36 Burst results for "Yorker"

Fresh update on "yorker" discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

00:30 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "yorker" discussed on Ridiculous History

"Downloading the latest songs from artists days or sometimes even weeks before the album would actually drop. The New Yorker did a profile on someone responsible for thousands of leaks. He was not the only one but This is a representation of what was going on. There's a guy named Del Glover. He was working at a Polygram CD manufacturing facility in the Carolinas, and Glover claimed he never personally smuggled any of those production CDs out of the facility. But he had a network of employees who would do that for them for him. So he would, you know, rely on these people to smuggle out brand new CDs that were Being produced. But not yet being sold One of the ways they would do this is they would commonly produce more CDs than they actually needed for an order Because sometimes you know you have irregular. CDs that are pressed some there might be some manufacturing error. Something is affecting the quality on sometimes you would just end up with extras anyway, and those extras were always meant to go through a shredder so that the material could be destroyed and then recycled. But you could just secretly, you know, hide one of those CDs on your person while you're taking all the rest of the shutter because no one was keeping track of the shredded Disks. So if you did it and you were careful and you didn't get caught, you could stand to gain from that. So Glover would take the smuggled disks home and then he would rip the music off of them using his computer. And upload the files to a ringleader of a piracy ring who then made them available in various peer to peer networks, well, first on centralized networks and later peer to peer networks. This also helped start the idea that The content on the Internet is free. It's a It's an idea that's got a pretty strong hold on the average Internet users psyche this these days, this concept that if I if I go online, I should be able to get stuff for free. People got used to that idea. I didn't have to walk into a store and lay down cash for purchase. Now, In some cases, artist Sir Cos. Might allow people to listen to or even download some content for free. It actually becomes something they're welcoming. They might think of it as a type of marketing. But in other cases, people were just pirating the heck out of stuff. They were just copping it because they could not because it was allowed, and the thought of paying for content was on the decline. The revenue model for the Web Was largely ad based, right if you went to a website, chances are that website was making money by using Web advertising they were selling space on the Web page. That advertisers would pay money to occupy for a certain amount of time. And this was not ideal for content creators necessarily because and for website operators to because people were starting to develop what we largely would revert to as as ad blindness. People would stop paying attention to the fact that there even were ads. They're just paying attention to the content that led to some pretty irritating trends and advertising things like pop ups and pop unders and Ads with full sound that just start playing assumes they load on your screen, irritating stuff like that. That would decrease your enjoyment of the Web experience. But It also meant that a lot of people would install ad blockers that they could not have that experience and still get the content they wanted. The content wasn't technically free because it was being paid for by advertising. But the end user was not directly paying for the experience, right. It wasn't like it was behind a paywall. So for the user, it felt like everything is free. And when everything feels like it's free. Then feels like a huge imposition to be told. Hey, if you want access to this, you've got to pay for it. And so it kind of condition people to an expectation that content needs to be free. Um, that's a huge problem, not just for music. It's for Web content in general. And I'll talk about that a little bit later, too. But this was also a shift away from owning a physical copy of a song or a movie or television show as those would follow the same path. If you could get a digital version, and it was a good enough digital version of whatever it was he wanted. There wasn't much call for buying something that would take up physical space. There's still people who preferred having a physical copy, and there still are today. There are people who would much prefer to go out and get physical copies of movies largely because It's a good way to guarantee you're getting the best. Uh, experience for your money, And that thing's like a Blue ray desk. Like I say, you're going to get a four K ultra high definition desk. And you want to watch it on a fork, a television you're probably gonna have a better experience than watching a digital version that's gone through compression in the decompression. That still might be really good. It might be better than high definition, but It's probably not going to measure up to the physical copy. So there's some people who still demand that They also might want things like the cover art or liner notes or special features. Or they may just want something physical to relate to with the music or movies or television that they enjoyed. They might have sort of. Ah, psychological attachment to that. And then there's the audio file community. They were largely against digital files in general compression in particular, and really lossy formats. They hated that idea because they were Very passionate in arguing that that approach was decreasing the actual quality of the music itself. Now, generally speaking, you could tell the difference between a good analog recording played on a decent stereo system. And a digital file of the same piece of music played on a comparable sound system specifically compressed digital vile, The more extreme the compression, the easier it was to tell the difference between the two. And so there was a community of audio files who protests and how the compressed format was ruining the beauty of The experience of listening to music. But for many people, including myself, the convenience factor mattered way more than the quality of.

Del Glover Glover Carolinas Today TWO Thousands Of Leaks Polygram First One Of Four K A Lot Of People Sir Cos New Yorker ONE
Putin Tells Red Square Parade That Nazi Ideas Persist

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:56 sec | 1 d ago

Putin Tells Red Square Parade That Nazi Ideas Persist

"Russia today marks the 76th anniversary of the Soviet Union's victory over Nazi Germany and World War two from Moscow. Charles Maynes reports Rise Nicholas Young, legal buy beer, They're speaking before some 12,000 troops taking part in the military parade on Red Square. Russian President Vladimir Putin paid honor to the Soviet victory, while vowing to defend against what he said were persistent Nazi beliefs in Europe, considered Russia and the other former Soviet Republics most revered holiday in honor of the some 27 million Soviets killed in the fighting. Victory Day has taken on added political weight in Putin's Russia, where the line between historical memory and rising nationalism has often blurred. This year's anniversary comes amid rising tensions with the West, which Putin suggested was trying to rewrite history by ignoring the Soviet sacrifice and the victory over fascism. NPR NEWS. I'm Charles means in Moscow,

Charles Maynes Nicholas Young Russia Soviet Union Red Square Vladimir Putin Moscow Germany Putin Europe Npr News Charles
New Record Deaths as Coronavirus Engulfs India

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:05 min | Last week

New Record Deaths as Coronavirus Engulfs India

Abiola Abrams: African Goddess Initiation

You Can Heal Your Life

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Abiola Abrams: African Goddess Initiation

"Guest is abiolas. Abrahams and ola has been releasing a few audios and the house unlimited audio app. You might have seen her on one of the. Hey how's facebook pages. But she has her new book coming out and her new book is called african goddess initiations sacred rituals for self love prosperity and joy. How you doing abiola's read. I am on top of the world today so glad to be here with you. Were happy to have you here. And so you've written has great book for us. But i'd love to just start and learn a little bit more about you and what you do. I know you're a spiritual teacher coach intuitive. But i'd love to hear from you kind of how you work with. People how you work with the goddesses and just kinda get an overview before we jump into some of the other things absolutely absolutely so it to introduce myself to your audience. I am a native new yorker born and raised one of the five and i am the first person in my family born in the united states. Actually my mother and my father are both from a tiny village in guyana south america and strangely enough didn't meet their but they met in new york city. And here i am and as you mentioned. I am a spiritual teacher coach. I am a retreat leader. And the way that i work with people is that i help to help us to tap into greater self love greater self were and greater self acceptance and what better to be talking about in the house louise built

Abiola Abrahams OLA Facebook Guyana South America United States New York City House Louise Built
Biden to Propose Nearly Doubling Capital Gains Tax for Wealthy

The Breakdown with NLW

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden to Propose Nearly Doubling Capital Gains Tax for Wealthy

"Yesterday the big news story was biden's intended increase in the capital. gains tax. President biden is set to propose nearly doubling the capital gains tax rate to thirty nine point six percent. The stated goal of this is to pay for social spending that addresses inequality urban brookings suggests that it would raise three hundred and seventy billion dollars over a decade for those making a million dollars or more of the new top rate when combined with the obamacare levy would be forty three point four percent. That's supposed to a current base rate of twenty percents and it's even worse for new yorkers and californians where new york would be as high as fifty two point two two percent and california would see taxes of fifty six point seven percent. These central political argument will be wages and well should be treated same on one. Side versus investment capital encourages the development of the infrastructure of the future on the other side. What's clear is that the stock market does not like this. It slid the most that it has a month. of course. this isn't yet official. Biden will detail. His american families plan in joint address to congress on april twenty eight th that will include whatever final proposal is.

President Biden Biden New York California Congress
Capital-Gains Tax Hike Is on Biden's Radar

CoinDesk Podcast Network

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Capital-Gains Tax Hike Is on Biden's Radar

"Yesterday the big news story was biden's intended increase in the capital. gains tax. President biden is set to propose nearly doubling the capital gains tax rate to thirty nine point six percent. The stated goal of this is to pay for social spending that addresses inequality urban brookings suggests that it would raise three hundred and seventy billion dollars over a decade for those making a million dollars or more of the new top rate when combined with the obamacare levy would be forty three point four percent. That's supposed to a current base rate of twenty percents and it's even worse for new yorkers and californians where new york would be as high as fifty two point two two percent and california would see taxes of fifty six point seven percent. These central political argument will be wages and well should be treated same on one. Side versus investment capital encourages the development of the infrastructure of the future on the other side. What's clear is that the stock market does not like this. It slid the most that it has a month. of course. this isn't yet official. Biden will detail. His american families plan in joint address to congress on april twenty eight th that will include whatever final proposal is.

President Biden Biden New York California Congress
Interview With Kate and Jes From the Seltzer Squad Podcast

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Kate and Jes From the Seltzer Squad Podcast

"Hello my friends. I know you are going to be so super stoked about this episode. I am so freaking excited. You guys love these guys. And i have been waiting to record this episode for weeks. I'm so excited you guys. We have seltzer squad on addiction. Unlimited bringing to awesome podcast together. I love a good collaboration. So kate and jess welcome to the show. Thank you so much for doing this with me. Why don't you guys take a minute. Introduce yourselves and tell my listeners. A little bit about you and what you do all right. Well i'm just. Valentine and i am a tattoo artist. I live in brooklyn new york. And i am half of seltzer squad. Podcast a podcast about staying sober in the city and just trying to Stay cool and not boring guest kate you. He's over having us on. We're very excited. I'm kate the other half of social squad. I am a freelance our director. I am a grad school. Hopefully grad school student for her to become a therapist. one day what else. I'm a cat. Mom introverts pace. I guess that really sums it up. Yeah. i'm a pisces. Work in school consume most of my life these days. So i don't really have any other slashes data on right now plus we've been quarantine i remember out of the. Yeah i remember those days. Well when work in school took over my life but i was already old. I didn't even go to college until i was thirty seven. I think or thirty eight something like that. So both of you ladies are in new york. I'm thursay technically. But i'm right across the river so we act i buy as a new yorker. We're very close. We're very closely two miles away from one another. But yeah

Kate Jess Brooklyn New York
Jelani Cobb on the Murder of Daunte Wright and the Derek Chauvin Trial

The Kicker

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Jelani Cobb on the Murder of Daunte Wright and the Derek Chauvin Trial

"This week coverage of the derek chauvin trial. It's been an amazingly distressing week in terms of the coverage of what's going on in the courtroom minneapolis where derek chauvin is on trial and even as is happening of there was another police shooting this one of dante right also in minneapolis and it requires journalists. Who are doing this to cover all these things at once. What's going on in the courtroom protests in the streets. What's going on with the dante right case and how to put all this together too so it makes sense and how to tell. The wider story is the job of now as we face a critical week next week when a verdict could well come down in the chauvin trial. I'm really happy to be joined by. Johnny cobb new yorker staff writer. Who has a piece about this. This week in the new yorker and has been covering the george floyd murder happened last may welcome gilani. So you've been reporting from minneapolis. For how helen helen we. They're a do days. What does that mean like. What how do you do that so you wanna you wanna keep an eye on what's happening in the courtroom but you also want to keep an eye on what's happening the street. So how did you. How did you go about reporting so these strange times as we already know and The nature of the trial was that only two reporters could be inside the actual courtroom and so they were doing pull reports and in the courtroom the in the courthouse The media were watching the proceedings on a bank of televisions and so the communications person for the courthouse literally fed. It's no different than you watching it in your living

Derek Chauvin Minneapolis Chauvin Johnny Cobb George Floyd Helen Helen Dante Gilani New Yorker
Biden Sees 'Win' for US In Electric Vehicle Battery Deal

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:51 sec | Last month

Biden Sees 'Win' for US In Electric Vehicle Battery Deal

"Biden is welcoming the settlement of a trade secret dispute between two South Korean companies that make batteries for electric vehicles. As Johnny Kauffman of member Station W. A B reports the settlement has major implications for the U. S electric vehicle industry, especially in Georgia. SK Innovation will pay Algae cam Nearly $2 billion is part of the settlement. The deal came before President Biden faced a deadline to act on a ruling from the U. S International Trade Commission that blocked SK from doing new battery business in the country. For a decade, Biden has made growing the electric vehicle industry a key part of his $2 trillion infrastructure plan. The commission ruled the Korean Corporation destroyed evidence in a trade secrets case. Georgia politicians were worried because SK is building a massive battery plant in the state that will likely employed thousands.

Johnny Kauffman Station W. Sk Innovation Biden President Biden U. S International Trade Commi U. Georgia SK Korean Corporation
Man threatens Asian-American undercover officer in New York City

Bloomberg Best

00:30 sec | Last month

Man threatens Asian-American undercover officer in New York City

"Police officer of Asian descent in the face in Penn Station yesterday. Vivian Rodriguez, who's 35 was arrested around 1:20 P.m. inside the station. New Yorkers continue to voice their concerns over the anti Asian hate crimes just said as me so much to see, like happens in New York City. It's so diverse here. The NYPD task force has been all over the city in the last two weeks looking to capture hate crime suspects amid the rash of attacks on Asian Americans. Right. It was the last day for parents to switch their New York

Vivian Rodriguez Penn Station Nypd New York City New York
No vaccine appointment necessary for some New York vaccine locations

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | Last month

No vaccine appointment necessary for some New York vaccine locations

"New York's vaccine sites generally discouraged people from showing up without unemployment. But his Caroline Lewis reports, there are some exceptions. More than two dozen vaccine sites are now accepting walk ins from people 75 older and anyone who escorts them. We'll get a shot to younger New Yorkers may be able to flag down the city's new mobile vaccine bus. Which will offer up to 200 shots a day of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine for restaurant and delivery workers for those willing to do some legwork there. Also standby lists. Many sites have doses left over at the end of the day because of cancelations. Some keep lists of people who can show up on short notice. Others will tell you to just arrived near the end of the day. Stand by policies aren't advertised, so you'll have to ask around. For more tips and tricks. Visit gothamist dot

Caroline Lewis Johnson New York
New Yorkers rally outside court where man faces anti-Asian hate crime charge

Sean Hannity

00:37 sec | Last month

New Yorkers rally outside court where man faces anti-Asian hate crime charge

"Of criminal court in New York City today is demanding safety for Asian Americans amid a soaring increase and bias attacks. Phil Wang, president of the Chinese American Citizens Rally, led the demonstration by calling for more cops. We as taxpayers expect low in order way, Ask taxpayers expect safety in the streets. Yeah, Waste taxpayers expect safety on the subways. This comes as Brandon Elliot is charged with a hate crime and assault in the brutal beating of a woman in Hell's kitchen last week. Meanwhile, there are numerous statistics that show anti Asian incidents are on the rise. Ah

Phil Wang Chinese American Citizens Rall New York City Brandon Elliot
For 7 New Yorkers, a pandemic year's fight for the future

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

For 7 New Yorkers, a pandemic year's fight for the future

"I'm Julie Walker a year ago the Associated Press told the story of a day in the life of the stricken city through the eyes of new Yorkers on the front lines and in quarantine as they faced beer tragedy isolation and upheaval the year has been surreal I mean that's a real for everyone not just us Dr Chris your doctor Joseph had bush says it's also made us pause and focus on family and friends and seeing what's important it's it's it's a room there's a silver lining to that Carla brown is in charge of getting meals to homebound seniors says at first she didn't know how they make it through now I'm waiting for her to New Jersey and just looking forward to getting back to whatever new normal is going to be FDNY paramedic Travis castle says it's been a long frustrating year with a lot more downs than ups feel like you gave your all and there are still five hundred thousand Americans

Julie Walker Dr Chris Carla Brown The Associated Press Joseph Bush Travis Castle New Jersey
Governor Cuomo Announces More Than 10 Million Total COVID Vaccine Doses Administered Across New York State

Page Publishing

00:29 sec | Last month

Governor Cuomo Announces More Than 10 Million Total COVID Vaccine Doses Administered Across New York State

"The covert vaccine have now been administered in New York State Governor Cuomo announced Saturday morning. Nearly a quarter million doses of the vaccine had been administered statewide over the past 24 hours. That pushed the total number of shots past the 10 million mark with nearly a third of state residents. Having received at least one dose of the vaccine, nearly 20% of all New Yorkers have completed their vaccination. Syriza. The governor also announced There were 60 virus related deaths Friday. 36 of those fatalities here in the city, the ST James Theater

Governor Cuomo New York State Syriza St James Theater
Jerry Seinfeld Performs at Re-Opened Gotham Comedy Club in NYC

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Jerry Seinfeld Performs at Re-Opened Gotham Comedy Club in NYC

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker Jerry Jerry Seinfeld Seinfeld was was back back on on stage stage in in New New York York City City as as it it reopens reopens clubs clubs theaters theaters and and music music venues venues for for limited limited capacity capacity shows shows Jerry Jerry Seinfeld Seinfeld strolled strolled into into the the Gotham Gotham comedy comedy club club Friday Friday night night for for its its re re opening opening and and said said he's he's excited excited to to bring bring the the live live comedy comedy back back the the audience audience was was great great and and I I was was actually actually doing doing like like you you can can I I still still do do this this to to you you you you know know I I don't don't know know but but you you wonder wonder if if you you remember remember us us like like not not playing playing tennis tennis for for years years so so had had it it go go comedy comedy never never changes changes it's it's funnier funnier it's it's not not and and Seinfeld Seinfeld has has a a message message about about the the Big Big Apple Apple coming coming back back no no place place feels feels like like this this place place and and and and people people who who think think they they will will will will get get used used to to that that living living here here that that used used the the you you know know real real new new Yorkers Yorkers will will realize realize it it doesn't doesn't work work it it says says that's that's because because only only New New York York is is New New York York Julie Julie Walker Walker New New York York

Julie Julie Walker Walker Jerr New New York York City City Jerry Jerry Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Tennis Apple New New York York Julie Julie Walker Walker
Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar

Slate's Culture Gabfest

02:08 min | Last month

Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar

"Me to talk about barbara star. Is rachel sign a staff writer for the new yorker. Hey rachel her so thanks for joining me for this one. I really was excited to talk about this one with you because you wrote something about it a little view in appreciation of it for the new yorker that i really love and i felt really tapped into some of the things that are special about this movie. I'm going to read a tiny bit of it back to you. Maybe that can inspire conversation so this comes early in what you're writing about it when you talk about the transition from what i would think of as the setup the first twenty minutes or so where we beat barbara starr in their hometown of soft rot nebraska and how it then it then transitions to town of title of vista del. Mar in florida. And so you're right. There solid jokes from the get-go but it's not clear right away. What the movie is up to our. Wigan molo denizens of los angeles where they first met as part of the l. Sketch comedy troupe. The groundlings taking the piss out of flyover over forties then skipping ahead of bit is talking about the the that transition you say but as barbara starr unfolds. It's quirky heroines fuel. Less and less like stand ins for certain kind of tj maxx shopper. Instead the film goes for something far more specific and silly loving often lovely. Where so many comedies are either retreads old ideas or feel designed by committee to hit newsy talking points. Barbara starr is the rare film. That feels sue generous in both conceit an execution barbara starr or such finely drawn characters that they could be nobody else but themselves so that really spoke to me and exactly what i love about this movie and this was going to frame it to you. Is that this movie gets compared a lot to bridesmaids which of course was written by the the co writers and co stars of this movie and malone christian wig and another movie that sprung to mind was spy which is this wild sort of a spoof of james bond films. That's also a female friendship bonding movie with incredible performances by melissa mccarthy and rose byrne i love both bridesmaids an spy but i found this movie far more original than either one and in a way more exciting i mean i can see why bridesmaids changed comedy history. It's an important movie. it's still a very funny movie. But this sui generis quality that you point to i think is is so much more vibrant in this movie which really could only have come out of the imaginations of these two women who are friends in real

Barbara Starr Barbara Star Rachel Vista Del Wigan Molo Nebraska Los Angeles Florida Malone Melissa Mccarthy Rose Byrne James Bond
Weike Wang Reads Lara Vapnyar

The New Yorker: Fiction

02:21 min | Last month

Weike Wang Reads Lara Vapnyar

"Heike haidara how you doing all right. Thanks for joining us. So when we talked about doing the podcast laura vapin. Er was your first thought. Why was that. I thought neon sign went off of my head. I've read the store many times but this was one of the first stories that you know From the magazine that i read and then it stuck with me for a really long time and since then i've read her older stories in the magazine but also all of her collections. Her novels i think her most recent one about her mother Right divide by. Sarah is a great example of being introduced to a very small piece of a writer's work and then wanting to read everything about what she's written and seeing what kind of terrain she covers them. So she's one of those writers that i'm always recommending to everyone. What was it when about this story when you read it. That made such an impression. I think she does a great job of being very laser focused on an experience from childhood. That has an impact in in adulthood for this protagonist and Her friend while also taking on something as large as may be the immigrant experience but having that happened mostly off stage and i found that incredible that the first half is mostly set. You know in a foreign country with Girls who are just like girls in any country and somehow we end up in a different place by the end of the story. I'm just amazed at how much time and also territory was covered with very very specific characters and just dolls and you also right Fairly often about the life of immigrants in the us and roy The story is about. Russian emigrants not immigrants from china but Do you feel that. There's overlap in your interests right. I did feel a certain kinship about that experience very familiar train. It was eerie. When i read it because i understood so much about the interior of the protagonist in that relationship but also just the backdrop of what was happening and class class within immigrants class in your native country in your new country. I found that was done expertly but very very very subtly.

Heike Haidara Laura Vapin Sarah China United States
New York State Budget Misses Deadline

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | Last month

New York State Budget Misses Deadline

"This year. Governor Cuomo and state lawmakers have yet to reach a final agreement on a number of issues, Karen DeWitt reports. The Legislature is proposing $7 billion a new taxes on the wealthy and corporations and $4 billion Maurin School aid. Cuomo's tax and education aid plans are more modest. Senator Jeremy Cooney, a freshman from Rochester, is among those pressing for a $3.5 billion fund in the budget to pay for employment and other services to undocumented New Yorkers who lost their jobs during the pandemic. He says he'd rather have the right budget a few days late than one That's on time. Means that hundreds and thousands of excluded workers have resources to put food on the table. I'm okay with that. Lawmakers are also trying to piece together how to fit into the budget the billions of dollars in new funding from the federal stimulus package. Recreational

Governor Cuomo Karen Dewitt Maurin School Senator Jeremy Cooney Cuomo Legislature Rochester
Lyssa Mandel Embraces The Woo - burst 5

Apocalypse...Now?

00:54 sec | Last month

Lyssa Mandel Embraces The Woo - burst 5

"Are you one those people that thinks that new york will never come back. I think it will come back. Because i think that new yorkers are like cockroaches but it's gonna come back in a very different way and it might look a little more like detroit where you know. Maybe a lot of the big money doesn't come back. The big corporate businesses might not come back because they're all doing remote work. But i think that there's going to be a lot of space for artists to flourish. And that's what i'm excited to see honestly. Yeah i'm ready for new york to come back with all this pent-up artistic ambition and ideas ready to just explode and i'm also ready for the audience to be like. Gimme gimme content. Gimme gimme that load. I do think it's going to. I mean i hope. I do think it's going to be like arrest but i don't know how long that'll take because i don't know if it'll i don't think it'll be this

New York Detroit
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Hello it's Ilya Marritz Co host of Trump Inc Donald trump is the only recent accident to not release his tax returns the only president you can pay directly by booking a room at his hotel he shreds rules sometimes literally he didn't hear acas worth the tour memos or things and just throw them in the trash so took something from White House staff look you can't do that. Trump inc an open investigation into the business of trump from PROPUBLICA and WNYC subscribe wherever you get your podcasts this is the New Yorker radio hour thanks for being with us today I'm David Ramnik for reasons that are pretty obvious Richard Nixon's name has been coming up all the time in the news lately and one of the most acute portraits of the late president was an essay by Michael Korda that ran in the New Yorker in nineteen ninety four quarter I got to know Nixon pretty well during the long years after the ex-president left Washington there is a theory that great men have large heads and prominent features think of Charles de Gaulle and his nose LBJ and his ears FDR and his jaw and by this standard if no other Richard Nixon had reached greatness his head was enormous is jowls and ski jump knows where Justice cartoonist had always portrayed them his is dark in penetrating most striking of all was his voice a deep rumbling Bosso Phunto rather like an avalanche the distance Michael Korda Nixon weren't exactly friends quarter says editor he worked on the books that Nixon published with Simon and Schuster and in nineteen eighty nine he was invited to a dinner at Nixon's home in Saddle River New Jersey and on that night it turned out the former president was conducting a little shout of diplomacy of his own something very much on our minds right now here's Dylan Baker reading from Michael Curtis Account of that night with Gregg Star as Richard Nixon within a mile or so of New Jersey Commercial Strip full of mini malls service stations Nixon's house was tucked away as secretly Shangrila behind high dense growths of trees and hedges it was impossible for any casual and you'd find rather like any number of cul de sacs in Belair but without palm trees Nixon staff had presented with careful instructions on how to reach the house but it seemed a little puzzled that I was driving myself their puzzlement became clear as I pulled up before the entrance a row of limousines to one side made it evident that Nixon's guests tended to be driven by chauffeurs yes I had driven my silver Porsche. The courtyard was a blacktop space big enough for a good sized motel the security people at the door seemed uncertain what to make of the car the weather because it was frivolous or foreign I wasn't sure and inside I found most of my fellow guests milling about the entrance hall looking suitably solemn I recognize Robert Aplin up a large jovial looking man who had been in the limelight as a Nixon backer and personal friend during Watergate there was the CEO of Archer Daniels Midland an assistant secretary of state and a former U S representative to NATO there were also three Chinese gentleman all with the bland inscrutable faces of professional diplomats the senior of them was Hans Shoe China's depart eating ambassador there were no women present it was to be a stag dinner Nixon appeared at the top of the stairs at exactly the moment we had been summoned for he descended halfway stretched out his arms justice he used to do when he was campaigning with a broad smile gentleman the good news is bar is open as I was shortly to discover drinks in the Nixon household were not to be taken or even held lightly they were Sir served in immense heavy tumblers and every time guest took a sip Nixon who had an eagle is a host would attract the Butler attention it better fresh up Mr Cora's drink I ordered one of his famous dockery's made with almost no sugar the recipe for which was said to be one of his more closely guarded secrets the president claim to make the best dachary ever and I can report that it lived up to expectation nations.

Michael Korda Nixon Donald trump Trump inc Michael Korda president White House Ilya Marritz Co WNYC Charles de Gaulle Archer Daniels Midland Saddle River New Jersey New Jersey Commercial Strip Dylan Baker Washington Michael Curtis NATO Bosso Phunto David Ramnik
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"We invite poets to selective home the New Yorker archive to read and discuss along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the magazine my guest today. Deborah Landau, author of the uses of the body and the last usable our both Lannan literary selections she's received a Guggenheim fellowship and the Robert Dana and hinge prize for poetry. And she directs the creative writing program at New York University. Welcome Deborah, thanks so much. Thanks for joining us today. So the palm you've chosen from the archive is little girl. My string bean, my lovely woman by insects, and can you tell us why this particular poem stood out to you? Well, for for several reasons, but I'll start by saying that it would have been Sexton's ninetieth birthday this month. And I thought it would be nice to read this in her honor. Grant, let's hear it. And then we can talk after. Little girl. My string bean. My lovely woman. My daughter at eleven almost twelve is like a garden. Oh, darling. Born in that sweet birthday suit and having owned it and known it for so long. Now, you must watch high noon, enter noon that ghost our. Oh, funny. Little girl this one under a blueberry sky this one. How can I say that I've known just what you know? And just where you are. It's not a strange place. This I'd home where your face sits in my hand so full of distance so full of its immediate fever. The summer has seized you as when last month in a mall fee? I saw lemons as large as your desk side globe that miniature map of the world, and I could mention to the market stalls of mushrooms and garlic buds all engorged, or I think even of the orchard next door where the berries are done and the apples are beginning to swell and once with our first backyard, I remember planted in Aker of yellow beans. We couldn't eat oh little girl..

Deborah Landau Guggenheim fellowship Robert Dana New York University Sexton Lannan Grant
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Editor of the New Yorker magazine, as you may know on this program, we invited poets to poem for the magazines archive to read and chat about along with the palm of their own. That's been published in the New Yorker joining us today is Nick Flynn, the author of several poetry collections memoirs. He's received the Erikson institute prize for excellence in mental health media as well as wards fellowships from Penn Guggenheim foundation and the library of congress. Welcome nick. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks cannon. I saw also that you've been translated into fifteen languages is that right? Yeah. Not the poems. The pros. Yes. One one book has been translated into fifteen Lang exciting. That's amazing. I don't point out one book. One book fifteen times. So the poem you selected today is objectively as blanket, but Zoe hit sig tell us what about this piece caught your attention as you're looking through our archives the archives is you know, you have to sort of sort through them. They you don't have a whole list of poets that you know. And then you should like remember poem and see you have to sort of actually sure gauge it page comes up this ten in each page. And I my my attention online is is not huge. And so I got through twenty pages of that twenty pages twenty pages. And then just put in Poland. She wanted to just look through and see the past. I didn't see the little search button. So okay. And I actually didn't want do actor after quite a walks. I realize on each page that'd be like ten poets. And I would know either them personally or know of their work pretty well of most of the pages and occasionally be a name that would that. I didn't know. Right. And then after a while I began to read a lot. The poems and after a while be really interested in the post. I'd never heard of before. Yeah. Sure. And I decided to go for that. Okay. All right. So we hear the poem. Sure. I'd love to you. Yeah. Let's hear it objectively as blanket. No, the police hyenas on hearing five confessions for false in one to irresistible nor the mental health elephant tusks by the state, nor the common sense store twisting at the prosecutors feet, nor the one the one juror uneasy facing eleven pale sheep at bay all day all night for conviction, nor the governor, sir, nor the common sense stork. Now in a not nor the shots. No, the clause unbending nor the clause bending nor seeing his fitful approach did one turn back to flip the window latch for the life form. Nearly breaking himself on glass, nor the next governor nor the state carriage horses trotting ever steady blinders acute to the I nor the widower how he could how could he Puma and pull focus not defense counsel. Not for lack of it, nor the stork is she breathing. Is there such a thing as breathing here? Does it mean? The polyester the Royal blue the blanket on the bed of the mother of two. That was objectively as blanket by Zoe hit sig which ran in the March twentieth. Twenty seventeen issue of the magazine while it's really great to hear you re. I love all those Nores. It's it's the denial before the admission, I suppose, how did you hear those? Yeah. I mean the negating opponent at the beginning. I thought was really interesting strategy just to get me into it and just seem to be willing to like right from the beginning to exist in this state of instability, and you know, already with the first line having not being chromatic Lee, completely correct perhaps, and it just allowing that sort of while tumbling energy along with negation and long with a stuttering to nor the one the one juror without even a comet like just doing a lot of things that are genuine to itself. I think. Yeah. Once invested in language and the ways that we might. Miss your language or hear language differently. And I I love that about it. But it's also I think interested in the kind of rhetoric nor the governor, sir this kind of old fashioned Roderick..

Zoe Nick Flynn New Yorker magazine Erikson institute Penn Guggenheim foundation Editor cannon congress Poland Lang Roderick Lee Puma
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

05:04 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

Robert Cooper New Yorker magazine writer Hari Deborah Trason John Barth McConnell editor Kevin representative Couve
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

The New Yorker: Poetry

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker: Poetry

"Kevin young poultry under the New Yorker magazine and the director of the center for research in black culture on this program. We invite poets twos Apoel from the New Yorker archive to read and discuss then we asked them to read one of their own poems. That's when published in the magazine Mike s today is Tarrant Hayes a chancellor of the kademi of American poets. Current poetry editor at the New York Times magazine distinguished professor of English at the university of Pittsburgh and distinguished writer in residence at New York University. His many honors include a MacArthur fellowship a Guggenheim fellowship and the national book award for poetry, welcome Terrance. Hey, man. Good to be here. Good to see you. So the poem you've chosen to read his fire by Matthew Dickman, tell us what in particular about this poem Katcher is you're sifting through the archive. Well, naturally, I thought about my own palm, which of my own poems. I would pick. And then I sorta backed up and recalled reading this. Poem and thinking that there in conversation. So I wanted to figure that out with you today just to see what these two poems doing with each other. Let's give it a listen. Here's Terrance Hayes reading fire by Matthew Dickman fire. Oh fire. You burn me at a singing behind the smoke in Kohl's his wife near him. The rest of us below the stars swimming above Washington state burning through themselves. He's like an appellation prince Henry with his banjo and whiskey the court surrounding him and the deer off in the dark hills like the French terrified, but in love and hungry. I'm burning all the time my pockets full of matches and lighters. The blue smoke crawling out like a skinny ghost from between. My lips my lungs on fire. The wings of them falling from the open sky, the top of Michelle's long hands looked like the beautiful coats leopards have covered dark spots all the cigarettes. She would like and then smash out her is the color of hairspray cloudy and stingy and gone. But beautiful she carried her hands around like. To terrible letters of introduction. I never understood who could have opened them read them aloud still thrown her onto a bad still walk into the street. She was still lit what little fuse. She had left. Oh fire. You burn me. My sister, and I and southern comfort making us singer and spark the family ash all around us the way she is beautiful to me in her singular, blaze, my brain lighting up my tongue like a monk in wartime a wash and RH silk and flames.

Michelle New Yorker magazine Matthew Dickman Terrance Hayes New York Times magazine New York University Kohl distinguished professor of Eng Tarrant Hayes poetry editor university of Pittsburgh Kevin national book award Guggenheim fellowship chancellor Washington director MacArthur writer
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Oh mm a this is the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik wrong the y uae like it from guinea midnight why man dry in miles away lead free last year i spent a few days with the songwriter leonard cohen cohen had been avoiding interviews for the past four or five six years but once he agreed to talk we talk for days and covered the length and breadth of his career and i'm grateful that i had the chance to visit when i did because not long after leonard cohen died at the age of eighty two cohen once wrote a song called the tower of song in which he compared himself really unfavourably to hank williams but along with the other masters bob dylan certainly joni mitchell konya west everybody's got their own list leonard cohen is way up there in the ranks of songwriters when i visited him in los angeles he was suffering from a number of very serious illnesses although he was keeping that very very private he was in deep pain especially from compression fractures in his spine and he had to sit in the big blue medical chair you was very thin may be a hundred and ten pounds at the most but i have to say that he was in a bullion mood somehow for a man who knew where life was taking him and it was going to take him there in a hurry he was the most gracious toast the side of my mother.

david ramnik uae leonard cohen cohen los angeles new yorker guinea hank williams bob dylan joni mitchell big blue five six years ten pounds
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"That was david sideroads reading roy spivey by miranda july the story appeared in the june 11th 2007 issue of the new yorker and was published in the anthology the book of other people by penguin this new yorker podcast is supported by msnbc news in politics are more complicated and fast moving than ever every weeknight chris matthews chris hayes rachel maddow in lawrence o'donnell deliver sharp journalism clear context and award winning original reporting to help you make sense of these times in the world we live in join them weeknights seven to eleven pm eastern on msnbc and then the purported john lee anderson knows latin american politics better than almost anyone in this week on the new yorker radio hour he brings us a rare interview with the president of venezuela were political and economic chaos may give russia an opening very close to the united states we should be engaging with finish where the because it is going through the sewer on our watch that's john lee anderson on the new york radio our from wnyc studios listen wherever you get your podcasts let's just these saddest thing in the world this is mrs your reaction to reading this law reaction it is i feel like i was devastated is the character was at the end of that story so for you this is a very unhappy ending yeah well i mean she says it if it the number had shepherded her through her adult life so it had gotten her this far but now she's going to have to figure out how to get from here until the end so she was on the plane she had this encounter she was given this number and completely counter intuitively understood the number to be some kind of lucky talisman rather than an actual phone number to use her this change your life why did this overcome this strange inertia she's been suffering from me she knew that the number four was the last number of the number but she was just holding that out like will i can call him if things get bed others call roy he'll remember me do you think that's what it is because it's only.

david sideroads roy spivey new yorker rachel maddow lawrence o'donnell msnbc john lee anderson president venezuela russia united states wnyc studios chris matthews latin american new york
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deborah tradesman fiction editor at the new yorker last month in honor of the tenth anniversary of the new yorker fiction podcast we asked you to vote for your favorite episode from our first 10 years what amazed us was it out of more than one hundred twenty episodes seventy one different podcast got at least one vote and most of them got many more than that the final winner was an episode from two thousand twelve in which david sideroads fred and discussed the story roy spivey by miranda july the great selection and we're happy to release the episode now thank you to everyone who voted and thank you to all of our listeners for making this podcast such rewarding thing to work on this is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear roy spivey by miranda july he slept for the first hour and it was startling to see such a famous face look so vulnerable an empty the story was chosen by david sideroads who's personal essays and humor pieces have been appearing in the new yorker for nearly two decades he's published eight books including me talk pretty one day dress your family and quarter and dunham and when you were engulfed in flames high david i'd ever similar under july published a story collection called noone belongs him more than you a few years ago and two of her stories of appeared the magazine but she's also perhaps better known as a film director and performer she wrote directed and start into feature movies me and you and everyone we know in two thousand five in last year's the future but what side of her work to you know best i was not from you.

editor new yorker roy spivey new yorker magazine writer david sideroads david noone director david sideroads fred dunham two decades 10 years one day
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"New yorker radio hour is supported by msnbc every weeknight chris matthews chris hayes rachel meadow in lawrence o'donnell deliver sharp journalism and clear context to help you make sense of these times weeknights seven to eleven eastern on msnbc oh these are just anecdotes but it's building up into something more coherent and i think he he sings really try to unravel what his ties says is sort of country he'd abide under their own convenient anzen it's not clear where it goes nuts from one world trade center in manhattan this is the new yorker radio hour a coproduction of wnyc studios and the new yorker welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik staff writer sheila kaul had car covers a lot of business stories for the new yorker and she's been looking at a tremendous economic change going on in our country right now she has been reporting on how automation is making its way into industries that are still depending very much on human labour with robots that are much more advanced than what you might imagine in an automotive factory for example and every time robotics makes another leap forward economist start worrying with good reason here sheila kolhatkar why first became interested in this because income inequality is one of the defining issues of our time and time it's one of the major reasons that president trump one elected office it was one of the strong motivations of many of his voters and in occurred to me the technology and automation might be partly to blame and this actually defies conventional wisdom because in the past tech.

msnbc rachel meadow lawrence o'donnell manhattan wnyc studios new yorker sheila kaul sheila kolhatkar president chris matthews coherent david ramnik staff writer
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"New yorker radio our is supported by msnbc news in politics are more complicated in fastmoving than ever every weeknight chris matthews chris hayes rachel matto and lawrence o'donnell deliver sharp journalism clear context an awardwinning original reporting to help you make sense of these times in the world we live in join them weeknights seven to eleven pm eastern on msnbc new yorker radio our is supported by goldman sachs some of the most important questions facing the world today intersect with the global capital markets climate change autonomous driving the future of china's economic growth on exchanges i goldman sachs the firm's podcast you'll hear discussions on topics with farreaching implications like these think of it as a place to get insights from some of the world's leading thinkers on markets industries and the global economy available on your favorite podcast app andgscompodcast radio our listeners it's me david remnant now i'm not a pet person i can't imagine why you would have an animal other than a human being in your home here's our killed but i know him in the minority on this and if your family is on the other side of this debate we've got the podcast for you how can you hear my voice it a headphones wnyc studios has a new show for kids of all ages made by pets here with me at all always is benny that you're about any off any this podcast has fleas tells the stories of a dog and cat aero and they're dueling podcast thanks to while you cat lovers who downloaded my hit new single featured in last week's episode let's hear a little bit of it now.

New yorker lawrence o'donnell goldman sachs climate change china global economy msnbc fastmoving chris matthews rachel matto capital markets wnyc studios benny
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"So it's a cityscape of people standing on window ledges and that was your first cover but now you've become known as a really a great political artist you know like thomas nast or herblock or but yourself did you think of yourself as a political person growing up i absolutely not no that was my thing at all i mean i like taki and some baseball and then pop music as i got a little older i had a dorothy hamill period where i was drawing her a lot of that ended but uh i i i think i mean as i wrote in the book it seemed like when monica lewinsky gate happened when that stuff started when political news became pop culture news and i was doing regular stuff for entertainment weekly and they started asking me to to draw bill clinton and i was drawing bill clinton for the new yorker as well it's sort of happened from there what do you want your political are to do you you've done dozens of of car governor is about george w bush that was a favorite um uh a subject for certain and dozens of covers about obama and will go into some of the specifics in a second in now trump hadn't even greater rate um is anybody of all your subjects of all your political subjects a favorite somebody don't get sick off i mean people i draw subject i mean i don't get sick of of the act of drawing trump because i mean it's he's an amazing specimen to draw as i think a lot of presidents are know crazily enough.

baseball bill clinton new yorker obama thomas nast pop music dorothy hamill monica lewinsky george w bush
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"New yorker radio hour is supported by msnbc every weeknight chris matthews chris hayes rachel meadow in lawrence o'donnell deliver sharp journalism and clear context to help you make sense of these times weeknights seven to eleven eastern on msnbc new yorker radio our is supported by the economist from gluten to globalization the economist cuts through the noise and brings you stories that matter and now the economist is offering you a special opportunity get a free copy when you visit www dotted collumnistcomradio hour or search economists new yorker two sir perry during the butler west and me that right i basically to speak to be interesting to look at the emergence of a criminal economy also on the only from these on more profile profiles this really subversive strings in rapid specially and see what july's molecular the from one world trade center in manhattan this is the new yorker radio hour a coproduction of wnyc studios and the new yorker welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik i don't think there's a keener observer of american politics in life than barry blet now forgive me for bragging a little bit when i say this because berries been one of the great cover art is for the new yorker for a very long time by way of introduction i'm going to read you the blurb for his new book which is called pretty logically blet here's how it goes quote a gorgeous hilarious and provocative compendium of the awardwinning artist illustrations for the new yorker the new york times vanity fair at center at cetera and so forth now i'm quoting this is directly from his website continues quote barry blitz cartoons have been lampooning american politics and culture blablabla etcetera etcetera this lavish fullcolor collection showcases more than a quartercentury of its cetera and so on and so forth you get the idea the less said about it the better and quote berry tell me about this book the decision to do a book.

msnbc rachel meadow lawrence o'donnell perry manhattan wnyc studios new yorker david ramnik barry blet chris matthews new york times barry blitz berry
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"New yorker radio hour is supported by msnbc every weeknight chris matthews chris hayes rachel meadow in lawrence o'donnell deliver sharp journalism and clear context to help you make sense of these times weeknights seven to eleven eastern on msnbc oh the survey perry during the bought direct felt right i basically to speak to be interesting to look at the emergence of a criminal economy also i'm only for these that on more profile her really subversive strange day in round especially nc with delays malek herbert said the glenn from one world trade center in manhattan this is the new yorker radio hour a coproduction of wnyc studios and the new yorker welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik 2017 has been quite a year horrendous year in some ways with many natural disasters three of the worst hurricanes in memory the worst wildfire season on record in california and trip everything climate science tells us the future hold more frequent events like this more severe events as the planet continues to warm not long ago as houston was scrambling to deal with destruction from hurricane harvey the new yorkers caroline cormon was on a small boat she was there along with the radio our seren knicks in the middle of the chesapeake bay and their to a storm was heading their way were and when the mayor headed out to rescue a baby asprey how old even get is peres lazy they're not ready to fire yet and they might be on travel with the storm coming tomorrow.

california caroline cormon new yorker malek herbert chris matthews peres chesapeake bay new yorkers hurricane harvey houston msnbc david ramnik wnyc studios manhattan glenn nc perry lawrence o'donnell rachel meadow
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This is the new yorker fiction podcast from the new yorker magazine i'm deb retracement fiction editor at the new yorker each month we invite a writer to choose a story from the magazines archives to read and discuss this month were going to hear extra by ye lee which was published in the new yorker in december of two thousand three granny lynn gasps she has never had a husband in her life and the prospect of a dead husband frightens her yet auntie wong makes the decision for her right then in there between two fish stance and in a short time she finds granny lynn a match the story was chosen by sarah swan yenbuying them who's the author of two novels miss hempel chronicles and madeleine his sleeping which was a finalist for the national book award in two thousand four hi sarah hi debra so extra was it was the first story by ian lee that was published in the new yorker back in two thousand three and i believe it was only the second story that she'd published anywhere was the first piece of her set you read it was it was an i remember feeling excitement both because of the work itself and also because we had just missed each other at iowa but i had already sort of heard about this wonderful writer who was coming out of the program what impression did the story make on you and you're in it the story felt very poignant to me because the character of granny lynn and i imagine the stories taking place somewhere in the nineties maybe the midnineties or so let character of granny land is around the same age as my own mother um and my mother left china in 1949 and i was struck when i was reading the story of oh if my mother had stayed what might her life had look look like and and in some ways this story offered a window into what another life another self might have looked like river my mother the other thing i was struck by when i first read it.

editor new yorker writer wong sarah swan national book award debra ian lee iowa granny lynn china hempel madeleine
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"This new yorker podcast is supported by book of the month book of the month makes reading more fun and discovering great new bucks easier than ever every month they select five new hardcover releases that are truly worth reading you pick your favorite and they ship it to your door in a fund to open box from there it's time to curl up a get lost in a great story then cut back next month and do it all again this new yorker podcast is supported by mcgleish studying for standardized tests is stressful the act an sat influence college admissions and scholarships the gre g matt allen fat and end cat cadillac for grad school fortunately mcgleish online test prep help students wake up on test day confident and prepared magoche provide students with hundreds of practice questions steady schedules nvidia lessons plus access to expert tears best of all planned start at seventy nine dollars enter promo code new yorker at mcgleish dot com for twenty percent off this is david remnant from the new yorker radio hour this weekend let it talked with david simon whose new hbo show is a greedy dark with compelling look at the point industry in the 1970s in order to shape the whole story and to bring it to a point that it needed to be this could in no way be glorious persian sects were needed looms voice on the rural david simon on the deuce he joins me this week on the new yorker radio our from wnyc studio can find us wherever you get your podcasts.

new yorker david remnant david simon wnyc studio nvidia hbo seventy nine dollars twenty percent
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"So this is there not guy views but you know this could be one yeah it's it's funny just to think if the genders in the story were first and there is a man in love with a woman in pursuing and sleeping with another woman who looks like her simply for that reason one might feel more indignant that interesting i think i would totally read that story that is a really interesting idea i actually had the idea recently um do you know i probably won't do this but do you know how liz fare like one of i think that her sort of breakthrough early album was supposed to be sort of a response to a rolling stones album to notice and i was like i was i thought to myself recently it'd be interesting to sort of take relief famous um kind of male stories whether it's like uptakes anp etcetera etcetera and kind of rewrite them either from the female point of view or just tell a similar story where the protagonist is female instead of male to be super interesting i do feel it if this one were were turned around it would read differently yeah it definitely one where were exactly you know had the same inner life and have the same desire since ohen well there's i mean and actually in sunstroke there's a story where as he probably know i don't think it was in the new yorker but but there is a story where an older woman and like uh a essentially more like a boy than a young man it's not like they're they're not having sex and they're not they never even kiss but she definitely sort of you know sits next to him inappropriately or whatever and it's it's an uncomfortable story it's not a romantic story in i think it's.

new yorker
"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"yorker" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"He was watching her again this time he seemed to be trying to see her as it for the first time but could not she too was thinking of carnival of how the year after they met they addressed as bride and groom looking for someone to marry them she disguise herself as the bride and he has to groom for going the traditional puzzle at the end of the celebrations she had burned her wedding dress in the bonfire and he had burned his suit she wish now that they had kept them they could have walk these foreign streets in them performing their own carnival since she didn't know the language they wouldn't have to speak or ask any questions of the stonyfaced people around them they could perform their public wedding march in silence of silence like the one that had come over them now that was chino d as reading seven fayette reached antic at the story first appeared in the october first two thousand one issue if the new yorker and was included in her book the do breaker which was published by alfred a knopf in two thousand four so do you know as we just heard the story ends with this couple on the bus and they're sitting apart from each other and silence she's pretending not to look at him he staring at her as if he's trying to see her through all of these years that have divided them what do you make of the ending do think it's it's hopeful or is it the opposite i think that's why it's such a strong embassy booth or reader could take it either way and more ways i think that it's uh it's.

new yorker