'm a Is also is that would discreet Rice appear to be systems are already there used is just a v are naively ignoring the fact that some of the notes in the systems be malicious authority. Fonte just like internet. You have millions of notes on the net not everything. Not everything is on the cloud on server controlled by big or big komen administration. They are so many of these notes that are spreading misinformation they have destroying to disrupt the internet for example you might have heard of. Thanks like jamming attacks Jammed the settlers despite sandy query. So you know these kinds of notes vais fairly common in our everyday use in suggests we get to hear them band. There's a big disaster. Or there's an actual big down of these systems when i started learning about distributed computing and of course it was called big data at the time. One of the first examples is term frequencies so in a lot of documents you the percentage of times you see something that often gets labeled as embarrassingly parallel because you just want to frequency. You need the numerator divided by the denominator and it's easy to divide that problem up and rejoin it but not. Every problem is so embarrassingly easy to solve. What about your specific research into gradient descent. What makes that one hard to do in a distributed fashion. You had distributed Any one this networks to be useful to the specific problem. Let's say that you are trying to solve for example as you just mentioned either. You're trying to get the frequency of a border from documents spent on the internet or let's take a step forward but apps you are trying to build some kind of image classified so different notes on the have different data sets. Let's say images of their dogs. And you want to use these images of dogs neck so many images of those who could be a very strong image classic fire for dogs something that would dismantle the human ability declassified at all so you wanna less this complicated Now designing image classified using all these distribution data said on the internet different notes having different data points. It's quite complicated even when you have all the data points at one body a machine. It's a headline. more of the. The sets are divided in different machines so to ensure that comes like these like machine learning run smoothly when certain nodes in the network militias spinal challenging not descending. It's very interesting to study. How these types can be done. Smoothly on gedeon descent is specific That is by far the was algorithm used from sheet lending pieces and what happens ingredient descent. Is you have these different. Data sets distributed on different notes. Therefore defend nodes have different loss functions. Now what we are trying to do now in this district. Setting is minimized the aggregate of all these functions are loss functions. Now when you're doing this by nature the most commonly use angry gradients design. Because it's naturally distributed many obligingly send it just reduces at the gradients of loss functions in each round. Or so if you're learning and gordon to when you're adding these gradients together some notes are not going to provide you ladies of los angeles. They may be forty. May be broadway. You re totally incorrect. Greediest maybe designed maliciously innovate to move you. words solution. that famous day goes data points. They may favor. Let's say dogs of a burglary or some other panels notions. Maybe they want to completely rendered the classification problem useless. They want to maybe instead of dog. Trained you the classify so as you can see ensuring that is reputed gradient descent runs smoothly at least within some reasonable dominates in residents of such Notes is of practically at this point vendor. You have all this The algorithms training using data sets coming from all sorts of people on it.

Ebay University Komen Administration Darwin Switzerland Annette Gary Vancouver Gedeon Rice Gordon Los Angeles
"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

07:43 min | 2 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"With your product. Absolutely breakage is probably one of those obvious problems with glass we We mold this out of a very tough and resilient palmer. It's it's medical grade but it has a tremendous impact resistance and they're obviously you know for instance if you're Many drugs or freeze dried the the frozen. Why did they do that. Because the drugs Basically don't have a very long shelf life in a in a water base formulation so they're frozen and And you know that can be a problem. Obviously in a glass container in if if One by were to shatter in batch you basically contaminate that entire batch and that's a obviously a huge law company for the pharmaceutical company Ours will break. We've done studies where we done. Freeze dried drug products in vials versus glass and break A very specific application but Dropper all you can you can. Our owner likes to throw vowels against the wall just to show how tough they are on the dick crew. But it's very visual and people understand that That this stuff does not make a what type of regulatory review if any do these containers have to go through. They go through. I mean the the normal regulatory reviews that any other of violence on his. There's obviously other manufacturers of vials. Not and it's pretty rigorous. Obviously you have to ensure That you need all of the compendium guidelines and there are many To address things like Anything extracting or leaching from your your container into the drug product yet to ensure that there's no toxicity concerns Or any compatibility concerns and and again those are all tied up in the many tasks that At the expects when you When you go to apply for For for the ability to sell the product as you mentioned earlier in june the company secured a hundred and forty three million dollar. Us government contract to scallop and advance this platform for vaccines. What is this meant to. The company may have indicated before it's quite a privilege really For us to be able to play a significant role in In this pandemic tonight you know. I think you know as you said appropriately. Most people are back scene and And certainly the packaging is somewhat of a secondary consideration but it's albeit a very important one and We've spent yeah obviously alani years of lot of money to develop something that we think is superior and simply better and The the covid pandemic is is tremendous opportunity for us. I mean are each one of our. I'm really proud. And has a a sense of purpose everyday when they come in To work because they know these are going to The folks that are making these very viable vaccines and is going to hopefully. Obviously inoculate The population the masses From this horrendous virus so yeah. I think everybody comes in every with an extreme sense of purpose and Very excited to see a shipments of aisles. Go out to our customers I i mentioned madonna being one of those to be a recipient of of tens of millions of dollars already and i imagine. It's not just purpose but urgency. You're feeling You mentioned some of the expansion. You're doing but how quickly are you able to ramp up. And and how many vials do you need to produce. Here year there are many many companies. you know i think in count one hand how many companies are developing new new vaccines and And there are going to be more calm without question so we've said before we started With a capacity about you know Or so million per year and within a few months we're able to ramp up to Around hundred four hundred fifty million miles per year now remember each vial is a is a multi does vile meaning. You have multiple doses in in each vial. So you know so. Our our goal by the end of the year is to address around two hundred million doses for for the vaccine and then next year will be doing that. Even ten ten twenty fold so the ramp up is pretty aggressive. We have people working day and night. Auditor to address the so. Yes the urgency is there and we feel it's and And it's It's all hands on deck right now until we get all the vials out that we need to address All the studies. They're going on for for drugs. That are vaccines in development as well as for for those vaccines that will be distributed to analysis. And how does this fit into the broader business of to and and do you think this is going to have lasting impacts on the way life sciences companies view. Their containers were obviously very excited about arts technology. I'm equally excited about many of these companies that are developing these new vaccines and they were. They were already working on these. For instance you know the the messenger. Ornate technology was worked on prior to even uttering the word of it so they were they addressing and developing this technology for a whole host of ailments and obviously the pandemic things shifted a very quickly over to addressing this particular this particular virus. And so i think once this is addressed. of course they're going to shift their attention back over to all these other diseases using messenger. Arnie technology and we're going to be there for them. And and i think the union this is we will have already proven and show that. Our technology works with this vaccine. I mean that's we've done a lot of studies already and i think We're going to be a natural companies is to provide these other other you know vaccines and biologics that are under development and will be commercialized in your future risk. Why guard head of scientific affairs. Cheap scientists for seo to material science. Chris thanks so much for your time today. Thank you the pleasure. Thanks for listening. The buyer report is a production of the levin media group to automatically. Download this podcast. Each week subscribe to our rsp. Or through itunes. Or other podcasts manager join our mailing list go to levin media group dot com. We'd love to hear from you if you want to drop us a line or interested in sponsoring this podcast. Send email to danny. At levin media group dotcom special facts to levin who opposed our teams and the jon levin collective which performs.

alani palmer madonna Us levin media group Chris danny levin jon levin
"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

05:33 min | 2 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Chris thanks for joining us dan. It's a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about two of the many logistical challenges vaccine producers face getting their products to patients that your company s i o two material sciences dressing the this involves the vials needed to transport. The vaccines in the syringe is needed to deliver them. Perhaps we can begin with the demand where facing how many vials and syringes are expected to be delivered needed to deliver covid. Nineteen vaccines and. They're a ready supply. Well as you may or may not know. There's obviously a lot of glass that's on the market today supporting <hes>. A variety drug products. And of course the new the new covert <hes> back <hes> endemic is is really accelerated that need and <hes>. And i think you've if you around the internet you'll find that there's <hes>. There indeed a shortage of glass and and certainly the government and and <hes>. And other agencies are looking for alternatives or or at least a a short term <hes>. <hes> for addressing. These needs and we are. We're unique in the fact that <hes>. We can scale up very very quickly and <hes>. We can add additional capacity to address the short-term need this has obviously been infused by government money. We were lucky enough to get a grant from the government <hes>. To the tune of one hundred forty three million dollars <hes> months ago a few months ago. And we've since gone from a capacity of about ten million miles are per year <hes>. to upwards of forty. I'm sorry one hundred forty or or more <hes>. million miles per year and that's a pretty <hes>. Pretty quick a ramp up <hes>. Supply of vials. And we can do that. Because of our technology very difficult for glasmann factors to add that digital capacity in the short term <hes>. Because you got to build a brand new plan and typically that could take one or two years to do that. So we've added taken our plant from ten million to one hundred four hundred fifty million vials per year <hes>. Basically within three or four months. And that's what makes us so attractive to <hes>. To the us government and obviously other other entities that earn just seeing addressing this supply demand for glass. The company lost a line of specialty byles for biological drugs and vaccines at the end of april. You had already entered the pharmaceutical space but efforts to target the vaccine market. Were new to what extent this come response to the covid nineteen pandemic. Well yeah before. Before the summer we were targeting <hes>. Drugs known as biologics. And i think all of us have <hes>. Have no somebody who biologic drug <hes>. Whether it be humira or and brow or or whole variety of other drugs that are on the market for a variety of different ailments and diseases <hes>. So we were. We're in the midst of of <hes>. Supplying <hes> and again ramping up capacity for our customers and we have many in the space but certainly the covid <hes>. Pandemic really changed things for us. In in a very big way. I we could not of of <hes>. A ramped up so quickly without does this massive demand and <hes>. That's really been the motivation for hiring a an additional two hundred fifty additional folks since <hes>. Since summer adding on the oldest additional capacity we bought additional buildings here in auburn alabama. Where we're headquartered in order to to handle this and um we've got contracts with maderna's well as other companies to supply these files this <hes>. The serious endemic wins <hes>. With how significant is the need. And what's the opportunity for the company. Oh it's astronomical obviously it's <hes>. This was a bit of a blessing in disguise for us <hes>. As a as primary patching company for pharmaceutical products. Obviously we really appreciate <hes>. The ability to play a a really significant role in addressing this <hes>. This pandemic in as you indicated we do that but by supplying primary containers whether the vial or syringe to to historian administer the vaccine and <hes>. It is really propelled our business in a big big way. I mean i don't think we could certainly didn't have had no plans of this happening <hes>. Nobody could foresee it last year at this at the same time and <hes>. Our whole focus right now is addressing this short term need and <hes>. And at the same time we're obviously managing all those other customers for <hes>. For variety of other ailments <hes>. With with baligian drugs but this is our primary focus certainly in the next six months to twelve months. This is our primary focus to deliver on this. Are there problems or limitations with traditional glasser plastic containers.

maderna dan Chris us government auburn alabama
"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

03:49 min | 2 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"As potential vaccines for covid nineteen approached approval. The focus has been on the safety and efficacy of candidates. Now that vaccines have been approved. Attention has been shifting to the complex logistical challenges of manufacturing distributing and delivering vaccines to patients. The process has opened up visibility. Too many aspects of the supply chain that are usually taken for granted one of those aspects of the violence used to store vaccines and the threat that a shortage of glass bottles could cripple distribution efforts. S i o to material sciences which one hundred and forty three million dollar. Us government contract for vials and syringes is applying semiconductor technology to create plastic containers with a nano coating of glass inside. We spoke to christopher wildcard head of scientific affairs and chief scientist for as i o to material sciences about the considerations that go into a vaccine vial. The technology s i o two is using and why it offers advantages over traditional glass and plastic containers. Chris thanks for joining us dan. It's a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about two of the many logistical challenges vaccine producers face getting their products to patients that your company s i o two material sciences dressing the this involves the vials needed to transport. The vaccines in the syringe is needed to deliver them. Perhaps we can begin with the demand where facing how many vials and syringes are expected to be delivered needed to deliver covid. Nineteen vaccines and. They're a ready supply. Well as you may or may not know. There's obviously a lot of glass that's on the market today supporting <hes>. A variety drug products. And of course the new the new covert <hes> back <hes> endemic is is really accelerated that need and <hes>. And i think you've if you around the internet you'll find that there's <hes>. There indeed a shortage of glass and and certainly the government and and <hes>. And other agencies are looking for alternatives or or at least a a short term <hes>. <hes> for addressing. These needs and we are. We're unique in the fact that <hes>. We can scale up very very quickly and <hes>. We can add additional capacity to address the short-term need this has obviously been infused by government money. We were lucky enough to get a grant from the government <hes>. To the tune of one hundred forty three million dollars <hes> months ago a few months ago. And we've since gone from a capacity of about ten million miles are per year <hes>. to upwards of forty. I'm sorry one hundred forty or or more <hes>. million miles per year and that's a pretty <hes>. Pretty quick a ramp up <hes>. Supply of vials. And we can do that. Because of our technology very difficult for glasmann factors to add that digital capacity in the short term <hes>. Because you got to build a brand new plan and typically that could take one or two years to do that. So we've added taken our plant from ten million to one hundred four hundred fifty million vials per year <hes>. Basically within three or four months. And that's what makes us so attractive to <hes>. To the us government and obviously other other entities that earn just seeing addressing this supply demand for glass.

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

03:53 min | 2 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"As potential vaccines for covid nineteen approached approval. The focus has been on the safety and efficacy of candidates. Now that vaccines have been approved. Attention has been shifting to the complex logistical challenges of manufacturing distributing and delivering vaccines to patients. The process has opened up visibility. Too many aspects of the supply chain that are usually taken for granted one of those aspects of the violence used to store vaccines and the threat that a shortage of glass bottles could cripple distribution efforts. S i o to material sciences which one hundred and forty three million dollar. Us government contract for vials and syringes is applying semiconductor technology to create plastic containers with a nano coating of glass inside. We spoke to christopher wildcard head of scientific affairs and chief scientist for as i o to material sciences about the considerations that go into a vaccine vial. The technology s i o two is using and why it offers advantages over traditional glass and plastic containers. Chris thanks for joining us dan. It's a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about two of the many logistical challenges vaccine producers face getting their products to patients that your company s i o two material sciences dressing the this involves the vials needed to transport. The vaccines in the syringe is needed to deliver them. Perhaps we can begin with the demand where facing how many vials and syringes are expected to be delivered needed to deliver covid. Nineteen vaccines and. They're a ready supply. Well as you may or may not know. There's obviously a lot of glass that's on the market today supporting <hes>. A variety drug products. And of course the new the new covert <hes> back <hes> endemic is is really accelerated that need and <hes>. And i think you've if you around the internet you'll find that there's <hes>. There indeed a shortage of glass and and certainly the government and and <hes>. And other agencies are looking for alternatives or or at least a a short term <hes>. <hes> for addressing. These needs and we are. We're unique in the fact that <hes>. We can scale up very very quickly and <hes>. We can add additional capacity to address the short-term need this has obviously been infused by government money. We were lucky enough to get a grant from the government <hes>. To the tune of one hundred forty three million dollars <hes> months ago a few months ago. And we've since gone from a capacity of about ten million miles are per year <hes>. to upwards of forty. I'm sorry one hundred forty or or more <hes>. million miles per year and that's a pretty <hes>. Pretty quick a ramp up <hes>. Supply of vials. And we can do that. Because of our technology very difficult for glasmann factors to add that digital capacity in the short term <hes>. Because you got to build a brand new plan and typically that could take one or two years to do that. So we've added taken our plant from ten million to one hundred four hundred fifty million vials per year <hes>. Basically within three or four months. And that's what makes us so attractive to <hes>. To the us government and obviously other other entities that earn just seeing addressing this supply demand for

mike electric sowell beck navy micron auburn alabama
"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

03:49 min | 2 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"As potential vaccines for covid nineteen approached approval. The focus has been on the safety and efficacy of candidates. Now that vaccines have been approved. Attention has been shifting to the complex logistical challenges of manufacturing distributing and delivering vaccines to patients. The process has opened up visibility. Too many aspects of the supply chain that are usually taken for granted one of those aspects of the violence used to store vaccines and the threat that a shortage of glass bottles could cripple distribution efforts. S i o to material sciences which one hundred and forty three million dollar. Us government contract for vials and syringes is applying semiconductor technology to create plastic containers with a nano coating of glass inside. We spoke to christopher wildcard head of scientific affairs and chief scientist for as i o to material sciences about the considerations that go into a vaccine vial. The technology s i o two is using and why it offers advantages over traditional glass and plastic containers. Chris thanks for joining us dan. It's a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about two of the many logistical challenges vaccine producers face getting their products to patients that your company s i o two material sciences dressing the this involves the vials needed to transport. The vaccines in the syringe is needed to deliver them. Perhaps we can begin with the demand where facing how many vials and syringes are expected to be delivered needed to deliver covid. Nineteen vaccines and. They're a ready supply. Well as you may or may not know. There's obviously a lot of glass that's on the market today supporting <hes>. A variety drug products. And of course the new the new covert <hes> back <hes> endemic is is really accelerated that need and <hes>. And i think you've if you around the internet you'll find that there's <hes>. There indeed a shortage of glass and and certainly the government and and <hes>. And other agencies are looking for alternatives or or at least a a short term <hes>. <hes> for addressing. These needs and we are. We're unique in the fact that <hes>. We can scale up very very quickly and <hes>. We can add additional capacity to address the short-term need this has obviously been infused by government money. We were lucky enough to get a grant from the government <hes>. To the tune of one hundred forty three million dollars <hes> months ago a few months ago. And we've since gone from a capacity of about ten million miles are per year <hes>. to upwards of forty. I'm sorry one hundred forty or or more <hes>. million miles per year and that's a pretty <hes>. Pretty quick a ramp up <hes>. Supply of vials. And we can do that. Because of our technology very difficult for glasmann factors to add that digital capacity in the short term <hes>. Because you got to build a brand new plan and typically that could take one or two years to do that. So we've added taken our plant from ten million to one hundred four hundred fifty million vials per year <hes>. Basically within three or four months. And that's what makes us so attractive to <hes>. To the us government and obviously other other entities that earn just seeing addressing this supply demand

maderna dan Chris us government auburn alabama
"your first company" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"And we are serving this mission in a variety of ways we had the ninety. Nine new, which is an event series in a blog that really focused on creatives executing on their ideas were assist just sort of coming up with more ideas, which is pretty easy for creatives to do. We also had the action method, which was a daily task manager for creative professionals, and then the behalf network, which was the platform to showcase in discover creative work. So we really were serving this mission in a variety of ways and over a course of. Many years in bootstrap fashion years. Later, we ended up raising venture capital from Union Square ventures, and you know the adobe relationship actually transpired quickly after that capital raise. So we'd always had a relationship with adobe in thinking about sort of a stars align acquirer when you're building a start up and sort of perfect match adobe was that for us and we were making the decision to sell the business to adobe and just sort of thinking about this team that we put together this mission that we were serving and coming in as a partner allowed. US to continue to serve the mission in just at a greater scale, an impact to the creative community. So it was a no brainer, and if you think about where adobe was when we were acquired, they were one of the early pioneers making the transition from a box software company to a subscription business, and we were there at that specific inflection point in their business and we were a natural fit..

adobe partner Union Square ventures
"your first company" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

03:11 min | 9 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"Lately many companies have been extraordinarily vocal in their support of the black lives matter movement, but while some brands offer platitudes and carefully designed Graphics Sephora has promised something more tangible shelf space last Wednesday, the cosmetics retail giant became the first to sign the fifteen percent pledge agreeing to by fifteen percent of its products from businesses owned by black people. The pledge was launched on May, twenty ninth by Aurora James Founder of the sustainable accessories brand brother valleys in an instagram. Instagram Post James called on companies like Walmart Target Barnes and noble and Home Depot to stock products from black businesses. She wrote. We represent fifteen percent of the population, and we need to represent fifteen percent of your shelf space, and while it seems like a good first step Sephora has a long way to go currently just seven of its nearly three hundred brands are from black owned companies to help move the needle. The company is also shifting the focus of its. Program which has traditionally helped women entrepreneurs in cosmetics. Through funding coaching and distribution next year, the program will focus specifically on black owners and founders. Sephora does not currently have a deadline to meet the pledge goal. These efforts come at an important time for black owned businesses which have been hit especially hard by the covid nineteen pandemic, many black business owners said they were shut out of relief provided by the cares act. The Small Business Administration admits that it gave no guidance to lenders to prioritize underserved communities as it. It should have and between February April more than forty percent of black owned businesses closed for good compared to seventeen percent of businesses owned by white people, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research the fifteen percent pledge isn't the only movement to help and highlight black contributions to the economy far from it all over social media, list of businesses are cropping up under the by Black Hashtag. The lists are intended to give greater visibility to black owned businesses both for. For Consumers who want to patronize them, and for retailers hope to give more representative shelf space to black owned businesses among the other companies that have taken up the fifteen percent challenge, our e commerce fashion companies rent the runway and we were that James also told today style, but she's hearing from consumers who are willing to make the pledge in their own lives by how they spend their money. One company that hasn't made the fifteen percent pledge Sephora, rival Ulta, beauty. Beauty, but that doesn't mean. The retailer is opted out of the conversation. Ultra responded to another challenge issued by Sharon shooter founder of Oma beauty and inclusive makeup company shooters pull up or shut up social media campaign asks brands to disclose the number of black employees. They have at the corporate executive. Levels alter responded on instagram. Sharing the just six percent of its corporate associates are black. The company also published a list of thirteen black owned beauty brands. It carries. As more brands publicly state their support for racial equality, it's clear that advocates and consumers are taking know how brand new support for inclusivity will affect their bottom lines however. Has Yet to be seen?

Graphics Sephora Aurora James David Brown Instagram Barnes Small Business Administration National Bureau of Economic Re Walmart Home Depot Founder representative executive Ulta Ultra founder Oma
"your first company" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

Business Wars Daily

03:07 min | 9 months ago

"your first company" Discussed on Business Wars Daily

"From wondering I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Wednesday June seventeenth. Lately many companies have been extraordinarily vocal in their support of the black lives matter movement, but while some brands offer platitudes and carefully designed Graphics Sephora has promised something more tangible shelf space last Wednesday, the cosmetics retail giant became the first to sign the fifteen percent pledge agreeing to by fifteen percent of its products from businesses owned by black people. The pledge was launched on May, twenty ninth by Aurora James Founder of the sustainable accessories brand brother valleys in an instagram. Instagram Post James called on companies like Walmart Target Barnes and noble and Home Depot to stock products from black businesses. She wrote. We represent fifteen percent of the population, and we need to represent fifteen percent of your shelf space, and while it seems like a good first step Sephora has a long way to go currently just seven of its nearly three hundred brands are from black owned companies to help move the needle. The company is also shifting the focus of its. Program which has traditionally helped women entrepreneurs in cosmetics. Through funding coaching and distribution next year, the program will focus specifically on black owners and founders. Sephora does not currently have a deadline to meet the pledge goal. These efforts come at an important time for black owned businesses which have been hit especially hard by the covid nineteen pandemic, many black business owners said they were shut out of relief provided by the cares act. The Small Business Administration admits that it gave no guidance to lenders to prioritize underserved communities as it. It should have and between February April more than forty percent of black owned businesses closed for good compared to seventeen percent of businesses owned by white people, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research the fifteen percent pledge isn't the only movement to help and highlight black contributions to the economy far from it all over social media, list of businesses are cropping up under the by Black Hashtag. The lists are intended to give greater visibility to black owned businesses both for. For Consumers who want to patronize them, and for retailers hope to give more representative shelf space to black owned businesses among the other companies that have taken up the fifteen percent challenge, our e commerce fashion companies rent the runway and we were that James also told today style, but she's hearing from consumers who are willing to make the pledge in their own lives by how they spend their money. One company that hasn't made the fifteen percent pledge Sephora, rival Ulta, beauty. Beauty, but that doesn't mean. The retailer is opted out of the conversation. Ultra responded to another challenge issued by Sharon shooter founder of Oma beauty and inclusive makeup company shooters pull up or shut up social media campaign asks brands to disclose the number of black employees. They have at the corporate executive. Levels alter responded on instagram. Sharing the just six percent of its corporate associates are black. The company also published a list of thirteen black owned beauty brands. It carries. As more brands publicly.

Graphics Sephora Aurora James David Brown Instagram Barnes Small Business Administration National Bureau of Economic Re Walmart Home Depot Founder representative executive Ulta Ultra founder Oma
"your first company" Discussed on Marketing School

Marketing School

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"your first company" Discussed on Marketing School

"I've Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel today we're GonNa talk about how this one ad lost one company. A billion dollars billion with a B.. Neil you know what it is yes so this company is called Pelivan. They're a company that produces treadmills and bicycles. That you can have at home. They have really cool monitors and video lessons and you can work out with other people at your home. It's Kinda like a class environment but just in your home so if you're in the US and you've been to like a soul cycle is just like that but again in your home. Yeah so do you want to go over the Eric. I'll go over the the ad and by the way I mean we are both Peleton users and you know they have a subscription where they can basically help you afford it they help you finance it basically where you can pay like sixty four bucks or whatever are but so I use to bike neil has the treadmill and basically the way Peleton is seen and I've seen friends kind of send me snarky remarks before audits to grab what I post pictures of the workout view or whatever right basically Pelata is seen as something that is 'cause it's an expensive bike it's like twenty five hundred dollars or whatever whatever people see it as something to be used for the privilege or the people that are rich so the ad itself is basically it shows a young woman who's already very fit it and it shows are very nervous to be getting the Peleton as a gift right and it shows like you know her progressing through the year and then at the very end of the year her being very are grateful to her husband for buying Peleton for her and saying how it's changed your life right so the the irony before dive into a little more is that look look she's already fit short looks like she's already well off like very privileged and people are just kind of knocking the ad and because people are like you know if my husband ever bought me a Peleton on bike I would throw it right in the trash because like what it was my husband tried to say so there's a lot of backlash coming from it and basically what happened in that same week was that the the company actually lost a billion dollars in value because they are a publicly traded company so that is what happened so the question Neil is do we really think people people might say that this ad costume billion dollars at the end of the day do we think it's really one ad that drove this and we think the ad was that bad that's the question so what's funny is as for last Christmas about my wife Apollo Tom now the big difference is she was pregnant and she asked me to buy her Peleton. I don't think she needed one. And nor would I ever get my wife exercise equipment and you buy one to not only expensive but I I would never go and despite my wife any exercise equipment a gym pass or anything like that you know dislike. I married her for who she is whether she skinny you are not. I don't really care again. Married her for who she is. But what's funny is. I bought her as I mentioned because she wanted it and funny enough. It's it's been sitting in our living room for almost a technically pretty much a year now and I would say we've probably use it no more than ten times. If that may be fifteen undercounted to buy for discount yet you can buy it for discount on the but when you look at it and you think about this machine gene or even Peleton as a company I don't think the commercials really GonNa hurt their performance. Some people may have opinion saying that sexist. Some people may not. I'm not here to say it is sexist or not. I'm here to more so talk about. If they actually hurt the revenue you can learn about it. I honestly don't think I heard the revenue just like you know how facebook had had all these privacy issues in government hearings and fines didn't really hurt their revenue. They're still growing just because you some backlash it doesn't mean you're not gonNa when I grow any more as she bet what's going to happen from the ad and I know this may sound crazy to some of you. That bad press is getting Peleton more in the limelight. I bet you some people are like. Oh this is what this company does. LemMe buy the product. Yeah I think exactly the same way I think in this case the press is so it might be a little negative but to to me. It's almost more on the neutral side. I don't think it's like really good. I don't think it's really bad either. Actually did end up sharing that added with a couple of people so I think at this point. I think it's positive. Press Press. And by the way if you look at what Peleton's do as a company similar facebook before in the very beginning when they first ipod they're stuck demolished he got destroyed and it was very tumultuous. It's time for them. I remember Amazon was Tumultuous Times in the beginning the way I look at Peleton as a company if you look at where they're going like a right now the users they have even though they're more or affluent because their their product were expensive. The treadmill I think is a couple thousand dollars the bikes a couple of thousand dollars. The have a monthly subscription so they have monthly recurring revenue. This is from a business perspective. They have SAS revenue and their users are actually very sticky. Think about it you pay thirty nine dollars a month instead of paying thirty dollars per class for like a soul cycle which is a spin class and that's a pretty good deal now. The other thing is they have cheaper versions coming out. They're gonNA have a rowing machine coming out that have cheaper bikes coming out. So they are starting like like when you think about Tesla they start what really expensive model first and then they start going to the masses right and so you think about facebook. They started with Harvard. I and they started with elite colleges. College is and then they started branching out from there so the way I look at it Peleton right now the fact that they lost a total value. Recently I'm not an expert stock picker or anything like that but unlike mad if I really likes hello todd has a stock and have you know an investor. That's really looked into it. It might be worth it for the long term. I think I can see them doing amazing things for long term so I do think they lost lost a ton of money. A lot of people claim that Peleton lost the billion dollar market cap because of that Ad. Neil doesn't think so either bill at the end of the day bad had press. Yes it may sound like. It's the end of the world. I've even had bad press in the past some of my previous companies. Technically just one big one I remember I gotTA FTC investigation investigation a class action lawsuit I pass the FTC investigation with flying colors. It was just some journalists. wrote something that was inaccurate they did a retraction but known as a retraction and the class action lawsuit funny enough in America. It's cheaper to sometime. Settled it because insurance pays for the cost versus fighting and winning it. 'cause then you have to pay your own legal fees but even then funny enough. The lawsuit did hurt the company but a lot of the bad press at the same time was also getting new customers customers as well so I've seen it work in a positive way not just a negative way when you get bad press now if you WANNA leverage some creative marketing getting strategies that won't necessarily get you negative press began. Hope you grow in ways that you never thought before checkout marketing school dot baiocco slash. Live Eric doing something. Cool in San Francisco. It's something that probably none of you have ever experienced before and you're gonNA love it so check out marketing school dot io L. Slash live and. It's march eighth and March eighth through all right. See You tomorrow. We appreciate you joining us for this session of Marketing School School be sure to rate review. Subscribe to the show and visit marketing. School dot I o for more resources based on today's topic as well as access to more episodes that that will help you find True Marketing Success Tax Marketing School Dot. Io until next time class dismissed.

Peleton Neil Patel Eric Su facebook Press Press US Pelivan Marketing School School San Francisco FTC rowing Amazon Pelata America todd Tesla Apollo Tom
"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

"There's one from the UK who's a banker in a -nother entrepreneur out of Singapore. One out of Hong Kong and one out of the at Phnom, and it's just the team of you've decided you're gonna look at investments together and put money in together. I got so crazy what happened is day. I did a deal with with one of them. And they saw what I did. So then another one came, and then I did another one they saw what I did. So now, there's twelve it was me and one. Now, there's twelve us in the deals are getting bigger and more exciting. And I love it. And I'm having a blast. And if any entrepreneur tab stuff that they are looking for funding fire often Email unhappy look at him. All right, cool. I like it. You know, what I liked it? We just did this casually as as you're talking everything you say, I'm researching looking them looking up and sure enough just like you kinda hinted at me before. We started. You're always in a sports jacket in college shirt, and you very professional and Italy. Are you in a t shirt, you got this comfortable hat on you were in bed. When we first talked. I love you this way. Yeah. I was kind of a baris- actually. 'cause I usually I'm I don't, you know. But you know, I really appreciate it though. I got you. I really enjoyed just talking to you. This is so much fun. I mean, I I never get it talk about this crazy adventure. I came from nothing. I was four when I grew up. And now, you know, I mean, I I've been through Ferraris and Bentleys, you know, I have a big house and all that stuff. And you know, it's. I gotta tell you. If you're an entrepreneur, and you're listening to this. You know, just don't give up, you know, you'll fail in and that's part of the process in the only failure failure. We don't learn going if you stop in its failure. Which you gotta just keep going because you'll you'll make it eventually producer. I thought it was a failure. Because it took me seventeen years to sell this company. Feels like everyone's turning around and selling the company's fast. Yeah. Yeah. Two or three years. But yeah, it was the first one. Oh, that's why help of now, you know, because I'm like man, I feel I feel like entrepreneurs are the future of the company they are of the country the world all. Everything comes from north, and they also shake loose the money from the one tenth of one percent down to and distribute across a larger population. Right. It shakes loose that money. And that's really important. So I support that. So even though you know, I can retire anytime. I wanna help entrepreneurs really do. I love it. You know, and you get to meet these people that that are just I mean men you just. Man, I have respect for everybody listening. If you're an entrepreneur man hats off. All right for anyone who wants to go follow up directly with Gregg. It's Gregory shepherd dot com. Among like, a zillion different aimed this guy. Owns more domains than go. Daddy. But you can find lots of different ways to reach them. I appreciate you being on here. And I want to thank sponsors who made.

Hong Kong Singapore Gregg UK Italy producer seventeen years one percent three years
"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

"To, you know, separate principal over position. You win. It's your baby you built it from nothing. You know, you you have to really it was hard for me. I have to admit that it was hard for me to let go and okay. There's a new CEO. And there's, you know, the the board of directors in an, you know, it's not my thing anymore somebody else's company, and I don't get to make decisions, and, you know, without approval, and you know, everything, but I got really excited because you know, when they came to me, and they were like, look, you can build this thing that you this vision that you have we're gonna we're gonna we're gonna back you to build it. And then I got sort of recharge. Now's like, okay, we'll great. I don't have to deal with all the stuff I deal with right? I could be chief strategy officer chief technology officer. I don't want to deal with all the finance and all the HR all these problems all the time. I can just focus on building in epic tech stack. You know, something that would take affiliate to, you know, whole new level. And I built and I built it. And it's it's pretty awesome. But that's not all I do. I don't wanna just sound like an affiliate because now I do so much more one. Things that you do is you invest in in startups. Yeah. I mean, I do I take early stage companies, and I use a combination my experience my system, I helped them go to exit. So I start out with them released. Giving example, there's a transit company out of out of San Diego. And when I got this two years ago, I got involved with them. Ed burned earning about five million dollars a million dollars a year for five years. I got involved it was three point eight million dollar valuation. And we just sold it for forty million. And what did you by the way? I'm looking you up as you're saying this because on your your personal website, Gregory shepherd dot com. I see your articles. I see your book your upcoming book, meet the boss, I don't see your investments on there. As I go into like English. They can't find you can't see why why are you? So mysterious about what you're investing in. Because I only invest in things that I personally get involved in right now. So I can't do that many. 'cause I work at pepper, Jim. So this. Is like, you know, I mean. To be there and work day to day. You don't just wanna find somebody who's business. You like invest in them. And hope it becomes the next Uber. Yeah. I don't do that never do that. They need help. I mean I needed help. And they all need help you if you're not for Noor, and you're trying to start a business. There's a lot of things you don't know. And a lot of times intra preneurs think they're entre preneurs, but it's a whole different deal. When you go outside a company and build on your own, you know, and there's a lot of things you need to know. And so basically I help him avoid the pitfalls by using my own experience. You know that I've had multiple times with multiple startups in investments, and I and I help them out, you know, and I really think about them too. You know, I'm not just after equity. I'm a little different that way. So I don't do that many. 'cause I just can't it on at the time. So can you give me another example of what you've done to help on of these companies you invested in? So you know, that give you that example. So this is a transit company that put together a next generation transit system that allows people to pay for trains buses ferries all the kind of stuff with their iphone without pay or with a car just by tapping and that hadn't existed. So if you're if you have to go do public transportation, you have to go to depot or something by pass. And then get on a bus distracts, the driver, they can't change their fair prices. They can't change. The can't reload anything it was really old school..

chief strategy officer CEO principal chief technology officer San Diego Gregory shepherd Noor Ed Jim eight million dollar five million dollars million dollars five years two years
"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

"And basically start the company wife yet. My wife was no I mean, I moved the office into a barn. Oh god. I got it. Yeah. Might we had to move out of our house and then move into a studio apartment that smelled like mold was we called it the cave. It was horrible and get your furniture from yard sales from what I understand. Yeah. So I would go out to yard sales. Now. I would actually that's how I made paid my self 'cause I couldn't afford to pay myself in my employees. So what I did. Art sales. Get the furniture, refinish it on the patio. And then go sell it at the swap meet on the weekend. And that's how I paid my Haidar living expenses. All right. A question that comes to mind, but let me take a moment and talk about my second. Sponsored and come back and ask you about it. But I wanna know what what about your competition. I thought they were doing really well. All right, second sponsors, a company called active campaign. If you're doing Email marketing, and frankly, you should. You've got understand that just putting everyone in a single Email list is is not the right way to communicate. What you wanna do is tag people based on what they're doing? So for your business, Greg, obviously, you're not communicating Phileas the same ways, you're communicating to to what you call the other side of that of the appetizers, advertisers, publishers and advertisers, publishers advertise each one is different the publisher wants to make money the advertiser wants to spend money and get a return each one needs a different communication method. You don't wanna put them in the same list? You also don't want to what you wanna do. Instead is have one list tag people based on what they're doing. So that if you start to see people are clicking over and over to understand more about your -ffiliated product or about the publishing program, you know, that you can start sending a messages as if they're publishers if you see that somebody is bought you wanna send a different message from somebody who hasn't bought all that happens with tags. The problem is a pain in the butt to do that with most software or it's super expensive. And most people don't do it. Or what they frankly do if they do it his higher bunch of consultants to manage it. Active campaign said we can do all the super simple. We can make it easy for you to know when somebody clicks a link on your on your Email what they're doing. We could make it easy for you to customize each Email based on what tags users have we can also make it easy for you to understand if somebody's clicking through and watching the whole video on your site. Maybe wanna fire off another Email to them as follow up. All that stuff..

publisher Haidar Greg
"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

"So I started to I I ran into some problems with the networks because the Phillies networks were like, look your competitor. So I that's when I moved the check back to the background in came back. The foreground said, no, no, no where agency and I in the background, I integrated everything and built the whole tech stack. And it is a Gabi gave us some huge advantages over the affiliate networks in at that time agency started to come out. We were the first one an bohrium you. Go ahead. A cool story as we were the first Phillies marketing agency, I was the first one to go global. I was the largest in the world. I was the first one to be acquired. So it's kind of a neat story. And the the the time can get get acquired with fifteen years. Seventeen years seventeen years. Yeah. So one is hard one. So let's talk about how you got customers. Then back then so you were an agency. What did you do to get people who didn't really understand what affiliate were to understand that? They should hire you. Well, what I learned is that the retail if you look at the advertiser merchant industry, if you try to do lead gen it didn't work because people can just say, oh, the lead was a bad lead. It's not imperial. So you end up having a lot arguments travel turned out to be a problem because there's huge latency and getting paid they wait until, you know, hotel room closes down or somebody goes on cruise or whatever to get paid. So cash flow is problem, but retail transactions right now, you mounts bureauc-, no problem. But at that time, you have the the what I call brand manufacturer, which is somebody who makes their product and sells it like schedulers. Right. And then you have retailers who sell other people's products and. So when you look at these two markets, you realize that the retailers have more mouths to feed because they still have manufacturer. So they have less margins. They have less margins they need to not only make more, but they can pay less. So I I also learned that my exit strategy was to sell to somebody that wanted to close real brands manufacturer brands. So I got away completely away from settling anybody that was in the retail space and only went with people that so that was a manufacturer that drove sold direct consumers on apple sketchers forever. Twenty one companies like that. Right. So if they made the product, and they sold it online that was my customer, and so I built a base of customers around that which really did work in terms of getting to my exit. Who are some of the low lesser known companies that did a lot because they were in direct marketing like I'm talking about people like the old camera company extend that was out there for a long time with their failure program. Do you? Remember anyone that was doing the specially well for you. That's gone. Well, all the toys R us Circuit City. I mean, all those guys they toys R us and Circuit City, where Phillies of yours, they weren't manufacturing products. They were clients. So that was well, I accepted toys R us and Circuit City at the time. Because you know, they were huge was my way to get into the manufacturers. So what I did is. I said I wanted toys R us. I looked at the products they had and then I wouldn't call the manufacturers. So I had you know, the the major manufacturers sold a toys R us because I called them and said, hey, look toys, R us sales through me that are selling your product. Why wouldn't you wanna work with me got it? And then I started move over. Right. And then you need a Phillies to start moving that product. What did you do to get Philias?.

Phillies Circuit City Gabi apple Seventeen years seventeen years fifteen years
"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on Mixergy

"He'll to way by so I guess I'm not following this. I'm looking at a market wire of PR thing from twenty sixteen EBay enterprise marketing solutions today announced it acquired affiliate traction. Yeah. That was your company that was my company is too simple. They acquire that company. It was more like, yeah. Yeah. It was it was a sequence of deals where they're spinning off pay pal while they're spinning off pay pal. And all this other stuff, they're buying you going off at the same time. They're buying me. That was the first transaction. And then the second transaction after that was all of those companies including mind being spun off into the private equities. And then following transactions was a spin off of all of those little companies that they bought all the fourteen companies off to all these different places. So they it was crazy. And then in the end EBay owned affiliate traction in the at the end will I EBay owned it? Then at the end premiere Vanik around it EBay just for little bit. They owned it. Yeah. They bought it. Yeah. They owned it for a little bit. Why did they for how long are we talking about what? Because EBay the the transaction down for like a month. So the transaction was. Was put together with my company, and my technologies sort of like the minnow swallowing the whale. Mine was one of the smaller companies, but it was sort of core to the whole thing. So the the people that the investors that were buying all these companies they said in order for that one business unit to work we need to buy this company. So okay, why why do they need you in order to make that that part of their business work while I kinda started with Phillies was one of the first guys in the space, you know, in nineteen ninety nine maybe now, we go back in time and just find out about how you started out your somehow ended up in the travel space, actually, even before that you are one of the early people to create a web hosting company was called one-two-three turnkey. It was on you to figure out how to get customers. You try to bunch of different things that didn't work rate. What's one type of ad you remember that? We thought was going to work but didn't work great before you discovered affiliates. Will you know back then it was the internet wasn't. What it is today so advertising what it wasn't what it is staying. You had overture. You had paper click with some of the first ones right yahu stuff like that. But Google isn't there and things weren't the way they are now. So what we did is we resorted to hiring a sales team. And at the time, I didn't understand unit economics, and, you know, all the dynamics of flow and everything like I do now. So I had a certain finite amount of money that I raised and United million five. I raised the company was burn through the money, really fast. And it wasn't working. Right. I was looking at the cost of developing websites, the cost of acquisition, and I started to sort of learn about unit economics that way right without education. I just kinda started learning and figured out didn't work. So then I was like, okay. Well, this isn't working. Meaning if you're paying a sales person, what eighty one hundred thousand a year that sales person can possibly sell enough web hosting packages to pay for her salary and commission. That's what you're. About. And that's when you said, wait, this is not good. Yeah. So I'm having to build a website and the hosting so we started trying to sell. Okay. We're gonna give you the website for this amount..

EBay Phillies Google
"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"To help the embryo to implant, no less, you banish, San minister, only four hours Pyo to embryo trencher. And what we have these reports was positive history trial where we so that giving Lassie ban compared to placebo for hours before transfer was improving to chance of going home was a baby by thirty five. And what's the when might use seek regulatory approval? The best full. What's that? We are planning to submit an Indian Europe by end of next year. And we are going to be talking to the to agree and life. I wish them to pass for ones any sense. Yes. Definitively currently the market for Infinity drugs. Put it into is. Yes. Exceed two billion. We have not yet screws discussed the price of no Lhasa ban, pending confirmation of if you get C N registration. But we have to here is two things. I is that we are going to do a number of IBM cycling choir to go home with the baby and the navy citing this cost between twelve and twenty thousand US daughter to CDC standing us that. Chew fifty person of I've psycho in United States where there's an embryo transfer placement of two or more NPL's is perform to increase chance of.

United States NPL IBM navy Europe CDC four hours
"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Eva. Yes. I just picked after working for ten years dodge company, which was focused on infertility. So I really learned job on both on initial video to Windsor Cyrano. And then with what different would be that. We have a larger pipeline ABC's. I compared to program I think pregnant success was really based on a single drug, which by the way, it was successful. But it was more Hysky. We have here in Obsewrver three drugs Tenneco stage of development, two of them being infused three and one of them having already successfully complete a phase three. So I think the lessons was certainly a Jew a balance to his inevitable for you to sit on since I was probably too. So even more effective in civic than people working to team, and I built on my experience to recruit the right people's among the right people, you've got a CMO who are part of the program team what kind of advantages that to have a team that's worked together before and been successful at renting a product through develop. Approval. I think this is important because. People see when you'll recruits somebody who have one chance of three coaching to run best and one of three to get the right person. What those three to an outstanding person. So I think that beyond technical skills, you need to have the personal security to work with you went to have the same culture way to work, and therefore having seen people with home we were in well and efficiently was of usually an advantage for Seaver. One lead talk about reproductive health. What's the range of conditions that includes? Yes. These are wrench condition which are affecting women frequently. I mean, we have talking about infertility ten thousand of the vision we're talking about and Dimitrios ten percent of the population fiber elites are Solaar proportion of patient above forty and Preterm labor again eight to ten percent of the vision. So they are condition which are not life threatening. But I really pitting quantitive live and before of woman in to peel between puberty and menopause where the the most professionally active. You mentioned infertility ten percent of the population. My impression is that. This has become an increasing problem from global health perspective is infertility worsening understanding of what's driving that. Yes. I think you're very, right. The main issue is the fact that woman dealy h of first pregnancy thirty years ago, the mean age of first pregnancy was twenty two years old. No in not cities is public thirty two years old and the woman fifty to decline at the age of Turkey and actually do thirty seven. So we are facing a society issue. It's not medical issue as the sense, that's more disease leading to did it just aside that issue bringing of life where you have a higher probability of injecting. And that's true worldwide. We see that US. We see that Europe. We see that in China. Now, we see that in Japan. So yes, the is and has to be addressed of medical you went bust. Your we'd product is no Lhasa, which is designed to improve the success of IBM procedures. What What is is in the in the Las? Las? Yes. So known as Benny, San and honest of. The oxytocin receptor. So he's blocking a sceptre for those in which is a natural or driving uterus contraction and juicing blood flow into by enterprising that we make the uterus more relaxed quiescent better fusion, and that's important.

Lhasa Las US Windsor Cyrano ABC Benny menopause Eva. Seaver Hysky Obsewrver oxytocin Dimitrios Europe China San Japan IBM ten percent thirty two years
"your first company" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"your first company" Discussed on The Interchange

"Happened not one company not one company came remotely close to meeting there cost targets there was a ton of interesting research and it's still ongoing good science continues i think exxon is continuing it's it's research but we got virtually no bio fuels from the promise of a billion gallons two zero that's pretty staggering miss so in oil prices went back down the dozens of companies in this space all pivoted at once to pharmaceuticals lg they have antimicrobial properties and you know important proteins that can be valuable for pharmaceutical products or even beauty products and some are using their equipment for like fish farms some of shifted to conventional biofuels eric wes off our former editor he has been cataloging the space for a while and he wrote a great piece in two thousand seventeen looking at this this collective pivot and he catalogued at least twenty four companies that have made this shift all within a very short period of time all of whom were making claims about tens of millions of gallons of biofuels so i think that you could argue that this is the single biggest collective pivot based on failure that we've witnessed in this industry so you're not saying this is a failed pivot you're saying that it was failure that caused a pivot yes right 'cause actually the you could i think you could make a pretty strong case that it was a pretty successful pivot in that if these companies had stuck to their original business they would all be out of business today but instead they pivoted into pharmaceuticals and things like that and so they still exist right and actually many of the companies who are making these claims who were around are still around and more of them than i would have imagined right so okay so this is failure driven pivot actually i would make the case that might be one of the most successful pivots then yeah right i interpret both ways for sure right like if you're on the brink of failure and you figure out a way to keep the company alive like good on you that's the that's the best kind of pivot indeed but i think i'm still a little bit bitter about believing some of the claims of these companies and just seeing collectively so many companies tell the public and investors that they were gonna make massive amounts of fuels and none of it to materialize i mean it's it made me reflect inwardly when when all this played out over a course of a few years and that's when i really started become becoming more jaded about company claims yeah i mean i i you that in a very positive light not that the original company claims being wrong was a good thing but you know if you're taking the investor perspective one of the things you care about most is the leadership team and you wanna leadership team that is going to be able to roll with the punches right because there's so much that's unpredictable when you're early stages of business and so you know if it turns out that the technology that you're pursuing is wrong for the market that you're going after but might be right for another market then like the best thing you could look for is is is an executive team that will make that pivot successfully that's the that's the case in which you know i feel like the term pivot is not overused the case in which is overused is where you just say like well we tried this thing and i don't know so you know we pivoted we moved onto this other thing like that you know that's less exciting but the like we had an existential crisis that we were forced to pivot and we did it successfully as great yeah but you could also make the case that investor expectations were shattered and so these companies are doing you know a small business compared to the one hundred million gallons or tens of millions of gallons that they promised and so if you go in as an investor with a set of expectations even if you've made a pivot to a smaller business i would assume that you can feel pretty burned oh that's definitely true yeah no i don't think that the investors in those original businesses are are doing great i mean you know.

one hundred million gallons billion gallons