35 Burst results for "Yellowstone National Park"

Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Fungus found in Yellowstone is key ingredient in new meat substitute

"Two thousand nine. A team of researchers discovered a previously unknown microbe in the hot springs of yellowstone national park now. The fungus is the star ingredient in a new line of food products. He was very very high in protein. And it's actually a very exciting protein because it's a complete protein. There's really not that many sources of complete putting out there. That's thomas jonas. Ceo of nature's find the chicago based startup developed a process to ferment. the fungus and create. What's now called five protein. They're using it to make a variety of foods so we've been able to make things that range from chicken nuggets hamburgers breakfast sausages to yogurts and cheese earlier this year. The company offered a limited line of cream cheese and breakfast sausage on its website. Jonas says the products will soon be sold at stores. He foresees growing demand for protein. Filled foods produce more sustainably than meat and dairy that whole supply chain is completely inefficient and using a tremendous amount of resources of land of water energy. So jonas says fi could provide a more climate-friendly alternative.

Thomas Jonas Yellowstone National Park Nuggets Chicago Jonas
Grizzly Bear Attacks, Kills Camper in Western Montana

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Grizzly Bear Attacks, Kills Camper in Western Montana

"There is an extensive search in Montana for a grizzly bear that attacked and killed a man the man was camping and a park spokesman says the bear had previously wandered into the camping area and left but later returned the victim's identity was not immediately released and further circumstances surrounding the attack were under investigation a video camera from a local business caught footage of a grizzly bear just before the attack raiding a chicken coop one resident said they know to be bear aware but this is shaken up the community in April a back country guide was killed by a grizzly bear while fishing along the Yellowstone National Park border in Montana I'm a Donahue

Montana Yellowstone National Park
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

"It's not what we would expect of any law enforcement officers and it was definitely not what we expected of my folks. We did the best. We could take corrective action after it occurred and ensure that it never happens again so again Not only did one that the saunders Terminated the other deputy did as well And that was recommended for termination. He was a fifteen year veteran with the agency. He resigned after learning. He was going to be recommended for termination holman. Also a fifteen year veteran with the sheriff's office headed employment terminated as a result of the investigation. This is i mean. I don't see that happen that quickly. In a lot of law enforcement agencies but with the weld county sheriff's office he did Sheriff rooms then went on to talk about senate. Bill to seventeen was not. It was not in la at that point but he said i hate to give justification for legislation. I'm largely in opposition. But in that aspect talking about the fact that under senate bill to seventeen these officers immediately would have lost their. There's a law enforcement certification in colorado. He says but in that aspect you can see where it makes sense for an agency that might not hold their supervisors or their employees to that type of standard. I wish it had never happened. And i hope that the individuals involved are never in a situation where they can do that again. But that is now just coming to a close as saunders does Plead guilty again and sentenced to ninety days of probation For the former weld county. Deputy woman's body found in rocky mountain national park this out of the colorado and now Another another tragic story in another a deadly weekend in lower county when it comes to people enjoying the outdoors this time thirty-three-year-old arvada woman was recovered sunday in rocky mountain national park. After be being discovered friday the national park service reported so the body was found on friday. They were able to recover it on sunday Park visitors reported to rangers on friday discovered the body below the out outtake of the lok within the national park west of fort collins. The park service said in a news release. The couldn't get up there because this we can. There was weather including lightning storms darkness. That the that really hampered the search and rescue teams recovery efforts. The woman's body was recovered. Sunday with the help of thirty eight thirty eight park search and rescue team members. Twenty eight of whom were in the field They had to go up sixty feet through a tough territory to get all the way up there and they they did get the body and have recovered it. An investigation is underway. The woman's name will be released after next of kin or not This from rebecca pal again out of the colorado in and Just another reminder father's day weekends a busy weekend as the weather continues to be like this you're going to see more and more people getting out and into into these different areas and They Just be of the of the the tough areas that You can get into and the dangers that come in here Got a text here. let's see Well i will you know. I'll tell you what let's break. I'll look into this Here's a story that that one of our textures well would like to lie. Look into if that is the case. If this is true we will absolutely take a look at this. How about we do that. I won't be back for another j jeanine agencies northern colorado's voice thirteen ten. Kfi the whole sports story in northern colorado state in the country tune into the whole show weekdays noon to two and thirteen ten kfi k.

Sunday colorado fifteen year sixty feet friday ninety days thirty-three-year-old Twenty eight sunday thirteen fort collins seventeen rebecca pal northern colorado rocky mountain national park national park service father's day one thirty eight thirty eight park
New Idaho Law Calls for Killing 90% of State's Wolves

90.3 KAZU Programming

02:07 min | 5 months ago

New Idaho Law Calls for Killing 90% of State's Wolves

"They did well enough that 10 years ago, the animal came off the endangered species list. Since then, hunters have legally killed hundreds every year on a host current wolf population is about 1500. That's way too many for state lawmakers like Dorothy Moon, You know when there s O fearless that they are now walking down the center of a dirt road. Um, that that means there's too many of them. Moon and many others don't like how some of the state's prized herds of elk have become smaller since wolves returned, but biologist Michael Lucid, formerly with Idaho's Department of Fish and Game Says big herds of elk don't necessarily indicate healthy ecosystems. One of the points of having wolves in the ecosystem is to have a reasonable number of them in the head. Him perform their roles as predators, keeping milk, another prey, wild animals and doing things like reducing disease and calling older and weaker members of those herds. Lucid helped write Idaho's Wolf Management plan, informed by studies showing positive ecological impacts from returning wolves to Yellowstone National Park and other locations. But lawmakers have a different idea What a reasonable number of wolves is. Idaho's new law calls for killing up to 90% of them again lawmaker Dorothy Moon whose central Idaho district includes wolves, and some of their prime habitat, We've got to get this in check. And in all due respect, efficient game, they need this help. That help means giving wolf hunters the right to do things that are illegal when pursuing other animals, like using night vision goggles, killing wolf pups in their dens and chasing wolves with motorized vehicles. Those changes don't sit well with Ned Burns, the mayor of a small town near where wolves currently Rome He's also a hunter and says it's more important to follow the principles of fair chase than what laws might allow. Sits in a wide open area, and they can't get into cover. If you could just run one down, Tol basically exhaust itself. I don't necessarily know that that's the way I've ever been raised to hunt animals. It's unclear how many hunters will respond to Idaho lawmakers call

Dorothy Moon Idaho Michael Lucid Department Of Fish And Game Sa Yellowstone National Park Lucid Ned Burns Rome
New Idaho Law Calls For Killing 90% of State's Wolves

Environment: NPR

02:01 min | 5 months ago

New Idaho Law Calls For Killing 90% of State's Wolves

"Conservative lockers in. Idaho montana are going after wolves in those states New laws call for killing more than thousand wolves and paying people to shoot them to boise. State public radio's troy oppy. Says the laws passed despite objections from local wildlife managers twenty five years ago. Federal wildlife officials re introduced wolves to idaho. They did well enough that ten years ago the animal came off the endangered species list since then hunters have legally killed hundreds every year. Idaho's current wolf population is about fifteen hundred and that's way too many for state lawmakers. Dorothy moon you know when they are so fearless that they are now walking down the center of a dirt road. That means there's too many of them moon and many others don't like how some of the state's prized herds of elk have become smaller since wolves returned but biologists michael lucid formerly with idaho department of fish and game says big herds of elk don't necessarily indicate healthy ecosystems on points of having lows in the ecosystem is to have a reasonable number of them in Perform their roles as predators keeping elk other prey wild animals and doing things like reducing disease and colon older and weaker members of those hurts. Lucid helped write. Idaho's wolf management plan informed by studies showing positive ecological impacts from returning wolves to yellowstone national park and other locations but lawmakers have a different idea. What a reasonable number of wolves is idaho's new law calls for killing up to ninety percent of them again lawmaker. dorothy moon. who's central idaho. District includes wolves and some of their prime habitat. We've got to get this in check. And i'll do respect fish and game. They need this help. That help means giving wolf hunters the right to do things that are illegal. When pursuing other animals like using night vision goggles killing wolf pups in their dens and chasing wolves with motorized

Troy Oppy Idaho Dorothy Moon Michael Lucid Idaho Department Of Fish And G Boise Montana Lucid Yellowstone National Park Colon
Backcountry Guide Mauled to Death While Fishing Near Yellowstone National Park

Atlanta's Morning News

00:16 sec | 6 months ago

Backcountry Guide Mauled to Death While Fishing Near Yellowstone National Park

"He was cut loose, whole legally bought both weapons used in the attack that killed eight people. A man dies after being attacked by a grizzly bear near Yellowstone National Park. 40 year old Carl Mach was mauled Thursday near Baker's whole campground. Instigators later shot and killed that bear when it charged at them them as as they they return return to to the the area area to to

Carl Mach Baker's Whole Campground Yellowstone National Park
Montana governor tests positive for COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Montana governor tests positive for COVID-19

"The governor of Montana is isolating after testing positive for coded nineteen the Republican governor of Montana Greg Gianforte has tested positive for Corbett nineteen the state recently expanded coronavirus vaccine eligibility to adults sixteen and over engine four day received his first dose of vaccine Thursday at a pharmacy in Helena his office released a statement Monday saying that after experiencing mild symptoms a day earlier he was tested out of an abundance of caution the governor's canceled in person events and they'll be isolated well he works from home in Bozeman the governor lifted a statewide mask mandate in mid February it had been in place since last July G. forty had recently been in the news after he tried to kill the wolf outside Yellowstone National Park I received a warning from Montana fish wildlife and parks department for not having gone through a state required wolf trapping certification course I'm Jennifer king

Greg Gianforte Montana Corbett Helena G. Forty Bozeman Montana Fish Wildlife And Park Yellowstone National Park Jennifer King
Severe drought could make the Old Faithful geyser less faithful

Climate Connections

01:06 min | 8 months ago

Severe drought could make the Old Faithful geyser less faithful

"In yellowstone national park. Large crowds watching as old faithful erupts with a roar launching a spire of water about one hundred and fifty feet in the air. Old faithful erupts at regular intervals throughout the day. But it was not always so predictable. Fossilized wood found on old. Faithful's geyser mound suggest that the guys are once stopped erupting long enough for trees to grow their trees. Do not grow on active. Geyser amounts that her hurwitz of the united states geological survey. His team sent samples of the would for radiocarbon dating and found that all were from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries so looking into it we found out that that was probably one of the driest periods in the region for last twelve hundred years. He says that as climate change causes more severe droughts. Something similar could happen again. There's a chance that some of the guys will change their frequency of europeans. And maybe even stop erupting depending on the availability of water. A complete shut off is not likely it would take many years continued. Drought but old faithful could erupt. Less frequently. eager tourist might have to wait longer to see the show.

Yellowstone National Park Geyser United States
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on WTVN

"And so there is a guy from Idaho and he has been banned from Yellowstone National Park. You know, I've always wanted to go to Yellowstone, Especially because of the very thing Well, not because of what he did. And how come he got banned? I'm just saying to see all of this. You've been there having all Yeah. Yeah, it's it's magical. If you get a chance, I don't care if it's 95 degrees Ah, Yellowstone Lake. It's basically the lake that fills up the crater. That's the super volcano. I don't know if you know this Yellowstone sits on top of a super volcano. That goes off approximately every 608 100,000 years. And if it were to go off that would we would go. Bye bye. If you're there, that's it. You know, I mean, like, anywhere you're going. Bye Bye. America. Okay, so any. Hopefully we got another couple 100,000 years before, but 2020 Josh, it's the coldest water I have ever been in in my life. I could only get there to my island mated in knee deep. Because the water does. It doesn't ever heat up so cold that you got to your knees and you were still affected by shrinkage. It took a week to get back to normal. Mark. Well, this guy from Idaho temporarily banned. This's hilarious man Safety regulations currently prohibit visitors. From Steri straying from the boardwalks of the maintain trails near the thermal fumes so they don't want you injuring yourself clearly if you get over that, But this guy pled guilty to charges on September 10th. He was sentenced to two years. Unsupervised probation, and he's not allowed to visit. You know why? Because he was cooking chickens in a burlap sack in a hot spring. That makes perfect sense. Just the way the indigenous folks did. It makes perfect sense. I was great. Why wouldn't you if you got a couple chickens on you? You're wandering around Yellowstone. You see a hot spring, Geiser. There you go. That's some hot, hot steam coming out of some hot steam. Some hot water. I bet it probably take about 10 minutes to cook a big bird like that. Maybe not even the thoroughly. You're not supposed to have food with you. They say in that were the area where he was. You're not supposed to take food for a lot of reasons. And Yellowstone number one is there. You don't want to get eaten alive by bears or wolves, right? In addition to the probation, he was sentenced to pay 2 $600.5. I think one for each chicken..

Yellowstone Yellowstone Lake Yellowstone National Park Idaho Geiser Josh America Mark
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"Be just it happened in Yellowstone National Park and so to frame why this happened you have to understand that so we're traveling out last month and I did not know that Yellowstone was kind of like the New York City of national parks. And so we have a tent and we really valued tent camping and being able to not be around generators and have it be quiet and have it be nice. So there's really only two places you can get a 10 at and you kind of have to be there early in the morning before you the 9 or 9:30 cuz it's going to get full so we woke up at four am in Montana sprinted down got into the park. Like my heart's racing. I'm like are we going to get are we going to go there and we get to the first camping site and we find out it's already dead. I'm just like oh no, this is not good. This is terrible. So there's only one more place we can go. It's it's in a different part of the park. We're going to have to you know, speed is really maintain. So we have to immediately turn around and talk about it and we're sleep-deprived we're worried about the spot and I'm driving back out to the main road and I see a bison on the road in my sleep-deprived simple mind. I look and I say wow that things like just it's bigger than a car but it's mainly vertically bigger. It's in the right lane. I can pass that in the left off. So like a simpleton I go up and I'm just treating it as if it's like an Amish buggy or something. I'm trying to pass the road just in the left lane and we got got it like oh look at this by 6. How about this and it was the oddest thing because you know, I'm driving Janelle my fiance is in the passenger seat and she is looking at the bison and we're you know, we're going by slow because we dog Spook it and we see its eyes turned and it meets her eyes..

Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone New York City Janelle Montana
Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Montana tribes complete large intertribal bison transfer

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the four Pekka cinnabon and Sioux tribes in Montana recently completed a large intertribal transfer of Bison Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. The forty buffalo were rounded up into semi trailers. In Wolf Point Montana they're headed to new homes with sixteen different tribes as far away as the United Nation in Wisconsin and Ludik tribe of Old Harbor Alaska. Urban Carlson is president of the intertribal Buffalo Council which facilitated the transfer. He says, the animals were part of a surplus population at Yellowstone National Park and would otherwise have been slaughtered today. Is Real. Gratifying. Just to be able to get some animals out of there, and then out to Chives, the Buffalo spent a year in quarantine on the fort pack reservation to ensure their disease free. Johnny Bear Cub, stiff arm has the Tribes Buffalo Program. She says, this transfer was a long time coming. We have drum group out here and they'll sing the songs they'll sing. Songs to send the Buffalo safely to their new homes, they travel safe and receive blessings. And say goodbye to enforce and we'll send them on their way. For National Native News I'm. Savannah Mark. A new art degree programs being offered to students at the University of Alaska Southeast, which is part of a larger vision that's been in the works for years to establish a north. West Coast Arts Hub Kate. Elizabeth Jenkins has more. The new degree program is a partnership between the University of Alaska, southeast Sealaska Heritage, Institute, and the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa. Fe. New Mexico the agreements were signed a few years ago, but it's taken some time to line everything up Cari groove in the our director at Sealaska Heritage Institute says there's a lot of room for growth. We are mealy great. Now that exists in the first place, the program is a two year degree with a focus on north west coast indigenous art. As part of the new program students are required to take an intro course into relevant native languages. Then their hands on our classes to choose from some of the courses have been offered before by the university and some are brand new for instance and claimed Weaver Lily hope is teaching an online class about career development as an artist students enrolled in the program, we'll have the option to transfer credits to the University of New Mexico if they want to pursue a bachelor's degree. Groove and things kind of comprehensive academic offering is long overdue. She says, many people are familiar with the region's form line design, but the associate's program is a way to gain deeper understanding in a way that. Associates degree provides a starting point for that journey with Cova Nineteen. Some of the courses will be offered online in some will still happen in person in accordance with universities pandemic plan, and in the future students will be able to experience some of these classes on a brand new campus. SEALASKA heritage has already started breaking ground on a six thousand square foot facility in downtown Juneau. The campus is slated to be completed sometime next year I'm Elizabeth, Jenkins. Powell's are being held virtually this Labor Day due to the cove in nineteen pandemic the online social distance Powell facebook group has been helping connect vendors, dancers, and singers for the last six months over the weekend. Dancers took part in contests uploading their videos to be judged and win prizes. I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Tribes Buffalo Program Buffalo Intertribal Buffalo Council Elizabeth Jenkins University Of Alaska Southeast Wolf Point Montana Antonio Gonzales New Mexico University Of New Mexico Sealaska Heritage Antonio Gonzalez United Nation Urban Carlson Sealaska Heritage Institute Yellowstone National Park University Of Alaska Wisconsin Bison Wyoming Johnny Bear Cub Savannah Mark
Business Is Booming At National Parks

Environment: NPR

04:11 min | 1 year ago

Business Is Booming At National Parks

"Standing outside the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Gardner Montana you could tick through about two dozen state license plates in the time that it takes you to drink a coffee. That is normal in the summer. What's not normal is the people driving those cars doing stuff like this we rented a van and it has a Florida license sag but I put a sign in the back window that said we are not from Florida. Lynn Hunter and her family are from Kansas, your that Kansas, even grandson, Noah will tell you. Don't want anybody think we are same goes for just about any place that's been in the news recently for having spikes in Cova Cases Families like the hunters are driving national parks like yellowstone in droves right now, king to escape from wherever are trying to salvage a summer of stress and they know that it comes with risks we were scared to come really we've been planning it for a long time. So here they are at one of the country's first national parks and they're happy they did thing is the same is true for about one point five, million other people since mid-may Ricarda, raise, and his family are from North Carolina. Made. It will be a kind of a little bit but a lot of people out there over the last couple of weeks the number of cars entering the Gardner entrance at Yellowstone National Park are higher than they were at the same time. Last year restaurants have long waits rafting companies are struggling to find workers and fly fishing guides. Richard Parkes owner of parks fly shop says too bad anglers. There's just as many people casting for Yellowstone Brown or cutthroat trout as there's ever been before I. Think we're getting some people that are just refugee ing Outta those places that's great for his bottom line park says he makes between eighty and ninety percent of his annual earnings between June and September. But at seventy seven years old, it's also a bit worrisome. I'm official old. Flood. Is. One of the people inherently more vulnerable than others and I get a little nervous when? Some mob of people running in. No Mash, no apparent care of how many people showed in the place but that's the dance he's having to do yellowstone brings in more than six hundred, million dollars to its surrounding communities every year most of that in the summer nationally visitor ship to national parks generates more than forty billion dollars annually, and so even while there are concerns particularly around rural parks like yellowstone that outsiders may be bringing in more than just. Their pocket books during the pandemic it's a risk that many are willing to take and so foreign yellowstone it seems to be paying off definitely get for the business community I think that you know in May they may have thought that they might not make it through the end of the year, and now they're seeing record breaking numbers juries. PETKOFF is the executive director of Garner's Chamber of Commerce so far she says only. Two Park employees and three visitors have tested positive for COVID. She sure some have gone undetected, but the numbers thus far are encouraging. Typically visitation goes way slower October. So we only have more months to make it through. So I think everyone has kind of holding their breath and just hoping the community spread doesn't happen I. Don't think I've ever been in a summer that I wanted to end as quickly as this one. Camp Shali Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park. There's not a day that I come to work where fearful of multiple employees testing positive for having symptoms yellowstone like many national parks around the country is limiting its services this summer to try and protect employees and visitors closing campgrounds in some cases or visitor centers. Social distancing and masks are strongly encouraged outside of the post office yellowstone's headquarters to mask bear statues serve as a reminder. But the National Park. Service overall has not mandated face coverings. Charlie says most visitors are doing a good job of protecting themselves and others, but not always. So He's urging people if you're sick. Are you have symptoms or you're not sure do us all a favor and don't come to the park or anywhere else for that matter Nathan Rot NPR News Gardner Montana.

Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone Yellowstone Brown Gardner Montana Lynn Hunter Florida Richard Parkes Gardner Kansas Charlie Noah North Carolina NPR Montana Ricarda Executive Director Official Superintendent Chamber Of Commerce Nathan
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Outdoors is beautiful outdoor playground of a state that we live in. And that includes all of the headlights, the outdoor headlines. How about this? How about instead of tuning in to CNN, Fox News, MSNBC and all of that here in all the headlines here in all the nastiness here and all the fighting and the bickering. How about we just talk about the headlines from the outdoor world? That's how we start the second hour of every single one of our shows. Sound a little snarky, right? There didn't know intern beans, beans here to keep me focused and not snarky. Let's go to Montana. A Montana woman and I'm looking at the video right now. This is just this is terrifying. Because a Montana woman had to fall on her face essentially She was in a full spring. And she had to just take a dive. I don't know if she fell or she dove. It's a little It looks like a little bit of both. Okay? She was escaping a bison. That was charging her Oh, I'm not kidding. A bisque. These things air. Look, this was in Yellowstone National Park. These things are no joke. I mean, you go to the national park. You are in nature. You are a ICO Tourists. And she was, you know, doing what Knuckleheads dio and getting a little too close to the bison. Mama Bison had none of this and was just running, so she fell down. And she played dead. Like the bison is now checking her out. Like she just laid down and was still in the bison like hit the brakes, right right in front of her. And then, like took a bounce to the side not to trounce earned was kind of like No Zinner. Oh, my goodness sakes. Like this is the bad thing is Because you see it all the day and time We talked about it when that woman was in Colorado and getting attacked by the elk. You see this all the time in the video? There's a man running in front of her. Like I know I can't outrun the bison. I just have to outrun you, dear. What if what if they were on a date? That's the last date that that should be the last date back. What is up men? Come on, like carrier. I don't care. I mean, man up. Ah, yeah, I and the woman with the Elks and attacked by the oak, the guys were sitting around staring She's getting mauled by this thing. They're just taking their taking video, because obviously, that's what you do. You got to take the video. Poor woman. Let's let's jump in the local news here and your airs on the game and fish departments launching an investigation. Into a absolute slappy idiot. Jerk, moron! Filthy, gross, Disgusting man named Blake Arons. And Thomas TJ purring turn 33 years old if he were overdone. Poachers. That's right. I love seeing poachers get busted. Yes, And I'm looking at this disgusting Slappy right now in his picture. In his cell phone picture of Blake Owens posing with a five by four velvet mule deer taken illegally and out of season. He faces seven different criminal cases in the Navajo County court. Good luck, champ. After a grand jury handed up its final indictments last week. Owens is charged with a Owens is charged. There We go. Thank you Get going mouth with a dozen crimes, the least serious of which includes taking, possessing and transporting wildlife. From a closed area in a closed hunting season without tags, throw the book at these idiots and then onto Thomas TJ Pearlington. He's posing with his four by four mule deer. Taking illegally in September of 2016 for the love of grief. Blake Owens and TJ Purinton opposed in pictures with this velvet buck both them together. Carrington also took the photographs. Of illegally taken dear in his taxidermy business. And posted on social media. That's it. I'm telling you, social media is is criminal Darwinism is just Darwinism altogether. These idiots that's a beautiful, beautiful deer, too. It is absolutely I just hope either the book thrown out because once again Until we take Poaching serious enough that we have serious enough penalties for poaching. It's just going to keep happening. One of these guys have a suspended license or inability to license for 20 years, and they have to pay $10,000 paid 10 thousands worldwide. I'm talking about. I mean, make these guys feel it for life. Or it's not going to stop period. If we don't get serious about it, and we don't take on these poachers and punish them. Hey, seriously. Nothing's gonna happen because they they didn't have. They didn't have tags and they took dear. Do you think they're going to worry about not doing this again? Because you took their license away? Nothing serious. I mean, they're going to have to pay some money, That's for darn sure. Yeah, Here it is. It's the That's why I knew it was here. They're going to pay $18,724 to the Arizona wildlife theft prevention funds, various fees and a $65 probation fee. For every month. So they both played down and they've got no jail time, some community service and in about $20,000 in fines, nothing to sneeze out. I get it. Once again If we don't get even more serious in talk about 50 $8500 in fines, it's never going to go away. Poachers will always be poaching. And don't even get me started on poaching these our community ponds and our lakes. Don't even get me started on.

Blake Owens Montana Mama Bison intern CNN Thomas TJ Pearlington MSNBC Blake Arons Thomas TJ Fox News Yellowstone National Park ICO Tourists Arizona Navajo County court dio Colorado theft Carrington TJ Purinton
Woman gored by bison at Yellowstone after getting too close for photos

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Woman gored by bison at Yellowstone after getting too close for photos

"Year old California woman was Gordon injured multiple times by a wild bison at Yellowstone National Park after repeatedly approaching the animal to take its photograph, park administrators say today. The woman, whose name and home city were not released, flown to an Idaho hospital for treatment of her injuries or current condition Unknown. Officials say she approached within 10 feet of the bison several times after it came near her campsite Yellowstone Park, visitors are required to stay at least 25 yards away from large animals, including the bison.

Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone Park Gordon Idaho California
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Today and so those tense up may end up by lifting and blowing around just a little bit partly cloudy sixty five now it's a touch security triple team traffic we got a red alert this is gonna be construction related let's go up to a helicopter in the air one good morning Eric brown good morning to you Joe yet because of the slow through downtown just creeping along because construction two left lanes are blocked between the formerly Keighley delays back to colonial drive so you might want to consider using a downtown service street that getting on or again at Keighley for after four eastbound is good to go Eric brown in there once new construction has cell street closed underneath hi for at the armory they specialize in firearms concealed weapon courses gunsmithing services trade ins and all your firearms needs the armories Kissimmee winter garden in a veto or the armories dot com with traffic alerts every six minutes in the morning or helping you get to work on time I'm at Torrance is ninety six point five W. DPO now the three big things you need to three three our national parks have been closed since March due to the pandemic with that did not stop a woman from illegally entering Yellowstone National Park Tuesday and falling into the thermal feature at the old faithful geyser the water not geyser is two hundred four degrees the steam as hot as three hundred and fifty degrees as you might imagine the woman suffered severe burns on her whole body but managed to drive herself away after that we're still more than two weeks away from the start of the twenty twenty land of hurricane season but the tropics appear ready to give us a preview of the hurricane season as an area of low.

Joe Eric brown Torrance Yellowstone National Park
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on KTRH

"Reporter Dionne Broxton was on location at Yellowstone National Park when he heard when he saw a herd of bison of the corner of his eye took me a few seconds to make up his mind when he did he left the scene most of which will all crescent with state owned waters in effect you know what most people would be doing this weekend watching Netflix and chilling on the couch it it in the name all so this is what he's someone so what should remain on with the you could do what they told you should do what they told all right here's another guest.

Dionne Broxton Yellowstone National Park Netflix Reporter
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Was on location at Yellowstone National Park when he heard when he saw a herd of bison on the corner of his eye took me a few seconds to make up his mind when he did he left the scene with Stan mortars in effect you know what most people would be doing this weekend watching Netflix and chilling on the couch hit it in the name of this is where all the houses you could do what they told you should do what they told all right here's another guest this sound here are your options before we play it Hey apparent pecking at his own reflection in a mirror be a toddler hitting his dad's beer glass with a toy hammer or see a woodpecker drumming on the wooden post of someone's back porch.

Yellowstone National Park Netflix Stan
Is Old Faithful Becoming Less Faithful?

BrainStuff

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Is Old Faithful Becoming Less Faithful?

"Old faithful used to have a less than modest nickname attorneys timepiece. Since at least the late eighteen hundreds this wyoming cone geyser has vowed spectators with its predictable. Eruptions you can see the landmark for yourself in Yellowstone National Park home to over five hundred geysers more than one hundred and fifty of these water spurting marvels including old faithful occupy the parks upper geyser basin so named in eighteen seventy because it spouted at regular intervals. Old faithful gets more fanfare than any other geothermal attraction in the world visited by presidents and immortalized by artists. The guys are spouts about seventeen times a day. Countdown clocks tell gathering tourists when to ready their cameras for the next waterworks. Show is he. There's a simple formula. Rangers used to estimate. How much time will likely elapsed between any two eruptions of old faithful? According to the National Park Service about ninety percent of these eruption predictions are accurate within a window of plus or minus ten minutes. That's a solid track record but old faithfuls still isn't something you'd want to set your watch by. Five decades of observation have revealed that the geyser is changing since nineteen fifty-nine the average interval between old faithfuls eruptions has gotten longer and while most of the actual eruptions which occurred back. Then were rather brief. This is no longer the case we spoke by email with sin may woo a geologist at the University of Utah who studied the physics of geysers and related structures. She said geysers are rare because they require very unique geologic conditions a persistent heat source abundant water supply from groundwater systems and porous or fractured medium that allows fluid migration and he transfer within usually the heat comes from magma a liquid or semi liquid rock found below. Earth's crust which is called lava once it bursts onto the surface yellowstone is positioned over to magma chambers including a. Nice long one. That's just three ten miles underground. That's five seventeen kilometers. Their maker was a localized swell of abnormally hot material. Beneath the crest classified as a mantle plume. It's the reason why. Yellowstone has the world's largest geyser collection the chambers warm up subterranean reservoirs of liquid groundwater. Although the physics here aren't entirely settled. We do know that some of this water gets super heated. That means it's temperature climbs above and beyond waters normal boiling point since this water's held him. Tight corridors. It's got nowhere else to go at first bearing down on the superheated liquid is a combination of overhanging rock and colder water at cramped quarters to the mix. And you've got a recipe for high pressure but the pressure doesn't last forever in a geyser like old faithful hyperactive. Steam bubbles eventually pushes small percentage of the groundwater through a narrow opening at the surface. Just like that. The pressure decreases and sets off an explosion of hot water and steam. If you're wise you'll give old faithful a wide berth. Visitors can safely watch the geyser erupt from a boardwalk maintained by yellowstone venture off that path. And you might be on the hook for six months in prison and a five thousand dollar fine and besides getting too close to hydrothermal features. Like geysers or hot springs isn't a cool idea. When old faithful goes off the water temperature around its vent can hit two hundred and four degrees? Fahrenheit that's ninety six Celsius meanwhile the steam gets even hotter sometimes exceeding three hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit or one hundred seventy seven Celsius viewed from an appropriate distance. Old Faithfuls eruptions are thrilling spectacles. Even if you've seen one before you might want to revisit the geyser some day because certain eruptions last longer than others. We'll explained that old. Faithful isn't as predictable as at once seemed there are two different categories of gaps between eruptions and of eruptions themselves an eruption that begins and ends in under two and a half minutes is considered short. Others are longer after a short eruption. There'll be an intermission of sixty to sixty five minutes before the Geyser spouts again yet old faithful will reliably take a break of around ninety two minutes once a long eruption subsides over the past fifty years longer eruptions at old faithful have become the norm short. One still occur but they are rarer than they used to be and no one is entirely sure. Why while the mystery is unresolved some geologists blame recent earthquakes for this changing schedule? The guys are source is another riddle. Scientists haven't determined where old faithful gets. Its water supply. Though in two thousand seventeen study Wu and five colleagues revealed an important clue using seismic waves sensors. They found a natural reservoir below the historic old faithful in which stands south. West of the Geyser who who said that body is interpreted to be a highly fractured and saturated area that we think provides fluids source to old faithful plumbing questions and by modal eruptions aside. Old Faithful is indeed more faithful. Then some of its counterparts. It's time we introduced the steamboat. Eiser another yellowstone resident. That happens to be the world's tallest. Active Geyser emitting jets of water three hundred to four hundred feet into the sky above. That's about ninety to one hundred and twenty meters but who said it is very unpredictable and has gone decades between eruptions the last eruption before March of two thousand eighteen was in September of two thousand fourteen. She added however that the two thousand eighteen blow up quote began an unprecedented active phase steamboat. Geyser has rented a total of eighty five times since then with the last eruption occurring February twenty first twenty twenty. We still don't know what initiates this active as what controls its eruptive behavior and what geometry looks like

Yellowstone Yellowstone National Park Geologist Wyoming Cone Rangers National Park Service WU University Of Utah
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Mr trump is expected to head to the CDC in Atlanta today but that part of the trip was scrapped they thought there was a problem at CDC with somebody that has the virus but Mr trump said that person is now tested negative the CDC stop may be on again under fire for a slow and disorganized federal response to the virus health secretary Alex ETS are insists the distribution of test kits is now on schedule markets are still on edge over coronavirus concerns the Dow took a two and a half percent hit at the open right now it's down seven hundred ninety six points S. and P. is off eighty six CBS news business analyst Jill Slazenger fear among economists and investors alike is that we don't know how long this will continue we don't know how pervasive it will be the labor department's new jobs report does not reflect fallout over the virus there were more than two hundred seventy three thousand new positions in February unemployment was down to three and a half percent losses are piling up for air carriers because of the virus the airline industry is not just bruised it is battered and bloody Perry flint of the international air transport association says it's a major crisis for our industry airlines is in demand fall by half or more people simply aren't traveling people are fearful unsure if they go somewhere they maybe quarantine unable to return home possibly even quarantine here the airlines are bracing for a sixty three billion dollar fall in passenger revenue galleon on CBS news months after her two children disappeared their mother Lori valoe has a court appearance in Idaho the FBI says cell phone data and photos show they'd taken a family trip to Yellowstone National Park the kids were never seen again CBS is Jonathan vaguely RD hello appear in court later this afternoon the children's grandparents will also be there they are the ones that requested the welfare check that said this investigation into motion Allen was arrested in Hawaii last month Yale researchers say they have proof it pays to relax during pregnancy CBS is Tom Hansen sign just gave mice a stress hormone in the womb and found it altered immune responses decreasing the ability to fight infections and tumors researchers believe their data helps explain why some people fight infections better than others down now down six hundred.

Idaho Yale Jill Slazenger business analyst secretary Hawaii Allen CBS Yellowstone National Park FBI Mr trump Lori valoe air transport association Perry flint Alex ETS Atlanta CDC
Mother of children missing for months is arrested in Hawaii

Mark and Melynda

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Mother of children missing for months is arrested in Hawaii

"The mother of two missing children from Idaho is due in court in Hawaii where she was arrested fox's Jessica Rosenthal has this live Lisa Cole white police say they arrested Laurie Val on a warrant issued by Madison County Idaho a judge there had ordered her to produce her children seventeen year old Kylie Ryan and seven year old Joshua by the end of last month but she failed to do so and he's now been charged with felony desertion of dependent children she's been held on five million dollars bail bail Justin caller is the county prosecutor incline extradition early often and one is certainly one of the more unusual one highly was last seen at Yellowstone National Park September eighth according to charging documents and Joshua was last seen a few weeks later at

Idaho Hawaii FOX Jessica Rosenthal Laurie Val Kylie Ryan Joshua Lisa Cole Madison County Justin Prosecutor Yellowstone National Park
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"You can check this out to and be great spot to see that type the hot springs you also have artists paint pots over here so if you don't do mud volcano you can do artists paint pots or vice versa. And you'll get a chance to see that type of a feature. Next is the upper loop so the upper loop. I'm GONNA think of more in terms of kind of four corners because there's really four towns that that mark the four corners of this loop and we already talked about Norris which is in the southwest corner and of course that has midway kaiser basin and artists paint pots. What's and then Kenyon village? Which I said was the village where there is a ranger station and stuff? So that's the southeast corner. Also were the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone will be at and then from there. We took that Kenyan village road and headed North Up to Tower Roosevelt. Now this road I hear is going to be closed for part of summer. Twenty twenty twenty. So just be sure you check on the website. I don't know when the closure starts on I don't know if that's been announced and how much of the summer that's going to affect things. But you won't actually be able to take this road north to go up to Tower Roosevelt You can still get to Tower Roosevelt. You're just GONNA have to kind of go the long way on the other side but when we went we were able to head North to Tower Roosevelt and then from Tower Roosevelt. This is where you could get onto the bear tooth highway and head out of town going towards the entrance. That is kind kind of Lower Montana Upper Wyoming on the east side if you were to drive out on that road. The bear tooth highway is if you're going exit park you're going to get to Lamar Valley. And Lamar Value Valley has a lot of features that are similar to hate him valley. You have those big vistas and you'll see different wildlife but it's more known for seen wolves so if it really matters to you to try to spot a wolf while you're on this trip. Then you're GONNA WANNA hit up Lamar Valley because that's probably your best bet if you are headed towards Tower Roosevelt. Some of the other things to see here are tower falls waterfalls and then the petrified tree is up here too so it's pretty easy to kind of. Stop there pullover. It's it's near the road and then it's a petrified tree so if you've never seen that your kids haven't seen that that's a super bowl nothing to stop and check out If you continue kind of on that northern part of the route then it will head to the West and go over to mammoth hot springs springs. Now mammoth hot springs is the biggest town in the park. It's where the park headquarters are at where the Rangers live. And you can tell that this is really the town for the the park. It's open so all your round so the road that goes from mammoth hot springs and over to tower. Roosevelt is actually the only road that's open through the winter in yellowstone the rest of the roads. They they don't clear you can take a snowmobile on them if you're part of one of the snowmobile tours. But you can't drive a car on him because They're covered in snow but up in mammoth hot springs. It's really cool to see. This is where the terraces are the The travertine terraces. So you can see those. They're really big. There's some different places where you can get out and hike around which is really need to see. We also saw a bunch of elk. Here I mean like in the road. You can't can't even drive because there's so many elk all over the place so I guess if you WanNa see elk is probably a good spot to go as well side note. Though this. This is not a hot springs you can bay. Then if you're from these coaster not used to hot springs out West. We have a ton of hot springs in a bunch of your mountain towns in places where you just have these natural hot springs. There's places that put in swimming pools and kind of Fuel pump some of that hot spring water are into the pool and then you can soak and sit around and do all sorts of stuff. So there's a lot of hot springs out west and that's one of the things I love about this area area but yellowstone. The mammoth hot springs are not hot springs for us to go in. There actually is one place where you are allowed to get into some hot springs natural literal hot springs and dip into it and I just learned about that recently. I didn't even know about that in the current trip. But I'll tell you about that right right now so apparently in boiling river. which is Kinda halfway between Gardner and mammoth? There's an area that you can stop and then you can go to a a hot springs kind of area so there's kind of some different pools and stuff so you need to you. Know Bring your swimsuit flip flops and all that kind of stuff And it's not not exactly like people don't know about it but if you do WanNa do a soak while you're in yellowstone that's the place where you can do it then as you continue back south heading towards Norris your pass roaring mountain in this is the place where you'll see the funerals so this is the steam. That's just kind of smoking and coming out of the side of the mountain so really cool. Cool to see That's probably one of the last highlights there on the upper loop and when we come back we're going to talk about camping at Yellowstone National Park.

Tower Roosevelt yellowstone Lamar Valley Twenty twenty twenty Norris Grand Canyon of Yellowstone Yellowstone National Park Roosevelt Lamar Value Valley Lower Montana Upper Wyoming kaiser basin Rangers boiling river. Gardner
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"You're not dealing with Labour Day. They traffic kids are back in school so for most people. They're not going to be able to travel this time of year so there is a lot less crowds but you still have the fall colors and and we still had beautiful weather so it was a great time to visit. I highly recommend visiting in the fall. Because you won't have to deal with so many crowds At least with with the US tourists there was a huge international crowd but a lot less people and it was easy enough to park at the different locations. There was only one time in one place. Yes where we actually had to wait to get a parking spot and everywhere else we were able to just stop and see the sights when we wanted to so highly recommend going in September. Oh and we also only had a few days tetons and we only had a few days at yellowstone. So that's not how I'd like to do it. I'd love to have more time but I'm still glad that we did that. In at at least got to see a base of it and then next time we go back we know what we want to see more of in where we want to spend more of our time so if you only have a few days or if you're driving out to glacier asier from somewhere in the east or the Midwest just stop at yellowstone even if it's just a day or two just so you can see some of it and get a taste for it and decide what you WanNa see more of when when you come back so that's kind of my feeling about it And then the other thing I want to make sure you know is that you will need a vehicle for Yellowstone National Channel Park so unlike some of the other places like Zion or glacier where they have a shuttle system that's available for you to go to the different sites around the park. There's no oh shuttle system at yellowstone. There's I mean. There are some private companies that will do bus tours. So I suppose you could get scheduled onto one of those if if you were coming into town or nearby in your RV and you didn't have a tow vehicle or You weren't with a travel trailer so you had vehicle with you so I guess that is an option. The the other thing is the different cities that are around yellowstone have some car rental options and we actually stayed in West Yellowstone which is in Montana. It's just just outside of the West entrance for the park and I know that there's a car rental place there because my inlaws need to use it and That worked out just fine. I can't remember what they had to pay for the day but if you don't have to- vehicle it'll be a lot cheaper just to rent a vehicle than to get that all set up so For sure rent a car plan on renting car or having your own vehicle because You have to drive to all the sites and you have to park with everybody else. WHO's trying to park there? That's the other reason why going in the offseason offseason. So either you could go kind of before summer starts so kinda before Memorial Day and When the kids are first out of school but things might not be open yet? So we're definitely getting snow through may in in those areas and so having that cleared out and ready to go for cars might not actually have until June but in September. You still probably have some pretty good weather there. There's a chance to have a snowfall but it's probably not going to close all the roads yet. So September number makes for a really good time and when we come back. We're going to talk about things to see on the lower loop. There are lots of amazing stops in Yellowstone National Park. But I think I'm going to focus on some of what I think. Maybe the must stews or some of the hydrothermal features. That you can see and talk about those. So when we came to yellowstone we came up from Grand Teton. So we were there the nights before. So we're heading northwest up into yellowstone. And then we were heading over where we're heading directly north and yellowstone and then we were heading towards the West to get to West Yellowstone. Which is where we were camping for the night and so when we did this we went ahead and stopped at old faithful? If you think about the lower loop as has being a clock face then I would put The entrance on the south end from Teton at six o'clock and then the parking lot in area for old world faithful being at about eight of probably seven or eight o'clock so it's it's not that far from that area and then the West Yellowstone stone entrance is pretty much at nine o'clock so it's on the route to their the nice thing about the stopping here. This night is that it saved us from needed to stop there on the next day which freed us up for other things and the old faithful. Parking lot is actually really large and it can accommodate large. RV's so we were able to pull up there were there was plenty of R. V. Parking and big enough spaces for a real big. RV Ours is thirty seven feet we were able to park. We kept the jeep there to We had our dog with us. So we're able to let her out and have her unleash but let her kinda like walk around and go the bathroom and stuff and the lodge is is there. Obviously the guys are old faithful. Geyser is amazing to see and you get to hang out for a little while and then you can just watch it. Shoot up into the sky super recall. We actually had a cloudy day so it may be didn't look as impressive as it is on a really clear blue sky day but it was still neat to see. There's also a boardwalk that walks around the area so you can see some of the other features in and things on the ground cause a lot of places where these hot springs are at. Obviously you can't be walking near that right. 'cause I mean we're we're talking about temperatures in two hundred degrees so really hot space and you can't walk it but you can see it from the boardwalk there's also use usually usually arranger giving a talk at the old faithful geyser so if you're hanging out there throughout the day I'm sure there will be a ranger speaking about the geyser and giving some information nations There was when we were there and for the rest of the trip we went ahead and parked. RV At the campsite which was outside of the park and then we just drove in our jeep for the rest of the areas and that really was necessary because there wasn't another parking lot that really could accommodate a large RV v.. So the old faithful parking lot is the only one that was really that size so the next morning we headed out with Rg and and came in through that West entrance and pretty soon after that there was a spot to pullover actually we had a bison on the road that was in our ways we kind of had to wait for the Bison to cross Ross and head over to the river and then we could see a bunch of different bison over in that area and then the first place though that we had set on our agenda agenda to go to see was grand prize medic spring and This is the Norris Geyser Basin. It's important to go here first thing in the morning because there's just Very limited parking so I mean maybe maybe thirty cars can fit in this parking lot and really not. RV's RV's we saw a couple RV but they were like short RV's class bees or vans. It's not really intended for RV's to be able to park in there so limited parking in even for cars and there's actually people that were kind of parking on the main road on the way in there before you even took the turn off. I don't know if that's allowed. And if arranger was making a move or not but we did have to wait here for a while so we probably should wait ten or fifteen minutes just in the line of people until something freed up in in in a parking spot opened up but this was the only place that we had to wait for the whole entire trip. That's why we got here though and we did this first thing and in terms of where grand prize medic spring is. I would put it at like ten o'clock mark so it's kind of On the west side but a little further south. What's so cool about GRANDPA pigeon springs is that you're seen this hot springs with the bacteria that are the different colors and the color? Differentiation is really exciting in. And you see this blue and orange and red and just all these fantastic colors that you just don't see in nature like this so it's really neat to see if you so you can actually walk on a boardwalk that will take you up to the main part of GRANDPA's matic springs and it's probably only maybe a half mile. Maybe three quarters of a mile. It's not that bad of a hike and like I said it's a boardwalk so it's the kind of thing you could push stroller if you needed to You also if you wanted to get a bird's bird's eye view of the grandkids medic springs. We didn't do this but next time. I definitely want to do this. You can do. The ferry falls hike which is kind of the access for this this kind of over by old faithful. It takes about three to four hours to do because it's about six miles but when you get up to the top you're getting this bird's eye view or you're looking down onto the GRANDPA's medic spring. And that would be really cool to see so as you keep heading counterclockwise around the lower loop from the whole kind. A six o'clock to three o'clock spread you're driving along yellowstone lake and this is the largest high altitude lake. It's really beautiful. We actually stopped here at Lake Lodge and one had an eight some lunch and because it was the fall there was nobody in the restaurant it was perfect to just sit there and sit fitted one of the windows and look out over. The view was really beautiful. This is also pretty close to the location where fishing bridge is at. And we'll talk more about that in the Campground Ron area but fishing bridge is a wonderful place to stay. It's close it puts you right in there. It's only for our vis It's been closed for renovations but they are opening it up this September so it's open pretty soon not in time for this summer but if you're going in the fall you'll be good and then for next sure and it'll give you a place to stay. So that's where this locations at if you keep heading counterclockwise and keep heading up at about probably like the two who o'clock part of the lower loop you get to mud volcano in Hayden Valley so Hayden Valleys on the inside of the loop and it's just this kind a flat space where you're likely to see wildlife so you're getting these big amazing vistas because you have the flat valley and then you have the peaks heats and the background and it's a great place to try to see different wildlife even wolves. Some of them might be in the Hayden Valley Area A- At least it's one of your better spots to check them out and then mud volcano is super cool. There's boiling mud pots. And Dragon's mouth is located here and Dragon's mouth was my kid's favorite thing..

yellowstone RV West Yellowstone Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Channel P yellowstone lake US GRANDPA pigeon springs Grand Teton Teton Midwest Hayden Valleys glacier asier Norris Geyser Basin Montana Zion or glacier
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"That travel part time in our motorhome. Home Jayco Seneca and we know a jeep travel with our dog and tend to visit a lot of the national parks. Because we're trying to take our girls to all the national parks before before they head off to college and I think we are now at number twenty seven or twenty eight so Trying to hit those all up and we try to bring information to you. That's useful useful for your trips in your RV and In particular to the national parks so on my instagram feed. Recently I asked the people well so the question that I get asked a lot is which is your favorite national park. And it's hard to just pick a favorite national park right. That's like picking a favorite Beatles Song. You can't can't do that. That depends on your mood and it depends on what you're looking for and there's different things you like about all of them so I don't think I could answer a favorite park but if if you were to ask me what's one park that I think every family should go to so if a family said they're only going to go to one national park with their kids. They've never done a national national park vacation. Where should they go? I definitely know my answer and it was the one that came up. The most in asking other people and that response was yellowstone. Oh Stone National Park and why is it that people love Yellowstone National Park while. I think there's three things that really make yellowstone amazing. The first first thing is just its overall size. It's really a huge park and there's so much of it that is unique and different throughout the park. So of course. The biggest national park in the lower forty eight is not yellowstone. Actually Death Valley But a lot of death valley might be kinda similar throughout yellowstone In contrast has a lot of very different properties depending on where you are within the park so I think it's a really unique and explorer floral. Land you really can get to a lot of places within the park or see those different types of highlights In a reasonable way it also is so so large that it goes into three states so for the most part it is in Wyoming but it also goes a little bit into Idaho and then a bit into Montana as well and and it's the only national park to do that to go into three states and it really is the type of park that has park and wildlife and wilderness. As as far as the I can see so you can be in a place and and as far as you can look which is far out west sometimes you have these huge vistas that gopher Everything is just still wildlife. There's not a lot of development that's on the fringe of it so you don't get this and you don't have you know things like oilfields oilfields and stuff like when Teddy Roosevelt or something. Where you have this other part of just an commercial life? That's imposing onto the national park. Instead you really feel like you're out in the wilderness you feel like You can even feel like it was the early cowboys and everybody saw when they were doing wagons west and heading out and it just it feels raw and I think that that wild feel is part of the reason people like it. The second thing I think makes yellowstone amazing is the wildlife so there's really abundant wildlife there's unique wildlife. If you like your kind of mammals and your larger animals you get at that chance to see Bison here and you can see elk and you can see grizzly bears and you can see regular bears you can see blackberries to But you you can see grizzly bears which you can't see I in Colorado. We don't get to see grizzly bears. They also have wolves up in yellowstone. We're starting to get wolves in Colorado but a lot of places you can't see wolves it's I gotta be honest. Though I've been yellowstone three times never seen a wolf there so But you you have. At least a potential to see him in yellowstone so there's a lot lot of wildlife and is just really cool to be able to experience that I guarantee when you go you will see bison that's pretty much given you're probably very likely going to see elk and I have been there and seen grizzly bears. So it's possible to see grizzly bears. The wolves are you probably going to have to work a little bit harder if you want to do that. So that's the the second reason I think yellowstone is super easy and then the third reason which I think is probably the biggest reason is that it exists on top of this Super Volcano. Okay no and that super volcano feeds the world's largest collection of hydrothermal features. So this is probably what makes this park such a popular Park Park as an international destination. When you go there you'll hear a lot of different languages spoken and have a lot of international people that are surrounding you because It is such a unique thing that that is the biggest place in the world to see all these hydrothermal features which is so cool. And so what are some of those features while there's five types of hydrothermal features features. You can see there. The first are the hot springs and so the hot springs are hot. Water with bacteria in them in this bacteria. Arterial will The type of bacteria that you have will depend on the temperature of the water. So you can have these pools pools of water where it's a little bit hotter towards the center and so it may be. It's a bluish color and then as you get out towards the fringe the type of bacteria that like that temperature are maybe orangish appear orange to us and reddish so you end up with these different colors in these hot pools based on the type of bacteria that's in there and probably the best view of this is grand prize medic springs which is part of the lower loop and we'll go through both the loops but just make a note that that's part of the lower loop and then one of the the second feature that I wanted to talk about are the geysers so geysers are where you have constricted hot water and then it just shoots up and rises up and so the one. That's probably most well known for that is old faithful which is also in the lower loop and and Old Faithfuls called that because it's generally pretty predictable in terms of the time and I think it was something like ninety minutes so generally if you're going to go there are and you're going to hang around for about two hours or so. You're you're guaranteed to see it in that time. So it's not exactly like clockwork because this is mother nature. But it's pretty consistent. So they they call it old faithful the third hydrothermal feature are the travertine terraces. And so this is where you have limestone and hot water over it. That creates this chock white travertine stone and so this can best be seen up at mammoth hot springs which is part of the upper loop the fourth hydro thermal feature are the funerals and these are steam vents so the smoke is just kind of coming out of the ground ground and the best place to see. This is roaring mountain which is up on the upper loop as well and then the fifth hydrothermal feature are the mud pots and these these are acidic springs. But they're so little water in the area that instead of seen kind of this water pool like you would with the other hot springs like Grand Prize medic spring instead instead. You're seeing the mud boil and so probably the best example of this is artists paint pots. which is part of the lower loop as well so those are some of the great features of yellowstone and probably some of the reasons at such popular park and when we come back? We're going to talk about logistics of the park and just some of the general things that you're going to want to know so I think one of the most important things to know about yellowstone is just how huge of a park it is is and knowing that the entrances for it are miles away from where the actual tourist sites are at and sometimes the towns can be miles away from where the entrances are for the park. So you could be camping somewhere and it could beat two hours for you to get to old faithful from where you're staying If you're not staying same within the park so I've heard. Sometimes I've seen people ask questions like on facebook and stuff. Oh can we stay Jackson hole and just do a couple of days and tetons is and do a couple of days in yellowstone and I guess the answer is yes technically you could but you'd probably be doing like twelve or fourteen hour days in your car because there's so much much driving time in that type of plan and nobody really wants to do that so I think the best thing to do is to stay somewhere within N- grantee on or close to Grand Teton. If you're wanting to do that as part of your trip and do that for a little bit of time like maybe two or three days and then head up and stay someplace that's either within yellowstone national park or just outside of their for three or four days in order to make that work so I think ideally it would be the best probably spend two to three days and tetons three to four up in yellowstone and to stay in those locations for the time that you're going to explore those parks because stained somewhere outside side of town and then trying to get to both of those parks. It's just GonNa make for long miserable days so I don't think you'll be as happy if you do that. So just know try to stay closer In there and then the other thing to know about it is that the park actually makes within yellowstone. It's almost like two loops that are attached. So it's almost like a number eight and so we'll talk about things in terms of the lower loop which is like the bottom half of the eight and then the upper loop which is like the top half of the eight and just so you know the lower loop if you were just to drive the lower loop not stop anywhere not be held up by traffic or animals in the road or anything if you were just to drive it doing the forty five mile per hour speed limit which it is most the time it would still take you like two or three hours probably closer to three hours to actually really drive around that loop so you can imagine if you actually want to stop and see things or you have to stop and wait for parking. That's significantly going to increase that time time. So you need a lot of time to see this park Having said that though I do want to throw out our story and just tell you how we did yellowstone yellowstone so I on our most recent trip with our RV so we got our two thousand Nineteen Jayco Seneca in September so it was like the first week of September in this was in two thousand eighteen. And so we got our Seneca and everybody says on your first trip stay close to home. Go somewhere where you have resources. Go somewhere where you'd have people to help you out. In case there is a problem and I think that's amazing advice We didn't take that advice advice though because what happened was we were going to go somewhere close to home so we were heading on. I eighty and we were going to head Dinosaur National Monument which we still have not seen and it's not that far for us and we were driving on the highway and saw the sign for yellowstone. Teton you know coming up at this exit and just said okay. Yeah let's do it. Our girls hadn't been. Let's just do it so we went to yellowstone and grand teton without any reservations without any of my maps and guidebooks and all the typical stuff I do to plan. I'm one of those people that over plan. All the trips as you can imagine My husband's more the fly by the seat of his pants. Kinda guy and we did that for this trip and it worked out fine fine now having said that this was mid September so I think we started the trip on probably like the fifteenth of September so middle of September..

yellowstone Yellowstone National Park yellowstone yellowstone Park Park Stone National Park Old Faithfuls Grand Teton Colorado Teddy Roosevelt Super Volcano Dinosaur National Monument facebook Wyoming Montana Idaho tetons Seneca Jackson hole
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:01 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on KGO 810

"John this is the job that's a show of Yellowstone National Park it is a gem of the solar system however within that Jack it's not just the geysers or the beautiful landscape or the excited tourists and the wonderful ice cream it's also the large animals particularly L. but there are lots of them for like it animals that these animals have been there since the ice laughed in Montana since the ice left in Wyoming and the west since the eyes were treated and expose North America in addition to the ice leaving it made room for the large animals to take up a new annual track called the Great Migration the amazing thing to discover is that we didn't know about it until recently and I welcome Brian you know blondes Kay he is the executive director of property environment a research center perk in Bozeman Montana Brian a very good evening to you the Yellowstone park and the surrounding area because Yellowstone's just totally eight nineteen centuries been there this this whole area has been there for ten thousand years has in it the Great Migration how do you define that and why did it take us so long to find it good evening to you Brian well it's great to be on your show John appreciate it yeah I know what you're describing is the greater Yellowstone ecosystem people think of Yellowstone National Park and that's just a small part of the ecosystem ecosystem itself is about twenty two million acres which if you think of it's about the size of the state of Indiana and straddles three state and it's also the home of the largest land mammal migrations that we have in the lower forty eight states right now elk pronghorn mule deer all use what is essentially the largest intact temper ecosystem temperate zone eco system on the planet can move back and forth across this landscape for their own survival and you ask a question about how the how do we know we're not know these migrations were happening you the advances in technology with the GPS and tracking devices just within the last ten years have given us a lot better sense of where the elk start and where they end and where they're going in between through the through the course of the year and so if you think of if you think of Yellowstone National Park you think of this like a pulmonary system Yellowstone National Park is like the beating heart it's the center of the system and then you've got these arteries which are essentially migration corridors coming out of Yellowstone National Park that poor from the high country the Yellowstone down into the low country along the river valleys we could be like your capillaries and those calories are essentially like private ranchers that ranch in the river valleys around Yellowstone they follow what is called the green wave what is that price yeah I think we call that surfing the green wave so so you know all these migrations begin and end somewhere and they usually begin and on private ranches imparted ranges are low country so when the winner the elk tend to be in the low country where grass is exposed where there's alfalfa field so that they can feed on our four to they can feed on and then as the spring calms you get grass shoots sprouting up in those grass shoots through the course of months go higher and higher in elevation and that the L. Kurds simply follow the grass there there they they like to eat the young shoots of grass that's most nutritious for them and so the follow the young shoots of grass from the lower elevation ranches all the way up to the plateau of Yellowstone in the middle of summer and then when the snows come back and they'll just reversed course and head back down to the river valley the animals names in a piece by your colleague Tom Wilkinson elk deer pronghorn moves bison bighorn sheep and mountain goats now I'm going to guess they don't obey boundaries and that this Great Migration extends out I've focused on Yellowstone because this is such a spectacular event to visit Yellowstone but do these great migrations include all of the western states and is it moving to Canada do we know how big the track they are you know some of the migration to our the but the migrations do cover most of the western states in the eleven western states that we think of in the in the lower forty eight but you're right al don't read signs so there they're moving from public land to moving from national parks to the National Forest in National Wildlife Refuge to state land to private land and some of these can go as long I mean one of the longest that we know of is a mule deer that that name was appropriately named mule deer two fifty five and she migrated essentially two hundred fifty miles from the red desert and south central Wyoming up into island park Idaho which is to the western side of Yellowstone at the two hundred fifty mile migration that she made we had GPS tracking on her and then he reversed course into the migration all way back so you know total round about five hundred miles for that mule deer the Great Migration describes these large beautiful animals and you can see them in the summertime in the winter time but I learned from Todd will consume as well that it describes an ecosystem that depends upon the migrating animals not only for the love flora and fauna but also for their carcasses house so yes so you know the the migrations and healthy L. Kurds actually support the large carnivores because as we have grizzly bears recovering we have wars coming back in the area we have mountain lions they all pray on the oak that's a primary food source for those for those large carnivores into large carnivorous will feed on the elk and then they'll leave the carcasses there for scavengers becomes a bird species coyotes fox others that that will come and pray so it's it's really a primary food source for other species in the ecosystem and it's also good for the economics of the eco system also hunters in this area I'm in Montana hunters relying on elk to feed their families through the course of the year so healthy elk herd help hunters and as you noted Taurus you know flock to Yellowstone C. species like elk and bison so so it's good for not just the ecosystem but the economy as well I've learned and reporting on Africa and reporting on the subcontinent that the chief threat to large animals any animal system is the destruction of the habitat and and that means that we have to deal not only with public land Yellowstone but with private land is that is that a program that exists in the western concern they lack of private landowners with this great migration well you hit the nail on the head habitat loss is the number one threat development around here is the number one threat you know of those twenty two million acres I described about twenty seven percent of that is private lands and we know that elk spend up to eighty percent of their time in the winter on private lands so the private the ranchers these are primarily cattle ranches they're doing an amazing job they are great the words of the habitat they're great stewards of the species but there is economic consequences for for them providing that stewardship for them help is oftentimes not too much of an asset as they are a liability elk will move on to their land they will destroy senses they'll eat forage that was designed for cattle and they are often transmitters of disease they can wipe out whole cattle herds so perk is really trying to work with these private land stewards he's working ranches and trying to figure out how we can find market based mechanisms that will help make the oak less of a liability or more of an asset to them so they can keep doing what they do best which is being working land a private ranches and not having to feel the pressure to convert to to develop Brian now that we see this great migration the pathways is it going to be advertised or publicized they're gonna have signs up for people can see it here in the east coast for example there's much attention the Appalachian Trail and people are proud to live near it is that possible in the west as well you know it's a tricky dynamic here lines on the map can kind of cut both ways for conservationists and scientists and and government folks and folks who care about the corridors lines on the map a really neat things and they're something that or worth looking at for ranchers and private landowners lines on a map or pretty scary thing it's not always good for the landowners often times if they are if they're land is part of that corridor they often look at that and think on getting more regulation or more oversight is is coming my way you know I have a friend out here who is told me that in Montana you can bring a gun to a meeting you just can't bring a map to a meeting and that kind of the thought process out here so there's a sensitivity among the scientists who are working on these corridors in tracking them that it's important to know where they are it's important to know where to focus resources and attention but at the same time there's a there's a downside to being on a map but if folks come to Yellowstone in the summer they will see LPL will be in the park in the summer in the high country primarily they'll see these movements in the shoulder seasons you know in the spring and the fall when the when the elk are moving in and out of the parking coming down to the river valleys in those river valleys are really how you access the part when you come to Yellowstone you'll go through paradise valley we'll go to the Madison value you'll come to Jackson and that's where those ultimately end up and finally before your got here these these migration pass existed is this what the native Americans followed they were aware of this and they camped accordingly yeah I know they were nomadic people and they often followed the great herds we know we had you know thirty to fifty million bison that roamed as far east as Ford if you can believe it and so those and no matter generally followed follow the animals in the open no different it's it's interesting that it sort of now Yellowstone is the focus of this because as we know as as as the United States has developed a to have intact ecosystems is something rare these days and and again Yellowstone is one of the largest intact temperature and eco system so that's why we continue to have these migrations in this particular part of the country Brian yeah Blonsky is executive director of the property environment research center we've been speaking of the Great Migration Yellowstone I recommend a recent article by his colleague a journalist Todd Wilkinson's on the migration itself I'm John batches wintertime they'll be migrating soon enough when the snows leave.

John Yellowstone National Park Jack
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:01 min | 1 year ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"John this is the John Kasich of Yellowstone National Park it is a gem of the solar system however within that Jack it's not just the geysers or the beautiful landscape or the excited tourists and the wonderful ice cream it's also the large animals particularly L. but there are lots of them for like an animal's that these animals have been there since the ice laughed in Montana since the ice left in Wyoming and the west since the eyes were treated and expose North America in addition to the ice leaving it made room for the large animals to take up a an annual track called the Great Migration the amazing thing to discover is that we didn't know about it until recently and I welcome Brian yelled Blonsky he is the executive director of property environment a research center perk in Bozeman Montana Brian a very good evening to you the Yellowstone park and the surrounding area because Yellowstone's just tell the eight nineteen centuries been there this this whole areas been there for ten thousand years has in it the Great Migration how do you define that and why did it take so long to find good evening to you Brian well it's great to be on your show John appreciate it yeah I know what you're describing is the greater Yellowstone ecosystem people think of Yellowstone National Park and that's just a small part of the ecosystem ecosystem itself is about twenty two million acres which if you think of it about the size of the state of Indiana and straddles three state and it's also the home of the largest land mammal migrations that we have in the lower forty eight states right now elk pronghorn mule deer all use what is essentially the largest intact temper ecosystem tempered zone eco system on the planet to move back and forth across this landscape for their own survival and you ask a question about how how do we know we're not know these migrations were happening you the advances in technology with GPS and tracking devices just within the last ten years have given us a lot better sense of where the elk start and where they end and where they're going in between to the to the course of the year and so if you think of if you think of Yellowstone National Park you think of this like a pulmonary system of Yellowstone National Park is like the beating heart it's the center of the system and then you've got these arteries which are essentially migration corridors coming out of Yellowstone National Park that poor from the high country Yellowstone down into the low country along the river valleys we could delete your capillaries and those calories are simply like private ranchers that ranch in the river valleys around Yellowstone they follow what is called the green wave what is that price yeah I think we call it surfing the green wave so so you know all these migrations begin and end up somewhere and they usually begin and on private ranches in private ranges are low country so when the winner the elk tend to be in the low country where grass is exposed where there's alfalfa field so that they can feed owner for to they compete on and then as the spring calms you getting crash shoots sprouting up in those grass shoots through the course of months go higher and higher in elevation and that the elk herds simply follow the grass there there they they like to eat the young shoots of grass that's most nutritious for them and they'll follow the young shoots of grass from the lower elevation ranches all the way up to the plateau of Yellowstone in the middle of summer and then when the snows come back and they'll just reversed course and head back down to the river valley the animals names in a piece by your colleague Todd will consume elk deer pronghorn moves bison bighorn sheep and mountain goats now I'm going to guess they don't obey boundaries and that this Great Migration extends out I've focused on Yellowstone because it's just such a spectacular event to visit Yellowstone but do these great migrations include all of the western states and is it moving to Canada do we know how big the track they are you know some of the migration are up to but the migrations do cover most of the western states in the eleven western states that we think of in the in the lower forty eight but you're right L. don't read signs so there they're moving from public land to moving from national parks hood National Forest in National Wildlife Refuge to state land to private land and some of these can go as long as he won the longest that we know of is a mule deer that that name was appropriately named mule deer two fifty five and she migrated essentially two hundred fifty miles from the red desert in south central Wyoming up into island park Idaho which is to the western side of Yellowstone at the two hundred fifty mile migration that she made we had GPS tracking on her and then he reversed course into the migration all way back so you know total round about five hundred miles for that mule deer the Great Migration describes these large beautiful animals and you can see them in the summertime in the winter time but I learned from Todd will consume as well that it describes an ecosystem that depends upon the migrating animals not only for the love flora and fauna but also for their carcasses house so yes so you know the the migrations and healthy L. Kurds actually support the large carnivores because as we have grizzly bears recovering we have wars coming back in the area we have mountain lions they all play on the out that's the primary food source for those up for those large carnivores into large carnivorous will feed on the elk and then they'll leave the carcasses there for scavengers becomes a bird species coyotes fox others that that will come in price so it's it's really a primary food source for other species in the ecosystem and it's also good for the economics of the ecosystem also hunters in this area I'm in Montana hunters relying on elk to feed their families through the course of the year so healthy elk herd help hunters and as you noted Taurus we have flocked to Yellowstone up primarily to see species like elk and bison so so it's good for not just the ecosystem but the economy as well I have learned and reporting on Africa and reporting on the subcontinent that the chief threat to large animals any animal system is the destruction of the habitat and and that means that we have to deal not only with public land Yellowstone but with private land is that is that a program that exists in the west to concern they let the private landowners with this great migration well you hit the nail on the head habitat loss is the number one threat development around here is the number one threat you know of those twenty two million acres I described about twenty seven percent of that is private lands and we know that elk spend up to eighty percent of their time in the winter on private lands so the private the ranchers either primarily cattle ranches they're doing an amazing job they are great the words of the habitat they're great stewards of the species but there is economic consequences for for them providing that stewardship for them elk is often times not too much of an asset as they are a liability elk will move on to their land they will destroy fences they'll eat forage that was designed for cattle and they are often transmitters of disease they can wipe out whole cattle herds so perk is really trying to work with these private land steward he's working ranches and try to figure out how we can find market based mechanisms that will help make the oak less of a liability or more of an asset to them so they can keep doing what they do best which is being working land of private ranches and not having to feel the pressure to convert to to develop Brian now that we see this great migration the pathways is it going to be advertised or publicized they're gonna have signs up for people can see it here in the east coast for example there's much attention the Appalachian Trail and people are proud to live near it is that possible in the west as well you know it's a tricky dynamic here winds on the map can kind of cut both ways for conservationists and scientists and and government folks and folks who care about the corridors lines on the map a really neat things and there's something that or worth looking at for ranchers in private landowners lines on a map or pretty scary thing it's not always good for the landowners often times if they're if they're land is part of that corridor they often look at that and think going getting more regulation or more oversight is is coming my way you know I have a friend out here who is told me that in Montana you can bring a gun to a meeting you just can't bring a map to a meeting and that kind of the thought process out here so there's a sensitivity among the scientists who are working on these quarters in tracking them that it's important to know where they are it's important to know where to focus resources and attention but at the same time there's a there's a downside to being on a map but if folks come to Yellowstone in the summer they will see LPL will be in the park in the summer in the high country primarily they'll see these movements in the shoulder seasons you know in the spring and the fall when the when the elk are moving in and out of the parking coming down to the river valleys in those river valleys are really how you access the park when you come to Yellowstone you'll go through paradise valley we'll go to the Madison value you'll come to Jackson and that's where those alcohol to million dollar and finally before your got here these these migration paths existed is this what the native Americans followed as they were aware of this and they camped accordingly yeah I know they were nomadic people and they often followed the great herds we know we had you know thirty to fifty million bison that roamed as far east as Florida if you can believe it and so those in no matter generally followed follow the animals in the open no different it's it's interesting that it sort of now Yellowstone is the focus of this because as we know as as as the United States has developed a to have intact ecosystems is something rare these days and and again Yellowstone is one of the largest intact eco system so that's why we continue to have these migration in this particular part of the country Brian yelled Blonsky is executive director of the property environment research center we've been speaking of the Great Migration Yellowstone I recommend a recent article by his colleague a journalist Todd Wilkinson's on the migration itself I'm John batches wintertime they'll be migrating soon enough when the snows sleeve is this is the.

John Kasich Yellowstone National Park Jack
Stomach illness outbreak prompts major clean-up at Yosemite National Park

AP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Stomach illness outbreak prompts major clean-up at Yosemite National Park

"There's a stomach illness outbreak in Yellowstone National Park at least a dozen people have fallen ill with stomach issues the National Park Service in the U. S. public health service told the San Francisco Chronicle they launched an investigation into the parks food service areas after employees and visitors reported the problems this month so far the illness or the origin of the outbreak hasn't been identified park officials said those who had gotten sick are getting better or already

Yellowstone National Park National Park Service San Francisco Chronicle U. S.
Yosemite National Park visitors hit with gastrointestinal illness prompting 'extensive clean-up': report

AP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Yosemite National Park visitors hit with gastrointestinal illness prompting 'extensive clean-up': report

"There's a stomach illness outbreak in Yellowstone National Park at least a dozen people have fallen ill with stomach issues the National Park Service in the U. S. public health service told the San Francisco Chronicle they launched an investigation into the parks food service areas after employees and visitors reported the problems this month so far the illness or the origin of the outbreak hasn't been identified park officials said those who had gotten sick are getting better or already

Yellowstone National Park National Park Service San Francisco Chronicle U. S.
Julia Garner and Her Curls Are Happily Married to Foster the People’s Mark Foster

Colleen and Bradley

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Julia Garner and Her Curls Are Happily Married to Foster the People’s Mark Foster

"Ozark actress Julia garner and foster the people frontmen mark foster are married hi and I did not even know they were a couple gradually since on top of that I didn't know foster the people's his real name was far I'm like so bright when he got the name so Julia garner should place hi I watch Ozark I can't remember the character's name but she just won an Emmy for playing that role Ozark and if you don't know she's the the cute blond curly hair he's very good on of that show and mark foster foster the people we we hear them on my tiger now that well this we only just learned about this this morning into an Instagram post shared by them the newly weds confirm their marriage with a ring emoji and the wedding date of Friday December twenty seventh the couple had not a publicly confirmed their engagement ever but the rumors swirling inside the circulate they were circling around may that foster had proposed during a trip to Yellowstone National Park the fall like a legit celebrity relationship that's how you do it did get married under the radar you shared after the fact congratulations to them we learned that his last name is actually foster fostered that's the big take away from the story congratulations to them by god yeah yeah I assume foster meant you know like you're a foster the parent or something in your fostering these people that people I thought they were fostering the people with the music press what made a different way you're done you know this and that hello people were talking about the merits

Julia Garner Emmy Yellowstone National Park Mark Foster Instagram
Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

FT News

09:07 min | 2 years ago

Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

"For the first time will also be recording this for video on our Youtube Channel so today we're here to talk about Crowell food an extreme file is a microbe that can survive in extreme conditions one star up in Chicago has found a way of turning these microbes rapa creatures into an edible protein part of a growing trend towards a microbial revolution in Food and agriculture could microbes hold the key to feeding a growing relation here with me in the studio to discuss this is Emiko Tarazona commodities correspondent and Clive Cookson science editor thanks for joining today Emiko to start with tell us a bit about this company and what it is trying to do so sustainable biproduct is a start up in the US yes and it's turning and micro that discovered in yellowstone national park into protein so they are going to use precision fermentation and they again A to turn this protein into alternative dairy and meat products like burgers and microbial base cheese wow has it garnered much first from investor's overall the search for alternative proteins is such a hot topic in Food and agriculture these days and comes as increasing income uh-huh in developing countries and when populations become more rich they moved from carbohydrates to prestige products I meet but people can't continue easing me because of the environmental is also health concerns as well so we've had the plant based meat products impossible Burger and beyond meat and the search is on for alternative sources of protein among entrepreneurs and scientists and so yes investors are we interested sustainable by products is raised she three million early this year from companies including France's Danone and Archer Daniels Midland which is an agricultural trade we've got some really serious money behind them what to these products actually tastes like have you tried any yourself when you talk about protein means you'll have a protein which is a source of the product by the vehicle for the taste so I think the idea there is to reduce the taste of the channel whatever you using it sauce itself like pre protein which is used in beyond meat you don't want it tastes like peas yeah so you want the protein to be pures possible with Mike I have not tasted was actually not on the market so I have not tasted volcanic microbial burgers but the other uses with proteins is as food ingredient to enhance the taste of a certain product or change the way the product tastes for instance impossible foods I uses a protein called him which is made from soy and that is made from precision fermentation and it adds the meaty taste gene. The bugah wow so how optimistic are you I mean is this pine sky or do you think this is genuinely changing the way that we wing to source proteins in our food well I didn't think it's Pine Sky Tool because you already have corn for instance that is more not not C. O. R. A. But exactly due to you O. R. N. and that is made from a micro protein which is a sort of fungus and that's been around forever clive you know better than me in Qu'une dates back to the nineteen eighties and it's a good thing to think of anyone has headcorn it is as you said a vehicle for taste quarter is growing out of single celled fungus which you can define `as Microbe F- Initiative Mike Grove is somewhat stretchy incubators any organism that you can't see with the naked eye as the individual cells and you have to onto microscope to identify them that's so interesting I mean microbe seem to be having a bit of a moment recently why have they come into the spotlight now I guess spotlight might be the wrong where maybe under the telescope from yes what's the wider scientific picture here well when it comes to food one of the most important changes as of the twenty first century in in nutrition and even I would say in medicine is understanding that the billions of microbes the bacteria that live in our what's play a gigantic role in our health not just how we digest food that's the most important thing but even welby being psychologically the microbes within our body of vital and therefore there's a big and growing industry you're trying to produce microbes not say much as food but to populate guts with friendly bacteria so that's a very big growth area Another is that might cribs used to ferment foods of being extended a lot everything from Kim Chae to sauerkraut route to the molds are cheeses to bear in wine they depend on microbes one sort or another and so using microbes to produce protein I mean could this be scaled up used worldwide I mean are there inhibiting factors will I think we have to remember uh-huh like all new foods microbial food stamp grow on thin air they will need a lot of input of water nutrients at that try so from the environmental point of view that are not going to be completely benign now they're probably going to be more sustainable and growing card which spends a lot of its energy wondering around fields and belching and burping and emitting methane which is a very powerful greenhouse gas but I think those environmental questions need to be answered and they haven't yet been answered by the new foods companies that are making not only microbial foods CACO's talking about earlier but also sell based meat and fish products web rather than growing a cow will catching a fish you'll grow the proteins and the muscle the fibers hopefully trying to capture the texture and taste in the lab and where does this fit into other types of new food technologies I think they're going to be seen alongside these other cell taste foods a lot of progress is being made in taking for example stem cells from cowes Castle and getting them to develop essentially and to meet and if you combine that with Three D. Printing you can get something that's good texture I mean that's one possibility abass meat but I guess this whole microbial fungus bacterial activity I mean how will consume is really react to it is the uh-huh because it's cruel to animals and I didn't think cruelty to microbes is going to enter the picture remains to be seen sustainable but biproduct CEO has told me that he wants is to get a product out into the market either on a trial basis or onto the shelves at least in about eighteen months in the US so it'll be interesting to see what sort of marketing strategy he takes a certified next Winter Christmas twenty twenty we could be having microbial something on the shelf test smoke it I think probably not in London yeah yeah as a final question I wanted to ask you both do you think there's an argument that time and money would be better spent encouraging food and agricultural offices that are more sustainable rather than creating new products that sort of enable everyone to keep consuming in the same way I think that's a really interesting question but I suspect that the horses kind of left the stable that consumers want convenient food that they crave and also the newly rid sh developing country population they also want that as well they expect that and on the other hand you'd companies and fast food companies won't all that so can we continue killing life is to have diversity I think from a sustainability and health point of view giving consumers as rich and diverse mixture of foods as

Emiko Tarazona Youtube Archer Daniels Midland Emiko Clive Cookson United States Chicago Yellowstone National Park Crowell France Editor Mike Eighteen Months
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Have a lifetime warranty shop online at work on the sun dot net to find your pre owned vehicles what car for love to all of us with your credit quality six six six seven two two seven two one pretty can hate talking about their health but you're probably thinking about it BDS affecting men at a younger age maybe you're wondering not yeah when mail medical group has a new simple and painless procedure that doesn't include the little blue pill gains weight gains way this simple noninvasive and most of all natural no pills no injections he'll test results over and over and over he's way the revolutionary Edie therapy available now at mail medical group mail medical group dot com the official sponsor of the pill free injection free easy fix hello Connecticut may I help you critical yes Mister Tyson what can I do for you Yellowstone National Park he all faithful just wrote that but the vacation by a passer by Connecticut water conditioner would you went over to my house and Senate that is looking at about door Manuel I forgot to set the bypass laughter at that other brand of the stop the use of four thousand bothersome Lister Tyson relax with your new Connecticut there is no vacation cycle or any worries about salt if you don't use any water your Connecticut won't either we not only believe in saving solved but also in saving water plug at that I'm trying to conserve electricity you forget that you're Connecticut doesn't use electricity either there's nothing to plug in and don't forget the your Connecticut was also completely automatic relax and enjoy the whole vacations right this is great I've got old faithful Yellowstone old faithful my Connecticut water conditioner at home Hey dot com hundreds of our most popular Nissan Nissan of new Braunfels dot com pick your color picker option pick it up in the store hi thirty five exit one ninety one a new lease on a new Braunfels I'm there.

younger age Mister Tyson Yellowstone National Park Connecticut Nissan official Senate Manuel Lister Tyson
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"To on air with Doug gent in Victoria sizes tonight as the LEDs is we Peru's what's going on in the world the story about this nine year old girl from Florida and that was walking so across the street in Yellowstone National Park and get too close to a bison with her calf and the vice in came after and booted or up in the air shoes right near old faithful the issue is I wouldn't want to be any what she didn't know she nine years old and the problem is I wouldn't know that their license in Yellowstone park yeah yeah yeah okay I know but nothing but but the point is the people is nobody going up on a farm anymore so they don't know to respect animals any power of any if you if I would do a recital vice and I just would next may I see it bison wouldn't bother you in the main currently they were standing like five to ten feet away for twenty minutes no thanks I just look at that way I'm a bison right and pretty young but yeah I don't go near them in cat cows that have cabs right after you don't get too close to home for awhile till they get themselves all not that I wouldn't know yeah no you don't get too close to me until you get on quite into each with each other ten before the hour and the DJB program your home of the docks.

Doug gent Victoria Peru Florida Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone park twenty minutes nine years nine year ten feet
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:41 min | 2 years ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Schools, I'm envious Sears reporting. Finally, Eric tech, it tells us native American fashion is showing off in Yellowstone National Park next week indigenous designers and artists from across the west are converging on the park for the first Yellowstone tribal marketplace in fashion show to showcase the art. And culture of the northern plains native people, one of the feature designers del big hair stop of crow agency, Montana and owner of designs by della. She describes her work as fashion meeting, culture and includes designs from her native crow or Uppsala, ca tribe in gals dresses, and active wear. She says native American designers are gaining recognition nationwide. At first, there was probably just a handful of designers from here from the plains and down to south.

Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone Eric tech Uppsala Montana
"yellowstone national park" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:50 min | 3 years ago

"yellowstone national park" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Noel king. And I'm Rachel Martin. The partial government shutdown is now on its twelfth day. And it's starting to take a toll on some of America's national parks, while many of the parks have stayed open. They are doing so without full park service staff. Right. So volunteer. Ears and businesses that depend on the parks or passing out garbage bags and asking visitors to follow the rules. Stay on the trails. Don't start illegal campfires still. It is not easy. Andy similar off Cohen's a company called stone adventures. It's a rock climbing guide business in Joshua tree. National park in southern California every year in the high season weeks. We hear stories about this fights over campground people who park legally on Instagram, we see people who are climbing and Joshua cheeser hanging hammocks. All of that activity is illegal. She says this year is no different. But is not staffed as it usually is. And so the local community is taking it upon themselves to try and do something. Some Roth is also worried about the desert ecosystem, very fragile to human intact. So one example is the topsoil it's very easy to destroy that. If it gets turned over by Sade taio heels or people running and skating or throwing it that topsoil dies, and it can take years for it to grow back. Joshua tree. Now says campgrounds in the park will close today, citing health and safety concerns. Meanwhile, at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, the climate is very different. It's white. Everything's covering the snow. That is Travis what he's general manager of the three bear lodge and see Yellowstone Alpin guides. They run snowball Beal and snow coach tours after a previous government shutdown outfits like his got concessions to operate even during a shutdown. All the guys earn courage and people to take care of things clean up after themselves and be respectful, Matt even there's not a lot of oversee I guess or guidance. But and they're doing a really good job that way, just so many of our friends and colleagues are out of work right now, clean up after yourselves and be respectful. Also, good advice for the lawmakers debating the shutdown. Refugees have been called security threats. They've been depicted as invaders now in new critically acclaimed play called Nora puts the experience of Iraqi refugees on stage. The writers have ties to the Middle East productions were staged in Washington and New York this year and will eventually be in regional theatres NPR's. Deborah Amos has the story with Heather ofo an award winning playwright and actor Renner writer's workshop in New York with women from the Middle East. She heard a common seem the women wrote powerful personal stories of leaving home and country forever. The handful of them that had fled within an inch of their lives to become their full selves unapologetically was so breathtaking, and it's only because they had to survive the stories inspired her to write and star in Nora part refugee tail part absence Dollhouse. Reimagined before she opened in Washington Ruffo tested out the authenticity with readings in immigrant communities. The men weren't so sure. But that woman would never swear like that the white the women said they identified with Ross central character. And then you hear he he he he in the corner, and it's three Christian Iraqi women going. Well, no, that's exactly how it goes down at home when we're angry you get that. When you go into community and get what people think the drama has struck a chord with audiences at a time when the question who gets to be an American is a heated political debate after the New York performance she heard from immigrants in the audience. This was their story to Jewish Americans Italian Americans Irish Americans they wanted to stay for the talk back and just say, this is my grandmother's story, this is my family's history. The plot features Nora and her husband Todd. They fled Iraq eight years earlier, and they've made it with American passports, and even American names Nora, and Tim and a son named Alex. But questions of belonging and identity surface when a twenty year old refugee arrived from me rock on Christmas Eve, the play is a searing portrait of the emotional cost of displacement. I could see my mom and her and I could see my aunt's in her. There's nothing that happens in this play that I'm not like, oh, yeah. Of course. So rob KOMO has been to the performance three times. She says to see refugees portrayed as she knows them in real life on stage for the first time Sarah Hassan has been to the play twice. It's a very interesting combination of things it's like, it's amazing like familiarity of like, look, they mentioned this food. I love food. I grew up with and like it's so cool to hear it on a stage. And you look at the audience and a lot of them are American. And it's like funny thing I start wondering what are they thinking warnin in Baghdad twenty five years ago, her parents left Iraq when she was a toddler for her? The play expresses unspoken family one, I really just wish my mom could have seen it. Because it's to me putting words so much to what I think she and my grandparents might have felt having left their country not really being able to ever go back to their home. Hello. Women from the writers workshop often come to see the production mentored by Rufo, their personal narratives are the inspiration for struggles. Over identity says Montessori I am a scrambled egg. Neither egg yolk. Neither white inseparable. American and European the writing workshops opened a path for her to examine her family story at a time when paths for immigration to the US are closing for endangered relatives. I don't know. If this is a term that's coined yet. But Diaz sport guilt of I should be there. Why am I here was a thing that all of the women in our worship? We're talking about playwright in star had the Ruffo is an unusual voice in the theater. Her mother is an American from Michigan. Her father an Iraqi Christian for most of his family, scattered by war. My family's doesn't live there anymore. Two cousins left in the country. That's out of over one hundred Ruffo says she can. Translate the refugee trauma for an American audience. And that's because I grew up as a blonde white Michigan girl that has an entire Iraqi family. So I'm always a bridge builder. I'm always in between a bridge that's worth the.

New York Nora Middle East Iraq Michigan Noel king Rachel Martin Joshua tree Washington Ruffo Yellowstone National Park America Ruffo National park Instagram Joshua cheeser Yellowstone Alpin Sade taio
Supreme Court rejects Trump administration's asylum ban

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

Supreme Court rejects Trump administration's asylum ban

"Yellowstone National Park area grizzly bears, Montana, publicradio snick Maude reports a judge's ruling blocked, but would have been the first grisly. Hudson decades, notice to appeal doesn't actually take the case to the ninth circuit. But it does by the government time to decide whether to formally challenge. The ruling the states of Wyoming and Idaho, along with four pro-hunting groups have also filed appeals attorney Andrea Senator Sierra of the center for biological diversity says a formal challenge by the administration would mean more resources spent on litigation less on recovery. Yellowstone beloved reservoirs deserve more than that. And we're prepared to fight vigorously to defend the court's determination. That grizzly bears. So meet federal protection fish and wildlife directed questions to the Justice department, which declined to comment for NPR news. I'm Nick Ma in Missoula, and you're listening to NPR news. Supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg is recovering at Memorial Sloan Kettering hospital in New York City after surgery Friday morning for lung cancer. This Ginsberg's third bout with cancer in twenty years and she's eighty five, but as NPR's Nina totenberg reports doctors say the prospects for full recovery or good barring serious complications Ginsburg is once again, proving what a fighter she is on Friday just hours after surgery, she cast a decisive refusing to allow the Trump administration to implement its new rules prohibiting people from seeking asylum. If they crossed the border illegally the five to four decision was a setback for the administration which cannot carry out its policy without first persuading lower court judges now by evening Ginsberg was sitting in a chair and calling friends who said she sounded strong and pretty Chipper barring any serious complications Ginsburg is expected to remain in the hospital for two to four days and then to resume a light schedule of work at. At home, Nina, totenberg, NPR news, Washington. London's Gatwick airport says it plans to run a full schedule of flights today. Gatwick is UK second largest airport had had to close the runway several times this week because of drones that started flying in the area. Police have made two arrests as part of their ongoing investigation into the criminal use of drones. A self driving car startup has one permission to start offering rides to passengers in California. State regulators branded the startup known as oops the first permit under a pilot program, the company cannot charge for the service. So in a backup driver must be in the car to take over if necessary. I'm Joel Snyder NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the NPR wine club where NPR shows become lines like weekend edition cabernet and every bottle tells the story available to adults twenty one years or older at NPR wine club dot org slash weekend. This weekend edition from NPR news. I'm Scott Simon.

NPR Bader Ginsburg Nina Totenberg Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospi Lung Cancer Yellowstone National Park Ginsberg Supreme Court Justice Department Gatwick Montana Yellowstone Hudson Maude Scott Simon Andrea Senator Sierra Missoula Wyoming
U.S. backs protecting Yellowstone’s northern gateway from mining

News, Traffic and Weather

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

U.S. backs protecting Yellowstone’s northern gateway from mining

"News that not even the near certainty that the Federal Reserve will lift benchmark interest rates next week slowdown buying recommending that new mining claims for gold, silver, and other minerals should be blocked for twenty years on the forested public lands would make Yellowstone National park's mountainous northern boundary. The Federal Bureau of land management and the US forest service

Federal Bureau Of Land Managem Federal Reserve Yellowstone National Park United States Twenty Years