35 Burst results for "York University"

New York University Student Can Stay: Trump Administration Rescinds Plan That Would Force International Students Out Of U.S.

WBZ Midday News

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

New York University Student Can Stay: Trump Administration Rescinds Plan That Would Force International Students Out Of U.S.

"Lawsuits in some criticism from allies around the globe, the Trump administration deciding to pull back On a plan to send thousands of foreign students home who may not be able to go back to campus this fall. Why you graduate student Divya Jeff Watley got the good news during a meeting she can stay was the most overjoyed presence is such a huge victory of Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey among the many state attorneys general and universities who challenged the new guidelines. I want those students to know that in this country we have a president in Washington, DC, but we've got a lot of others of us in government to the administration's lost Economies gain foreign students bring in some $44 billion a year. Vicki Barker CBS News

Divya Jeff Watley Maura Healey Vicki Barker Graduate Student CBS DC President Trump Washington Massachusetts Attorney
Facial Recognition Auditing

Data Skeptic

04:39 min | Last month

Facial Recognition Auditing

"Hi I'm. Deborah G and I'm attack fellow at the institute at New York. University will thanks so much for joining us today to kick off. Can you tell me a little bit about your background? I started off studying robotics engineering at the University of Toronto, in Canada, and then I spent a year working on the machine, learning team at clarify, which is a computer vision company in new. York and then wallet clarify sort of noticed that there was in the computer vision community especially with facial recognition in that space in particular there were glaring racial disparities in terms of our data set so data sets being used the facial recognition space in particular, was very visible that there were huge demographic disparities, huge underrepresentation of people of color for example certain demographics cues, and this was in my intuitive At the time. It's since bins empirically demonstrated, but at the time. So I started digging into it, and like exploring it more, and that led me to work with joy blend Weenie at the MIT media lab, and she was working on a project called gender shade, so the gender sheets project was really an investigation into the performance of mainstream deployed machine, learning systems by IBM face plus class and Microsoft and she looked specifically facial recognition systems for the task of gender classification. Is she said what would happen if we evaluated models, these deployed models already out there in the wild already being sold already being used by developers, you know. Know, what would happen if we evaluated these systems on not the demographically benchmarks that we all use in the computer vision community, but what if we created a new benchmark that was not demographically skewed, that was thou- for Gender Representation also skin-tight, so that's what she did. She created this benchmark and evaluated these mainstream computer vision fish recognition API's on demographically balanced benchmark, and what she found out was that there was a huge disparity between the performance on darker skin, females and lighter skinned males, and it was important revelation, especially the facial recognition community to realize that. That a lot of the data that they were using were not demographically representative Ed. There's a lot of racial bias, but also general demographic bias in the models that they were building and deploying so I worked with her that summer, and we did a lot of follow up work to gender shades, analyzing and beginning to try to understand companies didn't response to gender shades how they diversified their data sets in order to do better on the benchmark that we created how certain companies responded or did not respond in response to being targeted for specific audit, and then we. We also kind of looked at particular elements of audit designs that led to impact that led to the company's feeling. Push to change their behavior and at the same time, also I guess about low a research, not at Google I was working with colleagues there to think about documentation. How do we communicate the performance of a machine learning system? And how can we incorporate some of these ideas around auditing into the way that we present and talk about document, the performance of shoe system, and that sort of launched me on this whole dirty, which is where I. I am now like thinking about evaluation of machine learning systems especially under the language of Auditing Assessment Dinky demographic bias, but assessment other ways in other elements of the system, and then also thinking about the communication of the performance of the system. How do we document any of these things in a way that gives us a sense of how the model performs when in the real world and that's really connected to what this paper is about as well. This paper was written with some of the colleagues. It Google. I've been working with on that documentation project also other. Other colleagues from the Computer Vision Phase asking what do we learn and what can we not learn from what we call the gender shade style audit what we learned from these audits on demographic bias, and what is still missing information that we still need to figure out a way to capture document in order to really communicate it understand the full performance of a model or system or AI. System wants US deployed so yeah, that's sort of a brief overview. The whole journey of how we got here and this paper in particular is in response to the fact. Fact that following the generates project and following the subsequent sort of follow up work to under shades. We were realizing that a lot of people were just taking the benchmark from gender shades or recruiting shadow version of that benchmark and using that as a moratorium condition in policy for example or trying to use a similar method to assess the suitability of a model before deploying facial recognition model for demographic disparities and what we found. This paper goes into detail to ethics. There's a right way to do that and there's a wrong way to do that and they're. They're sort of important more nuanced ethical questions involved that need to be consider that need to be talked about when assessing official recognition system for example, but any broad system, and we need to sort of ask ourselves these more careful nuanced questions, the aware of some of these more nuanced ethical tensions before we allow the systems to be deploy,

Google Deborah G York New York MIT Canada University Of Toronto IBM Microsoft United States Representative Official AI
Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

The Big Story

07:44 min | 2 months ago

Is history at a turning point? How can we meet the moment?

"Now is the covid nineteen pandemic continues to grow, so are the parallels being drawn between it and another deadly virus that struck the globe more than a century ago, talking about the Spanish flu. Guys. We've been taking a look at some of the video from nineteen sixty eight. There's a lot of pieces of video that look very similar to what we're seeing today. Implementing the images and emotions coming out of Minneapolis too familiar to what happened right here in Ferguson Missouri in two thousand fourteen George Floyd arrest on a Minneapolis street corner, and his frantic pleas for help have given rise to one of the most turbulent periods in recent American history. The question that I can't stop asking myself. How does this all and You may have heard. At various points this year that we are living history right now. The truth is we're always living history. It's just that some of us can afford to ignore it until it boils over. But when racism and police brutality, and the rage that comes in response to that are laid bare for the world to see. In the middle of a pandemic and martial law is threatened. And nobody gets to look away. Everyone wants to know what happens next. Do, we even have a historical precedent for what's happening in America and around the world right now. What is the larger context of how we arrived at this moment? What are we missing when we watch people discuss it on. Cable News. And what needs to happen now? But does each of US need to do? For this to be a moment that changes the world for the better. That's still possible. I'm Jordan Rawlings, and this is the big story. Andre Demise is a writer and journalist, a contributing editor at Maclean's and a Nathanson fellow in history at York University. He is one of the smartest guests. We ever have on this podcast hi Andre. How's it going toward? It's going about as well as it can more importantly, how are you? doing my best I'm trying to reduce stress as much as I can by hanging out with my children and you know. Occasionally occasionally seeing partner but we're both in school. We've both got tons of homework were both busy plus jobs and everything else so yeah, we're even busier than before. The whole lockdown happened. Figure that and now you're spending this week with white people like me, asking you to please explain the historical context of this well I mean yeah, yeah, I am spending a lot of time explaining shift away, people. I mean I all. I can say I sincerely. Thank you for it. you know I? Just I find you incredibly smart and able to help me. learn some stuff from this. Thanks for taking the time Oh. Stop stuttered. Stop your flattery. I'm about to Leeann as I can plan. Why don't you just start by telling me while you watch everything? That's been happening this past week. What's going through your head? People say things like we've been through worse or we've been here before, and I have to ask the question. When when when of we've been here before we've been here before. Quote Unquote in nine eighteen during the Spanish flu pandemic. We've been here. Nine, hundred nineteen during the May Day riots and during red summer. We've been here before in nineteen sixty eight. But. My question is when when is all this happened at the same time? This is not this is unprecedented. My. Question is what is supposed to look like when when it's all over when the dust settles. Because at some point, there's going to be a change of some kind. Throughout history what happens in the course of a popular uprising that moves to straight up volt. The two methods that the ruling class can use. To try and tamp it down. One is use of force. This is where the Jimmy breaks down. This is where the state has to reveal as violence. And come out against the people with arms, or can try placating the people you can try it for example, the Civil Rights Act. It can try the declaration of the rights. It can try any number of mechanisms. To make that, the populace still has some faith in the state, but what? This looks like I don't know that there's anything to placate like there's I. Don't know that there's any mechanism. The state can try to convince people that social contract is worth upholding. That's the thing that keeps going through my head. Is You know what kind of concession can be made universally across? You know the entire United States that would actually mollify the anger I do know some of the answers to those questions I do know. That and this is something that I've been talking about over the last few years. That capitalism depends on racism to be able to reproduce and propagate itself. It's just plain fact If you beat Donald Harassed, who is a former economist Stanford also happens to be the father of Kamla Harris the former presidential candidate. But apparently they didn't. They didn't really have much of a relationship, but throughout American history. The the use of Racist promises the promising of white rages. what's been described as racial republicanism by scholars like David. What that does is incentivize the white working class against their black peers. It has the white working class essentially the. Generates like we are the only people that deserve to have. Rights. Everybody else is a on a cast below us. And until that cycle is abolished until we move away from a system of capital that accumulates the value of people's Labor and the crews it to a few select people. And then spreads out the rewards among certain other people, and then makes promises to certain people. Until that cycle is broken. I'm afraid we're going to be seeing this for the rest of our lives. I mean you're a fellow in history what? have. We seen that even close to like this in the past that ended with concessions. You have to go back very far. I mean you can. You can look at for example I mean not. Bolivia has been taken over in ashes coup. But if you look at Bolivia for example, the the presidency of evil, Morales and the Movement for socialism in Bolivia, lifted thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people out of out of poverty. It increased literacy rates incorporated indigenous eighty into the broader society. You had the the coca farmers. The the coca does I their their practices and their agricultural methods were incorporated into the broader nation. So that you didn't have eight of. The United States rating forms and burning crops. You headed that this is this is a a plants, but this is also a way of life that is valid, and the fact that it's been twisted into a normal trade has nothing to do with the people that originated the practice, so look at Bolivia for example like that. That was up until very recently and experiments in creating a broader. Social Democracy that was more inclusive and helped marginalized people, so

United States Bolivia Minneapolis Andre Demise George Floyd Coca Farmers Jordan Rawlings Ferguson Missouri America Leeann Partner York University Jimmy Donald Harassed Contributing Editor Morales David
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

"An federal American car health of the officials pilots are who has warning admitted of a potential to poor judgment problem with in the rapid breaking covert a quarantine nineteen order test to buy used medical across the supplies nation including has become the first at the White foreigner House in prison president in Singapore trump for has breaching healed its the Abbott restrictions laboratories meant test to curb as a game the convo changer not virus delivering results FedEx pilot in up Brian to fifteen Dugan yet again minutes from Alaska these tests was sentenced are highly to sophisticated four weeks very quick his very defense good lawyer used Ronny to test Tomasetti him pleaded and guilty key staff to leaving members his hotel every room day for three but the hours food and drug to buy administration mas says and it's a thermometer looking at preliminary data Singapore suggesting has one the test of the largest can miss outbreaks cases in Asia falsely with twenty clearing six people thousand who could cases then spread more the infection than ninety to percent others of those New infected York University a foreign researchers workers have living reported in crowded results dormitories suggesting the abit the tests tiny can city miss state up to has half strict the penalties infections caught for those by who arrival breach quarantine test rolls down adits by Moscow rejecting in public those findings or fail to and for adhere now to social the FDA distancing says it's measures reviewing the data I'm with abit sorry while I shockingly alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

White Foreigner House President Trump Abbott Brian Dugan Alaska Ronny Tomasetti Asia Abit Moscow Singapore Fedex York University FDA Donnie Washington
US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

US pilot jailed in Singapore for breaking quarantine order

"An federal American car health of the officials pilots are who has warning admitted of a potential to poor judgment problem with in the rapid breaking covert a quarantine nineteen order test to buy used medical across the supplies nation including has become the first at the White foreigner House in prison president in Singapore trump for has breaching healed its the Abbott restrictions laboratories meant test to curb as a game the convo changer not virus delivering results FedEx pilot in up Brian to fifteen Dugan yet again minutes from Alaska these tests was sentenced are highly to sophisticated four weeks very quick his very defense good lawyer used Ronny to test Tomasetti him pleaded and guilty key staff to leaving members his hotel every room day for three but the hours food and drug to buy administration mas says and it's a thermometer looking at preliminary data Singapore suggesting has one the test of the largest can miss outbreaks cases in Asia falsely with twenty clearing six people thousand who could cases then spread more the infection than ninety to percent others of those New infected York University a foreign researchers workers have living reported in crowded results dormitories suggesting the abit the tests tiny can city miss state up to has half strict the penalties infections caught for those by who arrival breach quarantine test rolls down adits by Moscow rejecting in public those findings or fail to and for adhere now to social the FDA distancing says it's measures reviewing the data I'm with abit sorry while I shockingly alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

White Foreigner House President Trump Abbott Brian Dugan Alaska Ronny Tomasetti Asia Abit Moscow Singapore Fedex York University FDA Donnie Washington
FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

FDA probes accuracy issue with Abbott's rapid virus test

"Federal health officials are warning of a potential problem with the rapid covert nineteen test used across the nation including at the White House president trump has healed the Abbott laboratories test as a game changer delivering results in up to fifteen minutes these tests are highly sophisticated very quick very good used to test him and key staff members every day but the food and drug administration says it's looking at preliminary data suggesting the test can miss cases falsely clearing people who could then spread the infection to others New York University researchers have reported results suggesting the abit tests can miss up to half the infections caught by arrival test adits rejecting those findings and for now the FDA says it's reviewing the data with abit while alerting doctors about the potential accuracy issue soccer mad Donnie Washington

FDA White House President Trump Abbott Laboratories New York University Abit Donnie Washington
New York University Study Raises Doubts Over Effectiveness Of Abbott Laboratories' Rapid Coronavirus Test

KYW 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 2 months ago

New York University Study Raises Doubts Over Effectiveness Of Abbott Laboratories' Rapid Coronavirus Test

"New questions are being raised about a speedy rotavirus test the New York University study says Abbott labs ID now test misses a third to a half of positive cases a concern since the test which returns results in minutes is being used at the White House Abbott is producing fifty thousand of the test today and plan to ramp up to two million by June Abbott says the city of Detroit study found the

June Abbott New York University White House Detroit
Beowulf Sheehan

Photography Radio

07:33 min | 2 months ago

Beowulf Sheehan

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have

New York Miami Dolphins Fort Lauderdale New York University Scott Olsen Magnet High School Beowulf Sheehan Oprah Winfrey Bill Dan Marino Wrestling Morrison Patti Smith Florida Everglades Yale Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewar Paul Simon Getting
How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

The Electorette Podcast

10:03 min | 3 months ago

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. Have A conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco is the Vice Dean and a professor at New York University School of law and she joins me to discuss. How state governors can use their authority to help slow the spread of Kobe. Nineteen in prison and jail populations around the country. Many local governments have responded to the corona virus outbreak with stay at home orders or by enforcing social distancing practices but very few had a comparable response to reducing the spread of Corona virus in the incarcerated population as well as to the jail and prison staff and to their families. Rachel Barco and I discussed a recent report that was published by data for progress which provides a detailed outline for exactly how local governments can act. Now slow the spread of covert nineteen in prisons and jails so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me so I think it's become increasingly obvious that you know while the current virus outbreak is dire generally for the rest of the population that it's even more dire in the incarcerated population people who are in prisons and jails and one of the obvious reasons as to why that is is that you can't socially descends properly in prison or in jail. But what are some other factors? You're certainly right at environment in. These facilities is such that people can't distance themselves but they also don't have access to some of the key things that health officials have told us. We need to try to stop the spread so people who were incarcerated often. Don't have access to soap. They charge in many facilities for soap. And people don't have it. They don't have hand sanitizer They don't have access to easily easy access to water to even wash their hands. So you know the kind of basic hygiene practices that we think of as necessary for prevention aren't things that are accessible there And then you you add that to the fact that the population of people who are inside these facilities leans toward people with preexisting health conditions and very older people. Who are there as well so you have a particularly vulnerable population should this spread within the facility? they're more likely to get serious cases in death as a result right. That's another factor that I hadn't actually considered that. The percentage of older people in the prison population is. It's actually grown quite a bit in the past decade or decade and a half. I think there's something like a tough percent of people who are over aged fifty five exactly and many even much older than fifty five past sixty past seventy. The populations that were were most concerned about. Yeah and and also they aged faster. I think just generally medical professionals tell us that people who are in car serrated kind of a person who is chronologically aged forty five is really more like a fifty five year old based on just the harsh conditions of living inside prisons. One of the things we aren't really talking about are the peripheral people who are involved with the population right like the prison guards or even the doctors and therapists that come in and out of prison then of course the families who are also kind of a risk. Yeah and if you look at New York which is where I'm located right now. There are almost nine hundred employees of the corrections department who are infected with Kovic. Nineteen so staff. The people who work in these facilities are the. It's not as if the virus is going to distinguish between the people who are there because they were convicted of a crime and the people who work there. It's going to spread to everybody and when we're talking about people who work there getting it they in turn we're gonNA take it outside. The prison walls back to their homes back into their communities. And so it's GonNa be a source of spread to the community at large when we're talking about it's spreading within these facilities and in addition to that thinking about the people within prison facilities who work specifically on medical issues the medical staff. You know these are not large numbers of people who do that and so if you get high rates of infection among the staff who are designated to treat people with inside these facilities. You're really looking at a looming crisis. Because if they get sick you know there aren't people to replace them. And now we don't have people to take care of the people inside who get this and you can just see how it very critically conspire onto a crisis. President NGO population. I don't think that they're being counted in the current projections for infections and deaths right And those projections are kind of scary already. Yes I've seen a couple projections. I believe it's the. Aclu has tried to do one to figure out if we did bring into the projections. What is happening now in prisons in jails in what it looks like going forward you know we we see exponential growth in terms of the number of people dying in infected when we factor that in. Because I don't think the existing models are properly accounting for how much more rapidly the spread of this virus would be inside prison facilities. You know it would be as if we had an unaccounted for. Really large proportion of people on cruise ships and because it spreads so much more rapidly in an environment like that. If your model wasn't accounting for that you would be under counting and I think that is the problem with most of the existing models that are out there is. They're not accounting for the much more rapid spread inside prison in jail right. So so what? We've seen generally in relation to the responses response. That kind of been working and I live in one of the states that that's had a really good response. I live in Washington. State where governor Jay Inslee is in charge. We've seen responses on the local level to the outbreak specifically on gubernatorial level. Like I said Jay Inslee. You know governor Cuomo Gretchen. Whitmer you know all democratic governors. I should run out but have any of them responded in a significant way to prevent the spread in prison and jail populations no and it's really disappointing. You know. I think that this isn't one of these left right. Republican Democratic Issues Savelly. It's it's basically both failing to address what's going on. You know there are. There are at most playing. You know at at at at best what we've seen them do is maybe some small numbers of releases but nothing that is commensurate with the problem in the risk. You know so here in New York. Governor Cuomo has done nothing to address the fact that we now have more than a thousand people who have covert nineteen inside our correctional facilities staff and people incarcerated both and he hasn't released anybody you know it's just I. I'm not sure what accounts for it. But it's an enormous blind spot and and it's true You know across the states you know. I should say there are some governors who have done some things and you know some of it may may surprise people that you know for example Oklahoma. The governor there has has granted a fair number of commutations letting people out earlier from their sentence in light of what's happening and you know that's a Republican Governor. And you know we've seen a few others who are trying to make an effort to have at least said that they would have releases places like. Vania a New Jersey but unfortunately the announcements that they made haven't yet been followed by actual releases that match what they promised. So what we see when we look around. The country is essentially really small numbers of people being released from these facilities and so in what ends up happening is they're crowded and the fire starts to spread and it starts to spread to the staff and it goes into the communities and so it's really the situation that we would hope that we'd have governors getting ahead of it but there are efforts thus far have been really disappointing is the nicest way. I could put it sure and you said that you know. This isn't partisan or shouldn't be partisan but of course in this climate everything. Everything's partisan just about right so we can talk about that later. So one of the solution that's being proposed as just what you hinted at is clemency or early releases. So how would that work exactly? Well there's a couple options for governors so a commutation would be a sentence reduction that's permanent basically saying look we know we gave you ten years but the is the Governor Im- going to say The eight years you've currently served as enough and released. You're done the other option that a governor has and sometimes with commutations. Governor could just do that with the stroke of a pen and other times. They need to go through a board or some kind of process so so. That's actually a mixed set of options for governors in

Rachel Barco Barco New York Jay Inslee Governor Cuomo Gretchen Governor Cuomo New York University School Of Jim Taylor Skinner Washington Vice Dean New Jersey Oklahoma President Trump Whitmer Professor
New York City Church Fights Fears Over The Coronavirus

Morning Edition

01:42 min | 5 months ago

New York City Church Fights Fears Over The Coronavirus

"Martin a church in New York City this fighting fears about the new coronavirus there are no known cases of the virus in the city but people at the New York Chinese alliance church are worried our church is located in close proximity to New York University so we have a large population of students from China and many of their family has been stricken what kind of art that is pastor Steven co he's been getting a lot of questions not just from parishioners but from other pastors to even concerned that that we should either change or cancel the way we had to communion on Sunday while the questions will pester co is uniquely qualified to offer both spiritual and medical expertise he's a doctor who used to be an infectious disease expert for the centers for disease control Pustaka recently wrote an article for the magazine Christianity Today and he argued that now is the time for people to come together we really have a calling and that passengers to care for the vulnerable and combat it will take that and then it will be a little thing we can to your now close our doors to a community that is hurting that it rang and chained right that is not only mental physical financial and so over the weekend pastor koh's congregation directly confronted their fears of the virus they sing together and listen to a sermon just like any other Sunday what we are doing is opening our doors and inviting them into a place where they can also share and play together has to because it's his job now is not only caring for bodies it's about uniting

New York City New York University China Pastor Steven Co Pustaka New York Chinese Alliance
Are You Prepared For Sponsorship?  The Career Big Game!

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

03:14 min | 6 months ago

Are You Prepared For Sponsorship? The Career Big Game!

"This week because it is the first week of black history. three-month I thought it would be a fitting time to highlight the first black woman. CEO of a fortune. Five hundred hundred company. I talk about her all time. She is one of the reasons for starting this podcast Ursula Burns. She has been the only black woman. The only there's only Orne just who and I don't even know how she dated. But let me tell you about Ursula. Woah Ursula Burns was appointed chairman and CEO of Veon in December. Two thousand eighteen. Now that is a company headquartered recorded in Amsterdam that focuses on telecommunications services so just think mobile phones fouling a period as executive -secutive chairman and previously chairman of the Board of directors. So she'd been in this thing for minute. Ursula has extensive international experience of large companies confronting technology change in their industries. She was chairman of the Board of of the Xerox Corporation from two thousand ten to two thousand seventeen and chief executive officer from two thousand nine to two thousand sixteen you up. So she was chairman of the board and the a former. US President Barack Obama are forever president and appointed her to help lead the White House national program on Science Technology Engineering and math and she served served as chair of the President's Export Council Ursula is the director of the Board of Exxon Mobil. Nestle and Uber Uber huge companies. She also counsels other community educational and nonprofit organizations including the Ford Foundation and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation. Mit She is a member of of the US. National Academy of Engineers and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Ursula holes a master's degree in mechanical engineering. I'm from Columbia University and a Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering From Polytechnic Institute of New York University. If you ever hear this I just want you to know that is a lot of us trying. We are here. Charm figured out. And we're trying not to let you be the only one that has been the CEO of a fortune five hundred company. Thank you for all of your contributions. Abusive fans thank you for being the first and letting US know that it is possible to hold the top spot at a fortune. Five hundred

Ursula Burns Chairman Chairman And Ceo CEO United States Ursula Mechanical Engineering From Po Barack Obama Orne President Trump Exxon Mobil Nestle Xerox Corporation American Academy Of Arts And S Chief Executive Officer Science Technology Engineering National Academy Of Engineers Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Columbia University Amsterdam
China Will Admit International Experts to Assist with Research and Help Contain Coronavirus Outbreak

Brett Winterble

04:59 min | 6 months ago

China Will Admit International Experts to Assist with Research and Help Contain Coronavirus Outbreak

"On Tuesday as case counts rose Chinese authorities agreed to allow the World Health Organization is an international experts to China to assist with research and containment of the virus it's not clear whether how that will affect the quarantine orders the virus so far has infected five thousand people on four continents that was after it was first detected a late last year end of last year in Wuhan China five cases have been reported in the United States including two in southern California Chinese containment measures could theoretically prevent infected people from introducing the virus elsewhere in the country or the world the virus is believed to be spreading from person to person to coughing and sneezing the information on this is involving on an almost daily basis the question is what is your level of concern in December cases of a pneumonia like illness began amount in Wuhan a major city in central China Chinese authorities who sequenced the virus learn it'd never been seen before but was genetically similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome you knew that is sars that killed eight hundred people worldwide back in twenty oh three in an attempt to contain the outbreak Chinese officials last week began sealing off highways in closing bus and subway systems and will on a city of eleven million people locked down orders have since been expanded and now apply to fifty million people across seventeen cities there in China John my gory has been mostly confined to the past week to his apartment on a Wuhan university campus where he teaches English you can leave the grounds to a single gate if he is wearing a mask but most friends are unwilling to meet up because of fears of falling ill nearly three thousand corona virus cases have been found in who obey the province of which will hide as the capital recent stores in the bustling city the seventh most populous in China largely deserted it's a ghost town now said more gory an American who's lived in Wuhan for six years warnings were used back during the black plague in the Middle Ages according was implemented in West Africa in twenty fourteen during a ball outbreak prompting cries it it's inhumane to track people and infected area while waiting for a fatal disease to run its course though a ball is far more deadly than coronavirus the people left in Wuhan other cities are still likely to feel like they're kind of being left behind as Guinea pigs or or maybe they're developing resistance to it I don't know that's the thing we don't know we don't understand this but we understand one very important thing China is an authoritarian government the Chinese as a culture tend to be more community oriented willing to do things for the greater good than Americans notes Arthur Caplan a New York University bio ethics professor so they're they're more on it even though they are a up in a store tarian state they're more about the community than the selfish Americans are check still any restrictions on freedom will be a touchy thing here in the United States here public health officials often refrain from using the word quarantine so as not to store a backlash remember a nurse flew into Newark airport was quarantine because officials said she had a bola she with the help of the ACLU then sued Chris Christie so should be for and that's the big deal right because the ACLU will soon allow people coming from Jack the people who try to want to commend the ACLU will happily say bring bring the corona virus in America because that's you know that's social justice white people can't trust people in the progressive left because they don't have any sense of decency your dignity and I'm sorry to have to break that to you but that's just that's just what it is so the question is what are we going to do don't sit here and be like that's it over their problem because it's a it's a it's a lot of places problem it's in Europe it's in Asia we got some cases in the United States in fact I read a report earlier today said there are four thousand African students who are studying in China over and we'll on at the university system they want to go back to Africa what do they do the Chinese keep them grounded there and we'll Honda they keep me grounded there in China they sent it back to Africa with this can now become a pandemic that spreads I don't know very it's very scary to understand what the outer limits of health care The Outer Limits of of of dealing with illnesses like this really are every six governments got the answer the government is nothing but force and a treasury government has no answers that's what you have to remember while the media is obsessed with impeachment this is going

World Health Organization China
Apple Faces Lawsuit for Heartbeat Monitoring Patent Violation

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:27 sec | 7 months ago

Apple Faces Lawsuit for Heartbeat Monitoring Patent Violation

"Apple is facing a patent infringement lawsuit I knew York University cardiologists says the apple watch is using his patented heartbeat monitoring invention so he's suing the tech giant's doctor Joseph wise L. claims the watch infringes his patent as a way to check for an irregular heart beat apple watch can alert users if they have an irregular pulse representatives with apple haven't commented on the lawsuit that report from correspondence mark

Apple Doctor Joseph Wise L. York University
Sensory Prediction Error Signals in the Neocortex with Blake Richards

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:13 min | 8 months ago

Sensory Prediction Error Signals in the Neocortex with Blake Richards

"Am with Blake. Richards Blake Blake is an assistant professor in the school of Computer Science and the Montreal neurological institute at McGill University as well as a core faculty member at et Mula and you've also got an affiliation with far yes. I'm a candidate C.. For a chair and a member of C far's learning machines and brands program. Fantastic fantastic passing. Well Blake welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you very much for having me. Also you are doing a talk here on sensory prediction error signals in the neo cortex yes Let's just jump right into that. What's the talk about sure? So a lot of people have postulated for a long time that our brains and in particular. The NEO CORTEX the region concerned with higher order thought or functions if you will is effectively. An unsupervised unsupervised learning machine. It is there to make predictions about incoming stimuli and that it would use. WHO's this differences between those predictions and the actual data that receives in order to learn about the structure of the world and develop a good internal model? And although Oh there have been many computational studies that have postulated this and this idea has also informed artificial intelligence a great deal. The fact act is that there isn't a lot of direct evidence for it in the brain. There are a few initial studies but myself and my collaborators Joel's Albert Virga York University Yatra Banjo also at Milan University. Molly AL and Tim Lily. Crap at Google deep mind. We put together a proposal to the the Allen Brain Institute a couple of years ago to run some experiments to explicitly look for some of the sorts of prediction dictionary signals. That these kinds of models of unsupervised learning in the brain predict would be there so the institute has been running a series of studies. Doing doing what's called two photon calcium imaging and mice is basically a way to record the activity of many hundreds of neurons at once as well as their dendritic processes in a live animal. And so we've got recordings of the brains of mice primary visual cortex. Well we expose them to new stimuli that follow particular statistical patterns which we then violate occasionally and we have found evidence for very clear sure and really strong responses to those violations of the expected stimulus and additionally there are some interesting kind of breakdowns in terms of where those signals appear in the critical circuit. And also ask some interesting data in terms of the way that it seems to be something that the animals actually learn over multiple exposures to the stimuli See your conditioning mice to expect some kind of response then you kind of take a left. Turn when they're expecting right so to speak and and you're observing. What's going on in their brains as a result and so that's not what you've found is what so what we've found is we've Zam? I'm in two different types of stimuli. One which is where you've got a consistent visual flow in in the screen as it were so there's these bricks that kind of drift left across the screen in a particular direction and they're always consistent in that movement and then occasionally some of the bricks will start moving in the different direction than the expected one or like pretty clearly. You notice it when you watch the stimuli yourself very much so And for those stimuli. We see a massive response. In a particular part of the neoclassical micro circuit the cells. Go nuts in response to the stimulus and this seems seems to happen right off the bat with no training so that suggests that this particular type of violation of expected stimuli is something that the circuit is hardwired wired to detect but we also have another set of stimuli where we present basically these random patches of edges That are all sampled from where the orientation of the edges are all sampled from a particular distribution and then occasionally violate that expectation by sampling. I'm from a different distribution for the orientations and when we present these stimulated the animal at I don't see any responses to the unexpected head orientations but over multiple recording sessions. We start to see huge responses to the unexpected annotations. So what's interesting about this. This is suggests that the circuit is able to learn as it were to be surprised particular types of stimuli and it might at the same time be a hard coded to respond to particular other types of violations. We hypothesize that this might have to do with the evolutionary purpose. This of most visual cortex one of which would obviously be to help the mouse avoid predators. And so it's very important that you detect violations of visual flow in your visual field if you're trying to avoid predators because that's something you want to avoid potential. You WanNa see that Hawk flying above or right exactly but for the other type Stimuli where that we're showing them where it's these oriented edges. That can violate these patterns. What's interesting is that they don't show that response right away but they learn to show it and so that what is some evidence that they're neo? CORTEX is in fact a sort of generative model that can learn the data distribution over time and learn to he surprised when data doesn't actually adhere to that distribution in the first case where you've got more of a stark difference in the visual pattern. Turn do they become desensitized to it over time. We don't actually see any evidence for desensitization which is interesting The signal continues to be very robust over three different days of recording sessions and each session is an hour long so even after many repute exposures of this stay still seem to signal this very strongly which again suggests that for that particular type of stimulus. This is a hard wired component which is very consistent with the evolutionary right. Like if you got desensitized to hawks probably be a bad thing if you're and so there was another element of this work ERC or at least one that you haven't gone into this level of detail yet but is talking about the hierarchical nature of inference in these kits. Is that kind of an ancillary result or is that core to the model that you've developed to understand the stuff yeah so The thing that I mentioned is that what's is interesting. Is that that second type of surprise signal that we see that the animals learned to be surprised to the orientation of edges in that occur in an expected elected way we actually see that signal not in the neurons themselves but in the dendritic trees of the neurons and in particular part of the dendritic trees that is the area drives being like the fingers that we see in our nerve. Yes that's right exactly. All those little branches is that comes out of the Dan right out of the neurons. Those are done rights and those are the sites of synoptic inputs to real neurons but real oh pyramidal neurons in the neo cortex which is a particular type of neuron comprises seventy five to eighty percent of the neurons in the CORTEX in. It's the kind of key the information Presence Cell type in this circuit these cells have a one unique dendritic. Nick process called the April damned right which they send up a vessel yet April okay and they kind of like the tree because what they do is they send it up to the top the surface the brain almost like what the trunk of a tree does the leaves up to the sunlight but in this case they ended up to the surface of the brain and what they receive at this location occasion are the top down in puts so higher order information from other parts of the brain and our data suggests so that is he's actually where we see those surprise signals that are learned and from some of the brain or in this structure overall in this dendritic structure. That is up at the top of the brain and what that data suggests and some of our other analyses suggest is that this surprise signal. Is this you know. Oh that violated my expectations signal that the animals learn is being driven by top down inputs. So that suggests that the entire model model that they have for the world that they're learning is a hierarchical model where it's actually the higher order parts of the network. If you will for machine machine learning people you can think of it. As the upper layers of the network that are actually detecting the violation of the expected statistics and then they are communicating that back down the hierarchy hierarchy to the lower layers of the

Blake Blake Allen Brain Institute Google Albert Virga York University Y Core Faculty Mcgill University Assistant Professor Milan University School Of Computer Science Nick Joel Molly Al Montreal Neurological Institut Hawk DAN Tim Lily
American Academy of Pediatrics sets new guidelines for autism diagnosis

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

American Academy of Pediatrics sets new guidelines for autism diagnosis

"The American academy of pediatrics is out with new guidelines the first in twelve years aimed at helping identify children who may have autism spectrum disorder the academy urges early intervention and says doctor should start checking for issues during well baby visits Dr Rebecca dog at helps oversee New York university's center for autism spectrum disorders we know a lot about early intervention and that it is you know it it is very helpful for developing the skills and kids brains are when they're younger are very what we call plastic they're really open to learning so if we can if we can work with kids when they're very young they have so much ability to bring on new skills the guidelines also encourage doctors to steer families only towards interventions backed by scientific

New York University American Academy Of Pediatrics Dr Rebecca Twelve Years
"york university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"york university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"So I think everybody has a sense that as a general rule chemicals are bad for you. You don't want a lot of chemicals in your body pesticides. For example, are things you want to keep out of your body. Perhaps you've heard that the receipts you get from gas stations or grocery stores are coated with a chemical called BPA. And if you touch it that can get in your body, and that's not good. And you've no doubt heard that you're not supposed to heat food in the microwave in a plastic container because the chemicals in the plastic can Leach into the food and get into your body. So yes, we all have a sense that chemicals are not good. But what most of us know about this is pretty vague and incomplete, and as it turns out, we need to know a lot more because the science is in and a lot of the news is not good news here to explain it is Dr Leonardo tra- Sunday. He is a pediatrician is vice chair. Chair for research of the department of pediatrics at New York University, and he's author of a book called sicker. Fatter poor the urgent threat of hormone disrupting chemicals to our health and future. And what we can do about it. I Dr welcome. Thank you for having me. You bet so start by making the case here because as I said, I think people have a general sense that chemicals aren't good. We don't want a lot of extra chemicals in our body. There's no real upside to that. But I think the pictures a bit blurry and incomplete so focus it and fill in the blanks. Sure. So let's just talk with about hormones, which we don't think about in our daily lives, but there are basic signaling molecules that our body uses to orchestrate normal bodily.

vice chair Dr Leonardo tra Leach New York University
"york university" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"york university" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"The talk shows went hunting for experts. Let's go to our guest. Now, she is a writer about the intersection of science and sex, and it splits. It politicize ation she has a PHD in sexually neuroscience from York University, and she has done quite a bit of work and research around this topic that we're going to get into the Google memo the one and only Dr Deborah so is here Dr. So how are you saying how are you Deborah? So was in demand because like former Google engineer, James damore. She is a firm believer that biology makes men and women different. Deborah has a PHD in neuroscience. But her opinions on gender are also personal when we got in touch. She told me that when she was young she did not feel much like a girl on my friends or boys. I just as a boy, I looked like a boy Debra says, she felt mail. She has helped conduct studies into the nature of gender. She thinks both Herat look and her interest. In science stem from her biology. I do think that I personally was exposed to higher levels of testosterone in the womb prenatal testosterone. That's Deborah simple explanation for her Bojnice, the levels of exposure to prenatal testosterone is actually the determining factor in terms of what children will be interested in what they will gravitate towards in terms of their interests. And behaviors in some ways, Deborah point of view sounds pretty old fashioned boys tend to gravitate towards mechanically interesting things. So they tend to be interested in things when they're playing with toys, they'll gravitate towards trucks, and cars girls tend to be more interested in socially, interesting activities. So things like playing with dolls and playing house old-fashioned, right? But Debra says the science backs up with many studies. She gives one example of a research study on girls who have genetic condition called congenital adrenal hyperplasia. These girls are exposed to unusually high levels of testosterone in the womb. And what we see when they are born is they will gravitate towards male, typical toys. And this is even if their parents, give them more praise for playing with female, typical toys. So it speaks to how powerful biology is and that gender identity and gender. Preferences. Can't really be molded as much by socialization too, strong, masculine ISIS. The brain Debra says, you can see this play out in many ways men's brains on average are bigger than women's and there are differences in the connective tissue in the brain white matter. There are more connections running from the front to the back of the brain and men and more connections running left to right or inter hemispherically in women. So this leads to adulthood differences. I mean, this is evident from a very young age as well. In terms of what children gravitate naturally towards differences in terms of efficiency of processing. So men tend to be more efficient on average when it comes to visual spatial processing, whereas women tend to be a more efficient with processing analytically and intuitively unanimous. Researchers have observed behavioral changes after birth if testosterone levels are changed in utero. In the wild, male and female monkeys behave. Differently..

Deborah testosterone Dr Deborah writer Google adrenal hyperplasia York University Herat utero James damore engineer
"york university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"york university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"York university's medical school looked at campaigns raising money for five treatments that are not supported by science, Arthur, Caplan, professor of bioethics NYU's medical school, led the study he tells KNX companies like go fund me needs to come up with a comprehensive plan to fight this problem. They need to come up with a standardized form, for example. It says here's what happens if we don't raise all their money is what happens if we get more money than we need. Here's what the outcome is. But sadly, so far. They've just been quiet study found nearly seven million dollars was raised for the five treatments. Kaplan says this is increasingly becoming a way to raise money in the medical industry. More alleged members of a violent white supremacist group based in southern California are now behind bars in the FBI is looking for another one. Federal prosecutors have filed rioting charges against four more man accused of attacking people at political rallies as part of the rise above movement. Three of the men have been ordered held without bond. The FBI is still looking for the fourth one earlier this month three other alleged round members. Anna suspected associate were indicted on similar charges. They're accused of helping to incite a deadly riot and Charlottesville Virginia last year. The rise about movement were essentially the foot soldiers of the alright extremism expert Joanna Mendelssohn of the Anti-Defamation League they operated like eight. All right side club. They romanticize their role of taking on the liberal communist forces, the men charged in this latest case are awaiting arraignment one has been identified as a founding member of ram. His attorney denies his client is the leader of the group cloud. Get pets. Todd KNX ten seventy NewsRadio. We've got a pair of tickets to give away to see. Impractical jokers at the Honda center. That's coming up on June twenty second our timeline contests. Coming up a little sooner it said five twenty four also our eye in the sky checking out the drive on the two ten between Pasadena and Glendora traffic less than four minutes from now it's five eleven let's talk about cutting dental..

FBI Caplan Arthur Honda center KNX Joanna Mendelssohn NYU York university Anti-Defamation League Todd KNX Kaplan professor founding member California Anna Charlottesville Pasadena Glendora attorney
"york university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WTVN

"So we'll find out what Mike has got, to say about that I'm going to call a throw a flag. On that, one myself, and say. Bunk see what Mike thinks about it before we get, to that though experts say it's actually I'm. Sorry I just can't seem to clear my throat. This afternoon and I drink a lot of water today. I don't know what the deal is experts say it's actually impossible to only. Buy one thing at target Tom Mavis a professor of marketing. At New York's university New York University stern of school Good God New, York university's stern school of business thank you knows a lot about shopping and he says. Maybe it's the layout of the place that compels us. To fill our cards at target he explains that stores know what path the. Shoppers take so they cross products to us by displaying them. Right next to. Each other and. We listen because one target tells us we need something it's usually right Joe Purdue targets vice president of store design explains, that the store goes out of its way to help direct us to what we really really, want stores have product displays that show us how things will really. Look at our homes and they've revamped the beauty. Department to look like a specialty shops so it's just target compelling us to buy, more and I, guess that, really doesn't come as much of a shock, because you know when you're online Serves you up all the ads of the stuff that you want to, see because it's been spying on you and probably listening to your. Conversation so I'm not saying target is quite as. Intrusive but it's certainly I guess not any different than the images and things that, were bombarded with When we're looking online traffic. And, weather every ten minutes on the tens from TempStar heating and cooling products Johnny, hill it's getting hot out.

Mike university New York University New York York university Tom Mavis TempStar Joe Purdue vice president professor of marketing ten minutes
"york university" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"One follow up question i want to ask you wesley what happens after your university days are over that's a good question that's something i've been trying to figure out myself in terms of in terms of care the thing about the merger dimes tendon care services at york university they only operate on the university so like on the canvas my plans for care in terms of the future is a service called direct funding we have it here in ontario i'm not sure if it's in other provinces but what that is and i give a little bit of a description what it is is the government will basically send you a sum of money based on an interviewing and survey process that determines how much they think you need the keyword is they think you need and what they do is they allow you to basically run your own attendant services business you get to screen and hire and frayne your own attendance and you're responsible for doing all that with the sum of money they give you thank you wesley and we are going to a question at microphone three from doug i'm the proud father of four extrordinary daughters my wife and i thirty two years their ages are twenty one to twenty nine and our second youngest is twenty two and she has developmental disability with complex mental health issues due to genetic thing called type to fingal syndrome we ended up in pediatric hospital in london on to admissions on the third time they required us to surrender our parental rights before they would help us again of course i refused and then it went after the pediatric.

york university doug developmental disability ontario wesley london thirty two years
"york university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"University of chicago with jonathan martin of new york university following a heated disagreement they had with some other people on the internet about the national interstate and defense highways act of nineteen fiftysix a group from march till now has gone to ninety five thousand members plus and it's it's the classic neem type thing you see in all of these horrible fake news political things you see but it's about urban renewal and transit and urban design and i just found it fascinating i know it's probably not the only example of this but is it just a passing fad of gen y and millennials because it's sort of absurd or doesn't portend some hot new trend of urbanism well i think the question here is whether or not it's the you know leads to greater political viability for these kinds of plans i mean the idea of the me modification of politics is real and it is here and there are certain segments of the political populace for which pride themselves on their memes and there s posting if you will so this is i think an outgrowth of that certainly very nerdy most imperative it honestly well i do think that there is an earnestness to the idea that these guys want a better sensitive that's true but they're also not taking themselves too seriously which is part of the charm of it as well yeah but that's inherently in the meme chur were sure that there there's an element of self effacing you know an acknowledgement of the facts even if they might be embarrassing that kind of goes hand in hand with a mean i'm just saying if a simcity three thousand playlists gets you excited go sign up you said before the show started that you were accepted into they did they approved my part of the group i am i am i would like a full report tomorrow all right excellent on what you taught you yeah what's that like wired and tie like tired nimbies wired numb talks if anyone got that then i'm here for really there is a lot of talk about unb's on numb tots which is in my backyard yes yhombi is versus the nimbies i don't know i i'm i'm i'm both depends on if it's the fourth of july or not at the twenty eighteen by do creator developer conference happening in beijing this week the company announced it's partnering with intel to deploy isreaeli developer mobile is technology into thomas vehicle effort project apollo by do plans to merge mobilized responsibilities sensitive safety it's an acronym that is our ss although i think that's a terrible idea so i'm going to call it that model onto code of the commercial apologize program and apollo pilots which is the deployment version of project apollo by do we'll also use mobilized surround computer vision kit as the preferred perception solution to project apollo in project around rather and by wants to put it in buses a mass transit opportunity how numb tots is yeah this is this is interesting in another way too because you've got a chinese company by do working with an israeli company mobilize which is owned by an american company intel doing a multinational effort to make self driving vehicles more reliable and safe well good on him yes exactly i think it's a great idea you're not against it i'm so glad hey folks if you want to get all the tech headlines each day in about five minutes be sure to subscribe to daily tech headlines at daily tech headlines dot com all.

jonathan martin new york university University of chicago five minutes
"york university" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The comments continued from students at new york university a lot of the knock proud of being an american comes from like the history of the us any place the come to mind that'd be better better than the us probably some nice little socialist country in europe michigan president and there's america that we can make that will be great yes and so i say makeamericagreatagain bizarre i'm saying in court right now with scary i'm scared i'm scared in the past we proud to be an american and what made you more proud than i guess it was just ignorance i had no idea how many people in this country where so far right and discriminatory i would first of all reverse everything's from every executive action yeah reverse everything he's done rain out that the economy that things are going pretty well right now in the economy those are pretty i don't think anything beneficial has been his doing at all reverse everything that trump has done i mean the mind follow up question would have been well what would you reverse i and she would say okay we don't separate children at the border that's already been reversed lady one eight hundred nine five five seventeen seventy six is our phone number two polls on this issue gallup poll headline today in us record low forty seven percent extremely proud to be americans this fourth of july marks a low point in us patriotism for the first time in gallup's eighteen year history asking us all's how proud they are to be americans fewer than a majority say they are extremely proud currently forty seven percent described themselves this way down from fifty one percent in two thousand seventeen and way below the peak of seventy percent when did that peak occur when do you think it occurred in two thousand and three under president bush i i do think that this highlights one of my very very big complaints about the democratic party and about mainstream media which is some of the crying wolf it's it's it's so far over the top and by the way they're not the only ones who are guilty i mean you can hear on the right now there is this promotion that the democrats are equal to the nazis and by the way the idea of both sides in our debates trying to say the other side are not sees the other side is trying to destroy america the leftist saying it but people in the writer saying it to and and again if there is a sour feeling in the united states despite our economic prosperity despite indications that we could make progress internationally do i love everything the president trump has done obviously not but for goodness sake to react to it like it some national nightmare that oh my goodness the suffering the horror by by one measure and this goes to yet another poll it's a pew research poll were they go to various countries and ask a fundamental question are is your country doing better than it was fifty years ago and what's remarkable is vietnam leaves the world by the way almost everybody in vietnam i mean it's not over ninety percent recognize it yeah vietnam is doing better today than it was fifty years ago fifty years ago of yet nam was in the midst of a devastating truly horrific war which was mostly a civil war most of the casualties in vietnam where vietnamese people including people who fought on both sides of that conflict both for the government of south vietnam which was aligned with the united states and the north vietnamese dictatorship communist dictatorship but in in the united states does someone really believe we were better off in nineteen sixty eight you think so by what standard we will get to that let's go quickly to james in pittsburgh james you're on the michael medved show thank you you're on yeah i i am any garage and a naturalized american was born in uganda i was born in you good congratulations welcome thank you when they become an american about eight years ago i was proud but in line much about an nabokov and the killing of black man i am black i think the police blacks in passionate no you don't you don't do what leads you to believe that the police are murdering blacks intentionally let me let me give you a very good example of why that's a very foolish belief do you know what happens to police officers who kill a black suspect or any suspect.

new york university fifty years forty seven percent fifty one percent seventy percent ninety percent eighteen year eight years
"york university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Is our phone number the comments continued from students and new york university a lot of the nop proud of being an american comes from like the history of the us any places that come to mind there'd be better better than the us probably some nice little socialist country in europe presidents and there's an america that we can make that will be great yes and so make america great again now what i'm saying supreme court right now with a scary i'm scared i'm scared in the past we proud to be an american and what made you more proud than i guess it was just ignorance i had no idea how many people in this country where so far discriminatory i would first of all reverse everything trump every executive action yeah and reverse everything whose son rain out crash the economy john that things are going pretty well right now in the economy those are pretty longitude and all i don't think anything beneficial has been his doing at all uhhuh reverse everything that trump has done the follow up question would have been well what would you reverse i and she would say okay we don't have children at the border that's already been reversed lady one eight hundred nine five five seventeen seventy six is our phone number two polls on this issue gallup poll a headline today in us record low forty seven percent extremely proud to be americans this fourth of july marks a low point in us patriotism for the first time in gallup's eighteen year history asking us adults how proud they are to be americans fewer than a majority say they are extremely proud currently forty seven percent described themselves this way down from fifty one percent in two thousand seventeen and way below the peak of seventy percent when did that peak occur when do you think it occurred in two thousand and three under president bush i do think that this highlights one of my very very big complaints about the democratic party and about mainstream media which is the some of the crying wolf is it's it's it's so far over the top and by the way they're not the only ones who are guilty i mean you can hear on the right now there is this promotion that the democrats are equal to the nazis and by the way the idea of both sides in our debates trying to say the other side are nazis that the other side is trying to destroy america the leftists saying it but people the writer saying it to and and again if there is a sour feeling in the united states despite our economic prosperity despite indications that we could make progress internationally do i love everything that president trump has done obviously not but for goodness sake to react to it like it's some national nightmare that oh my goodness the suffering the horror by by one measure and this goes to yet another poll it's a pew research poll where they go to various countries and ask a fundamental question are is your country doing better than it was fifty years ago and what's remarkable is a vietnam leaves the world by the way almost everybody in the at phnom i mean it's not over ninety percent recognize it yeah vietnam is doing better today than it was fifty years ago fifty years ago vietnam was in the midst of a devastating truly horrific war which was mostly a civil war most of the casualties in vietnam were vietnamese people including people who fought on both sides of that conflict both for the government of south vietnam which was aligned with the united states and the north vietnamese dictatorship communist dictatorship but in the united states does someone really believe we were better off in nineteen sixty eight you think so by what standard we will get to that let's go quickly to james in pittsburgh james you're on the michael medved show thank you you're on yeah i am in a garage naturalized american i was born in uganda the kid i was born in you american citizen good congratulations welcome thank you when become an american about eight years ago i was proud but in line much about an air costs and the killing of black man i am black i think the police i might have blocks in cash no you don't you don't do what leads you to believe that the police are murdering blacks intentionally let me let me give you a very good example of why that's very foolish belief do you know what happens to police officers who kill a black suspect or any suspect.

nop new york university fifty years forty seven percent fifty one percent seventy percent ninety percent eighteen year eight years
"york university" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WRVA

"At a recent conference new york university they were asked shooter risk profiler for example treat all racial groups equally regardless of their other differences should it acknowledge differences but focus on cheating similar error rates should it correct for previous wrongs do some definition seem good in the short term but have negative long term repercussions what are we headed for brad i think you know what we're headed for i read this amazing article and these are the things you know why i love talking about because you know he's the things that years ago i got invited by the department of homeland security to come in and brainstorm different ways that terrorists could attack the united states and the reason that i think they brought people like myself who are fiction writers is they wanted to figure out what's the craziest thing you could do and what i was fascinated with his i i started studying what when did they start bringing people in like this how this and one of the things that they told me and that i found out is there was a conference a few years back a futurist people who kind of try to fathom what the future is going to bring a really good at figuring out what the future will bring and the number one thing that they said what's the greatest threat to the united states right now and it used to be things like nuclear war you know things like that the greatest threat according to these futurists now is a small a group of individuals who have just an idea that they can't shake and they're willing to do anything for it and it's what society is facing right now is the ability of people to a small group country went on fighting russia went off fighting the cold war anymore we're fighting a tiny group of people this is if you saw this article you're talking about it you know it's a group of like a small business is what we're fighting who are basically able to influence us and the article that i read that really scared me is what we lose in all of this the the real thing that dies is truth that's what this appears because we don't realize anymore we can't trust what.

york university brad united states russia department of homeland
"york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"York university and christina i wonder how you heard the mayor of los angeles who is just on and the governor of new york who was just on with respect to the issue that you were raising before that this is primarily as far as the media is concerned a kind of suburban mostly white mass shootings issue whereas so many more of the deaths from guns are from handguns and in cities and affect people of color but going back to you know the point about the nra white nationalism it's like we always have to remember that this country is based on capitalism anti black racism white supremacy and white nationalism and patriarchy and this is a perfect storm and we have this gun debate we can i agreed with the governor when he said you know obviously the democrats are on the same page in taking back congress obviously hoping to get the presidency where the rubber hits the road is the complexity in which the vast majority of state houses are controlled by republicans even when they have democratic governors and i think the tension is a lot of students and a lot of democrats want their democratic elected officials to behave as democrats not necessarily caucus with republicans when it's convenient for them not necessarily situate themselves that they can play republicans and democrats on the state level off of one another because we know that so much of our money and so many decisions are made not necessarily in washington dc but in our home states and so in new york we do have this complicated relationship with republican parties the idc for those of you.

christina los angeles new york congress York university washington
"york university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"F cohen new york university princeton university russian history a marriage has seized western accord dotcom the website to watch cn saw my return there have been events that have been explicative that are particularly important for our conversation about the new cold war the professor nice started years ago looking at the possibility that ukraine would turned into a new a cold war hot new cold war one where people were shooting each other or near too well it's happened it's happened in imagination in these last days first in hawaii a clerk where told an employee of the state state government hawaii pushed the wrong button twice it couldn't just push at once but twice to send out a missile our two peoples cell phones because that's the alert system set up there and for 38 minutes the people of hawaii were not carefully informed that it was a false signal and there are anecdotes coming in from everywhere that people were hiding hiding their children calling friends panic for 38 minutes and now within these last hours we learned that in japan much the same thing not by the state of japan this time by television station sent out a false alert of an incoming missile in both instances these are small windows in what it was like in the first cold war growing up first cold war in the nineteen fifties as i did being told that when the bombs are co incoming you have time enough to power beneath your desk and avoid looking at the big window in the 4th grade and then experiences i've had over these last years when i was in israel during the hamas rocketing of the new gavin than firing rockets as far as tel aviv because that was the technology similar to what we see in a why when a missile launch would trigger a warning on smartphones so that you would know that there was incoming steve a very good evening to you these incoming episodes or false.

cold war professor ukraine hawaii japan windows hamas gavin steve york university princeton univ israel 38 minutes
"york university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show i welcome like holly sixty would of koa new york university princeton university at the end of our pursuit in another year 2017 of the facts of the new cold war as opposed to the political advantage of the new cold war for the united states for the united states zalaszanto of course then for russia the professor joins tonight at the end of a long long trail of dealing with russia gate which remains unsolved and on proved to the american people we know there is a special prosecutor when other committees in congress we certainly know that there is great interest in this in the newspapers and the elite newspapers because it drives a lot of traffic it's called elitist click bake i begin tonight before the professor speaks on the russian point of view for these many decades to mention that there is a new peace it the atlantic i highly recommend to everyone who's just plunging into russia get again by a young journalist m julia yossi she's riding at great length from her sources she's visited russia she was born in moscow and came here as a young child so she's very fluent uh she travels to russia she travels to what was one stalingrad no longer called out but in you know the city and she visits with her sources about how it is that russia has decided to attack the united states cybercrime undermined the democracy why did they do this how did they do it it's lengthy but inside of it i mean there's evidence here there's evidence there it doesn't mean it doesn't move the story at all because it's all anecdotal inside of as a theme and professor i begin the theme tonight with this point of view that exists in america that russia is in its last days that what we're looking at is an existential failure that one thousand years has come to vladimir putin is abusive the russian people and that the whole of the federation has already broken apart there is no substance to it whatsoever the defense is a false a is a false face and that its miss behavior in the world is is.

john batchelor koa new york university prince cold war united states russia professor prosecutor congress moscow america vladimir putin one thousand years
"york university" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WTMA

"I'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show i welcome my colleague mr would have koa new york university princeton university at the end of our pursuit in another year 2017 of the facts of the new cold war as opposed to the political advantage of the new cold war for the united states for the united states zalaszanto of course then for russia the professor joins tonight at the end of a long long trail of dealing with russia gate which remains unsolved and on proved to the american people we know there is a special prosecutor when other committees in congress we certainly know that there is great interest in this in the newspapers and the elite newspapers because it drives of traffic it's called elitist click bake i begin tonight before the professors speaks on the russian point of view for these many decades to mention that there is a new peace hit the atlantic i highly recommend to everyone who's just plunging into russia get again by a young journalist m julia yossi she's riding at great length from her sources she's visited russia she was born in moscow and came here as a young child so she's very fluent uh she travels to russia's she travels to what was one stalingrad no longer called that but in you know the city and she visits with her source says about how it is that russia has decided to attack the united states cybercrime undermined the democracy why did they do this how did they do it it's lengthy but inside of it i mean there's evidence here there's evidence there it doesn't mean it doesn't move the story at all because it's all anecdotal inside of as a theme and professor i begin the theme tonight with this point of view that exists in america that russia is in its last days that what we're looking at is an existential failure that one thousand years has come to vladimir putin is abusive the russian people and that the whole of the.

john batchelor new york university princeton cold war united states russia professor prosecutor congress moscow america vladimir putin one thousand years
"york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"york university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Long first amendment two crusader really in an academic colombian new new york university first anonymous for neonazis is the title of the article which i think is pretty much your position he says uh which should have been done at berkeley is should have said we'll call in reinforcements will bring out the national guard of necessary for we're not going to allow any group to intimidate and change the way which caplis is working way campuses work he argue should be free speech and of story that's pretty much what you're saying but then he goes into this whole thing about microaggressions and he's richard up he says address and nuts but is there many people who do feel that this was an assault on them makes them feel less safe the eu novelist for example is really the singling out transgendered people and saint terrible things about them omitted it's important to a point where you almost our sickened by it so what do you do you call in the national guard if necessary than you get into expenses and you get it to costs and yet to keep the people who are not students who wear black uniforms and masks and so forth wreak destruction but just because you have the right to say something doesn't mean that it's right to say it and we need to have deep engaged conversation as the community about our community values we have you have to put as many resources in two hub uh giving opportunities for those voices that can call attention to the many ways in which uh um uh microaggressions are are are not unconscious bias these.

first amendment new york university berkeley assault caplis richard
"york university" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"york university" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"I on a doubledecker bus and you developed a cult following because of your your style i i was that at new york university yes at steady in theater and play writing okay i'll is in la la land you probably know the blaze which la la land niantic of enclave of in the mad loop of sites between my ears yorkshire and as somebody in my senior year mentioned that it was in passing in a hallway i remember they said hey you know you're going to have to get a job on whatever rao was the one of the most confusing owns in my life how old are you at this point senior in college okay now when 21 um so i i was pretty desperate to try to brainstorm you know about how i could possibly be constructive to society it just seemed unlikely isn't real unlikely you know i know that so then now the tory guiding appear fanie happening he is like of as the perfect nexus for everything i was doing i love the city was in any way you walk in the streets every night i love the the story of the city the history plus of course the performance aspect of toward a guy of course theater means that to stand up thing to a lot of state of comedians will get jobs i've been told on tour guide bus things because it is it's like doing a set it's idea is ideal.

new york university la la
"york university" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Election's then finally will look into the explosion of hate and ignorance erupting around the country as much against sharia demonstrations took place in st paul seattle washington new york city and san bernardino california attracting counterdemonstrations that led to violence and a massive deployment of police to separate the sides brian levin a criminologist professor of criminal justice and director of the center for the study of hate and extremism at california state university san bernardino joins us to discuss why a nonexistent threat such as sharia law is inspiring rightwing hate groups to emerge from the fringes and joining us now is craig how hoon who who is the global distinguished professor at new york university and the centennial professor and former ahead of the london school of economics cs now the president of the book ruin institute whose mission is to develop foundational ideas and shake political economic and social institutions for the twentyfirst century the big ruinous chewed confers the bruins prize a a one dollar annual award given by an independent jury to a think whose ideas are helping to shape human self understanding in advance humankind welcome to background briefing craig culling good to talk him and things are really in disarray in the uk and it feels like this sort of cereal miss calculation here in terms of what just happened with the snap election that prime minister theresa may announced and then a rather than increase her majority from seventeen she's it's shrunk considerably.

bruins theresa london school of economics california san bernardino new york washington prime minister uk craig brian levin ruin institute president new york university distinguished professor hoon california state university sa director professor one dollar
"york university" Discussed on WTIC 1080 AM

WTIC 1080 AM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"york university" Discussed on WTIC 1080 AM

"Within the medical model to see how they can help reduce anxiety and depression in cancer patients how they can help people overcome post route medic strip disorder so we know that they have healing properties better being tested in a medical model today which is very different from the wild you simply substitute that went on in the nineteen sixty you well did you see the study in the new york times about the the chemical found in this matchup mushrooms that there was i i absolutely did and this was a report on research that was done at to university um new york university and at and up university and basically what they found is and and you know but look just cause here research into the substances which were classified under the control up and active nineteen seventy a schedule one it was a bit in for forty years and it's a very rare that any society our civilization actually research and the way that the division and gala let go talked about exactly here so now that the they'll have been lifted and we're in a period of a thank you don't like renaissance her new side his second telling researchers at the university jones up internet new york university you still aside been which is it like work to component and in magic much room it would reduced and we got easy and depression among cancer patients who many of them the person um depression because of the seriousness of alike threatening illness well eighty percent of them had a significant response and transformation from there from first goes and that very important because it i depression to regular impact impressions can take a month to work and then you've got to be on them for a long period of time so the researchers are very excited about it minding and this is the reason that this is going through the these one two in three study two so the gold standard that this can actually working wide skill testing on hundreds of patience in a standard out protocol that the very last up the floor at key approval to use this as a medicine i wanna stretch year you know we're not talking about putting this in the despite injury the way marijuana.

new york times new york university marijuana eighty percent forty years