17 Burst results for "Yellowstone Yosemite"

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:45 min | 4 months ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Will I be comfortable has been paramount and the great news is as we have started up. I can honestly say that our guests have felt safe. In terms of the protocols that have been put in place by. I think any of the partners that folks will will sort of visit with us. They travel in terms of the way people are conducting themselves. I don't want to minimize it guys. But I think you can check the box that people are feeling safe as as as their out there some other good things, not a lot of people in the destinations, right. If you're eager now is a great time to go because certainly it's not crowded As we start up, that's a benefit. On definitely the other thing is, destinations have been so starved of folks visiting them that the the warmth and the reception that our guests are getting where they're getting out there on the road is something that we haven't seen in a long time. There is a real eagerness for people to reconnect and for people to take care of each other, and that's a wonderful thing. On the downside, you know, traveling with social distancing and with masks. It's not ideal. People get accustomed to it. But things like dinner where there may be less wait Staff or no salt and pepper on the table. Things like that. It is a bit of a disruption, but nothing that anybody is really complaining about her staying away from Jeremy. I have to ask in the process of setting up your tours and taking folks places are you running into problems with trying to find things to do? When you get there, What's open? Which not? How is how is that as a challenge for a tour directors at this particular point for you and talc? Great question. The good news is on balance. Most things well, let me take a step back. Something is either open or closed right? So you can either go to a destination or you can't. If you can go, we are finding that most things are open. But the specifics specifics have changed. Excuse me. So our tour directors who have always been trained to sort of think on the fly and adjust, have been able to navigate their way through if a restaurant instead of having a full buffet for breakfast, For example, those aren't happening at the moment, right? A lot of it is now room service and getting your breakfast. Into go boxes, things of that nature. Luckily, that's what we do for our bread and butter, and that's what our tour directors have been able to respond to so belong in the long and short of it is we are able to go. Most things are open and things are changed versus being closed. I think the key word right now is if you want to travel, there are some advantages As you mentioned in some places. There are fewer people, but there are also fewer people to help you. And so what? I've told people Jeremy as the key word right now is the f word flexibility if you are a little bit flexible, and you don't mind going down in the morning to breakfast and being told, here's your to go bag. And please don't eat it in the lobby. Um then you're probably going to be okay traveling. But if you're somebody that has to have You know all your little luxuries and everything fall right into place for you to have a good time. Then this is probably not the best time for for you to hit the road, Jeremy. I see from from tox. Information that you that you shared with the media that you've you've kind of selective, limited yourself a little bit to select destinations around the country. Obviously, the whole international situation is still up in the air. In 30 seconds or less here. Can you give folks an idea of some of the places that you are operating tours to this season? Yeah, happy to. Generally speaking, people are going to destinations where you can physically distance yourself. So think of national parks where there is a lot of space, so Yellowstone Yosemite Grand Canyon. But I also think of places like Michigan or Charleston, Savannah. Generally, we're not operating in large urban environments, but anywhere where there is sort of a resort and there's nature and lots of open space. That's where people want to go right now. It's where they can go right now, and it's where we're operating. Awesome. Awesome. I concur with you about 110%. Jeremy. Let's talk a little bit about the history. By the way, we have Jeremy Palmer from talk big travel company formerly known as talk tours. Jeremy, your company has a long and storied history It is in in many corners credited with the top family is is credited with starting this industry the escorted tour industry many years ago. Give us Ah, just a little good Readers Digest version, perhaps of how the company got started, And there's a There's a very famous story about an advertisement that was placed on a very infamous day when the company was kicking off. If you could share that, I would, I would love it. You have? No, my pleasure. Yeah. Look, we are 96 years young on dirt all started back in the 19 twenties with Arthur Tell senior And basically this was an entrepreneur who had got fired from his job in a bank, and he came up with a product that he was selling. And as he was going around the Northeast, selling it, he's like, Man. This is this is beautiful Countryside. Other people should be seeing this and so he started bringing people with him six guests and an old Studebaker and he'd take care of the hotels. You take care of the meals, and he drive him around New England showing him initially, when sort of the leaves would change. And from those humble beginnings, just the sort of the evolution of the American travel industry has gone talc. Was there every step of the way in terms of Opening up. You know the West in terms of the national parks chartering airliners for the first time going over to Europe, the whole evolution we've gone through the whole way. And you know why we have been successful because at the end of the day, um we don't own hotels or ships. Although we use all of those. We've always been focused on the guest. We've always had a sense of purpose. Put our people first put our guests first and Our internal mantra is do the right thing by people that that's essentially the secret sauce to talk. But you know some of the ways we've ended up here. There's some fun stories and the one you're referring to Is most of our business comes from word of mouth. We don't do a lot of advertising, and that is a conscious decision. But if you want to be honest about how it really started, Arthur Talk senior back in the 19 forties, you know the business started slowly and he started to get some traction..

Jeremy Palmer New England Charleston Michigan Europe six guests Jeremy 30 seconds 96 years Savannah Arthur Tell 19 forties Readers Digest first time about 110% Yellowstone Yosemite Grand Can American first 19 twenties years
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:19 min | 5 months ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Peter Greenberg here with us. Ion travel continues. You know, if you've been reading my stories, or watching us on television, you'd notice that Just about every airline is that they're flooding the zone right now. Banking on the idea that America's gonna start traveling again within the United States, and when you take a look at the individual destinations they have announced as so called new routes. What a surprise. It's a Katya It's Bozeman, Montana. It's It's every destination you can imagine next to a national or state park. And the airlines. They're banking on the fact that we're all going well, Somebody knows a little bit about that is my next guest is the author of National Geographics, 100 Parks and 5000 Ideas where to go. I love this one when to go what to see? And what to do, Joe yogurts. How are you served? I'm great today. How are you, Peter? I'm good. Well, here's here's not exactly a news bulletin. Everybody's going. I mean, if you take a look at the numbers, I mean, already the campground. You're getting crowded the reservations they're going through. The roof. You can't find an RV. You can't find a rental car in United States on everybody seems to think that you know the national parks are gonna be their savior. And I understand why course you understand, right? You wrote the book. But the question I've got to ask is, let's let's be a little contrarian here and creative. Tell me where we really should go. If we're going to try to have a great experience and avoid the crazy crowds, well, there's still a lot of parks that people don't know about, or that flying to the radar. Like the last park I was in which was Big Bend in West Texas. I was there in late January, and even though they experienced what they consider a surge of visitors, it's nothing compared to a lot of other parks. And I did some canoe camping there on the Rio Grande with one of my daughters and a guide, and we were the only three people camped along the River that entire night for about an 80 mile stretch of Big Bend National Park, So there are still places you could go in national parks in the lower 48 states. Where you can get away from the madding crowds. All right? Sure. We got big Bend in Texas. But of course, if you look at those ion or you look at Yellowstone Yosemite, you know the usual suspects they're gonna get crowded. Yes, And even some of the not so usual suspects like Josh, which we in California has burst into the top 10 of visitation over the past year because it's close to 30 million people in Southern California. But again, there's other parts. I was in Zion last August. It was a zoo without a doubt. But then, if you drive around the Capitol Reef, it's nice and I'm crowded, and I think just a spectacular and I went around to arches and that was a zoo again. But if you're going to canyon lands, I remember a spectacular sunset in Canyon lands at the most famous viewpoint there, and I think there were maybe a dozen people. So there are places out there. You just have to do your research and Take a little bit outside of the box and go a little bit further off the grid than he normally might. You know, I go back to President Biden's rule about a mask mandate. Airlines. Federal buildings also applies the national parks. In your experience are people wearing their masks in the national parks? It's changed life for last August, when I did the Utah trip. But I would say about 90% of the people in the parks. We're not wearing masks or social distancing to this most recent trip to southern Arizona, southern New Mexico in West Texas, where about 90% of the people were. I think it changed a lot from last summer to the end of this winter. I think people even in places where we didn't expect it started to take it a lot more seriously because it just it covered was dragging on and on and on. And I think that especially people in tourism felt that if They were ever going to get back to normal. They had to do these things. The recommendations now I've always said that if you really smart and you strategize there are so many great state parks that are, in many cases very close to national parks. That could give you a great experience as well. And not as crowded. Yes, For sure, although some of them are yes, but it's impossible to get a campground for any time the rest of this year at a California Beach State Park campground. It's absolutely impossible. Um And luckily I have reservations for Crystal Cove in Orange County in August that a friend was able to snag when the park's opened up again. But other than that, I just can't find anything along the California coast. And But, yeah, you're right. There's a lot of the others somewhere between eight and 10,000 state parks in the United States. Um some of them are really well known and still crowded like Niagara Falls, and some of them are just out the middle of nowhere that people don't know about. It's a great resource because they're often just down the road from where you live. And it's a lot easier to go and do day trips to these places, even if you're not staying overnight, and you can find a lot of state parks and states that are more off the beaten track. And like Montana, for instance, where I've camped at the state parks where you're going to be able to find something very easily, I think even even now we're.

Peter Greenberg United States Utah Southern California Niagara Falls California Orange County Big Bend National Geographics big Bend Capitol Reef last August Big Bend National Park Zion Peter late January Bozeman Texas southern Arizona August
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on daily podcast

daily podcast

07:56 min | 6 months ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on daily podcast

"Since the nineteen forties or vancouver has been here four by the national park service. The national park service is a government agency that cares for over. Four hundred special places said the night united states like the ever played yellowstone yosemite the monuments in washington. Dc view of our national treasures. Today you're by to take works tour of fourteen using the tactile maps and you will have the opportunity to learn more about specific buildings at prices at flipping. The photo arms sly shows four vancouver at sunset during one of our special events at the mrs campfires candlelight. In this photo we could see many different kinds of families walking along the pair settling to the buildings inside the fort. I am so grateful to portland. State university's visually impaired orientation inability of the washington state school for the blind. The american printing house for the belie and portland states universities digital cities testbed center for organizing the spirit. Important cloak land today and a canadian. Wonderful opportunity. allu- aw experiments or into from a distance. I hope you find our time together today. Interesting and perhaps most important for so with that like to have megan st. Take it away. let's get started. thank you everyone. Hello everyone and thank you again for joining us today. If you received a tactile learning kit for today's program please take out your tactile map. This is an eight and a half by eleven inch piece of paper with raised aligns in either braille or print depending on your home with your tactile map in hand please oriented the page so that the key with the four symbols and text is in the upper left corner the four tactile symbols. You will encounter on this map. Include at thick line representing the palisade or exterior wall of the fort. A- hashed or dotted line representing the walking pads solid rectangular shapes representing buildings in thin raised outlines the rectangles with light texture representing the garden outside of fort in building footprints. Inside of the fort. We will start our walking tour on the hash. Line walkway at the north. End of your map or the top of the page as you follow. This hashed line down toward the exterior wall of the fort. You will pass the garden to the east which is to the right of the pathway. Hey this is megan. Good morning everyone. As we do our walk in fort vancouver today we will also hear sounds that remind us of each of the spaces that we walk through. We are now walking past the guard. And on our way into or being cooper there are flowers blooming plants growing birds and bees buzzing and volunteers wearing blue shirts working in the eighteen hundreds. This garden was much larger than it is now and provided food for the people who lived inside the court nick. Slide should an image of our tocqueville map. These continue to follow the path down as it crosses the exterior wall. Enter for vancouver. Find the first building on the left as an aside. You are visiting the park in person you would be walking south down. The path at the contact station would be to. You're right however we are looking at this map facing north so i will be using left directions from that perspective here. Now passing the context station. This is a small one story. Wood frame building with a porch inside. Visitors can pay entrance fees resent their annual. National park passes and get information from national park ranger next. We will head to achieve factors house which is directly across the pathway from the contact station to get to the front entrance. Continue down the pathway from the entrance to the park when you find an intersecting pathway turn right and head east then. The south side of the building as we approached the chief backers house we would hear some nineteenth century use it. We are now at the chief. Factors has eight lead to story. White building with a large veranda two cannons. Sit in front of this large home to enter. We will go up one of two carbs air cases as we crossed the noranda to the front door. We will see and smell great binds that grow across the front of this bill ling in the spring and summer inside a chief actors house. There is a central mess fall. Where the officers of the hudson's bay company will eat at a long table. Set or sixteen house has two wings each with a parlor in bedrooms here the Chief factor and chief trader. The with their families has also has an office and a separate dining room for women for trade posts in the nineteenth century. The wives and children of the hudson's bay company officers eat separately next. We will head to the kitchen. Which is a building attached to the chief factors house just to the north or above it on the map to enter the kitchen. We will continue east along path in front of the chief. Doctors house turn left at the next intersecting. Pathway and head north kitchen will be on your left and in the kitchen. We won't hear the crackling.

washington Today national park service nineteenth century nineteen forties one story portland eight and a half today fourteen two cannons two carbs eleven inch piece of paper each two wings eight lead one Four hundred special places four symbols tocqueville
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Hilary bird joins us he has his eye on travel at all times is it the CVS is also here with the WGN radio can hear I'm here on Saturday afternoons and it is a it is always a pleasure always honored to have you and you make my job easier when you're on and and it's a Friday Peter I know I'm I'm ruining your Friday but you're making mine zero anytime yeah I appreciate that okay let it so yesterday we talked to a guy who is an RV salesman about R. V. sales and rentals yeah there of the day they're just they're they're flying off the lots right now in in there and I learned things I did not know about how many different types of our visa really are and and you know what to do you can get you can actually rent an RV where you where you're at you dragging your toilet and your bad behind you for like it not not a whole lot of money I mean it's not that crazy when you consider what you have to be paying for a hotel and all the rest of that but is it is that a good if if one were to do that one want to go on the road in their own vehicle even in their own car whatever it is you know sleep is sleep in their SUV what is a good mid western set of trips do you think well it's not just a question of destination it's a question of capacity because you're right RV sales an RV rentals are spiking the manufacturers are working almost twenty four hour shifts to make new ones so that's the good news for them and it's an opportunity for us to get out of town with our self contained quarantine mobile but the capacity issue is we're gonna park it on the campgrounds going to be overcrowded answers yes our national parks and state parks in the overcrowded the answer is yes so you're gonna have to plan very carefully maybe not Yellowstone Yosemite but remember they're considered fifty more national parks you can visit where they might not have as crowded as a response to the Arby's so you can do that within a four mile radius of Chicago would be pretty pretty good option for you all because the such as the national parks it's the state parks as well yeah and it is we talked about here I mean there's there are some beautiful beautiful beautiful areas in Wisconsin and here start rocking illinois' beautiful Michigan is beautiful the further north you get a couple of years ago it doesn't have a whole upper peninsula Michigan in northern Wisconsin phenomenal Madison Wisconsin incredible because you're surrounded by four lakes I mean great opportunities yeah you went there didn't you and then I learned about him yes you did I'm a proud better okay I just can't believe that you remember any of it that's the funny thing about it because I mean I know who went to Wisconsin were like I know I graduate I know I was there I got the diploma I just have no recollection all right let's at the end I and I'm I just want to mention this because they they talk about this a couple years ago and I did it and it was really amazing trip was to drive around Lake Michigan go up through Wisconsin and just sort of trick you into those communities try to stay as close to the lake as you can and then you go up into the upper peninsula of Michigan which is really I mean it is on Lake Michigan looks like a calm almost you know serene just body of we just flat body of water up there because it is what it is can be yeah yeah look the opportunities there are great it's been a secret of the of the U. people took a long time but that's another because you're giving the opportunity to to take those shots in and explore your options yeah know for sure all right the sale was mother things of people are doing we we always talk about the airlines and every week there's another story about something that is happening in that it put out its new boarding rules this week and basically it's just it's an honor system questionnaires sent yeah it's a little bit more Seattle been affected well we're talking about though the show tomorrow as a matter of fact with the new United rule is that before you're allowed to board the plane would be your starting on on their app or online or the kiosk at the airport you're gonna be asked to answer some of the self certification questionnaire that you haven't been experiencing or displaying any covert nineteen symptoms in the past fourteen days temperature coughing muscle pains chills etcetera and what I find interesting about that the question of the rescuers you also the surprise you have not been denied boarding by any other airline in the last fourteen days but you're right it's the honor system in the military wanted doing they're doing a bundle in conjunction with the Cleveland Clinic so I'm sure the intention is there but let us not kid ourselves there are lawyers involved in this they're worried about their liability they don't want to be sued saying that they feel that they boarded somebody that they either didn't know their condition or didn't ask so you know that there's a legal implication there as well okay why are they asking of the question about the previous airline doing are they checking on you to find out can they see that on their system all they care to so it's still be our system it's it's a piece of paper that later on sign a piece of paper to electronic which they can then retrieve later on if in fact this ends up in litigation somewhere now Sir okay all right so that way that that's it basically does make any of the other password reset your let me give you an aviation term see YA that's a bit that's an airport terminal that Cleveland road yeah yeah yeah all right let's we'll get to the phone calls here through into ninety one seventy two hundred Peter Rehberg always here to answer questions about what you should do for your if you get a travel issue you've got a ticket you can't you don't know how.

Hilary bird WGN
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on KGO 810

"Good morning from our whole crew here K. joy timbre watching impeachment proceedings on the hill will continue to keep you updated of course the house approved those impeachment articles the Senate night I I think that one of the things that's happened it's unfortunate casualty of the impeachment conversation is a lot of other stuff that's going on gets crowded out of the news cycle and and I think as you are aware if you listen to show for any length of time one of the great treasures of this country is our our expansive national park system and some of the great pristine wilderness land and other land that is a thing both a thing of beauty and a thing to be respected and treasured and under a lot of different ministrations things have happened with the national parks in other words there's been a different philosophy is how to handle them generally got democratic administrations expand them and G. O. P. changes some of the stuff that's going on inside them but never has there been a wrecking ball taken to the national park system the way there is under this administration and and again trump peas and everyone it doesn't really matter where you stood on the political spectrum I'd love to you I'd love for you to just hear a few of the facts as laid out by Jonathan B. Jarvis he was the eighteenth the rector of the National Park Service and he joins us now on KGO hi John thank you for joining us good morning mark great to be here it is a it's a real to me urgent issue that confronts us and I wonder and you wrote a terrific piece and out I posted it once on my Twitter feed all post again and maybe we'll try to get up on the KGO side as well that in essence summarizes some of what I just said which is that the National Park Service has you know as the Grand Canyon Yellowstone statue of liberty minutes a lot of things that you don't even think of that are under the National Park Service you've indoor even as of someone who's been so after the parks for for so long all these different administrations but never has there been something under way of the sort that we're seeing now exactly in like forty years with the National Park Service obviously served under both democratic and Republican administrations different secretaries in as you said they have different priorities but I take this particular administration really is planning and executing and undermining of this extraordinary institution that is beloved by most Americans that's the other thing he has tremendous public support and that's almost part of the strategy to write because this institution has such great public support it almost needs to be dismantled in this formative way in the in in a way that you know has a almost a and I don't mean to ascribe a too many sort of dastardly motives but I I you know I'm for preserving this great institution they started to move key management figures out of their positions they started to make it almost impossible for the agency to continue the way it had absolutely there is no one laughed at the top of the organization we still do not have a director of the National Park Service that position has remained vacant since I retired in two thousand seventeen and then all of the senior positions regional directors senior executive superintendents like Yellowstone Yosemite have all been forcibly moved and most of them many of them have retired because they just did not want to be moved to another location where they really would not be attractive and so result is you have very very few left at the senior level within the National Park Service of people that have any type of long term experience of stewardship of our our nation's absolutely must greatest license did everybody here were Jonathan Jarvis your said it's so key it's been a real key part of this administration's tactic and that is to move people to send them quote to the field to be closer to the people they serve or whatever the reason is we saw it with a whole team of scientists that they want to get rid of who were in Washington and what happens is people you know those are real live people have real so that the kids in school and all the rest and they and they can't make those moves so they end up doing what resigning and then those positions are never filled again exactly they just leave those positions vacant and then the responsibilities for those jobs those decisions fall to the political that came in with the trump administration will they make decisions that are not to benefit the parts but basically to undermine the so let's talk about what's actually happening these park so you know they waive environmental laws and they they move the bulldozers and and they began to essentially export a lot of these national parks areas for a mineral exploitation and for oil extraction fossil fuel extraction is that essentially what's happening or a overall well I would say that the hoax themselves have not been opened up yet hi to any type of that sort of extractive exploration they would have to get some pretty significant changes to the laws in order to pull that off without almost immediately running into an injunction in the courts what is happening is immediately adjacent to the parks right outside park boundaries there is development going wall and in terms of these kinds of extraction mining activities where in the past the park service would have been at the table negotiating perhaps offers so far distance or a different way that this would be done so that didn't impact the reverse or by the grizzly bears or the other wildlife to the part where the visitor experience but the park superintendents have been told that they can't talk about these issues they can't talk to the press issued us with basically a muzzle memo where they have to get permission before they can speak about any of this and so this is just the start I don't I think they're smart enough not to try to just sort of completely you know open up the parks your tractor news they would probably like to do that but they they can't because that there's too much public support so they're going about it in a much more underhanded way that was the point of my article is that all of these actions that you see or not sort of random they are really a part of our overall efforts Jonathan Jarvis the eighteenth director the National Park Service is now retired and this article religious does talk about you know drilling mining and the exploitation of of of public lands for the benefit of industry we've seen a lot of this play out across the other areas as well during his administration but out you know just even when it comes to the suppression of of climate science you know out of our own government I'm talking out of out of No Way Out of the National Weather Service out you know out of the National Science Foundation etcetera up so the idea and then is to slowly if you will disconnect this national park service from the the public grid in terms of what's going on there that is to say the changes you're saying are subtle enough that many visitors to national parks may not even notice them yeah exactly I mean I think another example is each year it has the president has proposed his budget to the Congress he has proposed Coney and cuts to the park service's budget this year alone it requesting of five hundred million dollar cut to the parks but you know fortunately the house of representatives has not followed that direction and has actually maintain the work is not increased the park service's budget but it's just a good example of what they would really like to do they've also been preventing the park service from hiring and so we are now at we at the park service is now at the lowest staffing levels that they've been in decades and and it's coming at the same time when park visitation is is peaking we we had over three hundred twenty million visitors last year coming to the national parks of the person being overwhelmed by visitors while the staffing is going in the opposite direction the park service ability to respond to be there to help provide a great experiences to do certain rescued a point fire all the things that the park service does is being reduced by this administration you know it's a bizarre fact but very early on I mean in the first day of the trump presidency there was a national parks service controversy and you may remember what it was it was about the size of the inaugural crowd and the National Park Service you don't just put out I guess there's a what is it is a departure that puts out the other okay if you will official estimate as to how many people attend an event if it's on national park grounds is that how that works yeah so the the the national mall is managed and operated by the National Park Service so that is the ground where people come and stand for a presidential inauguration our service is essentially the host of the public and so we you know we provide security we provide toilets crowd control information so the public can go to an alteration safely and we also do crowd estimates and photography you know each time in a very non partisan way it's just the just the facts and the facts word that the crowd was smaller than wow that was there for president Obama just just a matter of fact but I don't think the adviser for the National Park Service said it was smaller van Obama's they just posted the number of people there it was the president said look look look that's a smaller credit bomb had yet yet you're correct and that they did not go over well no exactly put it put the National Park Service in this weird place right away I guess is my point anyway then you add into the mix Ryan's inky who was the interior secretary and he had to of resigned because of all these issues involving ethics but he tried to double the entrance fees into the park good night yes he did he could cause that so for the iconic parks the Yellowstone Grand Canyon Yosemite that would like to be almost a hundred percent increase sort of a peak pricing concept with all the parts in it and what was interesting about that and I have this from talking to my former colleagues is that he could no consultation with the National Park Service before rolling this idea out which was the which was hello he received that we could have told him that I mean that in a way that's exactly the point is that the career of employees of the National Park Service are there to help the political leadership understand what you know what it means to manage the National Park Service and and he rolled this one al that of course it was a map with a great deal of opposition by the American people are and your card services.

Senate
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:29 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon Boris Johnsons conservatives resoundingly won this week's British elections they are bound to complete Britain's withdrawal from the European Union and soon but a lot of Britain's weren't delighted by the display of democracy working Jenny Russell is a British political columnist and joins us now from London thanks very much for being with us good to be with these cuts you call this the dejection election why because everyone is totally fed up with politics of this in Britain it's three and a half years since the referendum the country split more less fifty fifty on whether to need the European Union and it's turned out to be such a complicated business nobody understands the details of it any longer people just wanted this problem to be fixed order the country's gonna totally divided on what they want from it under there was faced with two candidates who are the most unappealing options in a generation facing the country you had to underlying bullying blustering chanced on one side the spores Johnson on the other side you have Jeremy Corbyn his wooden insight to mind yes and was promising people keep us a kind of socialist paradise that put some might be accomplished with only a few tax rises and people frankly how did very little faith in either of them but they liked Boris Johnson slightly more because he promised an end to this black cloud of bricks that that's been hanging over people some wooden street as let me ask this from the distance of across the Atlantic with some admiration but how did this nation so admired for its parliamentary democracy wind up with what so many Britains considered to be dispiriting choices it's a very interesting question and I think they don't service that written like America has been faced with huge questions about how do we all live our lives how do you grow the economy and what should our future beyond to review like having immigration and how much is our culture being disrupted really deep questions and also a lot of people in this country are living stones beat out see for using for the past ten years of since financial crash everyone's looking for an answer to how do they make their lives better and win brexit came along as a suggestion you shall we just leave the European Union hops all our problems lie with the fact that we are lights here host the country believe that under British politics has been absolutely river because there isn't a good answer to this question so that two prime ministers before all this one have been defeated by the issue of brexit they couldn't deliver it they couldn't deliver what the nation wanted so we lost first prime is to convert and then prime minister may and all kinds of good people have to start to the field because the problems seem to huge and the electorate wants influences so there's a selection main Britain's great national drama is over or is it just starting I mean might Great Britain wind up being smaller Britain I'm afraid the big national drum is turning into a big national disaster it's highly probable that will end up with shrunken person we've turned out not to be in place and that's in some sort of a sort of cautious moderate on campus who was then we've turned out to be as revenue and angry with one another and as confused and with as much a tendency to blame everybody else in the country as everybody else it's highly probable that in a few years time Northern Ireland could decides to join with the rest of Ireland because they're already being to fight it from you the rest United Kingdom by the decisions taken every exit on the Scott swear the scopes national part you just won a huge sweeping victory across Scotland already saying they want to referendum because they would like to leave the rest the United Kingdom and join the European Union independently server shrunken driven nation this morning Scott it's not cherry Jenny Russell right for the times of London also contributes to The New York Times thanks very much for being with us thank you very much national parks called one of America's best ideas but it's been a long time since there's been a new Yellowstone Yosemite and that got one Silicon Valley business veteran on a mission he's trying to build a new kind of national park in Montana's Great Plains he wants it to be free to the public and funded by some of the richest people on earth but as Nate Hajji of member station K. you we are reports there's some opposition to the American prairie richer the northern Great Plains are green from recent thunderstorm dozens of big black house are lining up near electric fence on the C. lazy J. ranch rates are Connie French is trying to help her animals cross into a new pastor go pull that orange polls French reminds me of someone's artsy garden loving grandmother curly gray hair a big bright sun hat in the deeply tanned face of a person who spends every day outdoors as she's moving the cattle something suddenly makes I just heard it over here oiled rattle snakes yeah definitely gives you a great rattle snakes biting black flies the hordes of mosquitoes that hatch every summer the prairies of northeastern Montana can be downright nasty to live in the French love the challenge it's a self sufficiency maybe feeling like I can handle whatever gets thrown at me everything she says except for a project it'll turn this corner of cattle country into a three point two million acre wildlife sanctuary for them to be successful in their goals we can't be here and that's not okay with us it's called American prairie reserve its organizers are purchasing ranches facing up the cattle and replacing them with wild bison those private lands and then stitched together with vast tracts of neighboring federally owned lands the goal is to create one giant rewilding prairie John Garrity is the excel con Valley entrepreneur who founded this project eighteen years ago when it's complete of the roughly a million acres larger than Yellowstone four times the size of your seventy national park about five thousand square miles which increased about Africa searing Getty Garrity is standing in some of these reserved on lance he says all this will eventually be part of the largest wildlife sanctuary in the lower forty eight a place where all the animals that used to live in the Great Plains before Rangers arrived could roam once again wolves grizzly bears and thousands of genetically pure bison he points to an empty valley cut through by the wide muddy Missouri River over here would be some elk over here would be bison the law on the river banks would be mama grizzly there was two or three little cubs walk along in the mud there so far donors have helped purchase nearly thirty branches but they need at least another fifty Gerrity understands this idea is a popular with locals folks not gonna go to town and with a megaphone walk down the street and say oh great we are it's a good ways to be drummed out of the village but is geared he sees it this is one of the last intact grassland ecosystems in the world and he wants to fully restore it before it disappears to work on something pour your heart into it and arrange it like a giant work of art and the public by and large would appreciate and realize it would last far far beyond my lifetime they just seem like a dream come true securities dream is an affront to many of the ranchers that live out here driving around you see signs everywhere saying save the cowboys stop the American per reserve there are many arguments against the project some bordering on the crazy like this is a cunning plot by the United Nations to clear everyone from the Great Plains but the most common argument boils down to this god gave people of this land so we can be worked so we can produce food or fuel from rancher Connie French is rooted in this Christian notion of stewarding the land and she will never sell hers to the reserve we are the best hope to keep this land here I I really feel like we like ranchers these land stewards are the best option she knows local ranchers efforts have even been recognized by national conservation groups but as land prices get more expensive and ranchers struggle to find family members to take over their spreads when they die their control over northeastern Montana is weakening and that's a big reason why American prairie is here there's a lot of land for sale and is the nation ships away from its ranching and farming routes while places like northeastern Montana are becoming destination spots for hunters hikers and campers but French says there's a big difference so then you're a tourist your visitor you're an observer when you actually live there you are involved in the day to day life of not just you your animals but the land around you still some locals like American prairies plans to build a massive wildlife reserve here they say it'll help diversify the economy and give north eastern Montana a booster shot of tourism and then there are the tribes the new code up in the army they are the people who lived on this land before the ranchers arrived at a pow wow in the nearby fort.

Britain European Union NPR Scott Simon Boris Johnsons
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Back showing from my little so sure which term stream and then moved to a linear subject breaking of conservation fund and I say great conservation funding because I'm out in recent weeks indicate that for those of us who love the outdoors and love constipation we are going the caught my attention good night conservation one was four percent of the federal budget in nineteen eighty two today is less than one percent of the federal budget thank you Jay the federal budget's gone honest with us wow you with money was also Russian thirty five billion dollars is the number this time out I don't actually think that's right there are studies that we are not seeing that will dictate the actual funding for conservation is more in the early twenty two to twenty four billion with the federal government providing the overwhelming majority of this was staged providing about two three billion on the private sector providing about a billion concert so this is not right usually less than one percent of today's federal budget which is four percent so listen let to frankly a significant change in the way we are able to maintain manage choir and work with the private sector on on conservation interests and while quite simply no other reason all we know we've got a multi billion dollar maintenance backlogs in a national park hello if you've been to our national parks recently Yellowstone Yosemite they're gorgeous the Saudis are not not equal majesty of the place they are there to protect when we created the Yellowstone lodging well somebody he Catherine likable spokeswoman we did sell with like towards providing the American public not only with an incredible experience international parks but also with the experience hospitality and where you could enjoy staying in our national parks the infrastructure from roads facilities lodges offenses everything is in is in decline is because we do not have the money to maintain it through government today work at the same percentage of the federal budget four percent for conservation we were by the numbers that I trust in the scene we would be somewhere in the neighborhood of eighty billion dollars a year as opposed to two to twenty four billion a year at sixty billion dollars a year is is real money and I happen to believe that the best money some of the best money spent on the federal budget is spent on conservation and I'm sure many that doesn't mean it's perfect it doesn't mean this waste there's always ways from come to our state or federal government is just part of the animal and that's not picking on them that's just it's just the way it is there is once what the billion dollars would annualized basis think what that would have met in with me for national force our national parks or beaches all about the recreation we don't have it instead we're going the other way so what is happening is a summation leaders I don't consider myself a conservation leader but a group individuals have been getting together to try to address what are we gonna do about this and they have come up with if you considered on a scale of what I'm talking about eight please sit in a room but it's meaningful they've come up with the notion that we need to have about one point three billion dollars more annually of funding for conservation to begin to address the backlog of maintenance but more than maintenance there's a huge element of management our national parks and national force our BLM lands are all woefully under managed not only over used their underpants so this consortium of transportation industry interests and now legislators looking at how could we possibly get one point three billion dollars a year more conservation than we have now and that would be about a five percent increase over what we're receiving now so it is on me if you will it's on people's minds that we have a we have a serious problem and for those of you who use our state parks our national parks national force you your your keenly aware that things are not being managed to their maximum ability nor are they being maintained another component of this of course is that most of lands in America are privately owned and a lot of land owners want to do good things for wildlife they don't have the expertise years ago the Illinois department of conservation as it was known that have super private lands individuals who would come to your property talk to you about what you could do and I remember my case seeing a letter from the department of conservation is written my father back in the nineteen fifties on our farm in northern Illinois which small farm which was a good description of how you could manage forty acres just forty acres professionals and it was a detailed long letter and referred to all kinds of journals and nineteen fifties in individual came and spent the equivalent of several days with my father designing a plan for presence on forty acres think about that today would never happen you could have four thousand acres and good luck there couple people in the state of Illinois and Jerry Musser is at the very top of this has been that that the department now natural resources a long time coming through that with you this used to be common place used to be able to call the partner natural resources and say I need some help management private lands and you have a private lands man to that's not gonna happen again we don't have the money in the federal level we did we did a great deal more of that than we than we do now to the park to natural resources conservation service is still there but it's a shell of what it wants so private land owners who want to manage wildlife after now employ private companies nothing wrong with that private companies to come and tell them how to manage wildlife into the management for the there's absolutely nothing wrong with that what it shows is that our tax dollars which only increased are not providing the services for conservation that they once did the state almost all of them back on their ability to work with private landowners and and and the manager land so the alternative is you hire private company that's great except now you're paying twice you pay your taxes to the parkland natural resources in the state of Illinois in Houston lance manager now you pay your taxes the state only okay services that you have to go out and hire a company to do the work that you already paid for for your taxes so I think what we're facing a dilemma on and we're facing really across the country is a change and that's saying it's bad I'm just saying that wildlife management is headed in the direction of being privatized which is an absolute answer to the people at state from the federal government but it's currying because they no longer are doing the job that they once did so if you think about that number I mentioned a few minutes four percent of the federal budget in nineteen eighty one to conservation and Chris less than one percent of today on equal basis today we're getting about twenty two to twenty four million billion dollars conservation spending much of that to the department of agriculture in nineteen eighty two had we had the same numbers that would be in today we still have four percent of the federal budget that number would be over eighty billion dollars we are getting shortchanged folks the need to pay all kinds of social costs and and legacy costs have eaten in by seventy five percent of the funding it once went to conservation to protect our natural resources it's a bad situation it's going to get worse and what's going to be the result is the increase decrease privatization of management an increase in the crease in ability to properly manage our state and federal lands and in Illinois if you're heading out to all the claims this fall behind you're gonna notice if you've been going for many years I have they just despite the best efforts of the people who are actually on that land doing the best job they care they don't have the resources we don't have the equipment that they once did our public lands in Illinois are are poorly maintained at best so it's not a commentary on only it's happening across the country even becoming states out west they are also finding that their revenues are being compromised because of funds being siphoned off for her legacy costs Wesley on that subject watch the decline of Goodman Robertson sales revenues from the sale of firearms it continues to go on note the Obama administration is not a political statement but now that the Obama administration is now three years the gun sales in America have declined dramatically and the result is less revenue for crystallography so that's about it on the great outdoor show this morning I hope you enjoy it in the last thirty seconds you shall be glad you were not in rock Laker Bismarck North Dakota Winnipeg anywhere along the northern line this.

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Detour there. We hear a lot about overcrowding in some park, Zion Yellowstone Yosemite. Did you did you run into that? And do you think that is a genuine problem that, that some of our parks are facing right now? Yeah, I mean, sort of one of the, the side benefits of doing ally. Speaking churches was that on my Sundays, I was often fundraising on Saturdays. I was driving there. So I really grew to appreciate visiting the parks on Monday through Friday, when it was a lot less crowded, but even on those days like I was at Yellowstone in July. And I had planned a number of days there halfway through I said, I can't take this anymore. Like it's just so crowded is your spend so much time to sing in your car trying to get places waiting for parking at sort of ruins the experience and I had been Yellowstone many years ago during may, and that was so much better. Just because the traffic is so nuts that it really. Detriment to the experience. So I think one of the things we're struggling with now is, we have a park service in a park foundation that is promoting visiting these sites rightly, so but we aren't keeping pace with infrastructure that it takes to manage this increase number visitors and especially in the popular parks, the ones that are very well known very well marketed, it really shows. So the maintenance backlog that we've, we've heard about we've talked about a bit on, on this podcast from what you've seen it's real and and urgently in, in some places. Well, yeah. I mean one thing I have to say is that the park service, doesn't incredibly good job of working with what they have as general visitor. There were a lot of things that I didn't notice or they did a good job of hiding or or masking as far as maintenance issues go because, in general, the majority of my experiences parks, I never had to say, like, oh, gosh, I wish I could do this, but it's broken. They don't have the money to fix it. So I give them a lot of credit for, for making do with what they have. But yeah, that being said there are places that really need work done to make them capable of handling the amount of visitors that get. I assume over the course of these three years, you spoke to dozens or hundreds of Park, Rangers and park service, employees. Do you think there's a message that you have learned from them that if given the opportunity you would pass along to the top leadership at the park service, or at the interior department in DC? For the department of the interior in the park service. I would just remind them. How fortunate they are to have a staff that is so passionate about the mission that they are serving. I recently got to speaking engagement with employees of the park service, who mentioned that during a recent survey of all the government departments. The park service had the highest score as far as a staff leaving in the mission of their department and that was very evident anecdotally in my personal experiences. These are people who often work service jobs during the off season, just so they can keep having seasonal jobs, because they haven't been able to become full-time. They are people who are highly highly educated, who were jobs that people might say are beneath their education, but they just love their job. They love their sites so much. So I would remind the, the department heads how lucky they are to have a staff at his so committed to the goal. Of their department and to those higher up those in congress, I would ask that they go to our park service sites because when most frustrating things is to go to historic sites in see the United States make a mistake. Four hundred years ago, make it somewhere else three hundred years ago. Another place, two hundred another place. A hundred still today in realize we haven't really learned from our history that were preserving so I sort of wish I could make congress go to a lot of these places in hopefully it would impact the way they legislate. At a great takeaway. You mentioned dinosaur national monument as, as a big surprise any other sites, you visited that you think needed promotions. The end deserve national park status. Well as far as needing promotion. I really can't speak highly enough about the Dakotas people laugh. When I talk about how much I enjoyed them even I talked about how much I like Theodore Roosevelt, national park so much that the superintendent emailed me at one point and said, I just can't believe how much you enjoyed it and how much you keep talking about it. Because North Dakota is so unvisited that their tourism board has been called the save the best for last club. Where if it's your last state visited, they give you a pain in t shirt certificate so many people just put it off. And yet, both badlands national park in theater Roosevelt, national park where some of the most spectacular experiences head in the park service of the most unique places. I saw that it's such a shame that people see that Kotas may think it's only boring prairie. That's definitely one recommendation, give those are Kaplan capital parks, however, some of my other favorite sites. Don't have that. Nation would include white sands, national monument, absolutely incredible place. Wonderful experiences, there Buckeye reef national monument in Saint Croix. Never lens was spectacular spurious, and there's some funny sites, kind of like I went to organ pipe cactus national monument. And thought it was way, better than Suara national park. And I think about all the people that go to Celaya out because it's one of the big sixty one and overlook, Oregon pike cactus because it's a national monument. And think man, are they missing out? So there definitely were number of sites like that, where I think, may be politics was different policies were different sites that have certain status would have national park status to better reflect the experience have there. You mentioned getting E mail from the, the superintendent at at teddy Roosevelt, any other favorite people, you met along the way, I mean, you must run into all sorts of characters hitting four hundred nineteen national park sites. Yeah. Well there too that. I think one of them was a ranger cat. My national park, and he reached out when I was planning my Lasca portion and he's opening gay as well. And he said, he'd, I really appreciate the visibility you're helping bring to us, especially those less than work here. I know cat is really hard and expensive. So if you need a place to stay like you can you can stay at my place in the park, and so that was really cool, just to get to know him really well for few days in this really fascinating ark. And then a few months after I was there. He got reassigned to Hawaii volcanoes and moves at the end of December, just as the shutdown happened. And so now knowing him on a personal level. I got to see the real life impact of the. Shutdown had because he had a new apartment was the deposit, just shipped all stuff. And he's freaking out in Hawaii, Nola Hawaii, so from one of the most expensive parts of our countries to another most expensive, and he went weeks without a paycheck. And so I was heartbroken for him, but also sort of honored to get this window into the reality of Park Rangers because even with these struggles are still so passionate and that brings me to another great experience. I was in Everglades national park and doing a slew slog, which is where you're hiking in, in muddy waters up to your knees could have pythons alligators in them and the Rangers explaining this in our group has all scared, and she said, well, you don't have to you don't gotta worry about nothing as I got the Lord, I got this stick. And this ranger had described herself as a hillbilly, Alabama, who served in the military to protect America while wearing green and she finished. And she wanted to protect America's nature now while wearing green, and I ended up running into her, again, in dinosaur national monument. And then again in Holly, national park because she worked seasonally and it was fun to see the second time to catch up. And then the third time to get to get an update from her on a really magical experience. I had joined this journey where a wild Canadian goose follow my rafting groups before. And so when I saw her again, I got to say what happened to the goose because she was working there with so very fun connections? That sort of spread the entire length of. So your identity covers a whole lot of ground obviously outdoor enthusiasts a gay man. A working preacher, a classically trained counter tenor. How do you balance all of that on a trip this big when everything you do is being shared with the world real time? How do you find the real mica in all of that mix? Yeah, I sort of joke that if a gay Christian male soprano from the flat state in America can devote three years of his life to visiting the national parks. Don't tell me that there is an outdoorsy type, and that you're not part of that because I sort of go against very many of the prototypes of what you'd expect. It's been a fascinating journey, not just as physical wind, but to start this trip sort of thinking I had to hide who I was for it to be successful. And then in the end finding that it's only by embracing all of those unique traits about myself that this journey, eventually survived in came to completion. So I'm positive that there were opportunities sponsors, that would have loved to work with me that did not because one or some of my densities are all were just to offensive or too risky. In fact, one of them told me in writing that they were dropping me suddenly because I was doing too much LGBT. Owlry. So, yeah, it's been hard to realize that's a reality. But also really, heartwarming to wake up every day in say even if it's Justice three year trip, I figured out a way to do something that many people said it was impossible, and for most of the journey beat entirely true to myself, and wake up every day and say, this might be harder than I thought it might be a reference than I thought it might be way more difficult to complete than I thought. But at least every day that I wake up, I know that undoing something that I feel like is making the world better place and helping others. And if sharing those voluble parts of myself is able to help others than it's entirely worth it. So your trip is obviously, it's a once in a lifetime kind of dream that I, I suspect everyone listen to this podcast is thinking, wow. Wish wish I could do that. You're now what thirty three thirty four years old. You have a lifetime ahead of you having done a once in lifetime trip. So, so what's next for you? Yeah. As you said, this is sort of thing, so many people want to do, and having done it, at least in the way that I did it. I don't do what I did if you argon gonna. Visit all the parks figure out how to have your funding ahead of time or get on Netflix show and be super famous that you can get sponsors easily because making this, my job both in fundraising and putting out a product from experience made it a lot less personally fulfilling..

dinosaur national monument Rangers badlands national park Suara national park Everglades national park Theodore Roosevelt America Park Rangers superintendent Zion Yellowstone Yosemite congress Yellowstone Hawaii Kaplan capital parks Netflix government North Dakota United States Celaya
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"That is what Mike Mayer did an epic three year journey to not just every national park, but all four hundred and nineteen sites. Run by the National Park Service at the individual Micheals trip came to an end on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, surrounded by friends and family and fans who followed his journey on Instagram and Facebook mica joins us on the line from where are you now have been the appaluse AM? That's correct. I are you adjusting to, to life back in the real world? It is so much harder than I thought I, I realized it took me about two weeks to verbalize sort of feeling I was having. But I realized that for three years, I woke up every day and I knew what my short term goal was that day. What a needed to accomplish in how fit into three. Three year goal and my entire life. And now I wake up not in a parking lot not innovation in with sort of this less clear sense of urgency everyday, and my brain doesn't know how to handle it. So take us back three years. This started out as a tribute to your late father, but it turned into a whole lot more than that. Yeah. You know, my dad loves road trips in that was one of the ways that we bonded before he passed. And when I was nineteen he died from his office cancer. So I never got to take the road trips with him during college and beyond that I expected I would have done one road trip every year since he passed his way to keep that connection alive along the way realized that most of my peers seem to think they were guaranteed to make eighty since my dad passed away, fifty eight I had learned that, that's not the case hardway and wanted to do something crazy, when I turned thirty that would hopefully grab their attention, share this message and I figured what more relatable way to reach the entire world than our National Park Service. So walk us through the logistics you come up with this crazy idea. But how do you actually turn that into a game plan for a seventy five? Thousand mile road dream over however many years. Yes, so I spent I spent my twenty saving up money to, to launch this project ended age twenty eight realized it was time to start planning earnest. So really spent a solid two years, doing everything from research on whether patterns who best routes to most efficient ways to reach these sites to win. Each park was opened in summer, only open seasonally, who potential sponsors. I could reach out to who the most practical way to live on the road axes sites talking to experts getting help rafting schedule sort of doing everything. I could head of time who be best prepared for launch day when that came on April twenty ninth two thousand sixteen. And then, of course, on top of all those miles, you can't drive to Hawaii, or American Samoa or Guam, or Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands. You've got some some planes and boats to try and both factor in and fund as part of this. I couldn't have been a cheap endeavor. Right. And that was the scariest thing was I began this journey with what park experts told me was only a fish of the amount of money of what it would take to do this in. So I sort of got in that driver seat. And drove away on, on a big leap of faith that somehow in the following three years, I could figure out a way to make this sustainable incomplete. It. So you had funding and then part of this, you were you were preaching in passing the hat along the way. What point did you realize that was going to be part of, of this trip for you? Yeah, but when I planned it, I sort of pollyannaish looked around at the world of social media in saw millennials funding. Epic travels by getting sponsors. And I thought well just do that. And learn really quickly, that if you don't have over one hundred thousand followers, nobody really cares. And particularly in the outdoors industry, there were no openly t people that had any sponsorships the recreation industry had never had a pride month add, so I sort of knew going in that I would have to fight this uphill battle of not fitting that outdoorsy image and also not having huge social following that companies would require until I figured I would crowd fund this journey, and there was a total failure at first, I would do. Media sharing this journey. And I just got nasty emails from people who called me trust fund kid, which obviously didn't read the article 'cause they would know that passers don't have trust funds. But everyone was just really negative. And I found that unless unless I had the chance to talk to people on explain the real reason why was doing this trip. It wasn't just a vacation as they assumed but the meanings behind it, once they knew that they were really excited to help. And so it took me about nine months to figure out how to do that. But I began using my backgrounds of professional singer at spent over a decade, senior professionally, including our National Cathedral, and started out, just singing for my supper and would pass out the hat, and then churches started asking me to preach, the sermon and figure out a way to, to tie the story of this journey into a message that, that spoke to the people there and hear him three years later. So on top of all that you're obviously than visit. The parks themselves how much time you able to spend in each Parker. Or did you feel like you had to, you know show up get the visitor center, take a selfie and hit the road again? Yeah. That's another thing is a lot of people assume that I was sort of Chevy, chasing my way in touching the parks, leaving that they thought I was just doing it to set a record which records were happy coincidence, that happened from its initial goal. So I was really fortunate in that when I was planning this journey just by pure coincidence, about five miles east of me lived one of the three or so dozen people who at that point had visited all the parts and so one night, he came over for dinner, and I got out my spreadsheet, I went through every single site and said, if you go back here, what would be the ideal amount of time, you would spend and those days in the data that I used to come up with this three route. So really the intention in the actual experience was to spend the ideal amount of time. That each site suggests whether that's a historic site that you can do everything in a few hours or a place like the Grand Canyon, where you really wanna spend a week rafting down the middle. I made sure that that's what I did not goats. So this is left, you then with a very unique appreciation of the park service that, as you mentioned, only a few dozen people in the entire world might have. So I want to pick your brain here a little bit of a speed round asking you to pick a few of your favorites. But with kind of specific questions, what do you think is the most under appreciated national park? I would say, our national lake shores. There are three of them now that Indiana dunes became a capital in capital park. And I'm shocked by how many people don't know about them, despite their incredible beauty? Among the A-List, the ticket national parks, which one is absolutely every bit as good as advertised. Oh my gosh. I, I stood a glacier point, and watch sunset over half dome in Yosemite and was just blown away. And I know it's sort of the opposite of some of the things I said on this journey that I was trying to share about the park sites. You haven't heard of, but that's one that you have heard of that is very well visited that absolutely delivers what is the one park that everyone needs to see before they die. That's tough. I mean, what I learned about the park services that there are so many sites that can be special to people with specific interests of people who love certain president, or like Springfield armory, that, that chronicles our nation's history of, of guns and warfare. And if that's your interests, like you're gonna love that place where than anything else. So I would say whatever site specific -ly speaks to you, as far as your, your personal interests for myself. I was really enchanted in blown away in ways. I never expected by dinosaur national. Yes. I've heard that for many people who've been don't realize that, that's one that I've heard a lot of folks suggested that absolutely deserves national park status. The locals don't like me. I've got an Email saying, stop telling everyone about our secret. What was the biggest surprise of park that you maybe went in with low expectations and came out blown away? I really had a blast at the, the site in Guam the war in the Pacific, national historical park, and the accompanying affiliated site onsite pan, which is the American memorial park. Both of them are, are technically just small parcels of land. But then they have pieces of the history of America's involvement World War Two all around the islands. So really to fully experience these parks stories, you have to explore both the entire island of Guam, and the entire island of pan. And that was just such a an incredible experience that looking at the names, designations, this historical park and memorial, park, you'd probably think it'd be like a statue in a building, but getting to fully experiences place means taking on the entire island culture. And it was really incredible. You mentioned Refn and the Colorado what was the biggest thrill on your trip? So I my family grew up pretty poor and never got to, like, I mean, even we go to arcades and it was like too much to two quarters that stuff. So it was always like the cheapest way of traveling possible. Nothing extra. And so getting to do a hot air balloon ride in South Dakota was like something I never imagined or getting to take a helicopter tour over badlands, national park or Hawaii volcanoes like these are experiences that I always looked at, at other families and saw that they could do, but assumed I would never get to do my life. So because of this journey in sort of, I would trade trade, a coverage on my blog and social media for some of these two or opportunities. Getting to do those extra special views of the parks, just blew my mind. Were there any parks that you end up ended up, hitting either in the wrong season or mother nature just didn't cooperate near? You're like I would come back to you again. If given the chance and take a do over. Yeah. One of the things I pride myself on. Is that sort of a lot of the hiccups, that I think a lot of people expected, what happened on this trip did not happen because I spent two years planning. So I really did my research to make sure that, that I could it be places. When the weather was Satistics most likely to be good. However, California roomy off because devils, postpone, national monument can only be reached basically in the li- like middle, July, August and early September. And you're only a few hundred miles away from death valley, national park which do not wanna be at during that time of year. So I actually had to fly from Alaska down to Yosemite devils post. File just so I could reach devils postponed, national monument during that temperate, I am of year because the rest of California I did in the spring earlier that year. Yeah. It's a good, detour there. We hear a lot about overcrowding in some park, Zion Yellowstone Yosemite. Did you did you run into that? And do you think that is a genuine problem that, that some of our parks are facing right now? Yeah, I mean, sort of one of the, the side benefits of doing ally. Speaking churches was.

National Park Service Guam Hawaii California Mike Mayer National Cathedral Lincoln Memorial American memorial park Facebook Yosemite Micheals Chevy Zion Yellowstone Yosemite Indiana Virgin Islands Alaska Satistics Springfield armory South Dakota
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Most people don't realize there are service wide entities. That we would help all the parks, and then there's the parks themselves, and they're really quite I Thomas in. So it's you were in a position. I was in position that we were there at the service of these parks. And so that in itself creates its own problems. There was just a few of us. I think three or four staff that were based in Washington DC had I not been in DC with you. I would have even known less about the work that you've done it really would have been like, okay, you send emails on occasion. So I was lucky to breach the stuff that you're doing just because we'd go have lunch or have a coffee, whatever. But I think what was lost. Most of the staff were my listeners is that the climate change programs out in Fort Collins, Colorado with others, maybe spread out Hawaii, California. And so it was almost set up for difficult. But yeah, and. Anything to add of just how parks even sort of the support word that you used to do. So if it's not clear, if you don't know national parks service, and I think in the articles that you provided the the National Park Service is the primary federal agency dealing with historic preservation, right for the federal government. Yes. I they Mashal park service is the lead agency for cultural resources in the federal government in what I what I'm getting there to the tensions that you're bringing up between cultural resources and natural sources your average person in the United States thinks of national park Yellowstone Yosemite. And then they like I'll Lincoln Memorial that. And then throw out some cultural when I think of Evans, our church in Atlanta's at the one is that in the president's birthplace, the National Park Service, actually runs all these things. There's a huge number of parks that are related just to cultural resources, and I don't think. The public understands that and so that gets to that notion of natural resource tension versus the cultural, right, right? Thank the national parks. Just saying is the lead federal agency for cultural resources, and so it's responsible for a lot of the work under the national historic preservation act. So it's legislatively assigned a number of big responsibilities. It's worth saying use federal government doesn't have a ministry of culture. We don't have that. So the parks really fills in that role. But as you're saying that's not in the name. So that's not recognized. You say National Park Service, everyone thinks of the parks, and then the parks that most people think of our the Yellowstone's the seventy is the grand canyons. And so the association is of National Park Service is with these natural spaces. And then I think the one that's often thrown in on that list is the statue of liberty like which is a cultural park, then Jamestown island has. The traces of the first English settlement are permanent English in the new world. We may there's severity of which was the part that inspired the nineteen o six entities act, and so many cultural parks that we have across the system, and as I mentioned before every park, even if it was established because of its natural resources has cultural resources in it. So Yellowstone has a lot of archaeology. The Grand Canyon has a lot of archaeology. There was there were native Americans living in Yosemite that were removed at the time Yosemite. National park was created. So our responsibilities for cultural resources is is actually quite large in it's larger than the name and the popular conception, and that could background there. So I some of the materials which came out when you resign. Some the media coverage that you got in the grist article. I thought this was fascinating. I I don't think we ever talked about when I was there..

Grand Canyon National Park Service National park Mashal park Yellowstone Yosemite Thomas Washington Yosemite Lincoln Memorial Fort Collins United States Colorado California Jamestown island Evans president
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Kind of glossed over the difficulties that were involved in moving from part to part because you did have to keep, you know, boxing in boxing, all your all your worldly goods. Right. I was very lucky. My wife was extremely supportive. She knew since known. My wife's we were ten years old now, and she knew all along I wanted to be a park ranger. So anytime an opportunity would come. She would gladly move said the kids were gone at that point. And we moved probably not counting when we moved to Atlanta from school and all that stuff. We've got the park show. She must move eight different times in fifteen years. She always she always supported she always said that this is what you wanna do. This is what she should do. Don't back down keep following because you the hook never have the opportunity to do it again. So she was extremely supportive of it in our very lucky on that. So there's a lot of moving. Yeah. All an adventure. My life's been adventure. She she was part of it. It's always been adventure that fully enjoyed about. It. That's amazing. But no, these eight moves in fifteen years did that ever kind of shake your faith that this was what you wanted to do never never every every move was a move upward into and my toward my quest in a park ranger. And I one time aide park ranger could moved a little bit further. I wanted to I was getting older, you know, I was getting in my in my sixties latter part of sixty nine fulfill what I was looking for. And I saw no reason to go any further. I was past the age of trying to chase anything when already already received. What I what I wanted to do. So right, never any challenges. All she. We she had a great time moving every time was an adventure. And we were very lucky. Well, I'm also I mean, this is maybe a reflection of my being an urban dweller. But not to say, I've never been to any of the parks that you worked at. But something tells me they're not in urban centers. I mean, you were seems like some of these places you are a little bit. I'm not going to say in the sticks. But in in pretty rural are somewhat isolated areas right in the sticks pretty pretty much description of Vicksburg, Mississippi is it was on a Mississippi River is not a very small town was not a real big one. But the battle, you know, at the time was because of the battles Vic verbs because they trying to control the Mississippi River so most of the park I worked as what we refer to his canon ball parks. I didn't work in the pretty parks nature parks Yellowstone Yosemite. Smoky mountains, that's the one. Everybody thinks of I worked in the historical parks, and so lot of historical places like Andersonville. You know? I don't know you say you've never been in a it's it's a place right in the southeast Georgia. I in south southern Georgia. That's in the middle of nowhere. That's why they put his prison camp. And we had to live about about twenty miles away from a little town column erica's Georgia, but we didn't mind at all got to meet a whole lot of different people made whole lot different type of first analogies and so forth, and you know, and then we moved to our final place in Chattanooga Nicaragua's right on lookout mountain house pretty big place. But the battlefield was still away from all the activity, and so, yeah, we we we lived in stick some and we live in the suburbs. Some but mostly it was in the sticks. And that's okay. We enjoyed it. I love that phrase, canon, ball parks. So you're a no we'll get a little bit to your cannonball.

Georgia Mississippi River canon Mississippi Vicksburg Yellowstone Yosemite erica Chattanooga Nicaragua lookout mountain fifteen years ten years
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"According to national parks dot org. The website for the national park found. Dacian? There are currently sixty national parks. But even that number is misleading. The United States national park system encompasses a total of four hundred and eighteen different sites. That span across eighty four million acres, which is more land than than a lot of entire nations possess. The system includes parks and territories such as Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands American Samoa Guam, just one of America's parks. Alaska's Rangel, Saint Elliot's national park and preserve encompasses thirteen point two million acres bigger than Yellowstone Yosemite and the entire country of Switzerland combined. The US national park system is is in total over ten million acres bigger than the entire nation of Italy within the number of four hundred eighteen sites. Only sixty actually include national park is part of their proper name like Acadia national park on Maine's Atlantic coast Everglades national park on the southern tip of Florida Grand Canyon National park in Arizona Yellowstone National. Oh park primarily located in north west Wyoming but bleed into parts of Montana, and I'd Aho in addition to these national parks there are eleven different national battlefields. Four national battlefield parks. Won national battlefield site, nine national, military parks. Fifty one national historic parks, seventy eight national historic sites. And then there are national memorials national monuments national reserves, preserves recreation areas fee, shores, lake shores and more. So how did all these parks get here? Well, some people don't think they are here. Some people think they're just lies pushed on us via the moon matrix manipulated reality being projected down onto earth facilitated by courts deposits and alien technology taking the positive reality programming coming from the sun's photons twisting them into negative reality. Projectors pushing us towards war and famine and discord whatever turmoil faves the nudity those damn ancient Babylonian brotherhood, reptilian motherfucker. Cres that have been slaved humanity from Linnea, but those people are considered by most academics. And scientists to be utter maniacs. So let's nor that perspective. We're gonna have some fun with wacky doodles who do believe in shit equally crazy to what I just said here and there throughout today suck. And if that gibberish did make a little bit of sense to you, thanks for paying attention to the David stuff. I've been talking about from time to time people who live in the real world where history has not been grossly rewritten where we're not be manipulated by aliens understand that the origin of our national parks can be traced back to eighteen seventy two on March. I eighteen seventy two then president Ulysses s grant signed the Yellowstone National Park Protection Act. The congress had just passed establishing Yellowstone National Park in the territories of Montana in Wyoming as a quote, public park or pleasure. Ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people and placed it under exclusive control of the secretary of the interior the founding of Yellowstone National Park introduced a whole new concept and not just the people United States. But to the world at large, and that's the concept of preserving land for future generations to enjoy ensuring that no one will build on it outside the.

Florida Grand Canyon National Acadia national park Yellowstone National Park United States Yellowstone Yosemite Montana Wyoming Puerto Rico Virgin Islands American Samoa alien technology president Ulysses s Alaska Italy secretary Linnea Switzerland Maine Arizona America congress
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Roosevelt Amir's Yosemite visit has been called the most important camping trip in history. Afterward told friends I never before had so interesting hearty and Manley companion. I fairly fell in love with him. For Roosevelt part. It seems his time with Moore had surpassed his expectations, whatever downside express ahead of the trip in his letter to John Burroughs. He told reporters immediately afterward. It was bully. I had the time of my life Roosevelt later road of Muir. He was what few nature lovers are a man able to influence contemporary thought and action on the subjects to which he had devoted his life. He was a great factor in influencing the thought of California and the thought of the entire country. So as to secure the preservation of those great natural phenomenon, wonderful canyons, giant trees, slopes of flower spangled hillsides, which may California a veritable garden of the Lord returning from his trip. Roosevelt was recharged with the love for the outdoors, but he understood he still had work to do the time spent with Moore had helped the. I understand that Yosemite and the Mariposa grove could not be trusted in the hands of the states. Federal intervention was required to protect his natural wonders to keep his conservationist agenda on track. He would need to amplify it. In March nineteen. O five Roosevelt began his second term this time as the president, the country chose a little over a year later, he signed a pair of laws that would prove key to his environmental legacy. The oh seventy recession, Bill signed in June nineteen. Oh, six took the Yosemite valley grant and the Mariposa grove of giant sequoias out of the control of the state of California instead place them solely under the protection of the federal government as Yosemite, national park the same month Roosevelt signed the antibodies act allowing the president to create national monuments from federal lands. The goal was to establish legal protections for important, cultural and natural resources. And as soon as the law was official Roosevelt set to work before the year was out. He set aside four new sites, including devil's tower while homing El Moro New Mexico and Montezuma castle and the petrified forest in Arizona. Eventually, the law would be used to protect many other areas such as south Dakota's jewel cave, Utah. Ause natural bridges in Washington's Mount Olympus. Another of the sites was the Grand Canyon in January nineteen, o eight Roosevelt secured nearly eight hundred thousand acres of the Grand Canyon as a national monument paving the way for Woodrow Wilson to eventually designated a national park in nineteen nineteen Roosevelt would describe the Grand Canyon as the most beautiful scenery in the world. Roosevelt would leave behind a legacy of conservation in the course of his presidency. He established one hundred fifty, national forests, five national parks and eighteen national monuments. He protected approximately two hundred thirty million acres of public land. He saw in America's natural wonders, riches that surpass material wealth in his view. Conservation was intrinsically linked to the idea of manifest destiny the country. Now, stretched from coast to coast. He saw places like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and the Grand Canyon as hard won trophies their splendor earned through successful American expansion. The country needed to protect these natural treasures for future generations and hold them up as evidence of American greatness. Roosevelt started progressive era of environmental reform. His impact on the conservation and creation of national parks and monuments would be felt for generations. What his record was not spotless. Just two months before Roosevelt signed the anti. But he's a massive earthquake rocked San Francisco and set off an epic battle to secure the city's water supply that would leave a stain on your seventy and Roosevelt's legacy for decades to come. On the next episode of American history tellers to of Roosevelt's closest allies have a philosophical falling out over proposed dam that might save San Francisco, but drown portion of John yours favorite place on earth from wondering, this is American history. I hope you've.

Roosevelt Amir Yosemite Roosevelt John Burroughs Moore Grand Canyon California Mariposa grove Yosemite valley Manley president Muir San Francisco south Dakota Mount Olympus Washington Bill Woodrow Wilson Utah Montezuma castle
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"Monaco many more they got them all diesel pushers gas toy haulers in a great family a great place to do business with quality at motorhomes quality people and excellent pricing steinberg motorcoach please please tell them that you heard about them on the road trekking rv podcast rv podcast you can find show notes links to resources and websites mike and his guests mentioned videos and photos on the rv podcast dot com travel blonde and you can also send mike voice question to answer on the podcast buzzer on rv podcast all right i'm excited about this this interview this spent something it was jennifer's idea she said she's always talking about what is your favorite place what's the most interesting thing you've seen and she's she's been asked me for some time so when i asked that question get out the recorder or the video camera and record it and so i started doing that this summer and the first group of of of interviewees that we did have some really interesting places we thought you know when she thought that i thought oh yellowstone yosemite places like that you know but these places are much more obscure and their places as they as folks describe their favorite places that made me want to get there and go so we have the interview coming up i want you know i'm recording these interviews and video so you can actually see a video version of this interview and you can also look at of images and photos that were taken at these different spots that everybody is recommending that will be on our youtube channel and it'll all be linked in our show notes that road just go to road trekking dot com slash one ninety eight but you'll also find in our show notes besides a link to that video you'll find a complete transcript now of this interview and i will have well the time i transcribe this and get this ready to get posted here i will have links of all of the destinations that the folks are sharing and suggesting in the show notes and again is showing it's a road trekking dot com slash one.

mike jennifer yellowstone yosemite youtube
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"You live in a city it's a great city quote supercar it's not a super car but it's like a good rare fund gt bruiser yes sounds great the automatic transmission sucks balls the manual controls are slow think about what a torque converter gearbox from two thousand eight is that's that's the problem yeah unless it has like very low miles to me seventy five thousand dollars is very high that's a that's a lot of money for that car unless it's meg alot really really really low miles a driver condition one of those i'd put it like sixty so that then you've got your nine hundred seven two turbo i've got a thought there yeah so there there are late nine nine one nine nine seven point one turbos yeah that are metzger blocked unlike the point two's there's different opinions on this this is what i've heard are late nine and seven point one metzger blocked turbos with the newer interior oh that over two thousand nine you gotta find some late nine build or something okay so if you all right there's one you can't get nine nine seven and a half turbos in manual i don't think oh he says six maybe you can maybe assets you can't drive all hundred thousand for nine hundred okay all right or v twelve and six feet one hundred fifteen i think the dark horse value by long hold is the aston you think yeah v twelve b twelve six just yet naturally aspirated wheelbase durable engine yeah i'll a platform with a lot of parts availability unless you're going on racetracks in which case i would say the porsche yes but you already have a g three yeah so you already have a v twelve vantage manage manual is such a thousand i drove the early veto vantage and the late one both manual this f sixteen speed i prefer the sixty six all right yeah i prefer it the seven speed it's got that funky dogleg yeah which i'm not that into and that's my picture in the middle we won't get dinged on a copyright measure mind that's that's my picture with the of the press yeah we really have the same car yeah this is the nike and not nike but it looks like a sneaker that flannel the cerebrospinal that interior was amazed i in the video we we did the i'm dental was it was i think it was like that this thing had this gray flannel it was a beautiful like you know one of those like fucking sweatshirts that like it's like a kashmir hoodie you put on now where it's like but it's actually like that's it yeah the gray flannel that will leather but if you're if you're live just go to my or later whatever go to my youtube channel and i actually caressed the dash yeah yeah it was it was lovely but i the six speed is the one that's the early car yeah the speeds of the one to have their i hope that answers i already got a porsche nine seven gd three yeah yeah i'm b twelve manage that's a good way and thank you everyone oh here we go she week road trip starting in the santa barbara area to place to start with a focus on national parks camping and dirt roads wow ideas are right now take the one oh one north to seattle yellowstone moab zion grand canyon that trip you just described is so much driving yeah it's a lot of drive for one week you got to cut the miles in half on that my friend dirt roads to take your law long for we know for sure yeah yeah that's way too much driving you're gonna hate it hate to say i i would either go directly i would not go north to seattle or yellowstone you've got to go east to zion and grand canyon or you go north to yellowstone yosemite yeah right yeah you got to pick one i can tell you we're not to go where i was last week went to mure muir woods whatever national monument or well that's where i sprained my ankle last week well that's the problem that don't go to.

seventy five thousand dollars one week six feet
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Certainly could be luckily there's still a time for a public comments until november twenty four us that we can sort of as citizens make our voices heard here but yeah it it really could end up being a drastic increase accessibility to or lack thereof i should say to public lands it's not all national parks so they are at pains to say that most will remain free of charge is it just them trying to increase revenues from the most popular ones while it assume that way i mean uh they're enormously popular last year at least a two hundred thirty one million visitors came uh which is the most or you know in history and they say that you know it's not gonna be all of them but the ones that are targeting are certainly the most famous you know yellowstone yosemite uh arches canaan loans the big ones does this appear to be a direct response to a deed trump administration slashing of the parks department budget by about thirteen percent i believe that's correct and i think the parks department the interest of having a good relationship with their boss would say no it's not but it's hard to ignore the parallels here and and uh you know we really should be making our wild places more accessible to american instead of uh pricing about is it possible that this is a political ploy by the parks department to troy and embarrass the administration into restoring some of that funding because if we wait for whip up by significant popular outcry you would think that can only uh aid the cause that's certainly possible and i think you're seeing a lot of uh departments take that tack uh in the us uh w given the fact that their leader is you know in these making his decisions them and they're trying to figure out how to move forward with that while still maintaining good relationship with our but they often take reverend the press like this so do we have a sense of what concrete effects these increases will have like what does it cost now to go and visit yellowstone or yes yosemite save versus what might end up costing during peak season i believe it's about thirty dollars a car to get them and that could rise to as much as seven so right you mentioned earlier more than double and it seems.

thirteen percent thirty dollars
"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Attacks on sweetened beverages appears ready to go into effect in the chicago area next week the tax had been scheduled to take effect on july 1st but a retailer group in illinois filed a lawsuit in illinois judge dissolved a temporary restraining order yesterday clearing the way for the penny per ounce tax to take effect on wednesday yellowstone national park taking action against up to a dozen employees after an investigation found sexual harassment up some female employees and other problems yellowstone public radio's nate hedgy reports superintendent dan winked says some of the employees could be fired while others could receive suspensions or counseling tell me an organization has almost two thousand employees in finally won the doesn't have issues of a workplace issues i don't think you will doesn't mean we should improve links says the actions against yellowstone employees could start as early as august but he wouldn't give any more details citing privacy the move comes as widespread reports of harassment bullying and other misconducts have tarnished the image of the national park service and its parent agency the us interior department federal investigators found problems at many of the nation's most popular parks including yellowstone yosemite glacier and the grand canyon for npr news in mammoth springs wyoming i made heggie this is npr support for this podcast and the following message come from almond board of california the you know the almond community ads eleven billion dollars to the local economy sir grow would you know about almonds visit allman the sustainability dot org.

illinois yellowstone national park harassment us yellowstone yosemite glacier chicago yellowstone nate hedgy superintendent dan winked npr mammoth springs wyoming california allman eleven billion dollars