35 Burst results for "Yoni"

A Discussion on How to Prevent Mass Shootings in Schools

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:27 min | 2 months ago

A Discussion on How to Prevent Mass Shootings in Schools

"Is in Virginia. Hi yoni. How are you doing, Hugh? Good. What is this, Israeli system that the guy called about it isn't just that there's lots of people with a lot of training people with a lot of weapons in Israel to shoot terrorists dead when they show up. Well, first of all, we got a lot of people with a lot of guns. But in addition to that, the last school shooting mass school shooting in Israel. Happened, may 15th, 1974, when you were trying to figure out who to take to the prom, okay? I mean, seriously, that's how long ago it was. It resulted in 31 dead Israelis, 70 wounded at a school. As a result of that shooting, a couple of things happened. Number one, we created what is today the national counter terror unit, your mom, part of the border police. And secondly, we put at every school armed personnel. All we have to do in America to end this. We don't need to violate people's constitutional rights by restricting magazine capacities or outlying guns. We need to put at every school, armed officers, armed with not just with handguns, but with AR-15s because allegedly this guy yesterday hasn't been confirmed yet, was engaged with law enforcement in a gunfight before he went into the school and he was wearing soft body armor.

Hi Yoni Israel National Counter Terror Unit Hugh Virginia Border Police America
"yoni" Discussed on Sandy K Nutrition

Sandy K Nutrition

02:50 min | 4 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on Sandy K Nutrition

"Well, it's just natural that these decline, and we walked out of there and my husband was like, we're not going back to her. We're fixing our sex life. Yeah. And then we went to another therapist and she really helped me uncover get over some childhood trauma that I had stuffed. I was like, I'm done with it. It's not going to rule me, but the problem was I was dissociating in the bedroom. When my husband and I made love, I just checked out. I just gave evaporated. I couldn't stay present because I'd been a sexually abused. So I went through a very, very good experience of remembering it all, discussing all the insults and injustices, remembering who I was as a child and the beautiful little girl that I was that got destroyed by this man who abused me, my stepfather. And then I got into the ability to be able to have forgiveness for him because he was actually worse off than I was. He was a monster. And I was just a beautiful little girl that got tanked up up with a monster. And so once I was able to actually forgive the whole thing, that really helped me move through that and my husband really helped me stay in the sexual connection with him when he would see me leave. He'd bring me back and he'd look me in my eyes and he spent a lot of time holding me and he spent a lot of time doing yoni massage. Yoni is a beautiful word for the woman's vulva. I don't use the word vagina because vagina is just the birth canal and the canal for intercourse, but I use the word vulva because it's our entire genital system. It's the external, the it's kind of like a word you can use for, hey, there's more there than just the shoot you put your penis into. I feel like the vagina's like that patriarchal perspective. And I want to talk about the holistic female genital system. Because once you activate the whole system, you have all those 20 kinds of incredible orgasms. You have the best sex of your life and you're like, oh my God, I had no idea how good this could feel. I'm totally in love again. This is incredible. I feel empowered. My creativity is through the roof. I feel grounded and connected to the earth. I feel connected to all living beings. I'm like a Superwoman now because I'm having this great sex and I so deserve it. It is, as you said, our birthright sandy. Yeah. So once I started this yoni, which is another word for the vulva, why? It's a tantric lovemaking word. And what I teach are heart connected, conscious lovemaking techniques. What you see on pornography is friction. Checked out, performed.

Yoni
"yoni" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

04:45 min | 4 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Programmer notifications insights and things like that. Shortening the time to simulate a variety of scenarios. And so that's the vision for 12 months. Now, 12 months is nothing in our world. We're hoping to raise our seed round in Q one of 2023. We're going to launch publicly in the next two months right in the summer when we hope people have some time to really focus on something like this. About maybe 6 to 12 months later, we're going to be releasing a new pricing scheme. We are going, here's the big piece of the next 12 months, I guess. Number one is just continuously build on our simulation library, and that's what we need your feedback for. Let us know what scenarios you're in that are not accounted for in margin. We want them in there. So feel free to reach out to me. Number two is to get our get our insight engine MVP out the door. So we're not going to get to a fully fledged insight engine with machine learning in the next 12 months, but at least in MVP of that. Like I mentioned our fundraise and then we're off to the races. I mean, we're off to the races now, but we see things picking up tremendously in the next 6 to 8 months. Well, you kind of already stepped on my final question, which is basically, you know, asks from the mutant podcast army, but obviously go to MRG N AI sign up, it's free to mess around with, and like you said, the more you can dog food for them, the more that they can make the product better, like literally this is a stage where if this is a tool that sounds amazing to you, help them make it more amazing than you could even imagine because they're looking for these sorts of use cases that they don't know about yet, right? Nailed it. But beyond that, if someone's interested in keeping in touch for investing for later rounds for hires, for whatever, just tell me whatever you want as an ask for the mutant podcast army to know about. Absolutely. So first and foremost, we want to hear feedback. We want to hear negative feedback about the existing platform. We want to hear feature request interestingly, we've gotten an insanely disproportionate amount of feature requests that bug reports. One bug report in the last two months, 30 feature requests. And so we're seeing people saying, we want more of this, like more and more and more. So I want more of that from you guys. I want to build up that road map as robustly as we possibly can. That's number one. Number two, right now when you go to our site, if you want to play around, it's a super easy self serve. Please log in, create your account, play around with the platform. Very important to note though that in about month and about a month's time, we're going to be shutting down the completely streamlined free version and we're going to be moving to our paywall free version. We're of course you can tinker with the freemium plan, but if you get in before that happens, we will grandfather you in so you don't have to worry about that restriction. So go ahead and sign up today as quickly as possible. I can be reached at margin AI. We have live chat on the website. We have a knowledge base of course where you can open tickets with us and we'll respond within, I don't know, an hour. If that, and then next, we've got our fundraising round. So we're raising 1 million 1 $1 million pre seed $500,000 has already been committed. Thanks to Brian for putting the first check in and getting the ball rolling, we have data power ventures as well. Thanks to David yakovich. And others who are coming in and so we've got a lot in the pipeline right now, tremendous amount I'm more than ecstatic and happy to speak to anyone at any hour of the day. I don't sleep, so a 4 a.m. call would be fun for me. And that's that. So any angels or maybe early stage institutional precede pre rev, but traction to speak of, Harvard Business angels is looking at us right now, which is amazing. We have a call later on. I know when this airs, but we have a call later on today with Techstars. Thank you to Techstars for being big supporters of us throughout this journey. And we can't complain. So I appreciate you having a son, Brian. Techstars has been very friendly to a lot of our investments recently. Listen, so let me reiterate, although you should see it in the frigging title of the show. It's margin. It's dot AI, please get in touch with yoni about any questions, get in touch with me. I'll put you in touch with them. He takes for coming on and telling us about this company that I couldn't be more excited about. Absolutely. Thanks for having me, Brian..

David yakovich Harvard Business angels Brian Techstars yoni
"yoni" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

05:38 min | 4 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Yoni Rubin, thanks for coming on the tech meme ride home to talk about a ride home fund investment that we're obviously super excited about. Which is margin. So let's kick it off by just giving me not the elevator pitch, but give me a couple minutes high level of what margin does. Absolutely. Thank you, Brian and ride home for having us on the podcast. So obviously, my name is Joni Rubin on the CEO of margin. We are an SP and a platform for small to medium businesses. We don't love to use the term FP and a because those small businesses don't know what that means. Can you even tell the audience what SPN means? Being a financial planning and analysis. Absolutely. Very corporate term that SMBs don't understand. So there are several first generation solutions out there and we consider ourselves to be the second generation. And basically what they do is they help you with a turnkey solution to get your budget model up and running. While we do that as well, we also give you all sorts of value adds in terms of being able to look into the future a bit. So of course, we don't purport to look into the future, but we have the ability to allow our users to simulate a just a breadth of scenarios that they can that might impact their cash flow. And then the next generation of this we see is we're developing an insight engine so that we can actually tell users through our platform when their KPIs are strength from the norm. So we incept it just about two plus years ago. We are just in the tail end on the tail end of our beta launch, which we kicked off about two and a half months ago. And when fantastically, so far, just to highlight on that, is that we haven't really announced our existence and people are coming in unsolicited through search engines and referrals and fun stuff like that. Same thing for partners. We of course opened around a funding not long ago, which is going terrific as well. And that's the high level view. So this is not to make it too simple that you could replace a CTO with this sort of thing. But in essence, an SMB could use this tool to do beyond just spread sheeting to do more high level forecasting and things like that, a CTO, that's their job, essentially. CFO. But yes. Yeah, exactly. But more so, SMBs being brick and mortar, early stage SaaS companies, professional services, and consulting firms. A lot of them are budgeting on the back of a napkin or in spreadsheets and they're hiring their fractional CFOs to build out those spreadsheets for them and then maintain them over time. And so they need that finance acumen as well as the excel acumen. And most of them don't have it. So the current solutions give them that and of course we do as well. But the other solutions basically remain static on their computers granted in the cloud so they basically move their budget models from desktop local to the cloud, but don't give them enormous amounts of value. And so they sit in the background. They don't do a lot for the business. Whereas margin is actually proactively letting users know, hey, you know, maybe it's time to backfill a role because you don't have enough quota enough revenue accounted for in your quota to meet your next year's next year's targets or hey, taxes are coming up. Maybe you can use this accounting firm to file your taxes. All sorts of insights. Also on the KPI side in terms of benchmarking against industry data and saying, hey, your gross margin is thinner than other companies in your space. And therefore, this is what you can do to fix that. So all sorts of things about being able to see a few steps ahead so you can mitigate risks. Let's back up a bit and tell me a bit about your entrepreneurial story. I know this is not your first rodeo. So just tell me a little bit about what you've done before margin and then we'll get into how the idea from margin came about. You got it. And I can segue directly into that second portion, but pause me at any time. So I've spent about 15 years now being a startup COO. I was a military commander. I spent half my life in Israel, half my life in the states, most recently relocated to New York from Tel Aviv about maybe 7 or 8 years ago. It's been 14 years in Florida previous to that. And then I basically dove in to the tech scene in Tel Aviv, which everybody knows is pretty rampant and huge. I had a great time there. I served as chief of staff and M and a and an M and a analysis role with a company that we had just taken public. And ended up listing to the New York Stock Exchange and they have since uplifted the NASDAQ since my departure. From there, I was poached away for a relocation role in random business operations for thirsty here in New York. Before I got swept away by pipe stream, where I ran business operations as well. I spent about 6 years there. I've raised about $250 million for a variety of businesses and handled all communications between investment banks, SEC, everything to do with public and private markets, but public and private placements as well. And so I've come into startups basically and I tell them something very, very, I think very satisfying to them, I say, hey, first of all, my job is to make things more efficient for you and easier for you. So you.

Yoni Rubin Joni Rubin Brian Tel Aviv New York New York Stock Exchange Israel Florida SEC
"yoni" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

04:55 min | 6 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on The One You Feed

"Said 90 to 95% of people were saying old age and injury, herniated disc, so by and large, many, many people are thinking that the cause of their pain is something on the structural biomechanical level. And so shifting from that to saying, oh, the cause of my pain is neural pathways and fear is a major shift that happens. So step one is kind of assessing that. You know, as a clinician, you would assess that and then step two is getting the person in pain on board with that assessment. And for that it really helps to have evidence. Actually, this is not any leap of faith we're asking anyone to take. This is a scientifically grounded evidence based process where you can look through your life and if, you know, when I was earlier listing the indicators of neuroplastic pain, if you're sitting there going check, chuck, check. That's a list of evidence right there. You know, and on the flip side, what's the evidence that there's actually something wrong on your body. And don't say what my back hurts, because we know that's not evidence that there's something wrong in the back. Yep, that's just, that's where the sensations are felt in the moment. But how do you know that something actually wrong there? You know, what's the evidence for that? Maybe they're strong evidence. Maybe there isn't. And what's the evidence that now it's neuroplastic pain and in the book the appendix has a more detailed elaboration of all these factors I was mentioning earlier. So we call it building the case. So building the case that this is really what's going on for me is a really major first step. Yeah, and you talk about different barriers in the book to overcoming that. And one of them is indeed medical diagnoses, right? And I know from being involved with people who had chronic pain, taking them to doctors. You could see a doctor and you're like, I'm in an incredible amount of pain. There's a lot of pressure on that doctor to go, well, this, you know, like to come up with something, right? I know in those experiences it's been you start to go, when one doctor's like, it's this. And the next doctor is like, it's this, which is a different thing. And then they both disagree on the way you treatment. You should do physical therapy. No, you shouldn't do it at all. I mean, you start to go wait a second. Yes. Nobody really knows why I hurt this bad. Yes. And that is another great positive indicator for neuroplastic pain, getting different or contradictory stories from multiple different providers. That means they don't know. Even if they sound confident. Is it possible to have neuroplastic pain in.

chuck
"yoni" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

05:53 min | 6 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on The One You Feed

"Pain has multiple components to it. If I were to think of my back pain right now, right? Okay, I've got a physical sensation that I would ascribe to it, right? And then there are a couple other elements that are very obvious if you sort of watch your mind. Element one is just my overall resistance to it. No, no, no, I don't want it. My resistance, my amplification, my all that. And then the third is all the stories I start saying about what this pain might mean. You know, mine is, if my back hurts like this at 50, what will I be like at 80? Will I be able to do this? So there's all this stuff that goes on. And so I've talked about that with various people in the show. And when I was reading your work, you lead into the primary thing that drives the neuroplastic pain engine is fear. This is a really important Eric and it also gets to a way that our work is potentially different than some current framework. So everyone agrees that there is this whole layer of resistance and storytelling and unhelpful narratives that can be on top of the pain that can make us miserable and make things worse. And everyone would agree that limiting that or reducing that will be helpful. What I think is really provocative about our work is suggesting that mind brain.

Eric
"yoni" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on The One You Feed

"And stomach aches and sound and light sensitivity and now your hip is hurting. So it's possible that you have a stomach problem and the hip problem and the head problem, but it's also even more likely that there might be something in how the brain is processing input from the body. That is causing this gain of signal, this volume amplification, and that can be an explanation for these multiple symptoms. Oh, another one that's really important here is when the pain is really contextually sensitive and so what I mean is that you have pain in some context but not in others and it doesn't make any sense from a biomechanical perspective. So for example, when I had years of chronic back pain, my back would always hurt when I stood, but it never hurt when I ran, and I could run for miles in my back felt great, and then I would stop at the end of the run and my back would start hurting. And it just like, what's going on? Something's a little fishy here. Like, why would that be? And I later understood when I got into all this research that I had developed a conditioned response that my brain had paired standing still with pain and so whenever I was starting to create pain just like pavlov's dog is learn to link a bell to food. We can link a certain position to pain, even though that position isn't now objectively more dangerous or putting our body at risk than running or some other position is. Is it possible that you would have both that you might have, say, you're an older person and you have some arthritis, which you know is probably actually causing some pain. So you might also have neuroplastic pain. Is there a place where it's not one or the other? Yes. So it's a spectrum, and you could be anywhere along the spectrum for more, say, peripheral tissue causes, there's something in the body that's really driving it to centralized central nervous system, brain causes. So people can be what we call mixed pain, where there's both of those. That being said, I think some of us suspect more and more that a fairly large portion is centralized or primary pain, neuroplastic pain. For example, Eric like arthritis is not necessarily painful. Now, severe arthritis is a painful, but mild to moderate arthritis is often not painful. So if you have arthritis, you can have arthritis and you could have pain, but the arthritis might not be the cause of the pain. For example, exact numbers eluding as something like 80% of pain free necks have a bulging disc in them. So tons of people who have no pain at all have all kinds of anatomical findings. If you go in, take a hundred healthy pain free people off the street and scan their bodies, you will see. A wonderful symphony of bulging discs and herniations and protruding this and tears on this tendon and this ligament and they're typically not painful or they're often not painful. And so knowing that you might have one of these findings in your body is great. Now, is that the cause of pain? Yeah. Does that explain if there is spatial variability if the pain is moving around? Well gosh, that's not so consistent with this one. Injury in this one site or if the pain is very variable, is the injury moving from day to day is this bulging one day and not the next. All right, there's probably something else going on..

arthritis pavlov Eric
"yoni" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

07:56 min | 9 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"If they went to therapy, do you think there's also a mindset of, well, I am 65 now. So what do you want me to do? You know what I mean? I'm packing can be helpful and healing for somebody who's 25 because they get the life in front of them. And that's interesting. We have the luxury. We really do. We stand on their shoulders and we have the luxury to just like, to be like, oh, like, introspective to be on a podcast. Yes. Exactly. Did they ever think that any did any of our ancestors have that in the cards? Hell no. They're on the helicopter. They're thinking about my son. One day, you go back. You think some new in? You think some Nguyen dynasty dude on horseback? He's fighting off the 5th Chinese invasion, and he's like, man, one day, my ancestors, they're gonna be on a podcast. Anyways. Anyways, you guys, you guys gotta cut my guys got to cut off my leg 'cause it's getting gangrenous. And you know what's funny? Yeah, I know. Yeah. Yeah, okay, but sorry. Those are long way to not answer your question for me. I'm so sorry. This is good. I don't know what we would love to, yeah, yeah. I also want to okay, this is so fascinating because I do feel like so cool up a couple weeks ago, I was talking about how I've been experienced a lot of depression symptoms and I think it's a lot of it just moving to LA. But it's so ridiculous to think about it. It also store parents lies because I remember when my mom moved to Ohio. I'm having these thoughts. I'm like, well, my Friends aren't here, and my community's not here, but it's like I'm in LA, you know, people I speak the language. I know some people. There's juices here. There's hot girls. You know who's like, my mom came here and she went to Ohio. There's no Japanese people. They don't speak to English. I remember she would just be always watching TV like recorded tapes that my grandmother would send. Television. And she would just be like, get her pajamas all day. And you're right, Mike, maybe that was like a sign of depression that I didn't really know. This is like her, how could she deal with it? I didn't know, you know? You know? I get it. Yeah. Yeah. Well, but yes, it's so good to recognize and know that. But it also is a trap and I'm not saying you're saying this to me, but it is sometimes a trap to go. Well, it's just not that bad. Right. You know what I mean? And mine stuff is like it is so it's thought of so differently. Because if you broke your arm, you know, I was like, that's not so bad, but because it's visible and you know, easy to it's like arm broken. Like, it's just easy to explain, you know, like there's something a little bit. I don't know. My mental stuff, it's still even though we're talking about it more. It's hard, especially when you are going through something. It's not like you have all of the words to explain it. Right. Right? Well, sometimes I feel this way sometimes I don't. Yes. That's a really good point about the arm thing. It's almost like, you know, video games. If you're playing like an RPG video game and your character gets poisoned, your health poisons. It turns green and it is you just take a little damage each time. But people can see you are poisoned because your character is poisoning and shit. You're so green. And then I got to hit you with the antidote. With the antidote. We need a mental health video game bar that tells you what state you're getting. That's a great idea. Help so much, but I mean, maybe that's what zucks is doing with the medical person. But wouldn't that be so much because we honestly don't know. We have to keep going, hey, I don't know, everyone's dealing with their own shit. But so many so much conflict, especially with strangers or not even. You don't know that what happened two seconds ago. You know what I mean? So if we add that, it would be easier. Yeah. Yeah. You know, especially on the Internet, if that could also be part of your Twitter handle, so you could go, all right, well, he's having a bad day. Respond to this. You know what I mean? He's poisoned. That's not the case, right? And it's like not only are we doing like there's just like, especially on social media and Internet, you just seeing, because everybody thinks they're special. I'm not saying they're not, but there's something about the social media that kind of like everyone's on their soapbox, right? And with that said, it's just like clearly just ramping mental illness. The question is, how do you deal with it? Yeah. You got poisoned, okay? How do you get yourself antidote that you hope is going to help you with a little bit from taking so much HP damage, you know? Yeah. And I would say for myself, it's like, you're like, oh, I'm like, how do I know if I'm depressed? For me, I sometimes was just, I feel sad. I don't want to engage. I kind of feel like everything has, it's not rose colored glasses. This is something else, right? Yeah. Everything. And also, for me, I'll just sometimes like start crying. And I remember just crying. A little bit here there. Not like wheeling. In fact, if I wailed, it would be more relief. It would be a primal sort of release. Yes, yes. And I talked to my therapist and I was like, man, maybe I need maybe I should get it on something like maybe an antidepressant or something like that because this crying and my therapist was like, well, I think it's actually like a good for you. Because it's like a canary in the coal mine, it tells you something. Let's not take away that signal. And I was like, all right, yeah. Yeah. You know, like 'cause I have a really just because of the where I grew up who I grew up just a high pain tolerance and sometimes for me, I have to I'll stop to not feel something. And that is like imagery for that would be like putting your hand on top of like a stove and just like hanging, you know? Yeah. Just hanging and not even smelling it. Like, what's that? What's that smell? What's cooking? We're not moving the hand. Look at everywhere else, right? And that's social media, you know? So I have to really be mindful. I have to be mindful and go, okay, I'm this is something that is happening right now. And I have to ask for help. Yep. It's good to be from my community. I do believe in therapy for myself. I think that helps a lot. And it is community. It's talking to my partner, it's talking my Friends, it's asking for help. And it's not for and help is not fixed me. Because sometimes when you're down, it's just like, just be with me. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. Just be feel you, I feel you. Damn, that's like an R&B song. That's really nice. That's a good song. It's a song about depression. I definitely think that the self awareness mindfulness of just like knowing that something's happening is a useful first step, you know? Because I have some nieces and nephews who are really young and they're like one or two. And sometimes they get upset about something, but they don't know why they're you know what I'm saying?.

Nguyen dynasty depression Ohio zucks LA Mike Twitter
"yoni" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"So here we go. The newest people for this week. I think this person, we might have forgotten to do him. He don't know a long time ago, but I don't know. I never checked them off. And so I'm a special shout out to Jim E Lee. That's not really Jim Jim Lee. Like Robert E. Lee, but Jimmy Lee. Yeah, shepherd shouts to Jim Ely. There's a really famous Jim Lee comic book artist, so it could be him. Maybe that would be awesome. But also, maybe he's a descendant of Robert E. Lee. Who knows? Maybe there's some may not even be Chinese like we think he is. You're right, this guy could be all about he was, you know, he's a big fan of, you know, states rights, you know? I get it. Yeah. I don't know what this idea, but we're so sorry for your loss. I'm not really sure. I don't know. The confederates shall live. I have no idea. The sentence of Robert E. Lee, thank you so much. You're a Robert E. Lee Asian. And we love that America. There you go. Here we go. Your state's rights Asian, yeah. Next we got Maggie denman deep dead men MAN. Denman. These are getting so hard. These are hard. I think people are I think our fans are getting married with people from all over the world. I agree. I want to say Maggie, you know, she's Chinese, but she married a guy from Denmark, but this guy when he hit his name is so weird in Denmark that when he came here to America, he was just like, I'm then dead man, boom. And man. So simple. Okay, so you congratulations. Congratulations on your marriage. We hope you bring this beautiful. Next, we have Akane, rosa moto. That is sounds Japanese, but I've actually never met Russo moto. You know, rosa moto, that sounds like a cool Mexican Japanese fusion spot. It does. It doesn't sound like Akane is Japanese and like something moto is Japanese, but I've never met a rosa moto. I don't know how it's spelled awesome moto. It does sound. Like the mixing of some last name. Yeah, I think you're right. I think this is a Mexican Japanese person, and not only has a mixing Japanese yeah and they mix the last name as well. It makes the last name and they opened up a new restaurant. It's on fairfax. So you guys go check it out. If you like sushi tacos dude, go to rosa moto's tacos. So good, dude. And last but not least, we have Catherine mill Holland. MIL Andy. I feel like I went to school with this person. Did you really? Maybe I don't know. This just sounds like a regular. I mean, this person Asian, I have no idea. Fuck. Dude, that's, I don't know. I'm gonna say you're from Holland. This is similar to the literally just might sound like this, I think this person is just like, honestly, just might be like a cheerleader, a popular white cheerleader at some Sherman oaks high school. That's what this is, you know? Yeah, well, you know, congrats on making the team and leading the lions to another state championship cheer. Yeah. And also everybody likes you. Good luck at invitationals. We hope you have a good time there. Nice. Anyways, you're a cheerleader Asian. And we love that about you. Thank you so much for donating. And again, if you want to get into this game, go to Patreon dot com slash Asian Asian pod. Before we start the show, we always like to ask her questions. We always like to ask each other. What kind of Asian were you this week? I'm going to go first because Mike has a better story than me. This week, I was a 2006 Asian. Okay. And what I mean by 2006 to Asian is it's actually gets a little sad, but I'm not trying to try to tell in a not sad way. But I was doing stand up and I think I've talked about this. Yeah. The end. You're doing stand up you say? Oh my God. Poor bastard. What about who are you? Yeah. Okay, so I think what I episode that I record a couple months ago. I was talking about how I'm trying to get I'm trying to understand because some parts are very much like New York, some parts I feel like I'm on Staten Island, some parts like the Ohio show in the valley somewhere. And it's a patch show and I got heckled in a way that I haven't been heckled since 2006, and that's before I was doing stand up. This is just me getting high cold in life. I was in life. Yeah, I mean, this was so so regressive that I didn't even have time to address it because it was so crazy. But basically, I have this bit about how I'm bad at sexting because I like to whatever I text, I put an LOL or an emoji after everything. Oh, yeah. And so I have some act out of that. But I was like, setting up that joke. I was like, I'm not really a good at sexting because and before I could get to the LOL emoji line, the guy in the front row is like this fat white guy. He goes, small dick. That's what. Oh my God. I haven't gotten that in so long. Yeah. That's a vintage 2006 mint condition fucking, you know? That's yeah, man, I hope that shit was in the rapper still. It really yeah, that's like in your dad's baseball card collection racism. Right. Yeah. Yeah, and it threw me up. I only had 8 minutes and I was like, you know, I don't get to get up a lot in LA. You want it to do it. So I just ignored it, and I decided to work on new stuff, but it was like, I don't know, I guess it kind of annoyed me, but at the same time it was so, so fun. It was like racism from so long ago that I couldn't help but laugh. You know what I'm saying? Because it was just so crazy. It didn't like disrupt the show, did it? Did you not? Because I didn't call him out. So if I did, you just rolled right over it. I wrote yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. Was he a problem for the rest of the show? For other people? No, because I think hecklers, you know, anytime I see a heckler on a comedy show, I think they want to perform. You know what I mean? Yes. They want to perform. And so if you don't give them the attention, then they get insecure about it. You know what I mean? And they don't. Right. So he didn't like do anything else. Yeah, because if I gave him attention, he would be like, oh, now people are looking at me. Now I can be funny, you know? You give him the malt. But if you ignore him, it's usually fine. But yeah, I spent some vintage 1970s racism and that's beautiful. It was beautiful. It's a beautiful 2006 racism that I feel that's like around the time that jaw was real big. Yeah, yeah. That's a shanti. It really is ashanti was there. The dazzle jeans. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, like von Dutch hats. That's a good one. I mean, yeah, I feel like I feel like with I kind of got a little heckled like that..

rosa moto Robert E. Lee Jim E Lee Jim Jim Lee Jim Ely Akane Maggie denman Denmark Jimmy Lee Catherine mill Holland MIL Andy Jim Lee Sherman oaks high school Denman America shepherd Russo Maggie fairfax Holland
"yoni" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

02:41 min | 10 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Safety concerns I always say. Just always dilute until you know your oils and you know yourself a little better. So a little bit goes a long way. It does. Yeah, so for that muscle rub, I'll do, you know, let's say a quarter cup of coconut oil and then about 15 drops each of frankincense coat by eba, winter green and peppermint. Okay, so that our last year quite a while. Yeah, definitely. Yeah. Just a little bit does go a very long way. And is this a situation Samantha where one oil enhances the effect of another? That can definitely be the case. There's a lot of synergy that happens between essential oils that were really only just beginning to understand all those different interactions. A really common practice, though, for example, is like let's say you're having some intense pain in your knees. Maybe you want to put on some frankincense, some copaiba, maybe some wintergreen. In there and you can layer those on and then if you finish that with a layer of peppermint oil, peppermint is known as a driver and can actually drive those essential oils deeper into the muscles and drive it in there a little bit faster. If you do that, that layering technique. I'm a little lazy. So I tend to just mix everything together. So you're saying that if I took that frankincense and Kobe and the coconut base and put it on and then afterward, do I have to wait a while or can I do it immediately afterwards? No, immediately. I can do it immediately afterward and then it'll drive it in. And that one do I need to carry your oil for the peppermint as well? Or the peppermint? If you've already got enough coconut oil in your carrier base, then you'd probably be fine. It's going to kind of mix in there unless you're extremely sensitive and you just want to be extra cautious, then you're welcome to pre dilute those. But it can be really simple. I have a very simple, I call it the lazy person's approach to essential oils. So, you know, I'm not into all the kind of pre mixing and all that stuff. It just takes too many bottles and too much time. So I like to literally just ask version. Yeah, the fast approach to me is just literally take a goober of a coconut oil, put it in the palm of your hand, take your essential oil bottle add a couple drops, mix it right there in your palm and slap it on. That's like my fast quick approach. And then if you wanted to drive it in hard, you would go a little bit of peppermint right over the top of it. Exactly. Thanks to bowlen branch for their support of our show. In so many things in life, the kind of essential oils I buy, the food I eat. I have a personal standard.

Samantha Kobe bowlen
"yoni" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

07:20 min | 10 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"I remember a day where I was, I was working at Panera bread, you know, just with my computer, and there was this one employee. She was running around. You can just tell sometimes when someone plays or having really bad days, right? So she's like running around just obviously very frantic having a tough day. And she comes over to my table and I just happen to have some essential oils out. I had frankincense rubbed all over me at that point because I love, I love that oil. And she just comes up and she goes, oh, it smells really good over here. And I was like, yeah, it does. You want some? And she was like, yeah, I do. So I just put a couple drops of frankincense in her hand. And I was like, just rub that over your neck and on your shoulders and on your chest. And she was like, okay, and did it. And, you know, walked away, and then she came back, you know, like, 30 seconds later, she just immediately came back and was like, what is that stuff like? I feel so much better. And she actually gave me a hug and was just like, thank you for that. I was like, thank the Frank, man. It's amazing. That's amazing. So that happened within minutes. Now my question on that is rubbing on the skin. Is it getting into the bloodstream that fast or is she just inhaling the fumes of it or has that aspect of it been researched? I would have thought that it would take a little longer to get into the bloodstream, so it must have been through inhalation. It's very quick actually that the quickest is through inhalation. So that's likely the first experience that she had was just the smell of it. So when essential oil molecules travel up the nose through the smell receptors, that goes lightning speed instantaneous up into the limbic system of our brain. There's a direct correlation between scent and your limbic system, which your limbic limbic system and in a nutshell is responsible for a lot of emotions, a lot of parasympathetic mode of the body. And so it can very easily calm you down from that direct scent experience. But those molecules also travel into through the lungs, which very quickly disseminate into the bloodstream, but also when you put essential oils onto your skin, they absorb very quickly into the bloodstream. I think one study cited 22 seconds to reach every single cell in your body. I don't know how that study was conducted, so I don't totally quote me on that one, but we do know that it has a very quick instantaneous reaction. If you put peppermint oil, let's say on the bottom of your feet, peppermint has a very distinct taste. You can taste that peppermint in your mouth within about 20 to 30 seconds. Wow. If you're sensitive enough to feel it, I've definitely tasted it before. So the really interesting thing about essential oils yoni and I'm not a scientist, so forgive me for my lack of sophisticated words here. But the molecules on a molecular level, essential oils are very, very, very tiny compared to other molecules. So, you know, one drop of essential oil has millions of just these tiny little molecules that are so small that they travel through our entire body, so easily and like lightning speed. In fact, they're one of the only substances that we know can actually travel past the blood brain barrier and go into our brains. You know? And that's a big deal. I mean, scientists and pharmaceutical companies specifically have been really fighting trying to find how can we make medicine that can pass the blood brain barrier so that we can give medicine that will reach tumors in the brain or reach parts of the brain in, they've failed time and time again because those pharmaceutical components are typically just too big. They're the molecules themselves are too large. The blood brain barrier, which is this protective barrier between your body and your brain is like, nope, you're not allowed to pass through you're too big or you're too dangerous, but essential oils, they're like, oh yeah, come on in. It's a party up here. We like you. Come on up. I like your explanation. That's a good one. It's very interesting. I saw a 2020 meta analysis that spoke specifically about essential oils being very effective for maternal anxiety and labor pain. And I don't have a woman in my life, whether a family member or a patient who would not have liked to have a little bit of extra help with no side effects in the delivery room. So yeah, that was a cool study. I enjoyed that. What's number two on your list? Number two on my list is copaiba or some people call papaya. It's COP AIB a I call it copaiba. But because it's more fun. So the copay Eva, I like to talk about next to frankincense because the two of those to me are just the perfect pair. To mix those two together and to use them in combination, for example, my mother in law, she suffers from arthritis. She's had two knee replacements. She's looking at getting a hip replacement soon. She's just always suffered from that. So I make her this muscle rub and she's always like, you know, you can get your own essential oils and make this yourself, and she's like, no, just do it for me. All right. I'll be the good daughter in law. So I make her this muscle rub that is mostly frankincense and cope by eba. There are a few other oils in there that I'll throw in. They are winter green and peppermint, and we can talk about those two as well. But frankincense and Copa Eva are really that power punch combination of tackling the frankincense, I think of as the calmer, the, that instant, I feel better already sent and then cope by eBay, I think of more of the physical, heavy hitter, the one that really goes into the muscles, the joints. And it assists the body's natural ability to fight inflammation. So I think of it as that heavy hitter on the physical side. Interesting. And you're making a rub out of that. So does that mean you're adding it to some kind of a base. And if so, what kind of base are you using? Yeah, I always recommend when you're new to essential oils to always mix your essential oils with some sort of base or what we call a carrier oil. And that can be literally any fatty based oil, my go to is coconut oil, especially for like a muscle rub because it's kind of thick and it's easy to just scoop it and put it on. Coconut oil, but jojoba oil, almond oil, olive oil, any of those fatty based oils are really great at extending the essential oils and diluting it down so that the essential oils which are obviously very potent substances aren't hitting your skin just bare because that can cause a rash or something like that. Some of them are more gentle than others, like lavender, frankincense, copay, but even are pretty gentle and I have personally used those undiluted myself, but for general safety concerns I always say. Just always dilute until you know your oils and you know yourself a little better. So a little bit goes a long way. It does..

Panera maternal anxiety yoni Frank Eva arthritis eBay
"yoni" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

08:24 min | 10 months ago

"yoni" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"There. Like you did when you started out your journey into natural means of birth control because yes, a lot of the options that are out there do suck and speaking about options that suck many of the options that are available as the first tier options for people with chronic pain, those also suck. And they have a pretty horrible list of side effects. You're talking with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs a 100,000 plus hospitalizations every single year. And thousands upon thousands of deaths that go with that. And yet, you know, they're often the number one thing that's prescribed with no thought given to those side effects. Opioids, as you mentioned with your family member, absolutely devastating. And a leading cause of death at this point for Americans under the age of 50. So let's talk, let's jump into. You mentioned just a second ago at the tail end of what you were saying that the essential oils from the plants are there means of defense and healing themselves and all of these things. So can you speak a little bit more about that? Yeah, sure. Well, you know, as I said, plants have evolved without feet or hands, right? They're not able to move themselves to safety. They're not able to pop a pill or an herbal extract when they're sick, right? They've evolved to have to really be this self sustaining machine that provides themselves with everything they need to grow and to live and to reproduce. And there's a lot of botanical philosophy and theories that have gone into why flowers are flowers, right? Why are flowers so beautiful? Well, maybe it's because humans are attracted to that and so they help that plant proliferate and whatnot. But when you get down to the science of essential oils, the essential oil of a botanical, let's say a rose flower or a rosebush, for example, is the part of that plant that gives it the smell. It's what makes a rose smell like a rose. It's what makes peppermint smell like peppermint. So everyday people are out in the world. If you go outside, if you sit under a pine tree, you are inhaling essential oils when you smell the pine of the pine tree. And I like to make the metaphor of the analogy between humans and plants. You know, if you wanted to make a correlation, the essential oil of the plant is almost like the blood of the plant as in our blood is what defends us against disease and colds and flus. It's what it's really what makes us tick and makes us live. It's the blood. And so essential oils are kind of like the blood of the plant, and it's what makes them smell really good. And there's a lot of, like I said, a lot of theory that can go behind why they smell so good. It's probably because they want to be attractive to humans because we have this kind of back and forth relationship of keeping each other healthy, safe and reproducing, right? Interesting. And so it's thought of as a cycle. So they help us in these obvious ways. How do we help them? Yeah, well, we help plants grow, you know, a specifically flowers, which essential oils come from all plants, not just flowers, but I like to think about, you know, roses don't really serve much of a purpose in human existence besides just looking pretty, right? I mean, we can't eat them, they're not that helpful of a plant besides they're just beautiful. And so we have helped rose bushes, reproduce more. We grow them. We help them spread and things like that. If you look at the world trade organization of different plants that have been spread all over the continent thanks to human beings, you can see how there is that reciprocal kind of relationship between the two. Especially, I like to take an approach to stewardship with the plant world humans, I think we take on a responsibility to be stewards of the earth and the essential oil industry in particular there's a lot of back and forth between is it a good industry? Is it not? Does it hurt plants? Does it help plans? And that really comes down to who's doing the producing and are they doing that ethically and responsible? Because it does take a lot of plant material to make one bottle of essential oil. I think it takes about 250 pounds of rose petals to make like one ounce of rose essential oil. So if those roses are being grown unethically, if they're being sprayed with a ton of pesticides or if they're being, you know, they're not rotating the crops and take really taking a sustainability approach and then it can be a damaging practice and industry and that's why I'm a huge advocate for knowing where your oils are coming from who's growing them how they're being sourced because there can be the opposite effect of really helping proliferate the plant world and doing it in a sustainable ethical way that is helping and not harming harming the earth. That's interesting. Before we get into the differences between different oils that are out there and production methods and all these things, can you just talk about how the oil gets out of the plant? Is it a compression? Is it a distillation process? How does that work? Yeah, it depends a lot on the plant that you're starting with. So different plants you get the essential you extract the essential oil in different ways. The most common way is through a steam distillation. So let's take peppermint, for example, you would harvest a whole bunch of fresh peppermint leaves, throw those into imagine a giant cylinder of that. And you close the lid on that and then you steam up from the bottom, this steam comes up, different companies have different approaches. If you do a really high heat, then it's going to kill off a lot of the therapeutic benefits that are in those in the plants. If you do a low steam heat, then it takes a lot longer, but you get a lot more of that therapeutic property out of the plant. But essentially that steam gets risen from the top. Captured in the top and then the water molecule is separated from the essential oil molecule that comes out of that and gets put into a bottle. So that's the most typical way if you look at the fruit world oranges, lemons, grapefruit, those essential oils are extracted from the rind of the plant. More like a cold pressed situation, almost like olive oil. And then there's a couple other examples of roots or the frankincense tree, the oil actually comes from the resin. So they have to essentially cut the tree, let the resin seep out, collect that, cure that in caves for a while and then do a distillation process. So you just mentioned frankincense there. That's an interesting segue here into talking about specific oils that are good for dealing with chronic pain or good for dealing with pain in general. Yeah, well, frankincense is actually number one on my list. You know, it's one that has been studied, but as you said, the studies that are done are interesting and the fact that they are very specific. So one study that I like to cite for frankincense is the use a study done on cancer patients who are undergo undergoing treatment. They would rub frankincense they would massage frankincense into their hands. And to see if there was a reduction in pain and there was a large report from most of the people in that study that said it did increase their comfort. And so it's a wonderful oil for that. It's a very soothing oil. And as I'm sure you could probably talk about more eloquently than I could, yoni is the correlation between stress and anxiety and pain. There's a cycle there. And so if we can cut that stress anxiety or tints cycle, if your body's tense, you're going to feel more pain, if we can lessen that if we can stop that cycle in its tracks, it can severely decrease our pain or increase our comfort and frankincense is one that can do that..

colds cancer yoni
What the Netanyahu Family Did to Palestine

Behind the Bastards

02:21 min | 1 year ago

What the Netanyahu Family Did to Palestine

"Then when we left off a we were talking about The netanyahu boys beaten yoni They're kind of ping pong back between the new state of israel and the united states. They don't really like it in the us. They think it's shallow and you know they. They wanna be back in israel and they're also frustrated at their dad because he he didn't he didn't kill anybody so in july of nineteen sixty four newly adult yoni went back home adult At nine hundred sixty four and he joins the idea phase three years older than bb bb still back in the us student. High school shit. Yanni became a paratrooper. Which at the time was pretty much the most elite unit in the new military He subsequently went on to train as an officer And in general seems to have been pretty good. It became a soldier now. Yonis absence was devastating to his younger brother. A baby would spend almost every one of his summers in israel usually alone because his brother was in the military he worked part-time back in the us on evenings and weekends so he could afford the airfare to spend every possible moment of his time That he wasn't in school in the us back in israel he was a good student but was noted as being very detached from other teenagers. That said his years in the us did rub off on him and his friends in israel noticed that he had adopted an american swagger over the years while he was fashioned in pop culture definitely rubbed off on bb politics if his second home did not so benjamin spent his teen years in the us during the explosion of the american civil rights movement. You know martin luther king and all that that's all happening in the us while he is an adolescent and the struggle of different groups within the united states to attain equal treatment under the law seems to completely passed him by like his father. Bb disliked most american jews who were liberal intended to the democrat. In fact the only thing about the united states that he preferred to israel was capitalism. So which is interesting because israel in this point is is a quasi socialist state under mapa right like businesses and whatnot are heavily centralized run by the government. it is not very much like the united states in this period Mvp likes all of the things that are militants and austere and and a kind of aggressive in end ethno-nationalist about these release date. He hates the socialism

Israel United States Yoni Yonis Netanyahu Yanni American Civil Rights Movement Benjamin Martin Luther King Government
Eradicating Abuse Of Women in Yoga with Uma Dinsmore-Tuli

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

08:31 min | 2 years ago

Eradicating Abuse Of Women in Yoga with Uma Dinsmore-Tuli

"Hello and welcome back to this episode of the sacred. We import podcast a radically in the abuse of women in Yoga why? Madden's Mottley is back here to talk about her fantastic campaign to meet Yoga's safe place for women with the Yoni shocked he movement. I'M GONNA. Let this one speak for itself. ooh is fantastic. Again is packed with information and all the links we mentioned are in the show notes. If you do want to support this, you do get what a get involved in any way, then you. Can there lots of different ways really fundamentally. This is to make yoga a safe place and to restore as a healing tool. So he goes here is. Mortally welcome back to the PUCK customer. Thank you for inviting me might melanie. Thank you at will honor an oppression to pin here with. So Yoni shock to the movement. Where did it come from Anwar is? This is a great question. Okay, so Yoni Shaquoti literally it means source power, or you could translate it as as count power. It's the power of the life. Force is the name of the I wrote eight years ago and I finished writing at years ago. My intention without book was to liberate the practices of Yoga for women for us to have as freedom practices. You know to to liberate us to support us in our. In our unfolding as within feminine cycles, basically to get a hold of yogurt and. Shake up and let women get access to what we needed. And so that's what I thought would happen when I wrote the book put out, but what's happened is that there were revelations of abuse of women within yoga. Many people are totally unaware of this I. Did know about it when the book was released on Me Admire, editor actually decided I'd written a whole piece and it was censored. We cut it out and it was about some of the beginning revelations of these abuses. Now this was pre me to. It was pre me, too, so that came out, and I wanted to WHO Yoga to change and be wore women friendly woman centric. You know and. It sort of helped, but not enough, and what's happened recently is more and more revelations of come abuses, financial, sexual physical everything you can think of in almost every single yoga school law of Yoga. Yoga training organizations so basically enough is enough Yoni shot team movement. Arose as a way to. Just put a stop to this said that the what we're trying to do is to eradicate yoga. Eradicate Yoga. Sorry, Iraq quite the abuse of women in Yoga, which is an abusive yogurts, well, I think is a it's a freedom tool, so we radical the abuse of women in Yoga, and to reclaim yoga as a tool for. Planetary Healing for justice. I'm for freedom. So, it's a, it's A. It's a co- for Justice in healing. A of women have read. The book stepped up pretty much. Anyone who's ever been a yoga class up. Listen up on entre Israel is raising awareness. Campaign is a movement in the sense that. I'm an educator can really do is is educate so I'm I'm raising propagating a public awareness and there's a crowd funding campaign to raise money. To. Fund public, awareness and education campaign that could run for. For for years. Until everybody knows and will know then then everybody's Saif. I just felt like my daughter isn't going to be safe in those places. Nobody's daughter safe in those places. We all need to know what's going on. And so we can actually reclaim this amazing. Positive Force in the world. From the clutches of the Patriarchy you. Know How it is. That's the plan and when you talk about like the clutches of the Patriarchy I think we all know the obvious sorts of abuse that are out there. Some women are getting raped some being molested abused in different ways, and they said the more obvious ones that women are able to step up to say. Hey, this is happened. It's not a K.. I I need some hail in an. For everyone to band together and support what am interested in talking to you about as well is the subtle ways that the disempowerment of women We moved into practices so that it becomes almost like a grooming process and prep for intrinsic abuse that then unfortunately can, and sometimes does gets passed on from women to other women. Absolutely you have nailed it. I could say that I mean within some organizations as trafficking, Ripe Sexual Assault. It's it's criminal Sex Crimes on. People convicted for them, but what you're describing is what enables abuse to happen how how that happen in a in an organization or a teaching dynamic that supposed to be about liberation. The way it happens is insidious. What can happen is that you have a whole culture? What's it's it's is could by stabbed rhythm. People just stand by a normalized this stuff now. Some people are beneficiaries of this. They benefit from it because they've got proximity to power, so the that procuring the girls for the Gurus on this does happen. They traffic in the mall, everybody Europe and all over the world. So that can happen, so there's that, but this bystander ism is actually the kind of culture that really. Enables this abuse. What happens is even in a situation like when you step into A. A class at run by particular traditional. What have you they line? You'll up like soldiers. You know why Islam Anyway, but they line you all up like sodas and person at the front is telling you what to do. Even if you feel your body, that day is cooling for something different. We've got sense that we go. Go along. You do what you're told. They know best. Is this sense we? Devolve like abdicate our power to the people outside of us because they're the experts, and they know best Annella loin you and correct you. An offer knows alignments and corrections and basic instructions given in this extraordinarily Imbalance kind of way there is no power or Given to the student, none whatsoever you know best, do as you're told. The Guru has the grace to come and correct you. Sometimes, it's very it. Sexual assault happens in clauses. That's what happened in the string of. Over decades I'm people just stood by and let go on, so it was actually normalized a not protest. What that means is that you can be in an environment where really quite abusive things are happening the time the sometimes people are bullied I don't if you've been in Nevada, you know you take the Piss out the I knew all the question. Anybody who says well. This doesn't feel good for me. Because, you're not good enough, or this doesn't feel right to me. Will you don't know any better? Rather than actually giving people power, and saying no listening to your intuitive voice, which is course what we're trying to do? In the the women's empowerment work, you listen to the the the rhythms of your psycho. Listen to how it feels in your body in actually what happens in Yoga is very. Very often the opposite of that, so what you get is a culture where it's perfectly normal for for for a woman, especially a woman Amina because I'm talking about all you know natural rhythmic cycles of our menstruation or of all menopause experiences, and they're kind of overridden. They're all a bit inconvenient in a classroom member. Talking with you about this before you go a pair of Preston and Of Women's buttocks. Just gets in the way so so basically it's kind of inconvenient female, but like it's a privileged for you to learn its practices for Mason that basic idea, which isn't helpful.

Yoni Shaquoti Puck Madden Anwar Europe Editor Nevada Mottley Iraq Amina Assault Israel Preston Mason
Eradicating Abuse Of Women in Yoga with Uma Dinsmore-Tuli

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Eradicating Abuse Of Women in Yoga with Uma Dinsmore-Tuli

"Hello and welcome back to this episode of the sacred. We import podcast a radically in the abuse of women in Yoga why? Madden's Mottley is back here to talk about her fantastic campaign to meet Yoga's safe place for women with the Yoni shocked he movement. I'M GONNA. Let this one speak for itself. ooh is fantastic. Again is packed with information and all the links we mentioned are in the show notes. If you do want to support this, you do get what a get involved in any way, then you. Can there lots of different ways really fundamentally. This is to make yoga a safe place and to restore as a healing tool. So he goes here is. Mortally welcome back to the PUCK customer. Thank you for inviting me might melanie. Thank you at will honor an oppression to pin here with. So Yoni shock to the movement. Where did it come from Anwar is? This is a great question. Okay, so Yoni Shaquoti literally it means source power, or you could translate it as as count power. It's the power of the life. Force is the name of the I wrote eight years ago and I finished writing at years ago. My intention without book was to liberate the practices of Yoga for women for us to have as freedom practices. You know to to liberate us to support us in our. In our unfolding as within feminine cycles, basically to get a hold of yogurt and. Shake up and let women get access to what we needed. And so that's what I thought would happen when I wrote the book put out, but what's happened is that there were revelations of abuse of women within yoga. Many people are totally unaware of this I. Did know about it when the book was released on Me Admire, editor actually decided I'd written a whole piece and it was censored. We cut it out and it was about some of the beginning revelations of these abuses. Now this was pre me to. It was pre me, too, so that came out, and I wanted to WHO Yoga to change and be wore women friendly woman centric. You know and. It sort of helped, but not enough, and what's happened recently is more and more revelations of come abuses, financial, sexual physical everything you can think of in almost every single yoga school law of Yoga. Yoga training organizations so basically enough is enough Yoni shot team movement. Arose as a way to. Just put a stop to this said that the what we're trying to do is to eradicate yoga. Eradicate Yoga. Sorry, Iraq quite the abuse of women in Yoga, which is an abusive yogurts, well, I think is a it's a freedom tool, so we radical the abuse of women in Yoga, and to reclaim yoga as a tool for. Planetary Healing for justice. I'm for freedom. So, it's a, it's A. It's a co- for Justice in healing. A of women have read. The book stepped up pretty much. Anyone who's ever been a yoga class up. Listen up on entre Israel is raising awareness. Campaign is a movement in the sense that. I'm an educator can really do is is educate so I'm I'm raising propagating a public awareness and there's a crowd funding campaign to raise money. To. Fund public, awareness and education campaign that could run for. For for years. Until everybody knows and will know then then everybody's Saif. I just felt like my daughter isn't going to be safe in those places. Nobody's daughter safe in those places. We all need to know what's going on. And so we can actually reclaim this amazing. Positive Force in the world. From the clutches of the Patriarchy you. Know How it is. That's the plan

Yoni Shaquoti Puck Madden Anwar Mottley Editor Iraq Israel
Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:30 min | 2 years ago

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

"On your new exhibition. It is truly magical. It's supremely beautiful. Have to say and I learned a ton from its accompanying catalogue which is called Ballerina. Fashions Modern Muse for any of our listeners. Who WanNa pop on over to Amazon and pick up a copy so for any of our listeners. Who like me may not be ballet aficionados? I'm hoping I we can do a little bit of Bali history just a little bit. When do I see the emergence of ballet? And what distinguished? It from other types of dance which preceded it bally's quite an old art form the genesis of what you see today. The basic steps in the positions were already in place as early as the sixteen sixties. The first formal school was started in sixteen sixty one under the auspices of Louis. The fourteenth who himself was a very accomplished valeted Ella. It was clearly an aristocratic endeavor. And you see that carried over today. This would erect posture. This sort of very formal movement of the body so in some ways it is part of that French also regime aspect and we still see it today but ballet's also a very athletic endeavor so it's marrying these two extremes if you will sort of restraint kind of technical Bravura and again. That's why I think they call ballet dancers artists athletes. Yeah because they merged the two and then fast forward. The ballet went from being aristocratic very classical in its themes and male dominated to about the eighteen. Twenty eighteen thirties when women take over ballet's international. It's much more standardized and very importantly the romantic style. The sort of supernatural narrative takes over and it seems that women artists were better suited to express this new ballet form. What can you tell us about the life of a professional ballerina in the early years of the art forum in the Nineteenth Century? What was her place in society very different from today. The Ballerina really sat at the bottom of the socio economic scale. If you will. There were a few exceptions in. Even though there was a flourishing in the eighteen thirties and forties where there were certainly respectable stars By and large these women were very marginalized. They were paid very little and as a result they were often exploited. Many of them had to turn to prostitution To survive and we see these beautiful pictures by got today showing what seems like an idealized environment but in fact often in the back. You'll see men lurking. They were known as the abomination repower men of the Jockey Club and they regularly exploited these young women so many of them had very sad stories even though they were quite accomplished artists and speaking of data. I think there's even a little back story to his very famous sculpture of the fourteen year. Old Dancer Right. That's right that famous. Bronze sculpture is of a young girl She was part of a family where I think her sister was. Also a dancer but sadly she was likely a victim of the circumstances at the time where she hardly made any money to survive. Many of the dancers were hungry. They were physically exerting themselves and this young lady did fall into prostitution as well and probably died a very sad life so yeah it's horrible to think of and so different from the way we view dancers today right and it really is a fact that the majority of ballerinas then and now will never make it to star status. That's right or or you know prima which was a term. That's kind of more favorite in the past right. Today's top dancers are really generally called principal dancers. If I'm correct right why this shift and terminology from Ballerina to Principal Dancer. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that ballet culture came up in Great Britain and especially the United States and we view ourselves as a bit more democratic so the idea of the Ballerina which was a term given to very very few female dancers. You really had to be at the apex at one point in the late nineteenth century in Russia and said there were only six ballerinas in all of Russia was extraordinary So you can see how limited the term was bandied about then but today we view of the hierarchy of the principal soloist in the quarter ballet member but I think it erases the difference between male versus female and one that really I think asserts a sense of achieving it not so much through social connections or through whims but really through technical as well as artistic merit so. This is one of the reasons we see that change in France. They still use the word. A twelve or star to designate the very top rank. Oh Nice Yeah. I'd like to turn our attention to one of the all time greats who we were just talking about Before we started recording Marie Tahiliani And she really rose to international claim in the early nineteenth century. I'm hoping you could tell us a little bit about her. And also her innovations which helped to shape the future trajectory of ballet as an art form. That's right I think Marie Tagliani was important to very significant ways. One was the art form itself. He was not considered a beautiful woman and had certain physical flaws. Someone told me that. She was slightly hunchback and her father who was a brilliant choreographer was able to create dance. Movements that did not distract from that in fact Really enhanced her physical illness She was very hard working and she was a pioneer of the idea of going up on point sort of Now we think of it is absolutely essential in classical ballet for a female dancer but it was very rare when she started and I think the other thing that she did was to raise the respectability of the Ballerina. She was very careful in the way she cost him herself. She was discreet. Show is where pearls she had. A Floral Diadem And the other thing is that she acted very lady like off stage and she made sure her physical depictions whether in costume more in high fashion. We're always done in a very respectable way so she was able to do something. Many other ballerinas could not do which was Garner female audience. Even the young Princess Victoria was a huge fan of hers and so if members of the royal family could embrace. It was considered acceptable. So she was a breakaway star but unusual in that way and and correct me. If I'm wrong queen perhaps named one of her horses Tahiliani. He did tell Yoni was one of her race horses and also there was a stagecoach that ran between cities that was called the Tagliani fabrics after her famous role muscle feed many different types. Candies were named after her and the Russians were especially enamored. There were some bellum who made a soup out of her shoes needed hotel. Yoni mania swept through Europe and the eighteen thirties forties talk about being a mythic. Yes exactly Speaking of iconic elements of ballet. I would be very very surprised if there's a single one of our listeners out there who is not familiar with the garment which is of course. Queen essentially synonymous with ballet and I am of course talking about the two one thing that I was taken a bit backed by. When I was reading the exhibition catalogue was the somewhat body origins of this term. So how did this term to come about an aunt at its most basic? What is a two two while the two two is just the Ballerina skirt? It's costume and when it was invented in the eighteen thirties It was a word that came from. Rather if you will of course background it's a slang or play on the word. Kuku which itself is slang for the petite call. Which is your behind. Basically ballet audiences were different in the way they were positioned back in those days. The people who were members of the aristocracy or had money were always in what they called the box seats or the rings that were on the upper tiers of the Opera House and it was down in the orchestra seats where the more working class people sat and they could sometimes get a glimpse of the Valarie Yes that they were diaphanous garments and so sometimes depending on how she twirled or whatnot it you could get a look up them and they were also bit dangerous they were often starched ahead sizing in them which made them flammable and with the open gas lights. Some of the Ballerina skirts caught on fire and sadly a number of stars did die that

Prostitution Principal Russia Jockey Club Amazon Marie Tagliani Bally Bravura Ella Marie Tahiliani France Europe Louis Opera House United States Tahiliani Great Britain Yoni Princess Victoria Garner
Why Are You a Leader?

The EntreLeadership Podcast

08:08 min | 2 years ago

Why Are You a Leader?

"I think it's safe to say that. Today we live in a leadership. Culture leadership is glorified revered encouraged and admired so much so that the people we work with work for and even the person in the mirror can pursue and chase leadership without ever answering the most important question for the Ramsey network. This is the entree leadership podcast where we help. Business leaders themselves their teams and their profits. I'm your host Alex Judd. And today we're talking with our friend. Patrick Lynch Yoni he's the best selling author of the advantage. The five dysfunctions of a team the ideal team player and his newest one. It's a good one. It's called the motive and at the centerpiece of this story and all the principles that it teaches is a core question that every leader probably should've asked themselves along time ago. Why do I actually want to lead because if our answered? That question isn't clear and right. Well we're going to avoid all the activities that actually make up a leadership and folks that that's a problem. The problem is this if leaders don't do these things if they delegate them which is really or abdicate them because you can't delegate these things if they don't do these difficult things then no one else is going to and it's GonNa leave a huge vacuum and this is true in many many organizations and nobody else is going to do that. And real human suffering occurs both in terms of the morale and sense of belonging of the people in the organization and then customers feel it and then the financial performance gets hit two or the mission so this is not just like a nice to thing these are things that only the CEO can do now. This is not a comprehensive list of the CEO's job the five things we're GonNa talk about are the five common things that are really difficult and not very comfortable or it can be tedious that many leaders who are leading for the wrong reason. They just don't do them because they don't want to. Do you see these things. That people are avoiding. Do you see people avoiding them. At every level of the ORG chart in different industries different stages of business does it kind of transcend all of those categories. Yes yes and yes. It does the thing though. That's very interesting is the higher you go up in an organization. The more likely somebody is to do this. And at the purest level we see people that spend their whole lives doing these things because that's how they rise up the ladder and then they get to the top job and they know finally. I don't have to do those things anymore. And that's crazy. But but whether you're a pastor whether you're running a small entrepreneurial venture a school a Department within a company a multibillion dollar industry or a family business if you're the leader of that organization and you're not doing these things problems are going to occur and you really have to ask yourself. Do I really want to be the leader because if I do that? I'm going to do these things and if I don't then I probably shouldn't be in this role okay. So let's jump in number one was really investing your time and energy as a leader to developing and building the team. Explain to us from Your Perspective. What that actually means what. That actually looks like yet. That means taking an active role in helping your people work together. Well on the team you lied so if you have a small business it's probably everybody if it was like seven or eight of you but if you're if you're in a company of twenty five or fifty ord two thousand you have a leadership team. One of your primary job is to make that team behaviorally cohesive. And you don't do that by delegating it to someone in hr or even by bringing in an outside consultant. They can help you but your job is to lead that effort to be actively involved in it. Okay and so you're saying this is something. They are avoiding team. Building is kind of the claim that you're making way. It's a great question because I was just thinking about this. Very few CEOS today will actually say that stupid even if they believe it it's become politically or organizationally. Correct to do team building. But what they'll do is they'll bring somebody in for some touchy feely experiential. Offsite trust falls right. Yeah or they'll do something that they're not really that engaged in and that it just doesn't work the truth of the matter is if you have a leadership off site or if you do team building you are the leader of that team and if you have somebody helping you do that. People have to see that this is the CEO and his or her team is of primary importance. Tim and if we're not working together getting along being honest having conflict trusting each other than this is a problem and so many CEOS who say they care about it still delegate it give lip service and essentially abdicate responsibility for it happening so I was talking to someone the other day and it was as I was reading your book I was talking to someone and as a coach asked them the question? Okay are you playing a role in developing and building your team and they said we go to this conference every year and that was their answer. How do you respond to that? Yeah that's that's not it? That's great question is You go to the conference and everybody learns and then it's like so now. What are you as the leader? GonNa do to demand that people apply the principles of teamwork so that they run the organization the best possible way and mostly years ago. We went to the conference. If they're not doing it now I mean what can I do? And it's like no no. That's just informing the process that you need to lead. You make pretty bold claim that this is something that can't be delegated to a head of HR someone else. Why is it important that the leader be the person that is directly responsible directly involved in building the team because at the end of the day if people know that this is not important and of primary importance to leader? They're not GONNA do it. I mean the truth is I don't like overly hierarchical organizations but I love hierarchy and I love leadership and if Dave Ramsey is not paying attention to the things that are important in his organization people are going to pay attention to what he's looking at and so if I'm a leader and I'm saying I really care about the way you treat one another. I really care that. You're pursuing truth. Arguing and working together and if I don't see the leaders doing that I'm not going to pay attention to that. I don't care if you have the world's greatest. Hr PERSON OR TEAM BUILDER. And if they do it. It's not the same as if the leader does I mean. I can't bring in another person to teach my kids about what's important in my family. Even though I can bring in other books and I can point them to other things and I can invite others in if they say dad. You really don't care about that stuff to you. I mean it's a silly fight. Tell my kids not to do drugs. And and they get the best people to tell them that and they go but that does drugs. I what's GonNa matter more what you're saying rings true to that the principle that everything communicates what Dave Ramsey cares about as owner of our organization. I learn as a team member to care about so I guess my next question would be. We said it's not the touchy feeling team building. It's not just the trust falls and things like what does this look like in action when a CEO actually owns their role as team builder. What are the things you recommend they do? Or the actions you recommend. They take well what they have to do. And I write about this in both the five dysfunctions of a team and the ideal team player. But really it's like this. I leader. I'M GONNA be vulnerable and I'm going to demand that you guys vulnerable to is the leader. I'm going to disagree when I disagree about anything that matters. I'M GONNA demand that you do. That too is the leader. I'm going to force us at the end of conversations after we've been vulnerable engaged in conflict. I'm going to force you to commit to a decision so when we walk out of the room. There's nothing to say. There's no hallway conversations or parking lot conversations. I as the leader. I'm going hold you accountable so that you will in turn. Hold One. Another and me accountable. And I as the leader will focus on the collective good of the team and not pick the parts of the organization that I'm most interested in but realized that we're trying to drive the whole company and I am going to take an active interest in making sure you're doing that. Nobody else can do that but me. If I'M GONNA Spend Time Energy Angst and emotional vulnerability making sure this happens. Because if I don't do it they're not going to pay attention.

CEO Dave Ramsey Alex Judd Patrick Lynch Consultant TIM
"yoni" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"yoni" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"Yeah that's what I wanted to ask you about as well steaming circles. I've never actually been to esteem in circle. But I imagine you will say in a circle and say Stephen thing and the news and not maybe challenged POPs music and stuff and I was. I was talk arch token to somebody about this last week and I was telling them you were coming on the podcast and saying yet. So we're GonNa talk about steaming circles and you run them in Bristol in London and sort of Ashen Shade of why and what do you mean to all that and take turns on the same Steve which I obviously was clear about? No then let her do you all sit sort of naked and can you all see each other's Yonis so Could you explain what happens in a steaming circle because bring in the specifically because I think I think some really wild bizarre unusual things can go on in these in some circles? Sometimes and I want to assure the women lessening the it's really quite relaxing boundaries. And Okay so yet. Yes so let me just clear a few things up. I don't know why people these outlandish views on just think you know we'll just make together Dotson It's nothing like that so marsupials everyone is free. You don't see anything. I informed of when everyone to feel absolutely comfortable and because mice public. You never know who's GONNA turn up won't love what level of compatibility will be swell side. I'm just letting to keep it covered. Cy Watches off. That was a long skirt or dress. I'm whatever really whether comfortable but yet you don't see a single thing I told and then also was. Steaming is a good idea to keep a blank to put a blanket around your way spoil because that helps to keep the heat in so that's even an extra layer. That's actually see anything. Sounds great and we all have our own unique esteem seats as ESPN at one has around individual one. No one is sharing anything. Says it's not a cloth it's just block a piece of material a reputation actual cushion as well just for extra hygiene purposes so at least Sunday when the website done are just take them and put them in the washing machine and then start never again. It's like a relaxed Sharon Circle. And and how have a fool because I mean obviously I knew that once? You've boiled your water and got your water temperature where it's in a place where it steaming that doesn't last for very long unless you've got heat input so how long do your circles last. And how long do you steam for a case saw the circles loss for three hours and the actual steam in loss? Maybe outside T to forty minutes finished off wave meditation. Yoga relaxing music allow people have a lie down for about five ten minutes. We just got and chat about our experience. I love eager to a bit of a lie down. I like yeah. That's what for everyone forces I think for me anyway. That would be enough information to get started and thank you so much for sharing a lot about the herbs and the seats and the just K- giving it a go and Ryan it an same. What happens and relaxing and demystifying? Nfl Weird that might happen in a year. Stevenson also saying she fact so I cannot say another thing about like the circles. Molina in general. Thank you it's just another thing that I really focus on in my circles the language that we use when it comes to Allah are we only so I tell everyone what like the origin of young and was called around the world but then also educating us Educating women on what the different possible. Yonis actually named often. She really disgusted that our parts of what he actually been named often men so like for example. The Philippian cheap is named after Sixteenth Century So Dr Georges for Lopez and he apparently discovered yeah he discovered Our both our Now City it's just our X. travels down so I call it that On all sides of John Canal like John Lewis meant to apparently main sheaf sold or scabbard. And I'm just like festival these men That decided to name. I will canal the vagina. They must think that the penises of so great. An get is is a challenge. It can cost something down and that that's the sole purpose of our canal. It's it's to be a holder of the penises. I'm just like no no. It's not as for each individual women to decide what have adjoining was four. So a de focus a lot on the language that we get this and how taking control of our narrative of our actual body is a great way to reclaim our power. That's really important. I'm glad you didn't so you call flipping choose your cube. Yeah and what did you say you? Renamed the Journal Canal a canal the canal. Yeah I'M GONNA I'M GONNA rename those than ovaries. Okay yes I guess I okay freeze eggs tube womb uterus canal. You're now yeah go to go to the Philippian will never be uttered from my lips facial lips. Okay cool all right. Thank you so much What I will do is put links in the show notes to where women can buy your team seats and the herbal practitioners that you recommend as well. Yeah that'd be great right on cue. Thank you so much free time. It's been interesting to meet you and Yeah hopefully I'll see you in Yoni steaming circle at some point. Yeah that'd be cool. Well Yeah I'll put it up for my website and it's the awful on instagram and yet hey senior yeah all right. Thank you again. See later I really hope you enjoyed the podcast and the some useful tips out of it. That can make a genuine difference in your daily life. And if he'd love to work deeper with this stuff thank you to the sacred win dot com where you can sign up to receive a weekly newsletter and an invite to a private facebook group where you can share learn and grow with like minded women and save supported space. Thank you so much for tuning in delivers a rating on your comments of very very well. And I'll see you next time..

Journal Canal Sharon Circle Stephen John Canal Bristol instagram facebook Dotson Philippian ESPN Steve Yonis Nfl Molina Stevenson Ryan London John Lewis Dr Georges
"yoni" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

10:19 min | 2 years ago

"yoni" Discussed on The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

"In my journey. Four that didn't really seem hygiene. It can then also wants to something that could it's partner who mystical experience as well because by that time at grown such a fascination and as well as admiration for my womb being this beautiful vessel for creation and like the amount of energy. I want to see that will on that analysis like right. I need to make something that looks similar to a foreign love. Yes it's not a seat to thrown by my workshops. I'm just slightly ladies was to think of these as your friends because we are. Queens out buddies tempos and it's like are you only is like the very cool that he the heartbeat of the tempo on a win something that would reflect that and then I was just thinking about how would I make. One is lightweight and also that compact before account. It was a massive firm every president at It's not something that's combat. Because when I when I did my first team I was living at my dad's house and that just wasn't spicy. My rhythm and then I moved property in UTICA flash Fran but even so my room. It wasn't big enough for me to have an outward Definitely need something. That's compact but I can still make look really beautiful to Ana our your name. But Very Fussy I made was not a reflection of any of that to atoll in the slightest. It was very much just purchase. Hot for like shape size. How much weight can carry. I remember who down the street on my way to work on time and I just saw a milk crate on something determined to grab it so I did. And then there was some starring that was about to be thrown out. I was just like night taking it and I caught hoes while I washed the milk crate download the whole outfit hose out to Palestinian finds her crying and covered it with some African material high and steamed and it felt amazing. Like thought really comfortable I thought that my wife was evenly distributed over the actual see. It was very low down to the floor so that was great for opening up and helping my hip muscles to relax and also it just felt really comfortable with so on for about a good half an hour walk and I was like okay. So I've got this size. The shape of it now needs to make it out of something a lot. More sustainable something nestled more friendly have any chemicals in a tool but also really really pretty and that's when yet I just started doing research in different materials that can be used. I love going around different African fabric shop psyche. Locked that part of it the most and then yeah just look of materials are can use the C- Different techniques thinking about if I needed to glue anything that Jews in a slight the most sustainable at least harmful and was appraisers. It didn't take very long to be honest. I think that part of it maybe took about maybe about a month. 'cause I was just so determines I was just so determined and I was still working full time while we like but nothing was stuff in but you know when you get an idea and you know it's it's just so right and true for you. It was just one of those moments and I definitely felt like that was also may Chavalit Channel in my own Divine Feminine Energy. Which to me comes out when. I post something using creativity so I felt like I had. Yeah the encouragement and the power of the Divine Feminine Behind Me. Making these seats and I put a picture on my personal facebook page has been like hey are steamed. I made this. I do the same if it was amazing and spike a little bit about your statement and that was in the even went to bed. Wake up in the morning and they were like over a hundred comments and likes and people and I was just like. Wow there's an actual need for this or the women were like I think conspiracy to category so I have some who knew about you only steaming and we're just like I just need to see and you make them. Yes where can I get it from? And then the obvious that was all. What is your niece team in? Yeah I was okay with as an opportunity there to make and so the seat so women are already know about what's demon is and then there's also an opportunity to speak to women about. Yoenis seeming actually is especially the health benefits of it apart from it being realistic or spiritual experience and yet mama. Lena was born. Why why fight? But just the idea just had got hold of you and you run with it and then you go really good response. You got in this reality. Yeah Yeah. I'm curious well. All of the seats actually made from. Now what did you settle with? Okay so I've completely fully leveled up and upgraded from Boxes that will Here in the UK k. o Con Costume from a fabric shop here in Brazil Swell. I get the African fabric mainly from petticoat Lane in London's Liverpool Straight and I use fame for cushions inside or outside from the UK. And that's why he's A. Whoa so they sound really like way really comfy easy to post yes definitely so I mean deceased the for about the same way as my handbag see really incredibly lightweight maybe about one point kilograms for regular size and then maybe two kilograms of logic so it's just nice and easy to get one. Yeah as acting. And that's what I like. Is Lightweight no hassle? No Fuss when you want. He's using it. You don't need a little space when you dominate just wipe it down per diem the button part of it in the washing machine when it needs. Washington. That's it from us to basically you get the seat and I like being really practical about this. I'm GonNa ask you some death practical questions. Everybody listen feels like a really want. Everybody listening to feel like if they know already steam in they can just do it all. So let's just go through the process then you get some appropriate herbs and we'll talk about which ones are appropriate and a minute see. Got Some Abs correct me. If I'm wrong you boil them and then you put them in the seats and you save it for ten minutes. I guess in Tillis voters gone cool. That is literally a main in terms of boiling the hubs. I said if you can boil it makes you the water's cold I because you don't what ads the hubs to win water and then through homage to curb important because then the natural oils from the haves will be released. And that's what access medicines Wisconsin. There is not fun to watch Lee steam way apart from hot water really or what you can do is board award of. I take off. Take off the Out The cattle under sleep have to set for about five to ten minutes and just and then that will release the hubs as I did not have or crime in terms of choosing the hub. Let's back a bit before we go into that. Why would we steam? Are you knees? And it feels great. But I know there's a big argument sometimes often not come in from women to be honest of knows scientic evidence to back soup steaming yovany personally. I don't need that because I have my own scientific evidence which is my feeling my intuition tirec results of it as well. So and I've been tested for forty three years now plus pretty scientifically tested for me to talk to try to argue with you to fly on the world. So what what do you say to the benefits of it and to does new scientific supposed scientific evidence? Well I'd say the benefits of foreign wide Some of them are very much dependent on each individual. But I can definitely say that. It's great for Mesh tuition side. As either full stemming flies or go really heavy floods and that can be reduced by steaming it can help to regulate your periods a swell which is absolutely great for people who have evacuated periods. It can also help to stop bleeding as well. So for women who have Uterine issues Especially five weights and polycystic ovary syndrome and yet thirteen particular There can be bleeding in between periods so Yoni statement is out to degrade for helping to reduce the amount of blood to to to stop it and then also for period paint as far site that are women who have and Dimitrios Failings extreme pain and then if women who don't have intermediaries who still experienced are quite by crime pain pain so you only steam is absolutely amazing for anything to do with menstruation. Issues Redick for Menopause. While when helping to balance out the hormones during menopause as well so as that grateful insomnia is grateful. Relaxation is grateful. Anxiety is absolutely amazing. Fool boost infertility and also postpartum. Swell is great for helping you just to even if it's just to get in touch with your body to actually understand your body and build a relationship with it. I believe about speak to us all the time. But it's actually about understanding for saying an especially are we only because we've been so conditioned to.

UK Menopause polycystic ovary syndrome facebook partner president Brazil Swell Wisconsin UTICA Washington insomnia Redick Fran Lena Tillis London Yoni Lee Liverpool
Yoni Steaming 101 with Mama Luna

The Sacred Womb - Use your menstrual cycle as a natural compass encoded within the body.

03:24 min | 2 years ago

Yoni Steaming 101 with Mama Luna

"Welcome to the podcast ever. Thank you for having me today. We're GONNA be talking about everything to do with steaming abuse Yoni Yes yes. So would you tell us how you got started this? What drew you to steaming here. Yoni well why are you can stop so on one side? I've always been into natural health and I love anything to do with herbs and I've always been into women's empowerment and that really kicked infamy around the twins he free twenty four when I started coming into my own a bit more so those two Paz collided and that led me to book called Sacred Women and that's written by a lady called Queen fewer. He was based in the United States and sacred woman is a book that helps you to cleanse your womb. Basically physically emotionally mentally and spiritually and yet it was just such an amazing but some amazing and so many stories of From a women I can. Everyone I believe can relate to and within the book never nine gateways that you need to go through. It's like different exercises in a book. Basically and I mean I haven't even finished gateway zero and I got this book years ago. It's just so intense but WANNA was in gateway zero. That's when I found out about Yoni steaming and for all I really WanNa give this ago so I did it. One Ni- luckily had a friend here in the UK who has hubs for steaming. So I couldn't touch her. She made a pack. And I just put in Paul with water. I'm just like score is over. It and I was just in heaven. Absolute place like ultimate bliss. And I've been hooked ever since and the first time I did that was maybe about twenty six and I'm saying to now so to use team would smooth twice a month whenever you feel like it tends to be whenever I feel like it and that's just naturally become twice a month maybe three at push. Yeah twice a month. I'd say okay. I know that you make see these. Look so yeah point. Did you decide all right? I'm guessing squat in didn't feel very comfortable. I guess disappoint you. Saw Any summit to sit on a date. Want to put this in the toilet so what happened what. It was literally the day whilst I was steaming for the first time. It's coordinator Paul. The I was like. Yeah I need to make something to sit on because ten minutes into I was like I can't data's anymore I was like this is just it's too much. It's not relaxing experience. I had heard it to be even though it did still feel amazing and yes when I wake up. The next hour is like a job that what is again but want to be comfortable on. I couldn't find any seats in the UK. The ones in America were quite pricey and then there was the shipping in on top of that and I looked on Amazon an Ebay. I really don't know what was in there to be honest but just these tool looking thing that made a plastic analogies like. I definitely don't plastic

UK PAZ United States Amazon Paul Coordinator America
A Saner Mindset For Weight Loss

Rethinking Weight Loss

08:19 min | 2 years ago

A Saner Mindset For Weight Loss

"Okay. So there's a typical pattern to weight loss. And if you've ever gone on a diet you've you've probably experienced it. Basically people lose weight for the first four to six months and then they hit a plateau and then slowly they start to regain some or all of the weight they lost and sometimes they end up heavier than they started. There are a lot of biological reasons. Why weight loss's hard and we talked about those in episode two of the skied but there are some things we can control to an extent and those are the strategies in mindset? We use when approaching weight loss. One problem is that a lot of weight loss strategy start like minded with fat cabbage soup diet or the Cayenne pepper diet. Yeah remember that Queen Bay or some other crazy fed diet like I wasn't planning to eat cabbage soup sue forever you know just until the weight came off but after about a month pizzas started to look real real good to me like whole pie. Good it's hard to be restrictive for a very long time. That's Gary Bennet. He's a psychology professor and obesity researcher at Duke University. And he told me there's research showing that people apple kind of rebound after being on a really strict diet even if that diets more bounce than what I did and naturally people start to move back into moderation and then sometimes that let's see goes into a little bit more consumption and then you know things get a little bit off track so what Gary and Jonni both tell their patients and this is take away number one things that are are not done for good in the name of weight management lead to temporary results. And that's not generally what people are looking for in other words keeping weight off long term. I'm only happens if you liked the lifestyle. Gets you to that weight so much so that you actually stick to it short term crash diets. They're really not sustainable. Unless you like the life you're living while you're losing your weight you're probably not going to keep living that way and as a consequence that weight that you lost we'll come back and it was that philosophical shift that led me to the practice. I suppose that I I run today. Which is focused not on particular body weight goals? It's it's not on the body mass index. It's not on particular diet but rather it's trying to work with patients as individuals to figure out the healthiest life. They honestly enjoy. So if you're looking to lose weight and you go to Yonis practice. The first thing he would tell you is to stop thinking about weight itself like that number on the scale. Just just don't worry about it. We don't aim people at any numbers whatsoever in our office as far as Pounds on a scale or body mass indices or body fat percentages or clothing sizes sizes. I think all of the numbers are risky risky because our bodies and our genes are all built differently plus our job demands are different. Our environments are different are caregiving responsibilities. Wants abilities are different and all of that can affect our weight loss efforts so aiming for a specific number can set a lot of up to fail that's why Yoni says takeaway number to forget goalwards instead. Focus on behavior goals the analogy. I'll use regularly in. My Office is one of school. So if you've got a kid in school you know that that Kid's best grade is going to be whatever grade. They get when they go to class do their homework and study their best but by no means does everybody trying their best in school. Get an a plus. That's not how it works. And so the goal setting needs to be around the going to class doing your homework and studying and also needs to be realistic. Yanni loves a good analogy analogy. And you're going to hear from him in this episode but in this case when he says doing your homework he means adopting healthy behaviors for example. He really recommends trying to cook at home or often as for Gary he gives his patients a simple list of changes they can choose from for instance. Stop sugary beverage. Consumption huge for most people reduce alcohol intake. No more than one drink per night ECHINACEA that's harder for me. Maybe you you know. Stop eating chips cookies and candy right this those three no fast food. Do you do like four or five of those and your. You'll get pretty close to that five hundred calorie deficit each day a calorie deficit. That just means you're taking in fewer calories and you burn and that's how you lose weight but the weight-loss isn't the focus here the idea. Is that making. These changes can make you healthier regardless of how much weight lose are even if you don't lose any weight at all in other words their goals worth pursuing in of themselves and they're less likely to make you obsessive of course changing. Our behavior is easier said than done and this gets us to take away number three. Don't try to overhaul your behavior all at once instead. Start Small and let those changes snowball when it comes to weight management specifically people are so keen to suddenly have a black belt that they forget to get a black belt. you start with a white belt and fall down a whole bunch. Dan Slowly slowly over time with a lot of repetition. You build a skill set and I think healthy living is the same and when people try to suddenly have a black belt without taking that time to build up to it you know. They usually struggle and stop for a lot of people. Union says a good place to start as to just figure figure out what you're eating. I think one of the first things a person can do just like they would be doing if they were unhappy with their bank balance at the end of every month trying to understand what their spending ending patterns look like would be a great first step and I think the same is true about eating patterns eating habits now I am a fan of using food. Diaries I realize is that it's not for everybody but doing it for a few weeks would be a very eye opening thing for a lot of people where people will be keeping track of what they're eating when they're eating how much they're eating now. Joni said food. Diaries are not for everyone. If you have a history of eating disorders or tend to become obsessive about counting calories stay stay away from them because the trigger you but if he can look at the data dispassionately without self judgment food tracking can help you get to know yourself and your habits. That's when you can start taking stock of what you may or may not be able to change for instance. Maybe there's a food you can cut back on a couple of years ago. I started tracking and and I quickly realized that I was poring about four hundred calories worth of creamer into my coffee every morning. That was really eye opening so I cut back and eventually we realized just a spoonful was enough but a lot of people do find tracking their food too tedious. Even carry does. That's why he tells his patients to track their goals calls instead. I once had a patient who just tracked every day. She got a day planner and just put a smiley face or a sad face on the day planner each day and if she thought she was doing doing pretty well hitting our goals at day she would have happy face if she wasn't she wrote a sad face and she's she did wonderfully and felt really good about our progress. And you know she would tell you I just look at the day. Planner Sir can figure out all the trends and there's another reason to focus on meeting smaller goals. They're actually achievable. So it sets you up to to be able to celebrate small victories. Gary Remembers one day when he walked into one of the health centers. You works at and one of his patients. Waived him over. This woman comes over and doc to DOC DOC DOC DOC and she was shaking this thing at me and I didn't know what was happening and I realized that she was shaking a pedometer. My faith and she was look at my steps. Look at my steps. I hit thirteen thousand thirteen thousand and then she immediately started vogue ing I mean. She dislikes all the model poses. And the whole thing and she's like look you how I lost some weight but I've still kept a Dachsie and I've got my Michelle Obama arms and just doing the whole thing and and so we sat and talked for they'll and she just followed these really simple goals one of the simple goals Gary likes to offer. His patients is brisk activity. This patient certainly embrace stat and accomplishing it. Capture motivated to keep going over time. You can work your way up to black belt level lifestyle changes if you want and what those are GonNa look different for different people. It could be cooking most of the food. You eat yourself or running a marathon or playing kickball with your kid after school. That's actually what my husband does Yoni says the key is to stick with the types of changes. You most enjoy

Gary Bennet Yoni Queen Bay Yanni Michelle Obama Yonis Apple Duke University Kickball Union Pounds Professor Joni DAN Researcher Four Hundred Calories Five Hundred Calorie Six Months
"yoni" Discussed on Energy Healing

Energy Healing

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"yoni" Discussed on Energy Healing

"COM C. H. A. K. R. U. B. S.. And and they also have some adult toy crystals which would also help. SACO shocker. Work if you wanted to go that route how you use a Yoni Egg League is pretty straightforward. All you do is inserted into your vagina. You can use it for just a few minutes you can use it for longer and and you just hold it in using your vaginal muscles of course if you have any pelvic floor issues or any kind of medical issues were this could pose a problem then please speak with your gynecologist or physician. Whoever first before going out and buying these and using it but otherwise they are considered to be safe? Obviously keep it clean as far as what type of crystal to us when it comes to Yoni eggs like a mentioned jade is probably the most popular option but I think rose quartz is a wonderful option because when it comes to the sacred Shaqra and emotions motions and processing emotional trauma. The heart shocker needs support to end so having a Rose Courts Yoni egg is really helpful. Full if you have problems with grounding than Gopher Route Shocker Crystal Yoni Egg just kind of focus on what your needs are in that moment and with that I always just following your intuition and tuition will lead you to what kind of Yoni egg you need. So the Shaqra is one of my most favorite shock res- because it is such a powerful Shaqra and it governs such powerful awful parts of our lives and to have not been balanced and be clouded with a bunch of unprocessed stagnant emotions can be quite detrimental her mental too not just mental and emotional health but our physical health as well using a Yoni egg isn't going to make emotional trauma magically go away. You have to do the work to process at trauma and to do that sometimes requires therapy so do not be ashamed to seek out therapy. Should you need it so definitely give some love to your sacred Shaqra and this goes for people people who don't have a vagina you give love. Sheer sequel shock run to. It won't be through the use of Yoni Aig for obvious reasons but you can support your sake while Shaqra get out of your head and sit in your sacred shock. Gra that Orrin Shaqra below your belly button and sit there there and ask yourself what am I really feeling right now. Do something creative find something. You're passionate about experience -perience joy every day. Whatever that looks like for you do something that brings you joy? It's such an important Shaqra Shaqra yet. It gets overlooked a lot. So go fuel. Your sequel shop Gra in whatever way that looks like for you if you want to explore uni eggs more I'll go ahead and linked to shock rubs in the show notes so that you can venture over there and explore that and if you are someone who has trouble connecting with your sacred Shaqra injure emotions. We do explore motions in week. Three of signed your sole purpose if you want to check that out as well so you can head over to the episode Web. Page check out the show.

Shaqra Shaqra Yoni Egg League Shaqra Yoni Aig SACO Rose Courts C. H. A. K. R. U. B.
"yoni" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"yoni" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Access to be able to transact in financial services without minimums without politics dix. I think that's very important. I also believe in general and that's a social impact. Project editorial called the good dollar. I also so believe free money could mean universal basic income so we're developing cryptocurrency where every person around the world can open an account and get one good a dollar a day so i believe in freedom but also understand why governments regulators sometimes need need to sort of put rules in place when these rules are in place companies any company that needs to adhere to rules needs to adhere to the rules. It's easy for us on this side to go all those guys. Are you know they're horrible what they're doing and eh but you know they've got issues that they're dealing with on their side with threats of all kinds of legal action and so i guess won't be a little forgiving but we do appreciate your approach. I want to back up a little bit yoni because you did get into crypto really early. When did you first discover bitcoin and can you re how you when you first heard about it so i found bitcoin in two thousand ten. I think i have a tweet talking about bitcoin when it's printing twenty.

"yoni" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"yoni" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Financial services company offering people to trade in different markets and then the financial markets co of the sort of collapse which by the way a lot of people came to a tour to trade because of that uncertainty but what i really realized back then is how broken financial infrastructure and financial services ecosystem really is so as a computer scientist. That's when i realized like nothing is really connected. Everything is broken because there's no connectivity between sort of the database of all of the financial services companies you deal with and i started writing actually around about cryptocurrencies not cryptocurrency we i was writing about the need of new type of digital money back in two thousand and eight. I wrote a i called it. The visible hand saying that there is a need for new infrastructure where all of the transactions should should be public and therefore will also be used for good and i called that the dollar or you you yoni toshi i'm. I'm considering actually <hes> announcing that. I am so totally commode u._2. And so's my while you need to do is just set up a website and say ketosis right now and then but i lost all my millions of euro so unfortunately i lost. I lost them in a computer. That was perfect nick. Though i've been passionate about sort of fixing the market one of the reasons also why founder detoro was to create more access assists for more people to train investments simple and transparent way and then when i saw bitcoin i think it was november december her two thousand ten and started trading in it. I was fascinated how much that works well compared to traditional finance finance and then i started writing when i wrote about the free internet that would i really envisioned..

ketosis scientist founder detoro
"yoni" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"yoni" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I._n. Forward slash each horo for details for years coin has been the first point of contact for americans wanting to enter the crypto world but turns out. There's been a player on the other side of the pond for for a number of years. That's attracted over eleven million customers that exchanges called toro and they've been building what they believe is the world's best crypto dope platform since two thousand seven what there hasn't even been crypto that far back while today we welcome only the c._e._o. And founder of e talk to the show to share how e- touro got started and his vision for making crypto more social and for doing good stuff with good dollar. Get out your a number two pencil sharpener and begin taking notes because there will be a test and we'll have the nurse hands you a cup to then we just wanna make sure you're not contagious. Welcome to episode number three hundred and four of the bad crypto podcast gear to make the world better place joel common travis right. This is the bad crypto podcasts low mr travis right who's been did you hear i did. A little voice changes here for a second okay peter brady. This is good. It reminds me of in blazing saddles when <hes> gene wilder character lights up and to be hey part have helium. I'll tell you gene wilder and <hes> richard pryor did more for race relations than anybody else. They were hilarious. Which by the way different different films <hes> that was over streak silver streak. Yes yeah of course him in cleveland. Little too right wasn't cleveland little the guy in blazing saddles. Yes he was the sheriff sheriff. Is it near as good stuff. I say good movies. Good movies good lose so we are. We are the bad doc crypto podcast. Thanks for tuning in with over seven point five seven million five hundred thousand downloads. We're we're moving in the right direction not to just change somebody else to somebody. Else's listening tests three. Oh gosh it's going so fast. I wonder how many laughs we've served. That's you know that's the question. I always think about you. Know unite created this. I fart apps that we've had millions of downloads of the app but i wonder how many how much laughter has has created right so i like to think that we've created millions of laughs out there right with that many downloads you gotta figure there's at least one one laugh per download sometimes to maybe so maybe so maybe we've we've. We've created nearly fifteen million laughs out in the world. That's doing good stuff. I think so so making no other good stuff today's do that yeah yeah. The is yoni assia we did not know about good dollar and you guys are gonna learn about it as she learned about e toro as well in the show is brought to you by toro and yanni's kinda guy we'd have on you know regardless anyhow we actually met him briefly at paris blockchain week and this is a great discussion so here we go listen in for the longest time especially as we got into the crypt of space we were telling those in the republic of bed crypto pia to get started with bitcoin by going into coin base and it was the preferred platform four at time but i'll tell you what that brian armstrong would ever come on the show so the those guys well it actually you know as the crypto world has progressed there are uh other exchanges that have surfaced that are doing a better job of helping people to buy and sell crypto to track their crypto portfolio in to engage age with the community of other traders and that platform that we've been talking about lately is each horo. A toro is a sponsor of the show but there are sponsor for a good reason what they're doing is baller and today we are pleased to welcome to c. e. o. In the founder of toro to the show his name is yoni assia. Yoni welcome to bed crypto. Thank you very much and thank you for having me in bed crypto pia absolutely you have been into finance in computers since you were a kid in fact. I think you're still a kid..

e toro mr travis founder richard pryor peter brady gene wilder cleveland yoni assia c. e. o brian armstrong paris
The War-Stopping Eclipse

Curiosity Daily

03:53 min | 3 years ago

The War-Stopping Eclipse

"It's time for the second installment in our moon, Monday miniseries. We're will teach you how the history of the moon has affected the world in some way last week. We talked about how the Babylonians figured out Saros cycles, which basically predict how often is solar eclipse will appear who cares. Right. We'll thanks to this information. The Greek philosopher theories predicted a solar eclipse that helped end a war restore and economy and build a philosophy school that trained a couple of history's greatest minds. Here's the story from Dr David warm flash. But his terms of the eclipse cycles dailies warned about this and in five eighty five BC during a war between a couple at least two Pires a third one involved, but one of one empire was demeans. Empires. Meade's sort of in the area of Persia and the other word the lydian empire that control the big chunk of Asia Minor, including a Yoni. So the Iowans were Greeks who had been there for centuries because the Dorian invasion had pushed everybody all over the place, and they were living along the coast of Asia. Minor Annalong those those islands along the coast and the Libyan's were controlling them. And they wanted it into the war, and knowing these Sarah cycles from the Babylonians Staley's was able who is also a mathematician, he was able to calculate the likelihood of an eclipse. So he probably didn't know the moon was getting in front of the sun announcements causing it. But he knew the mathematics of it. And he turned out. He was he ended up being ri-, and he went to the commanders of both sides, and he told them the gods are really upset about this war. We need an end to the war and to to demonstrate that the. Gods are gonna dark in the sky on Tuesday at three o'clock, whatever and he was he got a little bit lucky because these cycles don't predict the eclipses that note map precisely but a little bit of luck. Also, got it. Right. Whoa. This guy knows what he's talking about. And the war came to an end and Staley's was also able to negotiate pretty good terms for the Onians, which is good for Iranian business. 'cause basically, I only were business people. They were maritime traders all that dailies himself had a certain amount of celebrity status because he predicted a really good olive harvest foreign urine. So he bought up all the olive presses. And you got to be really rich guy because he had this money, and you had this fame by ending the war and that helped him establish a philosophy school on the island of militants in people were flocking to come and study with him and some people eat that we hear about were students affair. Phillies address, for instance, puts agress was one of daily students. Eventually had a really didn't agree with dailies whole approach to how how you obtain knowledge, but he started out as when if they Lee students yet another student in accent Mander who is the earliest person, we know of to come up with an volition area theory about the emergence of humanity from fish that we started out fish, and he reason that fish don't need their their their mothers just come out of an egg in they either get eaten or they could survive. And so he reasoned that human infants couldn't have reclaim them in humans all time because infants can't survive in the first human would have be an instant in, you know, the chicken and egg problem. So he he reason it back to back to fish next week will jump ahead to the middle ages. And here fascinating story about the origins of astronomy. In the meantime, Dr David warm flashes. Book is called moon in illustrated history in you. Can pre-order it on Amazon today? You can also follow him on Twitter at cosmic.

Staley Dr David Asia Persia Pires Twitter Phillies Dorian Agress Meade Accent Mander Sarah Amazon Onians LEE
The Music Technologist That Ozzy Osbourne Calls "The Rocket Man"

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:51 min | 4 years ago

The Music Technologist That Ozzy Osbourne Calls "The Rocket Man"

"Warm. Welcome to the show. David. Can you tell the listeners a little about who you are? And what you do. Well, I'm David fringe Yoni. Great to be here. You know, a music technologist entrepreneur businessman engineer, producer drummer, author drum library, creator, artists development, professional very blessed to have a lot of work a lot of hats. And enjoy all that I do, and, you know, just love love the whole combination. I thought I spun a of place you put me the shave. You know, life's too short for me, not to keep really busy doing things that passionate about and that I think I think contribute to and and it's just, you know, just been a wild ride just for anyone tuning in hearing you for the first time, I just bring them up to speed you've been you've been the in house engineer for five of Arras mitts records and built most of every coding stereos and high end av systems, but you also K notoriety as the official technologies for the osbournes and even a paid a multiple episodes of their MTV show, and I believe Ozzy Osborne, even jokingly referred to you as the rocket, man. So can you tell me more about your backstory as a drummer? And also you'll you'll work which has been with everyone from the stones Ringo Starr out and John sting. Bryan, Adams, Shaquir shed, so many moist like you said he's been a hell of a ride. It started with at age too. I started playing the drums. And my my parents got me a little toy drum kit in somehow realized that I had an affinity for the drums and at the same time. I was diagnosed with retina, blah, stola, which is cancer of the eye, and what that turned out to be is that to remove the cancer. They had to remove my right is. So I became blind in my right eye since the age two in it really had a profound effect on my life and my family's life beyond the near death experience in the in the loss of sight. I had a prosthetic, and and it really kinda look different than other kids. So I had a pretty isolated kinda rough childhood in music ended up being my refuge. I also became kind of a collector. I I like started collecting baseball cards in GI Joe's and immersed myself in like my own world. Really? And by the time, I was eight I was taking drum lessons by the. Time. I was twelve I was playing in bands. I started taking lessons with some really amazing drum teachers drummers, Alan Dawson, Joe Morello, rod more instinct, less rural just world class drummers. And because my parents were always very intent on making sure that anything that he did took a very educated in learning approach and learned it, quote, unquote. Right. So I was taking lessons from young age than kind of volved to these amazing teachers and

David Fringe Shaquir Engineer Joe Morello Ozzy Osborne Cancer Ringo Starr MTV Alan Dawson Bryan John Sting Producer Official Adams
2 kids, 2 adults dead in arson fire at New Jersey mansion

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:20 sec | 4 years ago

2 kids, 2 adults dead in arson fire at New Jersey mansion

"New Jersey officials say arson appears to be the cause of a fire at a mentioned that killed two adults and two children. Monmouth county prosecutor Chris Greenwich Yoni. There was one body that was found out front of the home. The other three were recovered from inside the home. And unfortunately, they were burned severely as a result of the fire that they were exposed

Arson Chris Greenwich Monmouth County New Jersey Prosecutor
Body found in waters off Trump golf course in New York

Sports Overnight with Dino Costa

01:32 min | 4 years ago

Body found in waters off Trump golf course in New York

"The study people treated to a top, blood pressure reading of one twenty instead of one forty or nineteen percent less likely to develop mild. Cognitive impairment they also had fewer signs of damage on. Brain scans there was a possible trend toward fewer cases, of dementia Correspondent rich Thomasson says the study was led by. A researcher at North Carolina's Wake Forest Baptist medical center And unidentified bodies been founded the water off a Trump golf, resort in New York City he composed body was discovered Wednesday. Night in the East River. Snagged in rocks five hundred feet all the Trump golf links at ferry point this is townhall dot com Sergio archaeology who entered turnarounds. To save both THEO and Chrysler has died at the age of sixty six silky amok Yoni joined in. Twenty four lead at the cheering based companies merger with, bankrupt US a Chrysler he proceeded to then build that. Is sung companies, into, the wills sentence largest automaker monkey is. Reported to had, surgery for a shoulder problem. About three weeks gun Switzerland. Fiat Chrysler then set on Saturday that due to his deteriorating health the chief will not be able to. Return to work John Elkins says unfortunately what we feared has come to pass so. Mark Yoni man and friend is gone I'm. Charles de LA desma the Trump administration is releasing hundreds of emigrant families to faith-based groups that are taking. Responsibility for their wellbeing once they're out of government custody the releases or.

Donald Trump Rich Thomasson Fiat Chrysler Wake Forest Baptist Medical Ce Chrysler United States East River Mark Yoni North Carolina John Elkins New York City Charles De La Theo Researcher Switzerland Five Hundred Feet Nineteen Percent Three Weeks
Bloomberg, Boeing and Fiat discussed on Glenn Beck

Glenn Beck

00:59 sec | 4 years ago

Bloomberg, Boeing and Fiat discussed on Glenn Beck

"This is a Bloomberg market minute shares of Boeing or moving lower in premarket trading. They're down four percent before the opening bell. The company reported a four hundred eighteen million dollar blow from additional costs as it prepares to deliver the first of its much delayed aerial tankers to the air force. The stumble, Martin otherwise strong quarter for Boeing with profit and sales beating Wall Street estimates. The plan by UPS to cash in on surging ecommerce is running into a snag. Higher costs in it's crucial. Domestic package business. The US unit earned eleven cents for every dollar of sales in the second quarter down from about thirteen cents a year. Earlier, automakers could be in for a bumpy day after two of them lowered their outlooks General Motors cut its forecast for profit this year. Amid surging prices for steel and aluminum Fiat Chrysler cut its outlook after disappointing sales in China, hurt results, Fiat's earnings, followed news today that former CEO Sergio, Mark Yoni had died at the age of sixty six. Gina Cervetti. Bloomberg.

Bloomberg Boeing Fiat Gina Cervetti General Motors United States CEO Chrysler Martin Sergio Mark Yoni China Four Hundred Eighteen Million Four Percent
G-20 calls for more dialogue on rising trade tensions

Fox News Sunday

00:57 sec | 4 years ago

G-20 calls for more dialogue on rising trade tensions

"Newsroom the world's top finance chiefs warned that. Trade tensions threaten global growth as the engines of leading economies, fall out of sync global growth remains robust in many emerging market countries are better prepared to face crises but risks to the world economy have increased according to g twenty finance ministers and central bankers in a statement issued at the end of. A two-day summit in Buenos Aires trade tensions increased. Last week with President Trump's threat to slap import tariffs I'm five hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods. According to Gary of Nomar wealth advisors in. Dubai is such an escalation of the rhetoric that we've seen and that's what, the. G twenty's fearing today brezler has named Mike Manley fifty four year old Britain as its new CEO succeeding Sergio Marchi Yoni automotive, icon who's been forced to relinquish. The post due to ill health Manley has been head of Fiat Chrysler Jeep brand since two thousand nine that's the name plate. That's key to the company's plan to double prophets in the next five Five years to.

Mike Manley Buenos Aires President Trump Sergio Marchi Fiat Dubai Britain Jeep Gary CEO Five Hundred Billion Dollars Fifty Four Year Five Five Years Two-Day
G20 calls for greater dialogue on trade tensions

Meet the Press

01:02 min | 4 years ago

G20 calls for greater dialogue on trade tensions

"A whole foods in California I'm Mike. Moore And I'm Mark mills in the Bloomberg radio newsroom the world's top finance chiefs warned that trade tensions threaten global growth as, the engines of. Leading academies fall out of sync global growth remains robust in many emerging market countries are. Better prepared to face crises but risks to the world economy have increased according to g twenty, finance ministers and central bankers in a statement. Issued at the end of, a two-day summit in Buenos Aires trade. Tensions increased last week with President Trump's threat to slap import tariffs on, five hundred billion dollars. Worth, of Chinese, goods according to Gary Dugan of NoMura wealth advisors in Dubai, is such an escalation of the rhetoric that we've seen. And that's what the g twenty is fearing today, Fiat Chrysler has named Mike Manley fifty four year old Britain. As its new CEO succeeding Sergio Marchi Yoni the automotive. Icon who's been forced, to relinquish the post due to ill-health Manley has, been. Head of Fiat Chrysler Jeep brand since two thousand nine that's the name plate that's key. To the company's plan to double prophets in the next five years. To top oil.

Mike Manley Fiat Chrysler Fiat Britain Buenos Aires Bloomberg President Trump Gary Dugan Sergio Marchi California Mark Mills Moore Jeep Dubai Nomura CEO Five Hundred Billion Dollars Fifty Four Year Five Years
Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne To Step Down

Purity Products

01:13 min | 4 years ago

Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne To Step Down

"News Radio the longtime CEO of Fiat Chrysler is stepping down due to health issues the automaker announced that Sergio Marconi is resigning after complications from recent surgery he will also leave his leadership. Roles at Ferrari Marconi Yoni is credited with rescuing Chrysler after the two thousand eight financial crisis left US car companies on the brink of. Ruin details, of Mark Yonis illness were not disclosed he'll be replaced by the head of Chrysler's ram and Jeep brands Mike Manley. Another shark was caught off a Long Island beach in that has. People in the sand, at, Robert, Moses park Wondering if it's safe to be in the water Noah. Bladen has more moms and dads on the. Sand watching their kids very closely looking for any sign of danger, in the water I don't think they'll be going in very far the most will be doing is dipping their toes in Happen it's. Going. To happen if you know so I'm not, afraid I'm going to go on the water just, Friday, night a. Four and a half wit long sand. Shark was caught that capture comes just two days after two kids were bitten by sharks on Long Island beaches both of those kids okay shark sightings are not. Uncommon on Long Island but unprovoked attacks are no one Lleyton NBC News Radio New York Chicago.

Fiat Chrysler Long Island Sergio Marconi Shark Ferrari Marconi Yoni Mike Manley CEO Bladen Moses Park Mark Yonis NBC United States Robert New York Chicago Two Days
Trump's immigration reversal

Bill Handel

03:25 min | 4 years ago

Trump's immigration reversal

"Sarah netanyahu and that's bb benjamin netanyahu wife a lot of trouble charged with all kinds of fried among them were among the fraud allegations ordering a hundred thousand dollars worth of meals from gourmet chefs which is against the law in israel if there is a chef that is on the premises not right and that's the problem there was a chef oh and just for one big party over the course of years over the course of years he was the last one he was shot and killed and because of that the name be of course became an insane national story and because of yoni netanyahu his brother bb became a national figure an inter politics wow is a very hungry wife anna very hungry how does this compare to the first lady was what was she a filipino or indonesia the one with all the shoes imelda marcos that was far worse calls me series robin robin robinson the shoes like crazy yes i have no idea it's it's a woman thing i just don't get it and what's not allowed some practical aspects that make it almost impossible to do this successfully as a result of this the entire process of the twenty days within twenty days they have to be released we go back to catch and release which may have to i mean it's just i'll talk more about that coming up at seven o'clock also just a quick when this is trending like crazy the cover of time magazine it's a red cover and it shows donald trump looking down at a toddler who is crying oh boy and the caption is welcome to america.

Sarah Netanyahu BB Time Magazine Donald Trump Benjamin Netanyahu Fraud Israel Yoni Netanyahu Anna Indonesia Imelda Marcos Robin Robin America Twenty Days Hundred Thousand Dollars
High stakes, high expectations as earnings season heats up

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:31 min | 4 years ago

High stakes, high expectations as earnings season heats up

"Kaufman at fenway the as hticket dot com sports studio with more red sox will open the home portion of their season this afternoon here at fenway against the reason here's opens andrew bogart's is as good as he's been on the road shortstop spanning three fifty seven with a six forty three slugging percentage a major league leading five doubles a homer and to rbi after his first six games for them came in tampa including all those extra base hits a four seventy one average and no ps pushing fifteen hundred bogart's followed a two thousand sixteen all star campaign with down near last season is offensive production was below average but he told wbz's johnny miller es high expectations for himself heck at twenty five sky's the limit i don't know but i'm definitely going to find out my best baseball hasn't even been paid yet and i'm pretty confident in that and i'm looking forward a big season of had some good was what are we looking forward to this one doing some special teams for the if bogaerts first week is any indication it's going to be a fun year david price on the mound today opposite yoni torino's at fenway adam kaufman wbz sports also in sports the masters golf tournament is underway wbz's bob bubka joins us from augusta georgia won his first masters at age twenty one one that one by twelve shots he's going after victory number five here at augusta and he's now on the first hole from the masters i'm bob bubka now also brockton firefighter matt partiality is one par or is a one over par through six holes that is in the master's.

Fenway Tampa WBZ Johnny Miller Baseball David Price Yoni Torino Bob Bubka Georgia Augusta Matt Partiality Andrew Bogart Adam Kaufman Brockton