20 Episode results for "Yellow River"

Renaissance Emperor

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

21:40 min | 11 months ago

Renaissance Emperor

"Welcome to my podcasts. In sixteen eighty eight a group. A French scientist came to Peking to visit the Palace to specifically visit the emperor and they brought with them many many books they also brought with them. Thirty of the latest European scientific instruments included telescopes clocks and compasses and the emperor was enchanted. So enchanted. Was He that he invited some of them permanently. Stay there as court advisers. One of the scientists praised the emperor to Louis. The fourteenth another one of the scientists wrote a book bearing the name of the emperor in its title and quoting this about the emperor. He is enchanted to learn new scientific knowledge and spent several hours with us every day followed by a few more of self study. He horse wasting time and went to bed very late. Though we researchers appeared at the palace he had already been up and prepared for us. He readily asked our advice regarding his work is sometimes ask new questions and quote. This emperor has been compared to the rent renaissance king himself the Son. King Louis the fourteenth France whose reign of sixteen forty three to seventeen fifty. Seventeen fifteen roughly coincides with the emperor going to talk about and the emperor's name is county and I believe a renaissance man. Welcome again to my podcast. The rise and fall of the Qing Dynasty Cup of solid gold and this is episode six Renaissance Emperor. My last episode I talked about fooding the previous emperor and the father of Kangxi and the and the controversy regarding his death one controversy that there wasn't he named his third son as his successor and that third sons personal name was. I shouldn't Gio Schwinn. Yeah I shouldn't Gelo Swinger. But I'm going to use his cabin an official name Kangxi and he was born in Beijing in May of sixteen fifty four in he headed distinction of having the longest reign of all the Ching Emperors. He was only seven when his dad died and he ascended to the throne. So that's to emperor too young emperors in a row concrete and his father fooling. He was raised by his grandmother. The Grand Empress Shaoguan who was a consort of Taiji who was the second emperor and would've been countries grandfather. His grandmother was Mongolian Khan. She's father was MODU conscious. Mother was on Chinese and countries. Grandmother was Mongolian soil. Learn to speak Mongolian horse and learned horsemanship from his grandmother. He learned archery from his MONTJEU father and he learned Confucianism from his Han Chinese mother. It was said he could read it right by the time he was five years old and he ascended the throne in sixteen one. There were four regents appointed by his father and I mentioned this. The last episode all the regions were conservative. Modu courtiers all had extensive military experience. And those four were I'll buy Sukasah belong and swannee Dory about the names and they moved fast and I mentioned last episode that they replaced at thirteen offices that fool into created because it was run by Eunuchs who were disfavor by the mind shoes and instead they put a household office to replace the thirteen offices and it was staffed with paid bond servants. But that's about all these four could agree on. They did not work well together. There were plagued by jealousy rivalry and power struggles. One of them died soon. After fooling died I'll buy became the dominant one. A VIRTUAL DICTATOR REMEMBER. Doi- Gwyn I'll buy even executed. One of the other regions Kangxi eventually had had enough of this and in sixteen sixty nine. He took control of his own dynasty and he was fifteen years old. He had all by arrested at a wrestling match. By the wrestlers themselves. The country would not have much time to enjoy his empire because immediately or within a few years after he became emperor. The war of the three fugitives began in. This is awesome in classified as one of the Chinese civil wars. Also there were problems with to mean empire in Taiwan. I've mentioned that before as well throw in the chargers which are the indigenous tribes in Mongolia. And you've got trouble so who were. And what were these few Tories? Well let's start with the hoop the first few to Tori and there was three of them was led by guy by the naval. Woo segue and you'll recall those of you. The been listening to this from the beginning that he was one of the main generals did ask for help from Doi- Argon and the mind choose to defeat the rebel army of the dashing king for his efforts in helping the chain overthrow the Ming Dynasty. He was awarded the southwest portion of China. What is now Yunan? Guido provinces? The Second Fila was by the name of Shung Jersian and he at this time was an old man his son would soon take over and again for showings help in defeating the Ming Empire. He was awarded a portion of southern China. Which is now Guandong province? The third few DETTORI was run by a fellow by the name of Gung Ching Chung Gung Jinjiang and he was the grand. His grandfather was the Ming General Chen. Joe Ming and he was awarded for his help. In overthrowing the me a portion of southeast China which is now Fujian Province these few towards were essentially vassal states. These guys were vassal kings. They had total atonomy. They operated as independent countries within China's jurisdiction within their border the size of these few DETTORI's combined geographically would be from Texas to Georgia or the size of France and Spain put together. They levied and collected their own taxes. They pretty much created their own laws and regulations. They did what they wanted to do. But they had to pay an annual tribute to the King Emperor. The Kingdom of tone being of course have been set up a portion of Taiwan by fellow by the name of Jenn gene and he had inherited the kingdom from his dad. In the to me empire controlled the Taiwan straights the coastal areas of southeast China. And he wanted to reunite the few DETTORI's defeat the chain to create a revolution. These issues were invariably going to cause problems and they did and in September. Sixteen seventy three. Woo SOGARI rebel. And later that same year he declared his feud Tori free and independent of China. He wanted to restore the Ming Dynasty. And he was hoping he would get the other two hundred Tories to join him in this initial move. He was the only one and he called himself. Great Commander who summons men and horses for the Pesification of all under heaven and he quickly took she schwab products by March of seventy four fell. He hit an estimated somewhere around sixty five thousand dollars sixty five thousand troops eventually. He settled in Sichuan Province in Chengdu and stayed there and this is located roughly in the middle of China. The other two were watching and it didn't take them long to get involved. And in April of sixteen seventy four Gen Jinjiang the vessel King of the Fujian Futa Toy. Made his move and he had help from the two main kingdom who headed a navy and they were encouraged by these early successes. If for the first few years they really didn't get any resistance from the chain and after apex they controlled half of China one doom few dettori followed soon and they captured Shaanxi Province. And things look bad for the chain dynasty at this point so bad that we saw gooey offered Kangxi terms surrender and retire peacefully. Monjo or die country refuse the offer. Can't she'd been raising an army in his army. He raised was anywhere from four hundred thousand to nine hundred thousand troops and he countered he. He countered I Jame Gang Jin Jong and easily rolled him back by sixteen seventy six just a mere three four years into this thing the tide had turned in the chinks favour in sixteen seventy seven. We'll Sigua died. Succeeded is grandson. The other two leaders of the other two tours were eventually captured and they were executed and their troops surrendered by sixteen. Eighty Ching had reclaimed. Hunan we Joe Sichuan Shaanxi provinces and his sixteen eighty one. They finally captured Yunan. Province and reclaimed an entered Kunming the capital of that province and the war of the three stories was over Kangxi. Could now turn his attention on coming years. Prior to this encounter Kangxi ordered the whole entire southeast coast of China evacuated and moved inland. Forty fifty miles so they could provide no support and toomey emptying and to empire could could expect no support from anybody on mainland China. How awesome is that so also as well? Kaci raised a navy and in the battle of the PUNK who I know I mentioned this. I think in episode one that she navy defeated the told me. Navy and eventually Taiwan was recaptured. In incorporated into China country was very quick and harsh on some of his reprisals. The senior leaders of the future Tories were executed but for the peasants who were forced to fight. He gave them a reprieve and this win them. Over at the end China was unified. So what happened. Why did the three DETTORI's loose several reasons? One reason is disunity. There were different leaders. There was really no central leader. There were no coordinated measures or strategy at sometimes even mistakenly fought each other. Another reason is they weren't decisive. Despite very early successes they didn't press that advantage and they got bogged down. And they allowed a protracted war and their people got weary. Another reason is the Ching had the geographic advantage in terms of the economic and prosperous areas. They just held better areas than did. The few Tories and the other reason was incompetence and this showed up in the way that which they so easily defeated and the Ching military superiority the mighty Ching army the mighty man. Montjeu army had brushed them aside and they were able to pick these few Tories off. One by one was Sangley. Goes down in history as arrogant that he lived lavishly that he thought mistakenly that they could count. A local support has conquered more and more of China. But that's support never really came home because the locals didn't trust him because he was previously allegiant to the Chink with that out of the way that allowed CIA conscious to focus on other issues in China and the list of accomplishments and his personal characteristics are impressive. He rebuilt Peking that was destroyed by the chain during their conquest careful to restore the mean architectural wonders. He was an avid hunter. He had austere habits. He was not overly garish or lavish. He urged the production of very fine. Cheney's porcelain with very finding `naming with exquisite glazing. He opened four ports to foreign trade. He encouraged education an education. From all around the world he welcomed Western culture he welcomed the arts European refinements. He edited calligraphy. It said that documents will presented to him official documents that were presented to him he would review at the. Columbia free was wrong. He would correct it. He also worked on the infrastructure in China identity. He identified issues with the Yellow River. And then the collect of the Grand Canal. It said he was benevolent benevolent. Erudite THE WORKAHOLIC. Jumped a wet necessary but brutal. When he had to be the Yellow River had been for years neglected and was prone to flooding in sixteen seventy seven. He deployed civil engineers to address this issue and by sixteen eighty three. They had repaired. The Yellow River dredged it and put new embankments up the Grand Canal. Let me just say this before we get into what he did with the Grand Canal. The Grand Canal is the longest oldest artificial river in the world was built long before Kangxi long before the chain but this was an engineering marvel dope by the Chinese it. Roughly runs north and south connecting the yellow and Yellow rivers and the Yangtze rivers so that they can move around all around China through through navigable rivers ingenious Iran to the seaboard fit to the south and North to Peking Kangxi repaired. It treat flourished under him. He was enthralled with geometry. Is trying to be maps. He published the first Chinese atlas in seventeen seventeen. He was fascinated with European paintings and European art. He appreciated Western medicine. There's a story that. He was cured of malaria at the age of forty by two. European priests using frozen Quinine. He built a lab. At the Forbidden City that produced Western medications. He made his imperial household smallpox vaccinated. He curbed the rest of China to do the same remember. His father died of smallpox. And also remember. He had smallpox as a boy and was one of the reasons why he was chosen his temper because he survived he survived it and his face was scarred from it. Can't she also never raise taxes during his reign? He had a close relationship with many Jesuit priests and allowed them to build a Roman Catholic Church in Peking grateful for the Malaria Cure. He had some Catholic priests as advisors in Sixteen Ninety two. He issued an edict allowing Catholic churches and legalizing the practice of Christianity. In China after Taiwan was defeated he ordered the repopulation of the coastal cities that he had ordered abandoned. One can only imagine that massive project with the southern part of China Taiwan and infrastructure matters in Tokyo. He now turns his attention to China's northern border and for many decades Russian settlers Cossacks hunters had been impinging on module liens going in there and hunting and this was particularly troublesome and this would have been the area round the Arbor River valley or also called the Hilo John River valley and by the way to hate long. John River is a tenth largest river in the world in sixteen fifty. One the Russians built a fort at Alba's on it Steph to Cossacks and this would be the next drama that would play out in the story of China and the story of Kangxi. The next episode I will my discussion of country and there's more succession drama to come. If you have any comments questions suggestions please email me at history accounts at Yahoo Dot Com. Or if you prefer. Leave a rating for this podcast. Wherever you listen to your podcasts. And with that thank you. It's been my pleasure.

China Taiwan Kangxi Beijing Ming Dynasty Kangxi China Taiwan navy Tori Yunan Gung Ching Chung Gung Jinjiang Yellow River King Louis official Louis wrestling John River scientist Grand Empress Shaoguan
173: River

Robot or Not?

06:01 min | 1 year ago

173: River

"Isn't a robot. Listening Elliott would like to know the definition of a river now. I watched a youtube video recently about this about what. The world's shortest shortest river was and the idea was that there was one place where it was a like a spring that emerges and then there's like about fifty yards it's of concrete between it in a river and then flows into the river and the argument was this is the shortest river. It starts here at the spring and it flows out and then it ends up merging with this other river her then there was another example of somewhere else in the world where there are two lakes and there was a connector between them. The water flowed from one lake into the other and that was a river that flowed between between these two bodies of water. Do you have any thoughts about what what what makes a river with depth length. Anything else that it might make something a river versus the old creek or stream. I saw that video to and does get it had definition in it which just like whatever the the cartographers definition about where it has to flow from into. But I'm just going to say it has to be some water that flows in more or less uniform direction in a skinny thing not gonna go into manmade versus. Not because I feel like if you if you dig something and it's manmade but water keeps flowing there for many many years. I mean you made a river you can. You can make a river a lake. Why can't you make a river right? Like if you dig that thing and water keeps flowing on it and then hume's become extinct and five billion years later stuff still flowing like a river it was may may it's like it's a river so the length thing though. There is a minimum length like you can't just take two uber. Bodies have ordered that are separated by one. Millimeter breakdown that one. Millimeter thing and say this is one millimeter distancing. That's a river it's like no you've just you've literally just connected to things. There is nothing in between you have to separate them by a certain amount now. What does that amount is five feet two feet? I feel like we all moralize no most of the time. Things don't get names unless they are considered significant out got to be river this whole competition for shortest rivers causing people to name things in silly ways. If it's like three inches not say this is the World Charles. Wherever that competition for short will make you name things that are not rivers to call reverse verse? That's just ridiculous like you can name give it a name or whatever but if it's like a one inch long it's not a river at all so you need some water flowing flowing through thing that I feel like has to be. I'M NOT GONNA say thinner than it is long. But it should be recognizable as a thing that stuff flows goes down And I think a lot of the things I video probably too short to be over but I think you see it could be something that you could you know. It's the the minimum like shorter than you might think especially given the with if you really want to name something. That's twenty yards long a river. Fine because you might need to have the name for that thing because you might have one body of water another body water. What do you call the thing in? Between does it belong to the left body of water the right body or if it's long enough to be significant it should have a name and you could call it a river You could get into streaming creek and all sorts of stuff like that but I feel like you know river I'm GonNa say it's generic term like dish but it is is in discussions like this especially with the shortest one. I I don't I don't think it's productive to decide whether you're going gonNA call it a creek or stream or creek. Or whatever the other various synonyms are. We're all just saying. Is this a body of water worthy of being named all right I mean I I I think this is like it's however you wanted to find it. There are things that don't look like rivers but if you trace it back it turns is at this leads into a body of water. It ends up becoming the Mississippi River. You can jump over the Mississippi River in Minnesota at the source of it because it's tiny but it becomes the Mississippi the sippy river. It's the Mississippi River and it's it's very much like how do you want to set the definitions Geography is similar to like Strana me where it's like. What's planet well? Some group could define it in some way. But there's sort of like common use and it's very different. Yeah exactly for for professionals. There has to be a hard best definition like for matmaker and stuff like that but for regular people. They don't have to know about that definition when they're discussing rivers in in general that it's it's enough to I feel like there's this is one of those not probably not a lot of debate other than the shortest river people because we most people sort of know the Monday see them at only if you're in the Profession Ashen do you start drawing those fine distinctions and holding too. I do laugh my mom lives in Arizona and we often drive over a bridge over dirt. Sort that is the Gila River and it makes me laugh every time but the fact is in the there is a wet season. They're very briefly. And if there's a monsoon or a big rainstorm or something like that you know it will water will flow underneath that thing. But and they they call it a river even though for a large portion of the year there's no water in it but water flows through there in that direction and when it does. That's that's the Yellow River and sounds to me like you're driving over the Gila river bed for the area. Most of the year. It is a place where waiting for a river. It will get here eventually. It's not here right eight now. It's a riverbed it is. It is in the river is sleeping somewhere else for the moment. I don't know about the La River though about the Riverland Terminator. Two I guess yeah. Yeah and that's that is a river that they ended up putting concrete on and and guiding where it goes and you could call it something else but it was historically a river and it's still basically also very also dry out of the time if movies for sure believed absolutely also there's underground rivers but I don't even WanNa get talk talk about that. 'cause I don't even know what that is underground railroad but a little bit different. I think it's a lot different but okay.

Mississippi River Gila River La River Yellow River sippy river youtube Elliott Riverland Terminator hume Arizona Mississippi Strana Minnesota five billion years three inches twenty yards fifty yards five feet one inch two feet
The Death of Wang Mang, Augustus, and the Roman Republic | 11AD  20AD

A.D. History Podcast

1:14:56 hr | 1 year ago

The Death of Wang Mang, Augustus, and the Roman Republic | 11AD 20AD

"Have you ever wondered if China had station for Mao boyfriend combat to be in a republic well story for you this is the Ad History podcast weaving a tapestry of world history from one eighty two h day powered by t g get your good news that's real news at Tgi aw five visiting TJ and review dot com now here all your hosts Pool K. Di Costanzo and Patrick Foot brought to you by a London and New York City you are listening to the AD history podcast. I am pauquet. Di Costanzo and I am joined by my co host Patrick Foot. Who Have you been doing you know Patrick. It's the middle of August and it has been blistering here in the northeast but not today today is in the low seventies. It's beautiful fill out and you and I are inside recording yeah well. I'm on the opposite end of that spectrum. It's awful outside. We've had a really really rubbish weather. Eh Radio Obvious Weber in August this year. It's really sad because last summer was beautiful here in England and I spent the majority of a cost the my arm so I can really fully enjoy it so get and the weather is awful. Now is unhappy to be inside well that it makes one of us but in any case very few things that I enjoy more than recording eighty history and specifically what we have in line for today yeah because there's Patrick you are going to go into a place with long that I think has a very strong possibility to blow a lot of people's minds. It certainly did for us yet. This absolutely blew my mind and what's lucky about this. Is it so more or less perfectly fits of the structure of our podcast so one one to ten eighty one survey rungs rise to power whereas eleven to twenty eighty it more or less end. I mean actually ends in twenty eight but we'll go over just a little bit for this one because it wouldn't make sense ended twenty a d. It makes most end at twenty three so yes so if you haven't listened to the first episode I personally would really recommend gay Mac listening to it my intention. This podcast is for it to be like one continues being listened from the beginning fifties dipping from now. I'm going to fill you guys in briefly on what we talked about in the last episode. Where would I talked about anyway. Lake Patrick Right before we begin. I think this is the right time to finally introduced the highly anticipated and entirely necessary. Ad History History podcast ground rules take it away one evaluate events in the context. They occurred to over the span of recorded history. The way has been researched. It's methodology and the facts. Alton change immensely how we view in research history today is not necessarily how it was treated fifty years ago free. Nothing in history was inevitable. Tabu and for and perhaps most importantly history in the past is like a different country man's. That's a classic. I really just never gets old tawny way on with the show so in the loss of sit we talked about one monks raise voice the power how he became the emperor of China into ending the Hunt Dynasty and starting his own dynasty too. That's why we were then now today. We're going to be looking at what he did. As his time as emperor discontinuing broken into two sections here the stuff he did his impera and how his empire ended so we begin with if the stuff he did as emperor and that could be broken into two key categories his land reforms and his money reforms so what he he did for land is really interesting and I was stacked reading this and Paul. He told me to you amazed when I should you my show notes. It really blew my mind so so it was the last thing I ever expected to say same same so what he did. We've land in China. He Nationalizes Empires lands and you may be familiar with nationalization. You may not be that's fine if you're not nationalization is the is the government owning things in its most basic way is nationalized it means it's a belongs to you and it's taken care of by the government so things like a travel commu nationalized things like a gas electricity can be nationalized stuff like that one nationalizes analyzes empires land and he did was he distributed equally to all his subjects so and this how did this was by confiscating estates all of this if you own more than one hundred acres and distribution actually farmed it dyslexia about each family owning about five acres of land each every every family in China on five acres which I wouldn't say neutron sainthood five acres of land and how they pay tax on this wasn't a free the money on the Ho- what I read they pay tax on this by giving ten percent of older green food to the government and there's actually a really good quote I are found said by one moung about his views on land and he said the strong possess land by two thousand while the we have nowhere to police a needle which is if really read good quite and also he cut land taxes from fifty percent just down to ten percent now who'd when I read this this to you what would came to mind the one word that only could come to mind which is what might best be called. Proto does socialism yes yes. That's why we were so blown away by. We'll talk about this more in a bit but we have yet because Puffy Proto socialism realism even like somewhat communist and that's just bonkers to me so far back in time we had this happening in China of all countries. A country with a rich history of socialism and communism blacks a bit further down the line. I should say we have quite a few centuries ago. Just just a few centuries but like I said it wasn't only land reforms. He took part in he also reformed China's money Kwa along the way see this was replaced. China's gold coins with bronze coin of just nominal value. Now money is a weighty wait a thing. We let a five pound note or five dollar bill for yourself poor. That's actually worth five pounds old five dollars now. There's no it's a floating currency. We don't back it up with a gold or silver anymore. That's it's an old thing yeah. It used to be obviously but now is an Indus time China's county was based on actual gold so one monchy bronze coins and it's for he did this the kind of even the playing field for the rich and the poll with dishes nominal value discipline all the gold these wealthy people had would mean inasmuch because at us these bronze coins of value and it helped the poor who in debt because it meant they could get this money more easily so that you tweeted even the playing fields of all of this but it wasn't that good what was okay but something else he did which doesn't seem socialist at first and make them sound somewhat like a fire breathing drachen he holds all of China's goat like I said like Schmuck or something and still in his personal treasury and this had huge ramifications Haitians for not only China but the wider whoa baby read that this had an effect would wayne Rome with Augustus who we will be talking about a little bit later on mm-hmm will be handled by him. Just like we've mentioned in episode one one of the big one of the big benefits of Roman control over first century Palestine of course was controlling the eastern Mediterranean and having that route into Egypt eventually which is going to become the bread bags baskets of the empire but because of the immense it's either links out to the Far East and people don't realize just how interconnected this world was people think you're just pushing wheelbarrows and walking long distances instances. Yes that is true but there this is in many sense of very very early adaptation of global economy. It really is not something I I was quite shocked by when I researched this ifo at this moment in time. All of us are stories be connected it staggering that over two found years ago people in Italy had connections with people in China that that's crazy. It is very hard to envisage based on how we look at ancient history but it's there and it was incredibly important had very serious international geopolitical political consequences for decided to do if the Romans are reacting to it at this point you can feel the impact is really an incredible thing when you think about it is incredible and I said the Romans humans did Iraq to this they intended but go coins became like gold dust through them so there were certain things August this band purchasing so they wouldn't lose any the gold coins they had because they just weren't enough to go around because one moung would wavering China at hold the move for himself well. There's it's interesting because there's a little bit of a little bit of a pattern here in this whole concept of of hoarding a particular valuable metals is of of course during the first opium war they British were more than happy to pay silver for tea but they they were running out of silver because it wasn't capable going back to them at least not in the way they need it so the concept of hoarding a true commodity oddity of wealth is really almost almost predatory it really is. It's like I have the power because I have the valuable thing and the weird thing. We've we've given its value. That's what voice on what we've go. I mean sure it's not that common to find but just because how it looks and what we can do is given gold value when you start believing in the value of gold things wouldn't of worked out things would have worked out quite differently in our world. I think Oh yeah there's absolutely absolutely no doubt about it. That's something that's very hard for a lot of people when they're first getting their lessons while on a fundamental level about currency it simply as valuable as we accept it today yeah and that said that's what he did with the bronze coins as mentioned earlier so and he did mornings with money. It's actually four. He invented a ready pretty early form of social security payments which once again is quite crazy to hey and he collected taxes from the wealthy and he used his his taxes on the wealthy to make loans to the poor so he was also something of a overbill who've is time well. He's definitely somebody who is very ideologically. Eddie logically motivated. He's not just a cunning pragmatic powerbroker. He definitely has a mission in his mind in a very specific worldview worldview definitely and something really interesting he did a something. I think is really cool. He put huge taxes on slave owners. If you owned a slave late yet to pay a huge tax and does a couple of days as to why one moung victis some for he did this to try and unstop slavery a four if he puts enough tax on owning a slave peeping Osa even worth owning a slave now all was it just ten for him to make more money and we don't really know maybe it was both maybe it was both yeah which is nice food was. Both you know. That's really interesting though pretty much. When you're looking back at history people are always looking and yet for the definitive answer always was column? Mayo is Colin B and Model The Times. I'll stop and say to myself. Oh why can't it be you know one one from column a and one from column B Yeah Yeah things aren't things really black wide variety of reasons people do things so we we know what Mung did as Emperor of China but we didn't seem to know why he did what he did. As rule of China there were few ideas floating around their habit to reason why he led such a socialist looking empire and want really interesting ones. Is it something out out of his control. They've been to evidence that while one was emperor of China the river which goes through China a change changed course and because of this this resulted in famine drought flooding and yeah so it's for that really messed up China because we didn't think about about things like this now how nature can affect things seem so much in our modern world. We aren't affected by nature like this anymore. Like if a river the floods it it's bad obviously but went the country's a whole with such a global economy that we can depend on other people's goods to come in. We'll see how this time they can and do that. So this river was alive. Bringing a life give it to these guys and with it changing imminent one had to figure out oh my goodness. How am I gonNA GONNA sort this out so that's that's why he gave the land. Wait so many people there were more people growing food for the people trying to eat. It was a reason which we'll talk about in a bit reason people so let's get angry at one moung it's fault because of this because they will say much famine and trout and flooding trying to that's what people upset get angry at him so definitely it's four it definitely made him a bit more defenseless one way or another so a lot of other historians stories not because he will socialist but because he was confusion and Confucianism as we talked about earlier lost upsetting fat it played a real big role in Chinese history and somewhat in China Today. It's still very entrenched so actually did some dig into what exactly is Confucianism Awesome because I didn't say oh Confucianism but leave your that so luckily feeding a really good book little shift the world which I'm sure be linked down below. Oh you guys check out and had a perfect chapter explaining what Confucianism is an obviously from the name of it was founded by a fellow co Confucius and he it wasn't a nobleman but he was a son of a family who fell on really hard times and in this he got to thinking and he believed everyone should live peacefully together and one of the important things about Confucianism is e for outward appearances have lost stock. They're very important way. Retreat people people the way like barring elders he believed very strongly leaving doors open for others standing up when an authority enters the room. ooh. Ooh So stuff that you still see a lot of people doing to this day it was a huge impact in Asia and the lodge world and he also urged his fellow countryman to maintain these old habits and wanted him to stay and bucks at least they lost to this day and fundamentally he full that everyone we want was born on and good and remains deep within them today on. It's quite hard to imagine that we some people apparently everyone has a little bit good in them so and it was sort of days that's for one one lead hockey lead and you can see it like giving land to everyone. Make sure everyone can live peacefully together together. If everyone has the same amount of land they wouldn't be arguing. Oh I've got moreland. You've got Moreland so it is understandable to see why people would think this but also so it's a for he run things very confucianist early because he wanted to go back to the time of the dynasty and the Zhao Tennessee were much older a dynasty in China would be very prosperous. Chinese goods like the good old days if that makes sense of legendary dynasty that ruled really amazingly amazingly in wild and they were confucianists so one monk for hey five on things confucianist Hopefully we might be as good as Zhao Dynasty wa so that's what wanted as emperor that the changes he made to China and like I said this is a tale of two Hoff's as emperor. It's what he did and how it ended so about one month's later years as ruler of China and it's believed that he's of what restlessly he was always working there reports that he spent his collapse over his desk. You've been working all day and night and he just Bush just collapsed like that. It's even for he went a little crazy towards the end of his time. One historian whose name has left my mind right now really thinks he might even and spent a large amount this time a high of some sort of narcotic that they had enjoyed the time perhaps opium as we mentioned earlier and he even sought to delve into the domestic side of the world like he brought magicians to his palace and wanted to see their spells. Veasley disley would've entailed if he would have been pulling a rabbit out of the hat like we see now or if these people actually have actual magic though a more inclined to think as much like magic we see today and fundamentally. This was a very very different man to man introduced you guys to exit one. He's very smart and honorable by now the power had got to him which is quite sad. Little I guess we told by the loss episode houses the challenges of achieving power and Maintaining Power and wo won Monkhood Monkhood achieve it looks like he struggled to maintain it for show up and of course this comes into play the end of his reign and spoilers his death in his elementary loss episode his empire dies with him and this started to unrest the people in China and they wanted the to revive the Han Dynasty and this is due to the mandate from heaven which talk about a bit later on pool. I believe and Monday from heaven was Someone who was given it to rule over China from heaven a mandate from heaven as the explains and it was very changeable some people had it some people it didn't you could get it off your life and you could lose as well and we'll talk about that more bit more down the line so this letter peasants hasn't forming factions who wanted to overthrow him most notably a group of people direct eyebrows what would browse. I'm not too short to fund name. Maybe like they had read I browse as they use warpaint and these peasant uprising sorta began and defeated songs a huge armies and but fulfill Tober twenty free like I said we're going to be going over the twenty bracket exit make sense. These rebels broke into the capital and the people in the city joined them. They didn't fight back. They were like we're in your side. We can a- truncated as well and they will sit and fight to the city and fighting Wong's men and one metro to defend him but just these rebels were too strong and in one final crazed attempt he uses magic check with fences which I think went to woke his hate set by taxing magic exists well that exists. It's not magic and clearly not meant for the human experience. a one took the time just waiting in his palace. I think he knew his time was up. US defeated and he will probably would just stayed up there watching the world burned down in front of him which would really suck dyke like. I said it's hot with one. You almost feel sympathy for him here. He had tried a edges looks like he was in Kosovo power. Oh as much as he thought he was so the rebels eventually found him in his palace and they killed him but they didn't just kill him. A squeamish might want to just take the headphones out from the minute they decapitated him toyed body apart and they kept the soldiers and rebels kept puff his body a souvenir as an in one fun lack they cut out his tongue and ate it and I looked into cannibalism in a Chinese history and it doesn't it seemed to be a thing they tooken that often so that's quite the example to see that they ate his tongue and of course this led to the hunted tasty being reformed and this ended one -mongst time as a two. That's one monks story. It's an interesting one. It really is an IT opens up so many questions which pool. I'm sure you have some foamy. Here's an interesting place to start so naturally you can't ignore the part of the story story that just sticks out above all the rest and that is what appears at least in form as some form of pro socialism something that happened a good. Oh I don't know like almost eight one two thousand eight hundred and fifty years before the communist manifesto something like that yeah so that was one of the things I wrote down here. The Communist manifesto was published in eighteen forty eight to this is over a thousand years before yet that was even a thing which is crazy and of course looks like we said China have quite a history with socialism and communism and this is probably phrase. We're going to be saying quite often and I. It's a famous quote I am. I can't remember who said initially those you don't learn from history a doomed to repeat it is just you see a hey you see you see someone trying to trying to communities and not working out well well from my perspective when I'm looking at this and while you can't deny nine many of the major similarities I I am very I am very careful to to put those tags on it because they're they're very much. A you know a Western philosophy that came out of a very different time and place you know while mum never saw child labor in factories you know he never ever ever conceived of the idea in all likelihood of commoner. Labor collectively bargaining these these are some of the issues that that come around in in the in the socialist US socialist and communist thrust I into the twentieth century but what I find interesting and you get began looking into how this was affecting his people. The first thing that is very noticeable is he was going after the the high elite class every bit it as he was trying to affect his subjects ones. There were peasants city-dwellers. It didn't matter to him. Everybody was kind of on that level playing field and as far as an this he definitely he definitely made clearly a lot of enemies from the very privileged class who are clearly early lumping it right now in a way they're not ready to accept and you and I as we did an episode one. There's always that question about how power is accumulated. How does exercised and in this situation? Mrs where it's interesting. There's called the three PS when it comes comes to governing and specifically in this way given the nature of Chinese society at the time they say there are three things especially especially when you have complete one man rule. It's often been said that a government doesn't fall when the common people rise up it falls when when the noble elites abandoned them and they say there are three ways and a situation that where it's one man rule in which you can govern and manage just to keep that support their three PS versus politics second is privilege and the third is perch and in this case he certainly wasn't doing the second privilege was most certainly very much penalized in his dynasty and it seems unlikely that based on the policies that he was implementing. It didn't sound like he had too many the elites onboard for how he viewed the world or his vision of Xin Dynasty China at the time and well. Maybe you could tell me a little bitter about purge that he did to his own son but in this case he definitely definitely violated all three and on top of that the bronze coins were definitely not well received because many cases inland they read eyebrows certainly were a part of this was it was in fact taking from wealth and then they were hurting for it and on top of that then you have what happened at the Yellow River and so it's very it's obviously very difficult to understand why exactly he did this. You can't deny how much it sticks out but he was he was also very ideologically driven in a way that he most certainly wasn't in his rise to power and I find that very very fascinating and so do I you saying is g wasn't present in his. He's rise to power like when I research became a emperor. It was no talk about this. proto-socialist moves as as we've up there it just seem to come out the moment he took over and as it is absolutely fascinating. Yes it definitely is but there's the other part of this equation as well the the equation that they can't control and that of course is the Yellow River now. There's probably quite a few people that are listening into this podcast that may not exactly be up on their geography of China and that's okay. I believe it is the sixth longest river in the world is definitely one vitally important in China so I must be pretty big and it essentially flows from what we would call today up Inner Mongolia Ghalia and then out into the Yellow Sea but something that's really important for our listeners to realize is this was not some freak occasion within recorded history. The Yellow River has made a transformation from its traditional positioning as much as fifteen hundred times. I'll give you a wonderful example of this because the yellow the Yellow River has dictated so much of the history history of China that you actually have to look into to see what it's all about because obviously Wong most certainly was hurt by this and on top of that throughout Chinese History History Chinese leaders have weaponized the Yellow River a great deal. We're GONNA get to that in a moment see that. This is a really cool so in eleven twenty eight the song armies from the song dynasties breached they breached southern dykes on the Yellow River to weaponize it because they they were trying to they were in combat and they were making a advance in the other direction which isn't a very nice way of saying they're on the back foot and in this case ace the Yellow River diverted again because of this causing it to divert south of Shang Dong all right that if you look at the map Shang Province so where it was going originally was in the northernmost portion of Shang Dong. It actually actually diverted completely south of that province its distance is a distance of roughly two hundred and seventy nine nine miles and if your listeners. WanNa get a good way to visualize that imagine the Mississippi River decided to go up and have a wild weekend in Kansas City. That's the kind of thing we're talking about. That's the level of disaster. It's a level of disaster that would even still be difficult for us today to handle Okudaira and this sort of thing happens a great deal obviously some of its natural some of it is man made but the most infamous incident a a weapon housing the Yellow River was during the Japanese invasion of China after the Marco Polo Bridge incident and Chenggong. I check chose to destroy some of the dykes on the Yellow River to stop the Japanese advance and in doing so a AH estimated eight hundred thousand people died and more than four million were displaced now think about that. That's the kind of thing that they deal with. When it comes to the Yellow River edition the fact that it almost always floods naturally because of all the silt builds up it makes it a very unpredictable piece of territory despite its importance and that's the thing with this it will so unpredictable and is not even one monks full. Anyone could have been a emperor at this time and they would have to deal with this. He was just fighting something so out of his control there was nothing he could have done about the change in the yellow belly river and that's. I guess that would be like an you could look if that didn't happen. One might be more successful. He might be more remembered in history is just one of these swings. We don't know no. It's absolutely impossible to down but I'm looking at margin long and we're beginning to learn more about the man he was was on the whole it is in many ways something of a cautionary tale because he decided to basically up route in early futile society and redistricting assets across the board and of course he lost the kind of support that they needed and in addition to that he also had to deal with the absolute it disaster naturally that occurred in which is kind of interesting because water is not very very big problem in modern China but yeah if we're going to compare him to a socialist of course the other great and great not immoral context very very much in a stature context. I have have no love or sympathy for Mao whatsoever. Well the thing that here's the irony about it so there's a school of thought that believes one of the reasons why he want to enact these reforms was be head was to do with certain beliefs in Confucianism. Yes yes yes. That's that's always full to be that he wanted to follow Confucianism Very strictly in his times emperor yet you compare him to Mao Zedong and the historic irony of courses that Wong Mung perhaps enacted these reforms due to a very strong belief in Confucianism and then his you know let's let's just say idealogical. I ancestor then comes back almost two thousand years later launches the Cultural Revolution which one of the hallmarks was was of course targeting Confucianism are interesting. Yes it's like. WHOA long fully say devoutly as much as we can compare one. Now Mao had the complete opposite opinion of Confucianism too. It's like it's like an alternate. Take on one if we had the socially slight days but without Confucianism we get now unless I'm mistaken putting aside any sort of death or injury that occurred heard due to the diversion of the Yellow River which was out of their control. I could be wrong but I get the feeling that under one among the body count wasn't nearly as high no no compared to mouse. Many body counts a as high as those highs mouths especially compared to his body count. Yes and it's also interesting how quickly this fell apart on him and how he when he became emperor he didn't keep that part of him. That was you know keenly savvy in regards to politics playing the political game in order to further his as a vision. It's almost like he abandoned it. It releases an like Sean. Spicer is before becoming emperor. We have this really cunning guy. Hi this guy. He really manipulate what his way in the background. I maybe maybe he just saw realized I'm here now. I can do whatever I want and he didn't really he. He's abandoned that policies mind that policies being just went. I'm here now. Let's do would I want to do. This is offered to turn of how he acts. Before emperor and Harry acts as IMPR- and like I said in his later years you bonkers he went absolutely and say. Neil's like is blitzing drugs or the time. I was obsessive like magic. It's a whole different person. Yup I it certainly appears that way and the other thing that was really incredible about this is in terms of when he fell in the military aspect of my research is correct in terms of men fighting fighting men. He actually had a three to one advantage. Yes over the forces that ultimately did Jami and they still couldn't they soon can defeat the rebels known the rebels ultimately ended up seizing the capital and they ended up going over the wall and of course. We know how'd that happen next. That's well. Luckily luckily this very wholesome. podcast is rated e deeper explicit yes yes of course that's why we have it there but just to give the audience an idea of what we're trying to do here at eighty history so the other day. I was in a bookshop could waterstones which have they like. England Bond Noble and I opened an us into war history section. WHO's also get book for Research and there's a book about Chinese history of a UN. I come in handy up a new. I wanted to go and I sole. I went to pop out the Hun Dynasty and within the chapter up to the Han Dynasty was just a couple of paragraphs about Wong Mung his time as emperor so I just I just what I was really interesting being compared to the debt we're going into here compared to like a book about Chinese history and he had a couple of paragraphs on him and I appreciate in that and what we're trying to do this book. I just really need explanation of how finally we won't go history here. I completely concur in one of the EH. When it comes to history this is true across the world. Most people are interested in the history of their own people their own country their own sweep of civilization and certainly here in America. There are very few people that would be able to identify who long long was or have much to say about the Han Dynasty or first century China. I was one of them before research this yeah and he has far as I can tell point Patrick. It seems like we may be the most people maybe the people have talked about this fellow mojos. That's generally available at the moment like one moung Zomba's. Yes for better or worse but I have every intention of keeping all of my appendages and to be devoured by no it's my tongue is stayed in my mouth and no one else's no goodness goodness. I'll I'll tell you what Patrick this has been a very very interesting and worthwhile exploration of part of Chinese history and world history that is just not available in significant different digestible way but if it comes to power politics and dynasty and power and struggle. You'RE GONNA get a lot more of that. When we we come back right after a word from Anna Domini this is the AD history podcast keep up with the show and join the discussion and by following eighty history on twitter with the handle at eighty history. PC and the HASHTAG eighty history check us out over on facebook instagram on youtube by searching eighty history podcast as well as of course T. G. and review dot com slash eighty history podcast now now back to Paul and Patrick and thank you very much who we're going to get back to ancient Rome and you could tell us about how another emperor met his demise so Patrick. This is a very complicated story as well as a familiar and instructive story story you've heard and other places in history and in fiction but I think it's best to set the scene for the first time I'm bringing us to Rome proper and we are at fourteen. Ad On the deathbed of Augusta's and it said that his last words words were and there are several interpretations from Latin but I think this is the best one in this dark comedy. We call life have I. I played my role. Well is a very interesting and controversial question although not entirely unexpected and in the case of Augustus when you consider when he came into public life had roughly eighteen or nineteen years old between what would be two major Roman civil wars in a very very short period and how he managed to accumulate power and bring consolidation peace peace and stability to the empire despite the fact the way he did that not corresponding with the best values and customs of Roman Republicanism and democracy accuracy. You have to imagine that the answer is yes. He did inasmuch as this episode is about Tiberius. You cannot understand Tiberius or any Roman emperor that follows Augusta's his without understanding how August this came to power how he ruled how he accumulated power and ultimately how he shaped the role role for every single emperor in perpetuity for the Roman Empire unto the end of Rome itself but before we go any further Patrick get something of a misnomer to call Octavian later Augusta's emperor. That's Kinda putting a modern conception on the role that didn't the existence at the time and he didn't call himself that in fact no one in that role called themselves at or referred to that in any way prior to to the beginning of the second century in fact they went by the moniker print caps which is translated as for citizen. You know basically communicating the concept disingenuous are otherwise as a first among equals in fact the term emperor is a Roman military moniker. You're which was imperative which was given to a celebrated and victorious Roman General. But ultimately that was not how how they understood that position at that time but Augusta's at now where I will for currently as Octavian was the longest serving person in that print caps Roldan later emperor remaining in power effectively parts of five decades and there was a very good reason in for this in fact for even as a young man at eighteen or nineteen years old throwing into the charnel house of High Roman politics. He understood politics and especially especially the politics of the time far better than most anybody else. Could I certainly better than his contemporary allies and rivals because in truth he was a master of politics and later. We'll see very clearly that Tiberius was anything but that but ultimately in our as he is concerned who exactly was octavian later. Augusta's Octavian was the great grand nephew of the Guy s Julius Caesar Caesar yes that Julius Caesar the guy. He's on the front of Fuel Protocols Holding smartphone right now no no that's the Roman emperor no one's ever heard rid of Caesar auto of Cool Sir. No no that's one for you. Star Trek Deep Space Nine fans in the audience seriously will put a image comparison later on in social social media and you'll see what we mean. It's the same Julius Caesar that notably crosses the Rubicon the same Julius Caesar that created the first so-called first triumvirate which is basically a gentlemen's agreement with no legality and it was a coup and he's the same Julius Caesar that was assassinated on the is the march. He's the One Who would stab by conspirator senators including the fame Bruce. Thank you very much William Shakespeare and it was also nearly bungled in fact. It was a total total mess. The senators were looking to return senatorial rule to the republic because after winning the first romance of a war Julius issues are ended up basically crowning himself dictator for life and they want to get away from that just like they wanted to get away from what was effectively poppy as the dictator before Julius Caesar but they had a really big problem when it came to taking out Julius Caesar they had no idea how the Roman Republic Lick would react to that because in truth. Julius Caesar was actually very very popular at the time especially among lower classes of Romans. I know the reason in in many many respects he'd had many reforms that included redistribution of wealth especially in terms of land in hard currency and on top of that Julius Caesar also had a very very strong indeed fanatically loyal military followings from the Legions Legion that alternately led him to power of course it wasn't enough to save him but it certainly was there and so now that he was dead had he had a final will and testament and most important part of a witch named his successor which was his great nephew Octavian and he had definitely had other children but none that were really particularly right bore dynastic rule in fact he even had a son with Cleopatra the seventh the same clear Patrick seventh it will go on to let's say intimately collaborate with Mark Antony in fact Cleopatra will also also in Rome during the ides of March one of Julius Caesar's villas but of course when he's assassinated she flees for very obvious reasons but when Octavian arrives on the Italian peninsula eighteen or nineteen years old and here's the news that Julius Caesar is dead and he's named his successor the very first thing we he does this and we talked about this last time. Patrick is as was his right as his also adopted son which made the succession far far more fluid at at least in Julius Caesar's is Octavian assumes the name Gayus Julius Caesar. Now that's really fascinating is incredibly ably politically adept because Octavian essentially recognizes the power that is adopted father now the late Julius Caesar still still holds with a large fortune in the room Roman public in addition to the fact that he knows there are most certainly is going to be animosity against those who conspired heard and successfully managed to stab him to death in addition to that Octavian gets a really really wonderful prize which is shortly after Julius Caesar is murdered. They actually make decree basically stating that Julius Caesar was divine. This is something that's going to happen a lot more later on when we're talking the print caps role and emperors who follow simply because it was usually a a sign of how popular a a print caps and later emperor when they died but they could be given it could also be taken away. It's very interesting but it's really really helpful Octavian because basically makes him not just the name successor of Julius Caesar but it also makes him the son and appointed air to a God and that is incredibly powerful politically and culturally in the empire which most certainly accepts that as something of extreme value so here we begin to see the very initial framework for how Octavian begins to create this Britain caps and later emperor emperor roll through these slow gradual highwire high power political machinations and in a sense he begins by creating this role is also changing Rome from the republic that it was to the emperor the empire the Roman Empire and and very much secretive one man dynastic rule that will end up taking it to the very end of its days but when we're talking about this and and Octavian is very much aware of this in Roman political parlance whether you're talking to a an everyday Roman on the street or you're talking to a Roman politician there is one four letter words you can never use. Do you know what that word is. King Yeah King. I'M GONNA be talking about once. You've you told your story. I'm definitely dove into the Romans monarchy because it's it's a fascinating little world himself out of and then got himself back into no don't is absolutely incredible and I look forward to that but following the murder of Caesar there was a credible political fallout between a a conspirator assassins and what would become known as the second triumvirate the second ver was a faction that consisted of Octavian Marcus Lapidus and once again mark entity into are vying for power they entered a military coalition and Struggle Against the conspirator hitter senators once again the most notable one being brutus their coalition against these conspirators conclude successfully at the battle of Philip by which today is roughly flee what we'd be considered in Modern Day Macedonia and upon the second triumvirate victory the three coalition leaders but the Roman world into effectively three military dictatorships Octavian gets Hispania and gets goal which is awfully fitting given all the Julius Caesar did to Conquer and tame aim goal Marcus Lapidus basically what gets with a call Roman Africa which is today the northern most coastal regions of Libya Libya and Tunisia runs from SARANAC almost slightly past Tunis and Mark Antony gets the east which is a really really big deal because he focuses his power in Egypt. You makes his cab his capital Alexandria which is where the power in Egypt had been under Ptolemaic rule and with Cleopatra the seventh and also includes a great deal of wealth so at that point in time. It really looks like of the three of them that Mark Antony is the initial winner here but clearly that's not the case or certainly will not remain as such so to shore up all of their gains all three of them undertake undertake what is called the proscriptions. The prescriptions are a very very nasty political purge where on their are extra legal authority. They basically on their orders. Get rid of any potential rivals that could theoretically oppose them again and in the future in fact this is how Cicero met his fate on the orders of Mark Antony yet as soon as this triumvirate is settled the three beginning fighting each other it was never a stable or realistic arrangement especially when you stop and think about it and the ambitions of alter cleared anyone who has is to see in a a compact explanation of complicated events Octavian using the military he's developed which in fact is mostly at least initially composed of so much of Julius Caesar fanatically loyal legions that brought him to power in addition to the fact he also inherited a a great deal of wealth from Julius Caesar so he's able to not just say she stay. She hit them with the booty of victory but he also has extremely deep pockets doc. It's as well and they're going to get deeper in fact but octavian the first one to move on the other two because he figures that as soon as they find it practicable and they get their their first with a blood. They're gonNA turn on him. You Know How could you think otherwise right octavian defeats Lepres and most notably defeated Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the famous Masui battle at axiom after which Antony falls on his sword when they retreat committing suicide and Cleopatra the seventh legendarily poisons herself with a snake bite it effectively ends the Ptolemaic rule of Egypt which had been going on since pretty much the death of Alexander the Great about three hundred or so years prior to this point a little less than that in fact and it formally brings Egypt into the Roman Empire and in doing so it accumulates so so much of the wealth that was any gyp it was clearly being mismanaged by Ptolemaic rulers at that point in time and it also has an incredibly audibly advantageous geopolitical location especially when you consider that it's going to be one of the bread basket of the empire and there are great economic links especially by sea for trade between Egypt and India of course would be very much in a way to aggrandize end enrich the Roman empire -at's yeah that that's just show the power or KVM because Egypt two way empire on the longest lasting empires on the history of the world. I believe it's free thousand years. Egypt was an empire and it reached a point when another impacting gopher is it's just it's just crazy to hear no. It really is incredible. Egyptian civilizations along sweep of history accomplishes much it changes is faces in many ways over Millennia and now it's underfoot and subject to the Romans Octavian also undertakes little side earned of his own very much in the guise of not God very much in the flavor of the prescriptions listening to the advice of a of a friend and counsellor. RSD demise is quote to caesars are one too many meaning he should purge the biological son which we mentioned earlier of Julius Caesar that he had with Cleopatra and mm to guarantee that there would be no other potential political challenges to Julius Caesar and his progeny and sort of legitimacy of who should be actually succeeding him is at once again. It's one of those three Pisa power that we were talking about in the last segment purge these victories led by Octavian haven and his top military general markets Greta unite the Roman Empire under a single flag and truly and for all intents and purposes for the first first time in quite a long time and upon ultimate victory Octavian and Agrippa go back to Rome and upon their arrival the Senate elects them both as consuls mansell's and those for that are not familiar with US councils are about the highest level of power and oversight that you can have in Roman administration. Listen consoles have what was known as the power of imperium which gives consuls and those who possess that power the full effect and force of the Roman state and law by their very edict and desire and give them everything they really need to control the provinces because this is very specific to the provinces outside of Rome in certain parts of the Italian peninsula. This is effectively when he becomes print caps. I citizen and slowly begins accumulating all the power he desired probably thought was entirely necessary to accomplish what he wanted to accomplish considering so much of what he wanted to do in no undeniable way was to consolidate the empire because after all this time without debt consolidation and you can't have a proper society you can't have an economy you can't have a proper civil society political mechanisms don't work and he fully understands that and after serving for a period of a few years. Octavian makes a great show of Republican tradition and steps down from his console pose but essentially giving back power to the Senate itself. It was nothing less than a great show political theater in deference to tradition. There's really no. They look at that but he wasn't really going anywhere. He couldn't go anywhere. The situation was just too volatile. It was his greatest wish to consolidate consolidate as I mentioned and keep the peace should he have left. It's entirely likely that you would have seen other power rivals and others with similar ambitions whether it be general's troops under the command senators with deep pockets or a combination of both entering into what could then be just another vying for power and the cycle continues news so you WanNa make sure that Rome doesn't go back to square one and the military power he wielded itself made sure that matters remained remained stable because even though he's technically given back power and made this great show of deference they understand the the whip hand he has over over event almost in their entirety but Octavian understands that neither the Senate at this point nor the Roman public will accept a bald-faced dictatorship or a monarchy or anything that looks like that this was very much one of the big mistakes that Julius Caesar me made and Octavian goes a long wait to avoid doing that himself that he had to sh- had to slowly change the nature of the power struggle and ensure rule single-handedly but through the guys of Republican constitutionality and all of the structures that had had existed traditionally in the Roman Republic and at this point he also changes his his name officially from Octavian to Augusta's which translates from Latin entangle chaz revered one and intervene of Caesar's fun science fact for me looking too much into names Veasley August this is where we the name of August from just for in the always explaining Ainun them names explaining them names at this point Octavian now Augusta's has become. I'm an independent force matching the Roman state itself not only does he have the aforementioned military structure but he's just as much a financial nanteuil force as well he manages to accumulate a great deal of personal wealth both from the inheritance that he got from his adopted Stepfather Julius Julius Caesar as well as all of the booty that comes with conquering Egypt which as I mentioned earlier is really considerable and it changes so much because he then also has an immense power patronage there is even a story and this is really a classic story where Octavian Opinion Proposes Building a series of roads to the Senate and the Senate declined and basically what ends up happening is Augusta's estes finances most of that out of his own pockets and you know that's kind of a scary thing to think about if you put that in a modern context when you include that the fact that he has so much military force at his command as well moreover patronage Bison political allies keeps his military power satiated did it was incredible situation all forms so once again in a compact explanation of complicated events Augusta's undergoes what is called both the the first and second settlements with the Senate because they want to keep them around but they still need to keep up this guy's of constitutionality with him in this imprint caps I citizen role the first sediment allowed Octavian to retain his counselor post powers without actually being a console essentially neither no neither send nor the Roman people would have him go so for the benefit of appearance and constitutionality the Senate made agust a proconsul for a period of ten years he retained his power of imperium and gave him complete control over proconsul that are covering proconsul or provinces and this is kind of an an interesting little twists since pro consular provinces of course being governed by pro councils are generally the more troublesome and volatile provinces NSA's of the empire. There's usually a greater military force there than you would see another places hence it puts all that underneath the dictatorial and largely discretion of Octavian and adds that military power on top of what he already has and the great great constitutional compromise still trying to keep up this guy's he then gives the Senate control over Praetorian provinces which are controlled old by pray tours in doing that the reason why is Praetorian provinces are far more stable and they have far less military due due to the lack of necessity so the Senate gets that and it has the appearance of a constitutional compromise but for anybody anybody that has is to see at this point. It's very very clear that Augusta's has much bigger plans for the role in addition to that and this is another another very interesting point. Agus has also had immediate allies who possess the power of Tribune Tribune was a power granted to the top member of the assembly who could call them into session and of course they were elected by the plea Byan class they could call them into session and they also had a veto power as well and having that Political Cardi gave Augusta's far more direct legal control over the clearly larger plea in numbers the numbers in their class and control over them legally and directly in the second settlement. The most notable change was augustus formerly assuming the power of Tribune Tribune himself so he gets rid of the Middle Man. You don't need a proxy any more more or less giving him full control over the Roman state so now August is really getting to the point where e he has this bring casserole. He has so much of the power he wants but he begins considering issues that relate to succession and there's a lot of characters who come and go but the first person who came up and this is more of a matter of age is actually the son of his second wife called Tiberius. Tiberius was a military general he spent about twenty two years on the northern Roman provinces of drain has a fair amount of success there but he's a very different character than we're used to when it comes to Augusta's because he's not a politician he's very very much a military man and his is kind of a sad story when you get to this point because in order for this to properly work augustus basically commands that Tiberius divorce his first first and current wife whom he loved and Mary his daughter Yulia you know and this is a very this is a terrible situation because those two are a match may from from Hell and he doesn't like her and she's really really know better to him whatsoever. It's it's really terrible terrible. He didn't like his wife and something I find interesting with this. We took our history normally full of such vibrant characters if insulate your likes people use their words really off of articulate amazing people Caesar Ziza. A CICERO comes to mind very elegant ray charming good talking so person and tie babies. We ever really different kind of character. Ed Ed wonder either POPs up in room issue that often yes yes yeah now. There's no question about that so the other thing that happens as well Augusta's also has two grandchildren that began raising in profile in terms of his desire for succession succession when the time comes and in the case of Tiberius having to divorce his first wife is a big issue. There's a story maybe apocryphal that even a a officer had to be assigned to his first wife to keep them away from Tiberius because they understand exactly how Tiberius feels yes and her effect on him but he sees these two and he begins seeing them as the true successor that even if he does end up taking power or it's going to be in a custodial role where he's basically keeping the seat warm until one or two of them have matured already to enter public life in that role however however in fact both of them die in two and four eighty respectively but between the two desired grandchildren and then being forced to marry a woman he loathes e- ends up going into self imposed exile on the Isle of Roads. I can't even make this up so when we begin looking further into Tiberius and we get to the point where we're looking at succession at fourteen eighty when Octavian has him on on his deathbed even though the other choices are no longer particularly in the running and obviously he's been in self-imposed exile for a time now this is not a real problem for Augusta us the reason why is because for the most part he trusts Tiberius to know that the order of the day is consolidation and that held very very properly follow through on that so when Tiberius does come to Rome on this particular occasion has definitely plays he has no love for whatsoever and he comes to the Senate and they approach him and ask him to fill this first citizen role based on the wishes of Augusta's to succeed him. He begins and doing a bad impression of Augusta's so you remember how Augustus made that show giving back power Tiberius thing goes goes on to make what lease the senators thought was a very very disingenuous and a poor attempt to decline in that he he declined to much declined with too much vigor and they they saw right through the whole thing and this I really great example of just Kinda a poor politician that he was but even though they don't really like him and he is a very mercurial character. He's a very very different man than they are are used to. They still don't make a big fuss about it because they know what the alternative is and I think they at least trust them in so far as that goes but it's very very clear that there's this personal disconnect in a mutual animosity between the Senate and Tiberius at this point and his first real challenge Allen Jr and all of this is when they start may experience a mutiny of legions in Germania and this basically is due to the fact that a lot of Romans historians at the time will claim the reason was because these legions didn't want Tiberius to enter his role as bring caps later emperor that doesn't really make any sense especially because Tiberius was a military man he understood the military. He understood them and they understood him. It's much much more likely having to do with the fact that Roman and legions at that point swore personal allegiance to the pearn caps later emperor and with Augusta's dead they. I don't have an allegiance anybody so it's a bargaining chip for them to improve their lot since they don't have that connection and they have very very good reason to go ahead had an rebel like this to improve their lot because if you are a Roman soldier you fight for years for hope of plunder and booty but it's very very hard life especially when you're talking about intermedia we're talking about a place that very unstable that doesn't want to genuflect to the Roman an empire at any point in time and for all that's worth. Basically you fight for years. People are killed. People are main people are injured. The conditions editions of that situation are awful. They're life effectively sucks and they're trying to use this opportunity to make the better of it. You know there are some diplomacy almost back and forth at least a token effort to be sure but at the end of the day Tiberius does what Tiberius has to do and he puts sit down but it's a very very difficult situation to be sure but he handled ultimately and the only way that he could. It's really crazy stories Greece toby poor. I didn't really know much about Tiberius for like reading for your notes in but it is sad story. He's like the room and leader. He didn't like volume mm-hmm like the best working explain it seems like didn't want to be a part of that and obviously ended up in power due to monarchy and and how these employees find as opposed to being voted in and obviously you volume was always an empire before it was the Roman Empire of must call it was the republic and became a republic because you had the Roman monarchy before that and the Roy Moore Nacchio was a BLERTA taken republic so it's just amazing that earlier how they fell into being an empire a monarchy ruled empire want to gain. Do you think Paul any point join Jerry gold of this Tiberius may be wanted to dismantle. This empire gave back to the Times with the Republican Senate. You know that's an interesting question because it's definitely something. The senators were thinking themselves at the time especially because they couldn't read the man personally they couldn't tell because like I said he was so mercurial sometimes very very very cryptic and it was pretty clear that he didn't really want the role. He really was taking a non reluctantly. This was not is great calling he had suffered a great deal wheel to simply get to this point to job at effectively he didn't want to do but at the time based on his orders from Costas than that common understanding about consolidation consolidation. It's very unlikely that he would go ahead and alter the existing power structure in a way that could any way destabilize is the situation contrary to consolidation and the marching orders that Augustus gives him an additional the fact that he's never he does not want to expand either either. Augustus was very very clear about that he basically told him to keep his rear end out of Germania which wasn't a heart cells given all the time that he spent there but there is the Roman historian Tacitus who's writing about the beginning of the second century and he's doing a history of all of those who assume the role of bring caps from the death of Augusta so this would include Tiberius all the way to about one years writing at the beginning of the second century and Taibbi tacitus acids is wondering this himself and he wonders why the the senators didn't take advantage of this opportunity and the reason they didn't take advantage of it because they knew the possible alternative. They were ready to run with it. They remember the past all too well and the fact of the matter is Augusta's did a very good job. He didn't just consolidate he aggrandizement it. Suetonius who was a who was Augusta's personal biographer basically said that Augusta's had turned Rome from from a city of brick to a city of marble. Even though Tiberius would not be much for aggrandizing Roman culture or society or for you know holding festivals for his people understood the consolidation role but in the case of Tacitus he's looking at it from a time in which this looks like it's a possibility pity for him because he's going through a pair of what are considered a couple of the of the good emperors in his case. You're looking at Antonius pious and who serve as emperor and then you also have Marcus Aurelius best known for his meditations who served as co emperor who very much made a great deal personal sacrifice to Administra- A. and governed very very well in a way that others in that role most certainly do not who use it in many ways for very very personal political and financial gain rain and whatever fund them they can have with that but tacitus totally blown away from this is also very romance romanticizing the Roman Republic. E definitely wants that but he's is also very cynical so you have to keep that in mind. He basically considers what the Senate did. At this point in fourteen eighty with transition was essentially to him the senators putting themselves in to voluntary slavery which is kind of an odd way of putting it but it's not entirely unfair either however when it comes to Tiberius Iberia's I guess he's a very unusual fellow. WE'RE GONNA learn more about him. A bit more down the road you know Suetonius who was the biographer of Augusta's talked about Tiberius and and some of his very unusual and undesirable extracurricular activities when in the next episode ill go and Tiberius that is an exile himself onto the isle of Capri in basically keeps himself there for the rest of his reign which is it's own thing but no I don't think he was ever going to change the structure and despite the amazing resource that Tacitus is it it doesn't really reflect the reality of the time and place in which the transition was occurring is is really interesting story and I I wanted to her ends poorly going to be carrying on disturbed type babies into next episode. I can tell you this much patrick for everything it's worth. We're GONNA keep a very close pulse on this because a couple episodes down the road. Tiberius has a very very interesting and infamous successor. Who who was the son of the adopted son who is the son of the adopted son would making him Tiberius grandson the son of Germanic which of of course is Caligula? I may just do a portion on whether was he mad was bag was dangerous to know was he. All three are none and that should be a lot of fun. I think the audience is really going to enjoy that. Yes food hearing about that. This is the eighty history podcast anyway. I think that brings us to the end of our journey for today. Patrick where can people find us you can find me personally on twitter at name explain why tea and of course you can find me on my youtube channel name explain and for myself you can find me on my newly minted twitter account at the handle at PK D. and history as well as on the Social Media News Platform courts by searching polychaete Costanzo also take a peek at my reader email submitted Q. and A. Column The World War Two brain bucket over on T. R. We have linked down on the description now over to Anna policy you guys thank you so much for listening and good good Bali. Yes thank you for listening be well until next time like all good things we come to an end for today thank you for listening listening to the AD history podcast. It is listeners such as yourself who make this show possible and truly awesome be sure to follow in subscribed the upcoming eighty history podcast episodes available wherever podcasts southbound ulcer follow eighty history on social media follow the show on twitter at the handle at eighty history. PC as what is on facebook by visiting FACEBOOK DOT com slash eighty history podcast and instagram instagram as eighty history podcast in addition to liking and subscribing on Youtube by searching eighty history podcast do do you have a direct comment or question for pool and Patrick drop them an email at eighty history podcast at TGI review dot com also so be sure to visit the show's homepage at Tj and review dot com slash eighty history podcast for Poulin Patrick. Thank you for listening listening to the AD history podcast. We will see you again next time in the ever-growing tapestry of Welsh history Iraq.

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Episode 30: How To Teach History How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

53:01 min | 5 months ago

Episode 30: How To Teach History How To Teach History

"I'm Karen. Michelle were sisters and Homeschool MOMS. Welcome to the layers of learning podcast where we talk about family style home schooling. Welcome to the PODCAST. Today we are going to talk about how to teach history. So I, we're going to start by talking about what is history, and then we're going to talk about ways you can teach it, and then we're going to talk about methods to teach it in your homeschool kind of the philosophy behind it, and also what you actually do on day by day basis. So Michelle when you started home schooling. Did you teach history pretty much. The same way that you do currently, you've been doing this for a lot of years have you changed your methods I have changed mostly. I still teach it in order and I still use a spine. We use a history encyclopedia. Kind of is our spine to keep us on track and because you can't find information on all the history topics in normal books. But the thing I've added we do a lot more hands on than we used to do, and in fact, I used to really do know hands on I would have my kids read stuff and then they would draw a picture and I would write for them. This was when they were really small So when somebody asks you How do you teach history? What's your response? That is such a big subject, and that's why we're doing a whole podcast. But. I usually will say something like well. And then as you're going through history, you use living books I like real books I. Don't like textbooks. I. Don't want to buy a package curriculum with with the textbook kind of feel I want my kids to be reading historical fiction I want to be reading books from authors who love their subjects and then I like to add in hands on stuff and we don't do a hands activity for every single little thing but we will do you know maybe three or four hands on crafts or activities in a month where we're getting really into history and it helps create these hooks for kids it makes it memorable. So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital. I remember when we were studying US history I took our timeline squares and I have the dates. Blacked out of them. And I told my kids I want you to put these events in order. And so they started to look at things like the Boston Tea Party and you know different events that had occurred throughout that era. And they put them in order and the first time they got it completely wrong and I was showing him how look this led to this which led to this and it took them three or four times of putting it together. But they were finally able to do it and it was amazing how much they learned when they started to connect those events. In. A timeline and we can do that in isolated units like when we? Learn about early US history but we can also do that in a more global context looking at how different people's affected each other and really understanding how we are connected overtime and I think you mentioned timelines. Timelines are really really important for history because of that, you can't actually study history completely in chronological order. It's not possible because you're studying India and there's things happening in South America at the exact same time period, we live in a big world, it's not study. So you study India and then you study South America and the timeline connects the to you can see, oh, these things were happening at the same time or this happened just before that. And you can see how things are connected. You mentioned the Aztecs Michelle I remember as a kid learning about the INCAS as Texan. Maya's, and they were all together. Always they were grouped together those three people's and I had no idea that they weren't next door neighbors living at the same time period in history they were actually separated by thousands of years. The mayas were already dead and gone for eight hundred years or so before the Inca people even came on the scene. But. Because they're so often grouped in. Elementary School Type History Legis, you have no context for that. So when you teach things in order, it's really helpful for you to see how one thing led to the next thing and where they fit in the big picture. The next important principle after teaching things in order is to teach them in context I, think in. Part of the context, but there's even more to it than that. I had an amazing history teacher who was teaching us about ancient times and I remember him telling us hey, you cannot judge the people in ancient times by our standards today and it took me a little while to realize what he meant. But he's really right. We tend to look at historical figures. and. Kind of imagine what we would do knowing what we know today in their situation, and we can't really do that. They didn't live in the same situation that we did. A good example of that Karen is Genghis Khan. I do not like Genghis Khan? He is not my friend he he conquered approximately half of the world. And killed millions of people in the process so To me that's like, no, you're not a good guy not a hero however, I read Genghis Khan by Connie Golden. I can't remember the exact title but. Congleton wrote these the series of books about Gingas Kahn night the first one that was about childhood and I was floored because I had no concept before I read that book of what his world was like I didn't understand the moral context he came from I didn't understand the way he grew up the Mongol world back in the that time was brutal and in order to survive, you had to be brutal. You had to be harsh had life wasn't worth. What we think of it as being worth today, individuals didn't matter all that mattered was the tribe and the survival of of your tribe and the power of your tribe and it was all about the family. It wasn't about individuals and it didn't matter if someone died along the way and that's not how we think things today that is not where our moral focus is and so reading that made me realize okay I still don't really like him right but. It made me realize where he was coming from a why he was the way he was I don't know if the word is excused him from some of it but but at least it made me see the lens that he was looking through instead of the Lens that I'm looking through. I. Think. In the end that is a lot more instructive than you saying he's a bad guy he was horrible guy. You're you're seeing it in a more valuable way? Because you took the time to understand the culture and the time that he lived in. So when we put things in context instead of just judging based on our current situation. It actually teaches us a lot more not less. It's not as accepting the person. But it's US understanding. What makes people do the things they do and how the society and the culture that we live in can affect us. It teaches us a lot more than we could ever learn without the context I. Think it actually does help you to look at yourself too because. We, may think that we have the moral high ground over Gingas Kahn. But how many things will people look back at us in one hundred years from now and be very critical of the way that we're living our lives I mean. We can't know what it'll be like one hundred years from now but we do know that it won't be the same. Even from our childhood today it's really different. Yes. Now, add thousands of years, hundreds of years. At some real passage of time. And you realize things change really quickly in this world. What's acceptable changes really quickly the way we view things it changes. So that's part of the context is is being able to see people. Not. From just our perspective but from their perspective and from the Lens of the time in which they lived, and that's an important aspect of teaching history to your kids Michelle while you were speaking it made me think of when we were writing about the United States of America and that was some of the hardest writing. We've ever done in in the in the layers of learning curriculum. Yeah. Yeah. As we were writing about that. I was sitting there going this is all I've ever lived. I've traveled the world, but I have only ever lived. In the US. So how do you write about it as though you're not from the US. Americans are different in some ways because it's all I've ever known right? You're in the middle of it. Yeah. So we had to stop and ask ourselves what is culturally accepted here I remember talking about rock and roll and blue jeans and you know different things like that. But we had to really examine wait a minute. What does make this nation? What it is so context is a really interesting. Thing because sometimes we're so ingrained in our own time and place in the world that we don't take the time to see how it similar or different to other times and places. I think as we come to know more about different peoples and cultures, we can begin to connect them. We can begin to compare both our current time and place, but also make connections between the historical peoples that were studying. Yeah I think an interesting thing is that. We were speaking about the INCAS, we're GONNA. We're just probably going to keep going back to the. They're cool but. They're actually misunderstood with they. What's interesting? They conquered the Andes in fourteen thirty eight. that. Is only fifty four years before Columbus sailed to the new world. That is a very short time. They were not an ancient people. They weren't. They weren't an ancient people. I mean, of course they have ancient ancestors and they go back. But so does everybody we're talking about the INCA empire it was it was only fifty four years old when when Columbus. Made it to the Caribbean and it was a few years a very few short years after that there were Spanish conquistadors marching up into their land so They they had been around for less than one hundred years when they were conquered and I don't think that's something that people realize or conceptualize and then also. At the same time Inc. is were conquering the Andes. The British and the French were fighting the Hundred Years War. Joan of ARC had just died seven years before the the the Andes were conquered. We don't think about Joan of ARC living in the same decade. But she did she did yeah and at that same time John Van Eyck was the court painter for the Burgundian Bruhns. We don't know when he lived when we study him. Unless. We're studying in context, but all of these people lived around the same time as each other and when we start to make those connections and get a bigger picture of the world that changes the view that we have of history and the the interesting thing is that those people are all actually connected in real ways when. The Hundred Years War was finally over and Joan of arc was essential to the ending the war and Britain did not conquer. France, and this is this is very important because it changes the balance of power in Europe it means that the Spanish are free to go and explore other places because they're not having to defend their borders from the English and they and they ended up conquering the INCAS. Well, these are these things are connected to each other and that Jan van Dyke had the money and had the power. From. The Burgundian to make this great art. You know that was all behind his great art is because the Burgundy has were switching sides with the English and the French and because the renaissance was happening by then I mean these things are all very very connected to each other but you can't realize that if you're not using timeline if you're not teaching history in order if you're not looking at the context of things and I think as you begin to study. All of the historical time periods and peoples, you also have to continually make connections with your own world that you live in your own life your own time. You've got compare those things, the historical events and the people that you study and the actions and decisions that were made they need to be compared with your own experiences of real life of what you're doing today right? So even though you have never been medieval crusader, you have been a human being and so that alone connects us with people of the past and other places and other cultures and other times and we can say. Again, with the understanding that their time and places and cultures shaped them into what they were just like ours is shaping us but you still need to put yourself in that position and say, what would it have been like what? How would I have behaved if I had been in that world and what lessons can I learn from what those people did? You know what did they do? Right? What did they do wrong and how does that apply to my world? Today. Because events are happening right now in real time that have parallels to the past you know where? People are people. People. Do things that. Are Similar in all time they're seeking for power they're making great art. They're they're building businesses they are deciding which direction their country is GonNa take that has happened in the past just like it's happening today. A lot of the study of history is the study of human nature. It really is I. think that's actually the most important reason to study history is because you learn what are people made of what do they do, and then what are the consequences? Of the choices they make what happens when you overthrow your king. You know what? What is the next step and we can see that by looking back at the past basically everything that people do now has been done before in some way. Not The exact events but the exact kinds of choices and the character of people and you know we can learn a lot if we will make connections to our lives and the events that are happening now. And the events of history and the lessons that we can learn if we really look honestly humanity has not done a great job of learning from the past I. Think. We have progressed technologically and scientifically far more than we have progressed socially or morally, and we do tend to look back at the people in the past and think, oh, they were morally depraved Genghis Khan but. Are we really that much further on a lot of times I think? No, we're not and so I think until we can actually teach those kinds of lessons and look at that. What did we learn from this behavior in the past? Then we're not ever GONNA, really change as a human race, the tools, the stuff we have I think that change is really fast at least especially in the modern day like we have different technology. When I was a kid, we did not have cell phones. We didn't have the Internet. If you wanted to do a report for school, you had to go to the library, the card catalogue and fight over the one book. That all the other kids are trying to get to. So, things change fast like that. So we mentioned before that, we like to use real books not textbooks in the homeschooling world. A lot of people call these living books and that comes from the Charlotte Mason Philosophy which I like that I, I, really do I have noticed a big difference. In the way that my kids are taught versus the way I was taught in school be just because of the textbook alone. I think one of the things that living books do is introduce the stories of the people instead of just mentioning them and then moving on, you actually get into the lives and the stories of people in more meaningful ways biographies. I love to read to my kids because they feel like they know the people that we are reading about, read their biography and you do get part of that context of the world. They lived into a historical fiction authors are amazing people. They do a lot of research into their subject and it may not be one hundred percent accurate. We know it's not, but it's still immerses you in the world in a way that you could never be immersed in it. In any other way really you can picture it. You can imagine being part of a different place in time and yeah, historical fiction is powerful. So. Karen you were telling me the other day about a book called Twenty and ten which I actually haven't read. But that you read to your kids yes, we loved twenty and ten it is by Clare Hatchet Bishop. It is the story of twenty French children who were in a refuge in the mountains and a man came to them and ask them to. Hide ten, Jewish Refugee Children, and these twenty French kids agreed to do that and he was explaining to them. You know if you don't hide them if you give them away, they will die and these twenty children hid the ten children keeping them safe even though they were putting themselves at risk and it was just an incredible story and a different take on. The time and it was based on the story. Right was based on a true story and it was incredible and it was really neat that it was about kids. It's not always easy to find historical stories that are about kids. But my kids really connected because they were reading about kids their age. Another thing that I think is really valuable in it fits in the same category with. Historical fiction and books is is that. The documentaries because even though it's not a book Watch documentary. They do a great job of bringing you into the world. They often do reenactments and they've got historians that they're interviewing. They can be very, very powerful also just movies that are set in the time period I think, World War. Two. Ton of movies from that time but but a lot of times in history there are. There are movies or documentaries. It is amazing when you see period clothing when you see the actual landscapes of places. Just things that you didn't have in your mind before now they stick in your mind in a new way when you just watch even a little movie clip even if it's not an entire documentary, there was there was A. Some British people I don't even know who made it. I can't remember but some British people interviewed some Saxons right from from from medieval early early Britain British history, and so they have these actors who are playing Saxons and it was fascinating because they were speaking in this dialect that you couldn't even understand and they ha they were interviewing. The poor people and they were interviewing the Lord of the Manor and it was fascinating because the Lord of the manor lives in conditions that even our poor people today don't live in you know and. And, it was really interesting to hear them interviewing them and they had the people, the actors who were being the ancient saxons. Were completely in character the whole time so the interviewer would ask them something like well, don't you think your servant works too much and they're like, what are you talking about? He's not even a person I mean like they totally. Autism opposite attitudes stay within there and it was really really fascinating. That is interesting I also love to incorporate primary sources as we're studying history. So a primary source is directly written at the historical time period that you're talking about. Sometimes it's a speech sometimes, it's a letter sometimes, it's a journal. But when you read those primary source materials, they also give you insight into what was in the minds and hearts of the people that lived at that time. So one of the primary sources that we have read with with. My older kids with my teenagers I. had them read I in hard he wrote a little volume about Charlemagne, what was going on in Charlemagne's court I in hard was one of Charlemagne's secretary. So he knew him personally worked with him everyday was part of the court and he wrote this little volume and it's been preserved through the ages and we read a translation of it because we don't actually read the ancient French dialect that they were speaking that. They need to up your game in your Home School Michelle I know. And actually when you're looking at primary source, if they're not from time that's fairly recent and in your own language, then you're going to be reading a translation and different translations are very different and finding a modern accessible translation is very, very important to having your kids understand and being able to have accessible for them. So translations matter a lot just keep that in mind when you're looking at primary sources. If you struggle with one, maybe find a different translation version I think beyond. The reading history really will come to life when you start to integrate hands on projects, and that's a huge part of what layers of learning is about. Is the projects that will help your kids remember what they're learning. We made a medieval castle out of cardboard boxes when we were doing medieval history. This was a few years ago but. At at the time we also made flags that went in the castle and the flags. All had different parts of the oath that nights take when they're. Knighted and and so we put that on the castle to show. This is the basically these are the highest ideals of the of medieval Europe at the time. That these castles were being built and when the nights were being knighted and all that, and it helped us to connect all that together and the kids. Remember the castle building far more than they would remember if we had just read a book. So this past school year, we made some period costumes that were night costumes and it was really really fun to watch my kids create their own night costumes, and then we even went through the ceremony. and. So costumes any kind of a project like that. It's amazing. How much they take away from that because they don't forget it. It was memorable creating the project right. So basically, the pattern we do is we read and we watch movies. And then we do some kind of a project. And we? A few years ago, we did a Roman costumes of a Roman soldier and we just made out of cardboard spray painted. You know it was very simple, very cheap. Of Fun Costume and my son went and put on red shorts and a red t shirt, and then he put his. Armor over the top of that, and we talked about how the Romans were red and the reason that they did it. You know so that so their enemies couldn't see them bleed and. Were like that is so hard core that. You, know, and it just makes it really brings to life the whole, the Roman military and the way that they were highly disciplined, and that's why they were able to conquer to the world and all of the things like go with that see, you can read a lot of textbooks on Rome and never come away with that that you came away with because you made a little period costume and talked about why they dress the way data so much fun I mean the kids loved it. They they enjoy it. I hear. So often people say history is so boring. Well, it's not being taught right is problem. There's nothing boring about all of the stories that have ever happened in our whole world that's worrying. It's everything that has ever happened. It's all the things people have done. It's all scientific discoveries. It's all the wars. It's all of the intrigue and backstabbing there's nothing boring about any of no no, it's fascinating and not every single hands on project has to be super crazy involved either I mean even when we make little paper foldable, we've got some really great world war planes. The layers of learning curriculum and I remember when my kids made those they were so excited about it and it took us no time at all can make one plane in ten minutes. Yeah. Yeah and they played with those planes for at least a few weeks I remember them being all over our house in our school room and so not every single hands on project has to be super involved but just doing the projects really helps it become memorable and come to life. Have you guys ever done an acting out of his of a historical event or A. Yeah. My kids really like it. When they acted out in video so we've got a few interspersed in our home videos that are priceless. It's really funny to watch all of the little scenes from history that they've enjoyed acting out. We did the battle of Long Island time, and that was that was George Washington during the American revolution and they were getting pounded by the British and they had to escape from Long Island over to I think it was to Manhattan across the river across the river and acting that whole thing out a we we have some people are being the British we have a big family so that helps. You, both armies, I've. So some people are being the British and they're marching on the American positions that are entrenched in the Americans are freaking out because they're going to die. The British were definitely overpowering them, but it was fun to and it makes it. So the kids really remember this. I mean. They will never forget that battle. They know exactly what happened they know the troop movements became did it out And again, we don't do that all the time we have done that a few times because it is time intensive and you have to have big armies. You can always bring in stuffed animal troops come on yeah. But it is it is memorable to do something like that. So along with teaching history in order and in context and with you know living. Books and great sources. As, well as hand on projects I, think one of the things that I have loved about learning history in home school is that we do it as a family I don't have every kid individually working on their own and learning their own curriculum. We're all learning the same thing together and that has been awesome and both of us have a pretty big spread in our kids ages. Yeah. I've got a roughly eleven years between my oldest and my youngest. So you know I have a I have a six year old at the same time. I've got one starting high school. So you know we we did all this family learning even though we had all these different ages we're the same we we span. We've got a little kids and then the middle earners in the high school and they're all learning together and it works. The reason it works is because There isn't any history subject that isn't just as interesting to a six year old as it is to an eighteen year old or an adult adult. Yeah. Yeah. I am amazed at the things that I learned in history even though I've been studying it for years, it is not possible to finish studying history even the greatest historians in the world don't know all of the stories of history. So it's a continual thing that you learned throughout your life from the time. Your little. Until you stop studying. So so we do the for your cycle where you come around to all of the history of the world, every four years and Each time that we learn it, we're learning about say ancient India and we've done it before and we're doing it again and we'll do it again in the future. But each time we do it, we just learned about a slightly different aspects and it doesn't matter exactly which parts of the ancient mogul history you're hitting on because. Like you said, nobody knows at all and most people don't know any of it. So if you if you hit on a different aspect of it, each time it if one of your kids never got that and if you remember that you are learning history. In great part to apply it to your life so that you're learning about human nature and the lessons it doesn't matter if you are an expert on every single person topic what matters is that you looked at some of those enough to glean the lesson from it. And then know that you're going to keep on studying, keep on learning and keep on gleaning more lessons. We don't even really memorized dates. There are a few dates in history that I think are really really pivotal that I have my kids memorize. But for the most part, we don't memorize dates. We don't do tests on history much at all. It's more of a joyful learning and just gleaning and when I as an adult learning. About any subject I, don't test myself on it. I'm learning about it because I either need it in my life as a tool or because it's just interesting and I want my kids to have that kind of feeling too. So we don't do tons of tests which helps I think with the family schooling because you don't have to try to make tests for each of your kids that are at a different level that's time consuming. So, what we actually do is we'll read a book together or I will assign books to the different levels of my children depending on what it is some of its more independent reas. That's how you make the family schoolwork where you can have a high schooler whose learning that level and a little one who obviously isn't GonNa read a twenty chapter book. An art are reading happens during reading time now string history time like we kind of separate those. Yeah or in bed at night or whatever. Yeah and my kids are most of them are very avid reader. So they read anyway, I don't have to assign a ton of stuff but. Even if they're not, you can still read with them or watch a movie together as a family. We do that a lot even if it's just a short clip off of Youtube, that's ten minutes will watch that, and then we do a project together and everybody can do the project. Yeah. And we do read aloud together pretty often that also is sometimes during our school time and sometimes other times we have read aloud going on a lot and so sometimes the read aloud are based on history and what we're learning about in history and other times they're not but. But we continually do that together too and for those I don't know what you do Michelle but I just kind of choose generally the more middle level. Books for that's what I do. I tried to have it appeal to as many kids as possible, which means you're going to end up reading something that's written for ten to twelve year olds. Yeah and usually I personally like those books as an adult reading them. If they're well written it doesn't matter that the age target is younger. So my schoolers will be interested in them too but the vocabulary and the story line or not something that is above the ability of my younger kids especially, if you're talking about it as questions come up, things like that yes, everyone can understand. One of the things that we do very differently kind of like the individual reading for the older kids, the writing assignments that I give my kids during history does depend on their age and sometimes I let them choose their topic or their exact assignment and sometimes I assign it but my little one. Might just be writing a sentence or two. With an illustrated picture or something like that. Yeah. But if my seventeen year old does that that's not going to be acceptable like iron choir more from them as they get older. So you can do family school and have the projects together and the videos together and the read aloud together. But then you can kind of send them off and say, okay, now you're GonNa show me what you've learned and they get to do some writing. That's more individual based on their ability in age. Even if it is the same assignment, you could say I want you to write a report about Captain Cook. Well, the report that your six year old is writing is not the same as the report that your twelve year old is writing or that your fourteen year old is writing, they can all have the same assignment, but you're getting different levels of workout of them. Right same thing goes with poster or with narration or any writing assignment that you you just adjust it based on the age and ability of NHA, and it can even take them roughly the same amount of time a six year old is laboring at their one sentence or two two cents or three sentences for much longer than. A. High Schooler is so high school or can get a page done in the time that the six year old is getting there few. Yeah often narrations in school they usually call them short answer. Yes. They do. In homeschool we say right initiation, but it's basically the same thing you're just you're just repeating the information that you have absorbed in the way that you understand it right and it's a pretty simple assignment to check to see what they learned. Even the writing of it helps kids to remember what they have learned is kind of a review and a test and a writing assignment all in one. Yep. So Michelle, you have always loved history. You've kind of been a history buff for as long as I've known you. I've known you my whole life. So, what advice do you have for people who are afraid to teach history? Well. There's a couple of things. First of all a lot of people feel like they can't teach things they don't know. And very few people know anything about history because it's not taught very well in schools, and so they feel intimidated because they're like, well, how can I possibly teach to my kids? It's going to take me so much time in preparation. They feel like they have to study up on it before they start teaching well, and I think that it's helpful to remember what I said earlier no one not even the greatest historians know all of history. So you might remember that everyone is learning it. So stop. Saying to yourself I can't do it because I don't know everything. Of course, you don't know everything that's okay and you never will. You never will and that's okay. Point is you're learning. So I think it helps you to be a little less fearful if you accept that you don't know all of history that no one does and we're all learning and you do not need to prepare you do not. Need to cram before you teach your kids. First of all lecturing is probably the least effective method of teaching especially with children. Yes and so the most effective way to teach is actually to model learning, and so if you're learning with them, guess what you have built in you're actually in some ways in an advantage if you are being wowed by the new information at the same time, your kids are. I think the one thing that you do need to prepare for is the gathering of resources. You know to make sure that you have the books, the supplies that you need to be prepared in that vein, but you don't need to actually. Rehearse your speech that you're gonNA give your kids or right up your plan. You don't need to do that. You don't have to know anything at all about the Spanish. Civil war before you start reading about it with your kids You know the second thing is aside from being afraid of teaching things you don't know is that you shouldn't be afraid of tough subjects that come up at some point. I mean history is the story of human beings and human beings are horrible a lot of times and there's GonNa be horrible things that come up in history and I think it's good and proper to shield your little kids from that. But once your kids are in high school. You, need to have those discussions with them. You need to talk about apartheid in South Africa you need to talk about the Holocaust in Europe you need to talk about Pol Pot and the Cambodian killing fields those things need to come up in your history discussions. All over the world bad things have happened slavery in the United States. We should be talking about this stuff. You know your kids need to know the tough stuff and you need to talk about an in-depth ways. If they don't know the tough stuff they will doomed to repeat it. We do tend to repeat history. And it's important that we learned those lessons and that we are appalled by the things that we should be appalled by. Right. I remember just this last year I read the Hunger Games and I know this is not true history. This is a fictional series but I read the Hunger Games series to my kids and my daughter said, that is the worst book we've ever read. It. And I said, I'm so glad you feel that way because you're supposed to hate it, you're supposed to hate the things that happened. What happened in that with kids killing kids and then being forced into. This arena and all of these dreadful things at the hands of this dictator government, you're supposed to hate that and so very often the lessons that we learn from history we're supposed to hate that's part of the lesson I remember the first time the I learned about the my Lai massacre, which was a horrible event from the Vietnam. War. American. Soldiers had killed. A whole village of the local people in Vietnam and I was an adult before I learned about that because we don't learn history in the United States not very well at all and I remember being appalled by it. But at the same time I also had learned about that one soldier who stood up and said, no, this is wrong and everyone around him not just at that moment. But for years afterward was so hard on him he lost rank he didn't get advancement in the military he was blacklisted everywhere and he stood his ground and I want my. Kids to hear the horrible things but I also want them to hear how that one person can make a huge difference. That guy was just some guy. He was just some soldier. He wasn't anybody important, but he stood up and he saved dozens of lives from that village. When I think part of the lesson is that life didn't get easy for him because he did the right thing you can connect that to something that your kids are doing today right now and they can learn lessons from the people in history who did the hard things because they were right. And all kinds of lessons are there waiting for us to learn if we will just dig in and really look at history in that context? So Michelle, we've talked a lot about the whys of history and what we teach. But a lot of people ask. Pretty often how to actually do it in your home school? Day. So, what is your schedule like for history? It has changed some over the years from when I first started it but. The basic schedule has stayed the same so First of all, we teach history year round every year all the way from kindergarten through high school graduation we always teaching history I never don't have a history class going with my kids. So that is a subject that I feel like is essential and should be all the time and should be thoroughly. So when we first started I was doing. Every single day, we would read a little bit out of our history encyclopedia and the kids would draw pictures and right. That's all we did at the very beginning and it has morphed a little bit. We do it a little less frequently, but we do it for longer at a time. Is it because you're getting deeper? and. Because we're doing more hands on projects. It takes more time but I think the trade off is worth it. The kids are getting more out of it than they did when we were just reading and and drawing pictures and we've we've upped our game a little and so. Now we spend. One day out of our week we history and that is the only subject we do. We do math and reading and writing every day, but then are only. Extra subject is history on that one day and we usually do it Mondays and we'll spend a two to three hours on history that day. So you really only do history on Monday or do you do the main history on Monday? Okay. So I guess I need to explain it this way we we do our family school history on Mondays but all through the week in all the time, the kids are reading books that are history books that are about history, those living books that we discussed and we're doing read aloud and sometimes those are historical novels to they're not always but sometimes they are, and then we review frequently we use your big book of Knowledge Karen which that again, that's a fairly new thing in our home school, but it is. Fabulous. So all you do is you write down the main points that you want your kids to remember from the history lesson on a piece of paper, and you are able to just ask them questions and do it in a game style and review this constantly review that's how we do it. So we don't actually currently do the subject of the day in my home school, but it's close to that. We do history and geography on Mondays and Wednesdays, and we do science and art on. Tuesdays and Thursdays but we actually do them all everyday to some degree because we're doing the reading 'cause if the kids finish something before somebody else I, say, Hey, do a quick narration about what we learned yesterday or I might have them add something to their book of years when they have some time or like you said with the Big Book of knowledge, we'll we'll do some review. So it kind of depends on our day we're pretty flexible with it, but it kind of helps us. Complete the big projects. And watch the videos and dive into it a little more deeply when have days setup for it gives you a bigger block of time. So that's one of the reasons that we do a subject of the day. So we have this big block of time that we can spend doing projects or watching a movie or different things that we do. Often. We actually do a project while we're watching a movie or while I'm reading aloud to them, they're doing something hands on, they can be making Sumerian seals while I'm reading to them about mess, Patina. Yeah. That's that's how we do it too. So if you were going to teach daily. You'd probably spend like thirty to sixty minutes per subject and then jumped from subject to subject. Yeah and there's there is nothing wrong with doing it I don't think that there is a weekly schedule that is the perfect way to do it I think it just depends on what you want to do, try it and see what works I think you have all younger kids thirty minutes. is about their attention span so that might be better. But by the time I had kids in high school who were you know writing the essay that we talked about they needed more than thirty minutes to get it done. You know. So it just depends on your kids and your family and the phase that you're in but if you were doing it daily probably thirty to sixty minutes. If you're it either subject of the day or like I do the two subjects in a day you're talking about. More like one to two hours maybe three if it's just once a week. and. I'm really flexible about that too. I don't actually look at my clock and say, okay, we're starting at ten o'clock and we're ending at noon I don't do it that way. We just there's no bell that rings releases the kids, right? We we just we okay it's time for history because we just finished math. So we just move into the next subject and we do it for as long as it takes. Yeah, we never know exactly how long our school day is going to be on any given day because it depends on what project we're doing and what we have going on and. Truthfully. My kids never feel like Oh. We're stuck in school because we're having a really good time. They are itching for the day to be over I actually feel like that is one advantage that home schoolers really have over public schools. Public schoolers the teachers do bells they. They have to have a lesson plan that fits within their fifty minute or ninety minute class whatever the time period is they have to make a lesson plan that fits it exactly. It wasn't sure and it can't be too long and we don't. We don't have to worry about that. We start when we start we when we end. Having it be in longer chunks like that really does allow you to do the hands on projects that are gonNA help history just hop off the page in your family and it gives you the chance to watch that video or read aloud while they work on a project without feeling like, Oh, no, the bell rang gotta go on. So it actually is a really flexible way to do it. Take. Caryn at the beginning of this podcast, you asked me. If someone comes up to me and says, how do you teach history? What do you tell them? So now I'm going to ask you that question. What do you do if somebody says, how do I teach history well, definitely say I do really believe and teaching it in order like you do. And for sure I believe in teaching it in context and not trying to project our. Current. Society on people in the past. I like it when my kids connect. The things that we're learning with their lives in meaningful ways especially like we discussed the human nature concepts and things like that I love teaching with hands on projects. I love reading stories and imagining what life was like for other people and really just embracing cultures that have existed throughout the story of our whole world. It's awesome when you look at it like a story instead of like a test. And you really can. Help history to come to life for your kids. So that's my goal is a history teacher is to help them remember it through having it be alive for them. And having it be fun I think. Yeah. Yeah I. Think it can be fun. I also want to add to that just that I think this is something that you taught me. Karen is the the family school concept of. Doing projects together and having the whole thing be a family learning experience doing things as a family just makes it. It brings you together as a family. You all know the same things you can discuss things together. You can talk about it over the dinner table and that's been really valuable. Yeah. In a very real sense. People ask about our home school and truthfully that's just our life. We do it altogether. So are home is just. Our everyday life, we have awesome family memories of amazing reenacted battles. Period costumes, really fun projects and. That's what our family history is made of, is this homeschool history experience that we've enjoyed together and you've got the videos to prove we have family videos I will not be publishing. Some of our costumes are quite funny. Now, they're gonNA, there's going to be a clamor for you. We have a whole dress up box and when it's time to act something out, I'm like kids go to the dress up box. Find something. Good. But it is fun. History is meant to be fun and it shouldn't be intimidating. Just. An awesome part of your home school day Yep just relax and learn together. That's the key to history. We hope you love teaching history as much as we do. Thanks for joining us today. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast and leave us a rating wherever you listen readings and comments. Help people find happy family style schooling visit us at layers of learning dot com at instagram and on our facebook group and make sure to tune in next month for the next five. In the meantime, we wish you happiness in your home school. Have Fun learning.

Michelle I US Karen Europe Genghis Khan INCAS Aztecs time Inc. Rome Elementary School Type History Andes Britain ARC India Yellow River valley Charlemagne Joan South America
More Cowbell (and Goat Bagpipe), with guest host Archivists Bet On Sexy Witches

Your Brain on Facts

29:23 min | 2 years ago

More Cowbell (and Goat Bagpipe), with guest host Archivists Bet On Sexy Witches

"Music has charms to soothe a savage breast to soften rocks to bend nodded oak. When William congress wrote that in sixteen ninety seven all hazard, he never could have imagined the variety of musical instruments. The world would produce over the next three centuries or even all the different instruments that existed around the world in his time. Mankind has been using materials at hand to make music since the caveman days, and now we have triple neck electric guitars. My name's moxy, and this is your brain on facts. If you've ever found yourself wishing for an episode with more sound effects in intricate editing. You're in for a treat today from simple flutes two enormous self playing. Art installations, the breadth of the heading musical instruments is enormous. This is another one of those topics where I had to decide where to draw the line. What makes the list, and what doesn't some instruments are machines some are sculptures. Some are one off inventions just to see if the designer could all of them are instruments in their own, right? Even if they don't make the list. There are four main types of musical instruments or five depending on who you ask percussion would win string brass and Hiebert each appearing as mankind's ability to work different materials, evolved like the soundtrack for fiddler on the roof. Let's start with tradition. Every culture on earth began making music with percussion hitting one thing with another thing to make a sound you like the earliest evidence, we've been able to find drumming dates back one hundred and sixty five thousand years evidence of this and all other prehistoric instruments is hard to come by not only because of the vast chasm of time, but because they were made of materials that would have decomposed millennia ago like wood bone and leather that doesn't mean that no evidence exists fragments of bone flutes have been found. And archaeological sites in south western France dated between twenty thousand and thirty five thousand years old. They showed evidence of being used extensively with the finger holes having been burnished smooth by the players fingers. A very nearly complete bone flute was found in Germany and was nearly twice as old as the ones in France, slightly older. Still was a flute made from a cave bear femur on which archaeologists found evidence of chewing by the ancestors of modern hyenas. This flute may have been carved by Neanderthals expanding scientific opinion about what they were capable of. Full an intact bone flutes have been found in the Yellow River valley of China dating back some eight thousand years, they're the oldest playable instruments ever found and luckily for us someone recorded one the recording doesn't sound so great. But just think that someone in our time is playing the self same flute that a man or woman played not eight centuries ago, but eight millennia ago. How different the world was the first time that flute sang. After pounding on things and blowing through things early man began to experiment with strings, the earliest records, referencing stringed instruments, come from Batavia three thousand years ago and fragments of stringed instrument over two thousand years old have been found on the isle of Skye. They are liars little harps held against the body. Plucked instruments were eventually joined by bowed instruments. The first recorded reference to abode liar was in the ninth century in Persia that it was called lira that we don't have recordings of that. We do have the Chinese ear who which evolved from a two stringed lute Tej in key a thousand years ago and is still played today. Over in the breasts section appear of ornately engraved trumpets from zero tooting Commons tomb are believed to be the oldest playable trumpets in the world that over three thousand years old they were discovered in nineteen twenty two by archaeologist Howard Carter and played over BBC radio the following year since their discovery there have been claims the trumpets have the power to summon war since Britain entered World War Two five months after that broadcast. Sadly, the recording was not preserved and that leaves the fifth category. Keyboards? Oh, yeah. You're probably thinking harpsichord stuff those are relatively modern. You'd be surprised how old relatively modern could be a five strained instrument known by the Igbo of present day, Nigeria as Uba or Uba aqua survives into the modern era. As the thumb piano known as bureau or kalimba. The oldest specimen found was carved in bronze which probably accounts for it. Having survived a thousand years of degradation, though, it is known to have existed three times longer than that. This oldest example is a medium sized circular instrument with eight bronze keys and carved with intricate patterns. As our mentions of bone flutes should indicate musical instruments can be made from almost anything even stone. It's cold a little phone Greek for stone and sound and it reaches backwards to Vietnam ten thousand years ago and forward to modern day, Michigan picture xylophone with carefully selected and shaped slabs of stone. Naturally, different types of stone. Make different sounds here is one made of granite. And another made from limestone. Both of these were created by musician artist and educator. Tom kaufman. You can learn more about his musical sculptures at tinker tunes dot com. If hard things aren't your style. What about carving your next instrument out of a carrot ahead of lettuce or an over Sheehan never say eggplant if you can say aubergine Vienna is home to the Vienna. Vegetable orchestra a group that hits the green grocer on their way to the concert hall before each performance, they carve new instruments from fresh produce each performances different varying with the vegetables available. They turned the veggies into recorders Casta nets, whatever you call two things that you're up together by the end of the performance, the veggies are pretty much shot and the whole process starts again. Gear in Richmond Virginia we have the indigenous scored orchestra which is just as it sounds. But they add a few accoutrements like strings and drumsticks, and they also dress up in cool funny. Gord hats. You can wash down those veggies with a cool beer while you listen to the beer bottle, Oregon, this invention is the product of an instrument accessory company and was created exclusively with Guinness bottles to celebrate their fiftieth anniversary. If you like your beer cold, which is not how to drink Guinness cold is for pills, Nur's and light lagers. But don't get me started on that. There's an entire festival with instruments made of ice just like those who make music with produce musicians at the ice music festival in Norway work with a team of ice carvers to prep their gear. You can't use just any old ice for this. Last year is Carver's selected the frozen waters of lake physi- as well as a nearby glacier as their material of choice armed with chain, saws chisels and hammers. They're tasked with the finger numbing process of fashioning blocks of ice into guitars, woodwinds, keyboards and drums, even the stage is carve out of ice. To ensure that there is enough ice to work with and that it will last long enough the festival has been moved to Finci as temperatures had been abnormally warm and getting warmer in gala where the festival debuted in two thousand five. If that's not your kind of cool. You could always play a skater. The skater is a Qatar and base made from a skateboard played and sometimes written by Keith Irish of the California band punk as doornail which mixes rock with off guard. Atonal components by means of the skater being a bass player when Irish was asked to join a band as Qatar issed. He didn't have a Qatar, but he owned a skateboard so necessity being the mother of invention. The skater was born. If you really into rock, there's always the great Stalag pipe organ, deep in the Larache hazards of Virginia sits the largest musical instrument in the world, the great Stalag pipe organ appears at first to be a normal organ, but instead of using pipes the organ is wired to soft rubber mallets poised to gently tap stalactites of varying length and thickness. When the keyboard is played the entire subterranean landscape becomes a musical instrument in order to achieve precise musical tone stalactites were chosen from a range of over three and a half acres, but due to the enclosed nature of cave. The full sound can be heard anywhere. The organ was invented and built in nineteen fifty four by Leland sprinkle a mathematician, electronic scientists. And it took him over three years to complete it. If you'd prefer something a little more delicate, perhaps an instrument made of glass, please welcome this week's guest presenter from the podcast archivists bet on sexy witches. My name is Elizabeth gray in. I the head Huntress of the podcast Arcus bets on sexy. Witches unusually talking John from a girl's perspective, I get to talk about my little known passion for collecting unusual musical instruments. Specifically moxie asked me to talk about the glass or Monica now that is our Monica with a capital in not harm on with age. This is a common mixup you see all the time even on its Wiki page in seventeen ninety one founding. Father Ben Franklin went to a concert at highlighted a glass, harmonica player that is someone who plays the rim of crystalline glasses tuned with water, this Franklin intrigued, you wonder if you could create a glass instrument that would not need so much moisture to work he found you could make sounds with hand loan crystals of different sizes which van could be inset who manipulate tone in pitch. These bowls. When have a Donut light home center. He attached these glass bowls two wheel which could be spanned and the glass or Monica was born. You would. Well, musician sits in front of the Monica please at three much like Pia. No, some have hand creek. But larger one-time flip puddle that controls the speed of the glass harp. There are usually metal strips in between the glass rims to guide the players fingers along and while there is very little water used or want to players still have to mois in their hands to create its dulcet tones never I mean, never touch the hands of glass of Monica player before performance. They really don't like that. It was given mixed reception by the public large some of the super-rich took to them right away. This was said to included a very young marie-antoinette at a few prominent composers did include them in their works, including Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Nielsen's on lewd vet Bonn Beethoven. However, there were also rumors long exposure could lead someone to go crazy many people compared the sounds of glass or Monica to the voices of aim. Angels people thought being exposed to divine for too long too much for humans. There are stories at a few players had dean gone crazy on yesterday. Even some cases of Monica players, dying young. There's also a rumor that players used mercury powder to protect their fingers from the constant rubbing of glass rims. It is true. Glasser Monica players do lose their fingerprints over time, but Murphy poison was relatively common in that Danaids. So we don't know the use of mercury or any of these stories actually true by the early eighteen hundreds the glass, Monica had already fell out of fashion for various reasons. Not the least of which was how fragile the glasses. Strict would be. There are a few people around the world still play a glass on Monica. You can even hear one to this day in the score of the best picture winner. Ashamed of water. The thank you for listening to me today about a glass or Monica want to think maxi for letting me talk about this truly. Elementary instrument and hope you join me for my season. Five mayor of our this sexy witches it'll be live. Newsday. January twenty seconds at nine PM eastern standard time on blog operate radio. Happy new year in good film, hunting this ahead. Huntress? Musical instrument making can get wild as in wild animal. The Toronto is a small ten string lute that originated in South America. The back of the instrument body is traditionally fashioned from an Armadillo shell when the Spanish came to South America. They brought with them the V whaler an ancestor of the Qatar the native people liked V Walea, but lacked the technology to shape the wood to make their own. However, there was a convenient resource nearby. Armadillos thus the Teranga was born. It was a happy for music, but probably a sad day for the Armadillo. Though, they do joke in the region that an Armadillo has to go to a conservatory for at least five years to study music before it can become a Tarango. Today. Many of the best wrangles have with backs instead of Armagh Delos. Domestic animals have their place in music too in the Balkans. There exists bagpipe called Guida bags, which are usually made of an entire sheep or goat. Hide different regions have different ways of treating the height. The simplest methods. Involve just the use of salt while more complex treatments involve milk flour. And the removal of the for the height is normally turned inside out. So that the for if it's left on is on the inside of the bag as this helps with moisture build up inside curious what one looks like search YouTube for goat bagpipe, but be ready. This popular. Search result hasn't lost its head. Debatably the wildest example in this category is also one of the strangest instruments out there, you've probably heard them your entire life without knowing what they were called Riva. What was making that sound? It's a Theran. A theorem is a little wooden box. With dials along one side, a loop of metal sticking out one end and two bits of metal rising from the other end, the tone is generated by two high frequency also leaders the pitch is controlled by the movement of the performance hand toward away from the circuit, but never actually touching it. So that's off on its own let alone when you stuff it inside, a dead European badger Taxidermied into a casual strolling pose by artists, David Kremlin. Why why not? And a quick tangent. Here. There is a coal onto coal to reduce the population of badgers in England. One of my favorite actors, Brian blessed teamed up with one of the world's greatest guitar players. Brian May to make a video speaking out against the coal. It is a parody of flash, Gordon and the old badger bedroom. Badger mushroom medium, please look it up. Stop everything. I mean, if you're driving pullover east, one of the greatest things ever to appear on the internet. Just as there are many materials from which to make instruments. There are many ways to make the sound contact and moving ere are so passe once you figure out how to make music with fire. The pyro phone also known as the fire organ or explosion Colli appea- actually dates back to eighteen seventy. It's made of glass tubes of different lengths like organ pipes, which are fed with hydrogen or propane flame at the bottom. The air flow is regulated to divide the flames up each vibrating in its tube to create a different sound. Fire isn't entertaining enough for you held out lightning? Zeus Afon is a singing tesla coil for those who don't recognize the term right off. You know that thing on the science museum where you touch the big metal sphere on the top. And it makes your hair stand up like that but much bigger and more powerful. It's a very Asian of the solid state. Tesla coil that's been modified to produce. We'll call them. Generously musical tones by modulating the spark output. The musical tone results directly from the passage of the spark through the air because solid-state coils drivers are limited to on or off. The sounds produced consists of a square wave form rather than a what's called Sino soil wave though, it can produce some simple courts. That was a lot to take in. I know but brace yourself 'cause there's more and it's even better. Remember last week? I said don't sign up to the patriot right now that's still hold true. Because next week. I launch a limited time exclusive special offer those who become members of the your brain on facts patriotic during that two week period between January twenty ninth and February twelve which will be our one year anniversary will receive benefits only available for those who sign up during that period. Also, I'm going to be increasing the benefits across the board. Whenever you sign up. There will now be too many bonus episodes month one available for even the lowest here, what are the other benefits? You're just going to have to wait and find out keep an eye on our social media. Facebook were. Instagram slash your brain on facts and Twitter slash brain on facts pod. For more details as we get closer to the launch. Continuing fem- of natural elements, but perhaps something a little more gentle than lighting. We looked to the wind in the alien harp named for a oldest the Greek God of the wind the traditional alien harp is essentially a wooden box with sounding board that has strings stretched lengthwise across two bridges. It's often placed at a slightly open window where the wind can blow across the strings to produce sound. Streams can in need of different materials or different thicknesses. That are all tuned the same pitch or identify strings tuned to different pitches. Alien harps became popular as a household item during the romantic era, when they were just mad for anything even vaguely Greco Roman. And and harps are still handcrafted to this day some of them now take the form of monumental metal sculptures such as one in New Mexico that stands twenty four feet or seven point three meters. High and pleased it's beautiful melody over a now abandoned shopping center, which is a post-apocalyptic movie set waiting to happen. If I ever heard of one. For an even lighter touch. How about light itself? Professor Scott hall of cogs. Well, polytechnic college has used modern technology create a theorem type instrument. That's really one of a kind the opted yo tone projects video onto the ceiling from stock footage, movies, etc. And simultaneously response to the images with different sounds like tones and buzzes. Professor whole can control the images to control the output of the sounds thereby making music. Say you're in the mood for something more subtle the very road beneath your feet can make music or the road beneath your car. Anyway, there are a number of musical roads throughout the world from California to Japan to Denmark, where the first one was created in nineteen ninety-five grooves, our strategically carved into the road surface that change the sound of your tires as you drive over it at the correct speed like a rumble strip on the highway. If you tuned it. Unfortunately for the folks who drive over the musical road in Lancaster, California. A math error led to more space than necessary between the groups so they're Rhode sounds like this. Now size really matters when it comes to musical instruments. For example, here's a standard flute which measures twenty five inches or sixty five centimeters. The contra bass flute is an unbelievable nine point three feet were two and a half meters long as why does your two hands making a circle and sounds like this. They're so big. They can't be held when playing an actually stand on the floor the way cello. Does there's even a double controversies flute that's twice as long. Checkout a contra bass saxophone. The controversies clarinet. a contra bass, trumpet. And the biggest bull fiddle you ever saw the Octo base. And that's where we run out of ideas. At least for today. I'll leave you with one of my favorite instruments for a very specific reason. Lovers of the dark crystal. Should remember the ranch recorder type instrument that Jen the gal Flynn played I'd include a clip, but I'm pretty sure Disney owns the movie now, and I would get my cute little but suit off. That sound comes from a real instrument, not a census Cise. It's called a double flagellate. It's like a swollen bassoon mouthpiece with two wooden flutes sticking out the end of it. Kit. You just see valley of the mystics when you hear that. Thanks for spending part of your day with me. Look for the new tears and all the new information on January twenty ninth at patriach dot com slash your brain. On fact.

Monica Qatar California Yellow River Armadillo France Hiebert William congress Persia Germany Nigeria Guinness South America Elizabeth gray isle of Skye Ben Franklin Larache Rhode China science museum
12. High Qing

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

22:45 min | 8 months ago

12. High Qing

"Welcome to my podcast. Rise and fall of the Ching Dynasty Cup of Solid Gold and this is episode twelve. Hi Ching Let me say this before. I get into this episode. The reference to high chain in the episode title has nothing to do with drug or alcohol. Hi I'm referring to high noon. It is high noon for the chain dynasty in the last episode. I wanted to do a general review of Chinese Society Family Life Women Issues Status Gender and family relations commerce trade population in the first one hundred and fifty years of Ching rule. It was generally a prosperous time in China. The country the nation grew economically and a modern may major nation was on the world stage. But stresses were showing and how the Chinese leadership dealt with those might determine its future also we can see an acceleration of the interaction between China and other Western nations for good or ill in the current episode. I want to pick up on our chronology where we left it. If you remember she and long the last emperor had died in seventeen ninety nine his his son. Yeon had already been emperor for roughly three years after his father's education. In seventeen ninety six we have already had a small intro to the New Emperor. His given name was young then. Jello Union but I will refer to him by his more common and official emperor name Joshing. He was born at the old Summer Palace outside Peking November thirteenth. Seventeen sixty he would have ascended the throne already a grown man. There are numerous reports that he accompanied his father on many trips to g hall which is now called. Chunga in who obey province south central China and in other cities in China like most prince's. He received a good education immediately after his father's death he took full control of China besides inheriting the usual things. A crown prince gets from his emperor. Father joshing inherited lots of trouble. China was in pitiful condition on many fronts. Despite the fact that he was a frugal conscientious and hardworking emperor he would be unable to bring China back to its eighteenth century glory. Let me list the messes. He had to address economic decline. Initial treasury seriously depleted his father's pointy cushion and the corrupt structure and system. He left behind and rebellions on top of that. Ching would have to eventually deal with two assassination attempts on his life. He also dealt with repeated flooding and food supply distribution issues. Poor guy two episodes ago I mentioned her Shen and remember he was the Manchu Guardsmen. That befriended his father father chiloe eventually. Hush became a sort of dynasty manager. She loan trusted him. Fission was diabolically corrupt. While she was alive joshing the current emperor had to patiently bided his time and restrain his resentment toward vision as I mentioned in that episode. Five days after she lungs death joshing had hushing arrested and soon thereafter forced cushion to commit suicide. It was then discovered that who allegedly had under his control. The equivalent of one and a half billion dollars in assets. Worse Ching uncovered the vast extent Hussein's embezzlement and the large amount of people that were complicit with Russian cushion. If you remember married judging sister it is not clear if she knew or was complicit to in any event joshing spared her any punishment despite judging taking action to purge and punish some of the others involved the crimes he realized he could not punish all of those that deserved it. There were just too many involved. He was criticized for his leniency but he really had other big problems to resolve. It has been reported that cushion prolonged the two rebellions. That will talk about in this episode. He prolonged them. So he and his confederates could embezzle. More money and divert divert valuable funds away from the dynasties efforts to fight these rebellions as I said diabolical immediately upon taking the throne judging headed deal with an ongoing rebellion spread out over three provinces it was known as the White Lotus rebellion. A simple tax protest in the beginning became a full scale rebellion lasting ten years. From seventeen ninety four to eighteen O for it was instigated by followers of the White Lotus. Sect it was fought in parts of three provinces who bay Shaanxi sheesh one most of this very mountainous regions in south central channel. White Lotus were a secret religious society and as I mentioned it originally began taxes the first attempt by and long to quell the rebellion failed before it was over an alleged one. Hundred thousand rebels were casualties of this rebellion. One thing was for sure given the length of time the difficulty and the cost for the government to put down this rebellion for the first time called into question the things strength and resolve another unreleased unrelated. Rebellion was also occurring during the long joshing transition. Period let me say this. I I'm only going to summarize the event. It's quite complex. And there are many excellent works that have been written about this event in detail. Meow is the Chinese reference to the indigent indigenous people that inhabited the rugged mountain areas of Hunan and Guido provinces South and southwest China. This was not the first time the Chinese had problems with this region and its people including other dynasties and and including the Ming Dynasty. Seventeen thirty six was the last time they had to deal with these these. This area and the chain imposed very harsh measures on them and lots of resentment grew from these measures. Basically as China prospered. Han Chinese started migrating to the areas that were typically inhabited by the meow people. The Han Chinese were buying and selling in the very few tracts of arable land there was in the region and so the house had enough and they began to push back. The number of their fighters in this rebellion probably was never very large but the region was remote and it was very difficult terrain. It took the chain government ten years to suppress it sort of more on the meows in later episodes nonetheless this was a labor us an expensive affair for the Chan government. It exposed the once proud. Bannerman army that they were not the warriors they were in early. Ching conquest many have pined. This was a turning point. In the Imperial Ching Dynasty. Some of opined it was the high water mark for the Ching Dynasty. Any way you look at it one thing was for sure. The Ching Empire was never larger in its stent and never more powerful. The population explosion of the eighteenth century now became a noticeable burden and a great concern during the eighteenth century. Good production continue to rise proportionally to Chinese population to China's population but the law of diminishing returns and other issues began to assert themselves during the eighteenth century the agrarian sector boomed and the extended internal peace had produced and nurtured and expanding population but without developing new technologies or growth technologies or spates. It was clear. China could not continue to absorb the population. These were the roots that grew into problems. In the early nineteenth century early in the nineteenth century pressures began on the food distribution system Yellow River flooding silted and blocked the grain canal. Discussions begin on an alternative delivery system by the way the Yellow River flooded seventeen times during jennings rain. One of the problems was whatever solution they would have as an alternative to the Grand Canal. Would bump headlong into the patronage or the systemic generational largesse with the Grand Canal and the families and the people that worked and survived and lived. Offer the Grand Canal certainly. None of them won an alternative to the Grand Canal but there was open discussion about providing sea routes as an alternative for food supply issues dredging and maintaining the. Grand Canal was very expensive. Relief efforts exhausted the treasury and reduced the National Income Food. Shortages became a growing problem. As if this were not enough things to handle the chain government was becoming more and more ineffective in suppressing and preventing pirate attacks along China's southern coast. Of COURSE PIRATE ATTACKS. Were nothing new? But the Ching difficulties with preventing them in suppressing them were the rebellions and the pirates were exposing the considerably weakened. Modu army and navy the once proud bannerman army had become weak through extended luxury afforded them and required huge sums of money to maintain it joshing significantly reduced imperial household expenditures and state support for the huge number of family members dependent on the Imperial Hustle. He was attacked and nearly killed by street mob in eighteen. O Three one family member tried to kill him. He was a disgruntled. Former recipient of the imperial household's income. This was in eighteen thirteen. He would not happy which yeah chains. Cutting Measures on state support of family members. Jackie eventually ended the iconic and expensive southern imperial tours that I talked about with respect to cheat long and Kangxi massive flows of silver from smuggled opium into China began to be an issue from eighteen hundred eighteen. Eighty and eighteen eighteen opium trade into China moved through Macau during this time. Roughly four thousand chests were coming through each year. A chest by the way is roughly one hundred and forty pounds but in eighteen nineteen the opium imports to China exploded. Due to increased competition from suppliers. Prices were lowered and consumption. Increased opium was like gold from eighteen hundred to eighteen. Ten China gained about twenty six million dollars in world balance of payments. Within twenty years this would reverse due to opium. The West finally found something the Chinese would buy in quantities during GI chains ring. England became China's largest trading partner accounting. For nearly seventy to eighty percent of all foreign trade most of it through the Guangzhou Port in eighteen sixteen England sent another diplomatic trade emissary mission to China. Lord William Amherst was the ambassador and the stated purpose of the mission was to announce to the Chinese government the English victory over Napoleon the first and to reopen diplomatic negotiations with China they arrived in August eighteen sixteen but it failed again just like it did with long due to a mix up in credentials. It appears upon writing in Peking. The emperor immediately summoned the ambassador but he declined due to ill health and the English felt. The emperor wanted the emissary to perform the cow town. So this still appears to be an issue the to never met the ambassador and the emperor never met instead. The ambassador traveled around China until January of eighteen seventeen eighteen seventeen before departing on September. Second Eighteen twenty. She had died. His cause of death is not officially known. One story is eighty died of a lightning. Strike the more plausible story. Was he had a stroke he? It was said he was obese. I had read two stories regarding his successor. Wants story is he. That jetting died without naming one but his wife and Dowager Empress Xiao Kura one whole declared judging second son Mianyaing as emperor over her two sons. The other story is and the more likely one in my view. Is that the stroke. Judging suffered did not immediately kill him allowed him enough time and had the faculties to name his second son. Miandi judging is buried in the Ching tombs outside of Peking. He was fifty nine years of years of age when he died but all accounts. I am familiar. Judging was a conscientious and hardworking emperor. He had a legitimate concern and a legitimate effort was made to clean up the Hussein affair. He tried to bring chain finances and expenses in line with the reality of China's circumstances at that time despite all of this however today he's viewed as an ineffective emperor disliked more than liked in his defense. He was sailed with many serious problems after his father's death. But in trying to restrict ching expenditures and rethink the Grand Canal system and deal with the rebellions and the flooding. All of this seems to work against him. Hopefully for the Ching Dynasty jottings. Rain would not be a harbinger of things to come next episode. The story continues and I will introduce the new or the next emperor. Thank you been A.

China Ching Dynasty Grand Canal Father joshing Imperial Ching Dynasty opium Peking Ching Chinese Society Family Life Wo Yellow River Yeon Summer Palace Ming Dynasty Grand Canal Bannerman army Hush official Shaanxi sheesh g hall
Shaanxi earthquake - January 23, 1556

This Day in History Class

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Shaanxi earthquake - January 23, 1556

"This episode of This Day in History class is brought to you by the makers of skippy peanut butter. Whether you're looking for a protein boost or simply went to indulge skippy. Peanut butter is a quick easy easy and satisfying way to enjoy the moment. I've been eating skippy peanut butter on my PB and J.. Since I was a kid. And you should try to visit peanut butter dot com to check out more skippy skippy peanut butter products and recipes skippy peanut butter be smooth like skippy day. In history class is a production of iheartradio. Hello History History Lovers. I'm eve and you're listening to this day in history class. A show that uncovers history one day at a time today is January. Twenty third twenty twenty the day. He was January. Twenty third fifteen fifty six. A huge earthquake hit Shansi Province in northern China. It's believed to be the deadliest birth quake in recorded history the earthquake struck Shaanxi and the neighboring province of SCIENC- early that morning the pronunciations of those two who provinces are very similar and have slight tonal differences. So I'm probably getting them wrong but I'm going to go with it. The earthquake is estimated to have been a magnitude eight on the moment magnitude scale. It's not the strongest earthquake ever recorded but it caused great destruction in the region the area where or it hit was heavily populated. IM- buildings were not constructed with earthquakes in mind. The quake caused ground fissures substance and landslides. Hides it destroyed. Mountains caused flooding and caused fires villages near the epicenter. Were completely destroyed. The disaster is believed leave to have reduced the population of Shansi and Shaanxi. By around sixty percent. The epicenter of the earthquake is recorded as being in the Way River Valley Ali inside C. Province near the CDs of why Shean way nine and high in but damage was recorded as much as three hundred miles or five hundred kilometers away. From the epicenter in some places crevices as deep as sixty feet. Were carved out of the earth. An estimated estimated eight hundred thirty thousand people died in the disaster. That said this number could be too high or too low. Monuments were also lost in the disaster. The small wild goose pagoda built around seven. Oh nine lost around six feet in height. Many of the artifacts Imas delay forest in Entira were damaged or destroyed including works from a collection called a tongue stone classics the tongue. Stone classics are a group of Chinese. Works that were engraved on one hundred. Fourteen stone tablets. Dozens of those tablets were broken and the earthquake aftershocks continued for half a year. After the Shaanxi earthquake many survivors were injured in the disaster or had no shelter. Many people in the region previously live in. y'All dogs a type hype of Earth. Shelter carved out of a hillside because the dogs were made with softness soil. The people who lived in these homes were extremely vulnerable to having their homes collapsed on them. Because many of those who died were killed by falling buildings. People began to think about what they could do to prevent such destruction -struction from happening again. People consider it the risk of earthquakes in construction and used materials like bamboo and wood rather than stone and buildings things and tips on how to act during an earthquake like staying. Inside crouching down were recorded the fifteen fifty six Shaanxi earthquake earthquake is ranked as the third deadliest natural disaster ever behind the nineteen thirty one China floods and the eighteen eighty seven Yellow River flood. Hello I'm Jeff Code and hopefully a you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday if you have any insight on an accident or pronunciation association spoken in the show. Today you can feel free to send us a kind note on social media at T.. H Z podcast. Ask our email address. Is This Day at IHEARTMEDIA DOT com. Thanks for listening. And I hope you'll be back tomorrow for more podcasts. From iheartradio the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows too. Young rocker is a podcast coming of age story about finding a home in rock music and learning to flourish. In your own weird way. It's also a series of letters of advice to my younger self as she navigates the pressures of adolescence seals with social anxiety body issues and relationships and discovers the transformative power of music. During you're young rocker comes to you from double elvis productions is created and hosted by me Chelsea Ersan and executive produced by Jake Brennan of Graceland. Listen dear young rocker on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

China apple Shaanxi Shaanxi Shaanxi Way River Valley Ali Shansi Province Shansi Yellow River C. Province Chelsea Ersan Entira SCIENC Shean Jake Brennan Jeff Code executive Graceland five hundred kilometers
14. Civil War

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

22:03 min | 7 months ago

14. Civil War

"Welcome to my podcast. Rise and fall of the Ching Dynasty Cup of solid gold. This is episode fourteen. Civil war. Don't. Know. Just for review, the list episode talked about the Emperor Dog Ones Rain. And the many many troubles he had governing China. His Reign. Is known for its external disasters and internal rebellions. We learned how China the Ching Dynasty had lost territory in Xinjiang province. We also learned about infrastructure problems along the Yellow River and the Grand Canal. There were also pirates. And the problems they were causing with. The Food, supply. And finally. We talked about the growing opium prom problem culminating in the first opium war. In this episode I want to continue with a discussion of the first. Opium War primarily, the trees are resulted from it and their impact. I will conclude Dow Guan's rain and begin his successor's reign. And finally. We reached the point. OF THE CHAIN STORY! Of Its civil war its second if you count the wharf three few dettori's. The. Infamous or famous Taiping Rebellion I'll get to that. started at rebellion at least at the end of this episode. So we last. Talked about the treaties that were negotiated. Resulting from the. Chinese losses. From, the First Opium War. To the British. And the Chinese in the English set down to negotiate an end to this first. Opium War. And that culminated in a treaty. Named for the city where the parties met nudging or Nanking the Treaty of Nanjing. The treaty was adopted on August twenty ninth. Eighteen forty two. And its terms were. The Ching Dynasty ceded Hong Kong. To the English. The Ching Dynasty also agreed to pay the English. An Indemnity Of Twenty one million dollars. The Ching Dynasty also agreed to. Four additional ports for seatrade, bringing the number from one seaport to five. Gone forever. Was the sole trading port of Canton. These treaty ports as they became known as treaty ports were Fujio, Ningbo Shanghai and Xiamen in addition to of course, Canton. Just a little over a year later, a supplemental treaty was also negotiated. By the same parties. And it is known as the Treaty of the bulk. And it was signed on October eighth. Eighteen forty, three, a little over a year later after the treaty of Nanking. And in. The English were given given Favored Nation status. This gave English citizens. The rights to extra territoriality. And this meant. The English citizens would be only subject to English was. And Justice for crimes. They committed in China. Other nations quickly demanded the same rights and privileges from China. And the Chinese government were quick to great the same rights and privileges as they wanted to keep on nations on the same footing. July. Third Eighteen forty four. The Americans side their own treaty with the Ching Dynasty. Is Known as the Treaty of one Shia. And once Ya is the name of the suburban city outside Mikhail. It was the first formal agreement between the United States and China. The US like other nations also headed large trade imbalance with China. And this would have been the impetus for such a treaty. The treaty was negotiated by United States congressman from Massachusetts Caleb cushing. And it was modeled largely after the English Treaty of Non June. And it gave the Americans the same treatment as the English and it went a bit further. This treaty missionaries could stay and be permitted to hire mandarin tutors. Anyone involved in the opium trade would be prosecuted under Chinese law. So that's a distinction between this treaty and the one the English had signed. For all other crimes, not pertaining to opium. Extra territoriality would govern. President John Tyler signed this treaty into law on January seventeenth, eighteen, forty five. For context purposes only at this same time in the United States. Texas was being admitted into the Union. At roughly the same time as the treaty, the French would also receive the same treatment in their own treaty with the Ching Dynasty called the Treaty of one pool. Notice one thing however with all of these treaties. Opium and its trade. Were still considered illegal in China will come back to this and a little bit. There's been much discussion and debate. Over the years over the significance of the first opium war. Many Chinese today believe the trees began a century of humiliation by foreign powers. There is no doubt that is true. The treaties did build on Western imperialism in China. But it has also been observed. That these first set of treaties coming out of the First Opium War, Their impact. We're not far reaching. Some of the terms of these treaties were not unprecedented. For Instance The concept of extra territoriality. While appearing a serious breach of sovereignty. Was a common privilege granted by most nations in their customary discourse with other nations. Whatever far reaching impact, these treaties may have or have not had. Would be moot point anyways within the next twenty years. Keep in mind. For All the time, these events that I have described were ongoing. Dow Guan was still the emperor. He would die. In February of eighteen fifty. At the Summer Palace outside Peking. He was sixty seven. Just before he died, he canceled the country's New Year celebrations because of a solar eclipse. He, believing this to be a terrible omen, word word himself to death and died a few weeks later. Before, he passed. He did manage to name his fourth son each you to succeed him. Ju would become the next emperor. And that Emperor's name would be she informed. Dow Guang cannot. Be considered to be anything. Other than Ineffective Emperor. Well meaning and sincere. As he was known for. Unfortunately. We're to traits that were not capable of steering China and the Ching Dynasty. In a different direction. Recognizing that Dow Guan cannot be entirely blamed for the unequal treaties. He did nothing to improve thinks. The new emperor that I just mentioned. She and fund began his life on July seventeenth eighteenth thirty one at the Summer Palace outside Peking. He was the fourth son of Dow Guam. He would have been nineteen when his father died. And he took over the throne in early eighteen fifty. His reign would be plagued by rebellions, protests and foreign invasions. His personal birth name. Would have been. I shouldn't Jello. issue. However, I will refer to him by his more common and official name as the emperor she in fung. She informed. Is probably most associated with. The seminal event. In. Dynasty history. The Taiping Rebellion. Known commonly as the Chinese civil war. I, call the second civil war because I count the war of the three few DETTORI's early on in the Ching Dynasty as the first one. This rebellion. Would take the chain dynasty fourteen years to stop it. Before it was through. An estimated twenty million. Chinese civilians. And rebels would be casualties. And this probably is a huge. Underestimate. Even, at the number of twenty million. It would make the rebellion one of the bloodiest revolts and wars in world history. At their height. The Type Ping's would control about a third of China. The rebellion would devastate sixteen Chinese provinces and destroy six hundred cities. So, where do I begin? Talking about this event without making this podcast series, many more episodes longer. Well, let me try. And let me give a little context I. Some of the roots of the revolution. Can Be traced back in China's history long before the Ching Dynasty. But. Much of the roots of the rebellion. Are Attributable to the Ching Dynasty. And leading up to that rebellion. In the late eighteenth century, the South and southeast coast of China was scourged. By pirates. Many of them non-chinese descent. In the early nineteenth century, this banditry was joined with the Chinese underworld underworld involved in the opium, trade and distribution. From the type enes viewpoint. China had suffered numerous rebellions some small some not. Natural disasters. Combined with foreign encroachments and banditry associated with opium. It was this backdrop of discontent and dissatisfaction. That these people ahead with the MANCHUS. It was clear to everyone. That China's traditional order was collapsing. That proved to be. Fertile ground for alternative. Governing options answers. So, the Taiping rebellion started simply as traditional peasant revolt in the south part of China like many before. The exact date of when it started. Is Difficult to nail down. Some say eighteen fifty. It began other. Say Eighteen fifty one. The new feature of this rebellion unlike the others. was its leader. His name home shoot one. He was a Han Chinese man. That converted from Buddhism to Christianity. And the story told is that he was. Seriously ill. And became delusional. In this illness. In that delusional catatonic state. He claimed. God came to him. Removed his organs? Cleanse them. Put them back in his body and gave him a sword. At him to make war against idolaters. During his recovery, he was befriended and counseled by an American Baptist preacher. That he claimed. That is Hong Shoot. One claimed taught him the word of God. Home huge one himself became a Christian minister and attracted followers many of them. He preached. That he was the son of God and Jesus brother. Behind him. His motives were simple. He wanted to establish a kingdom of God. So the rebellion would be as much an ideological and social upheaval. As anything else. When the violence started. Cities were sacked, and he gained recruits everywhere he went. The word typing means. Heavenly Kingdom of great piece. His followers believed he had the mandate of Heaven. And early on in the rebellion, the tapings made rapid progress early on. By eighteen fifty three, the rebels had captured Nanjing and established their kingdom. They also put pressure on high and Wolszczan. The Kingdom. At its core. What's politically communist or socialist? They taught and encouraged sexual austerity. Women were prohibited from footbinding. It prohibited prostitution. and. and gambling and tobacco and alcohol and polygamy. However Despite the tapings early success and momentum. They stalled at Nanjing. Except for one week attempt to capture Peking. After eighteen, fifty six, the revolution never moved further north. And after fifty six, they were on the defensive. Ultimately Their failure go after Peking was their undoing. It should be duly noted that at this time. There were foreign powers in China. And they had their interest to protect in China. At the start of this rebellion, the English and the French were neutral toward the type paints. The Western nations only request to Taipei. Things was to leave the treaty ports unmolested. In the beginning of the rebellion, the English considered the typing as a separate autonomous entity in the middle young sit region of China. But that would change. And more. On that in a later episode. Before I get too far in the Taiping Revolution. contemporaneous, there were other key events happening. In China. That were unrelated to the. Taiping rebellion. The meow people rebelled again in eighteen, fifty four, and it took nearly twenty years to fully suppress that movement. There was also revolt in Yunan province that beginning eighteen fifty six, and that would take seventeen years to quell that revolt. And then there was Russia. In the spring of eighteen, fifty eight, Russia, attacked in the extreme northeast regions of Manchuria. And these of course that area course were were the native lands of the Montjuic. And the reason for this was over hunting and trading issues. That conflict finally culminated in another treaty. In May eighteen, fifty eight, the Russians, and the Chinese entities entered into the treaty eigen. A I G you win. In China ceded to Russia six hundred thousand square kilometers of land in northeast mantra. This is probably a good spot to end the episode. I could of course go on, but but I decided to get fresh into this continuing. Saga in excess of. A lot has already happened. And some of it was still ongoing. In the next episode I will continue with the Taiping rebellion. There's also the neon rebellion. That's right another one. And I must mention it in connection with the typing uprising. And, there is also the second opie more. Oh. And more treaties and Western nations to. The next episode will have it all. I hope you'll come back to find out. About all of these events in issues. Thank you. Been Pleased! Won't. Talk!

China Ching Dynasty opium Dow Guan Nanjing Peking Summer Palace Yellow River United States Taiping Dow Guan Xinjiang Chinese government Canton Russia President John Tyler Grand Canal Dow Guang
#89 Christmas Survival Guide

Jungle Brothers Strength & Movement

1:07:07 hr | Last month

#89 Christmas Survival Guide

"Ripping in welcome to episode ninety of john. Podcast joe eddington here. We've got high the portfolio in the house every christmas. Everyone's super excited with today's jb's christmas party and obviously full of energy guys doing since the since the camping epic. I'm okay. i'm bouncing off. The walls tipped do it all again today. Your betide what is it. It's it's i now so we got back into town yesterday. What was the to- talk me through the schedule. What do we have over the weekend. Who we got there on friday about me. Dial got there midday. we did a bit of prepping so we went to the colo river yellow river yala and calling and it yeah and it was a private property. I end by a couple of directors that had built this amazing little abode. It was actually like living on a film set. Like it felt didn't the way it was built. Yeah and like. I said from the set bond and it was built. It was right on the river. Had it sign private access to the rebel and the grass just pain laid in the courtyard was gorgeous and we we had twenty glamping tents already set up for members and another. How many arrived after that. But on the friday another ten. Yeah easy fifteen. Ten ten setups. Yeah yeah and then friday night. We had eight hawaiian cocktail party. Eighties wind cocktail covid. Karaoke pulled it very well. I haven't heard you sing before. Like black in the office a few times. I've never heard you get up on the mike and sing. O really impressed. Really you know a song on saturday night. Miss set one friend. The fire nina simone. I don't have much recollection. I saw very notice was very high. Pitched in as far as holding on you picked a tough track was it was good. John kelly yeah it was. It was surreal to watch. Actually yeah i was kind of hammett by that stage yet. Folks were but it was like it was. It was far from jovial. Oh shit like look at it. I was like oh this is you might be one. And then it kind of wasn't as sang a couple of songs like ours songs. Would you call it folk songs by the pogues awesome as powerful and i mean the the beauty of those is that they just any voice can sing it. It a storytelling Yeah yeah and it's kind of just like a pop anthem kind of thing. It doesn't ramar a lot of. There's not a lot of different pitches in time. Yeah but yours was like oh yeah. Deep and low rent got all that you guys both solemn and that was like one of my proudest statements from the weekend A wild as the wind i think bowie righted originally but going back to the friday. Not where the cocktail party. Then saturday we might take off fucking why i got everyone hamid year but you got yourself the most hamid people were mohammed to me. The people that are carried to say yes so it can be people. They go carried to the tent with exciting one of them with andrew. Andrew carries walsh while she got carried. He wants they can use just having a normal conversation and then the next second there are three people try. He's a big guy. Got three three people. Try and carry him to his tent or god which was exciting. I was making dock and stormies for everyone stock and stormies. I moonwalk and that's where we gave out the member of the which was to doris. Elaine and alley And then the next day we we had rehearsals for the quiet which we light it performed in. The middle of the main event party was on the saturday after that it was nude still life with parrots one of 'em members after their hassle. Just him hurt. He was looking for a second stuff. It was just him just him. As far as i know him in probably about women but drew him turning guy's going big tiny. When tiny tiny did he had a big and kyron. Nice tiny was probably like louis now because he was thinking. I'd like to do that to rig for radio. I'd like to see if i could do that posing. Yeah and entire to break dent same time which was really popular. That's right on the skype ramp and then and then it was. The burning man dog was doing it right. He also highway through all sunday friday she. She didn't stop shane and Then men party than those a betting man. Christmas parties stampeded the lawn urge. Yup which was enormous. Vooc kicked off on king's awful. I kind of like four. Was that at ten pm. Went off at ten. Am i was breaking. Everyone's bulls on friday night saturday night to instill we let it go on on saturday. It was good those without any way moved into the bond in the bond it was great. Right yeah it was. It was out was kind of a a lot covering of ryan. Oh saturday not just dance through it and the very much the weekend. We didn't actually get little to sun at all those just like credit through inside damp in a long time but it was nice. I think in the night didn't was nice and cool. Better them bushfires. Yeah exactly yeah. It was all close off sunday. We it was a good. I kicked off with yoga. I am in the morning aggravates. Troy took a yoga class head. It was quite good so not was day. Jiang higher class wouldn't take supposedly might it. Very difficult was a tough class so everyone harboring a hangover's trying to get through us. That was your instruction. Wasn't he told troy that if you can take a yoga class for jungle brothers visit needs to be a good challenge yoga. Yeah otherwise you'll lose interest. Tie-dye was off to that as well tie tied. I taught workshop and megan and they got about twelve twelve. People do some ties with them. A lot of todd creations up on the line. Right look fucking awesome. They did so well. She didn't quite dry after washington because it was damp awaken. Says you took them home. She tried them all and brought them all back. He folded tied up in little christmas type packages. With god's then names on it help what. Yeah yes he. He got his today stacked and then we had intention and reflections and then just writing some stuff down. How'd you go that you run. That didn't has mounted but it was all right. Had you had Jacob on the my notes so the whole bunch of stuff. That didn't get like do the way i wanted to do it. But but we still got for and then yeah and then we did some sound meditation off. That was jacob on the trombone. And the piano and the What's it the african jump corrigan. Jamba who's really. Yeah yeah. tj bay and then. There was the salsa with nick number for salsa lira with highly so there's an acro workshop and and then the salsa was the last one run on friday evening that was salsa with with nikolas misses. Fucking hell needed amazing. It was an action packed weekend. It was just yeah visually spectacular all so many talented people doing what they do. Best we also. Jared did his poker face whiskey. The on a saturday very popular. That was big but it was just amazing. I mean a lot of people came. That weren't part of the gym. Like partners and some friends and families. And i would just fucking blown off the fate. Yeah all of them. Came up one day to sit a couple like this is a gym. Didn't might make sense to didn't match up. it wasn't what they're expecting. Put it that way. No just a bit too artistic standard. Jim junkies vicks made said to me. Fuck man all the guys here so bill and then he's like oh that's right to jim. Christmas party cool man. It was so many different chapters to the to the noughts into the even the dies and you get involved in the workshop staff or you could just hang out and make some food or attend. We got from the river. You can hang out with the kids. Read a book. Yes pretty cool. It was like nuts. Stress pulled did a trip down. The revolt puhl took him up to the top of the river. On a kayak that we checked them on top of when he left yup Just pounced on the opportunity and through the clock on the top and we drive and it was funny because we are private property and ended up having to turn around. We've got some advice from them and found a spot. Yeah just dragged clack over. Bob y fence across some private property you in the boys and pavel helped the up and then just to just to get in on a state bank then then we we clicked down to the cab house. Mad like how long. How long did you get clock. Maybe forty minutes. Holy shit yeah. It's yeah it looks you move a lot slower than you think right. I thought it was going to go really really fast. But you don't even have to paddle because the whole thing was moving especially with the rain. It just it just goes really slowly and the rivers whiny but kind of you can still like straight and it doesn't move very fast posture. The was very slow and chilled and it was good. How nice little but yeah. It was great weekend about come off a little tired of course naturally as you do you late nights. We find ourselves three days away from christmas. Which maine's gyms kind of operating for another couple of days. And i guess by the time folks listen to this. It'll be pasta. Christmas bought the talk about a bit of a survival guide for the holidays because as we know people go off the rails a little bit of christmas time which they should however. There's always a couple of kind of cool things that we do. I think not particularly consciously just ways it. We manage ourselves when you're on holidays and you're hanging out meeting and dream whatever that's kind of helpful to to knock completely derail i don't know i don't wanna say progress because it's not like we're looking to progress through christmas stuff but it's sort of part of this just living healthy all the time and making choices. Yeah finding a balance. Yeah in a very very unbalanced part time of year. I believe yes miss with a lot of things you know. lots of. Let's shit crap around two eight. You don't even want but yeah lots of spare time and sometimes subject to you know people that you don't usually hang out with like the defense that like family and family friends and that kind of often an that subjected to different crowds and different culture. That makes an impact as well. Yes if you're training a lot and all your friends are trying a lot and then all of a sudden your. You're in a group of people that lactate shitting and drink the up which happens a lot too. So it's just how to navigate your way through through those kind of little little scenarios and environments. What's your what's your sort of christmas day. Set up like you have these big family thing with days famine staff or is it small and boutique. Every is a little bit different every second year. We spend it with days mom and dad because i They go away every every second year so when they go away we usually go away so we might add up to my mom's but yet that That that day depending doesn't matter where it is. There's usually a lot of food involved way more than you than your stomach can handle and lots of different choices which which makes things. This is the tough part. A huge variety of different. You know you got a whole zoo on the table and then on top of that snacks and nor does and cakes finish. And it's not a celebration wants animals to eight in the one sitting. Yeah it's quite knocks the body around if you're not careful i think setting a few parameters allows you to still enjoy what's in front of you still be social because a lot of the times i mean you can swing the ottawa and bay that person that like not. I'm not going to eight anything that's going to be bad for me. Not going to have a drink with everyone he's ended up in a potentially a bit of bore. Unless you just really upbeat person if you live like that all the time. I think it's different but if it's if it's a choice that you you make sometimes it can be a little bit antisocial so it's good to be able to find a little bit balanced go. You can still interact joy. The food that's on display have a little bit of a drink but not suffer for for the next month or two and i think anyone who knows us and maybe for some folks listening they might not know this. But we're not in any way hotline. Jim guys like we liked drink. We like to party with late nights. We'd like to eight shit food like but we don't. But we do those things kind of at times sparingly when we feel the need to but for the majority of the time we make in pretty good food choices and staying relatively healthy so we feel that. I think we could all agree. We have like a nice balance to how we manage that. And i think from the outside a lot of people can can look in and say whatever how we look and what we do for living think are you. Guys are like super strict disciplined a time. And we're telling you that we're not but we do have some cool little techniques that allows to navigate times like this in a way. That's not completely off the chart. I can relate to the family dues with lots of food. Lots of different food. And i reckon i got i got that wrong for so many years and also when we used to work in the film industry you know with the catering so many good foods solid sides breakfast. This ten different things date so long. I used to eight every single thing on the table glutton. Yeah like i used to have muesli than the fruit than the gay. And then the kanji and then have the hot breakfast and like the family is especially at the island of ones. It's the mountain plight stack and the technique the ross on one side. Build a little role yet. And then you get the chop suey and then you boom boom. Just keep going. But i'm i've learned it took me. I was a slow learner that you actually enjoy it. You have a little bit of everything. The sources makes the coconut milk goes into the curry. And it's just like you don't actually enjoy it that much of a slop. It doesn't over in our and you feel gross and it's usually like for me lying on a couch exactly. It's like time on because there's no room but saw yeah yes so got into usually Also back to back. It's like three days of eighty and we got kind of big families. Tashin is it's like half of oh family oneday. Half of my family. You know the other half and then my other half of the central coast type thing faulk see end up getting three different events. They're kind of we have. Three people liked this. Christmas might be different yet talking about generally like you visit one or lace to families you got kids and stuff like that and everywhere guy people wanna fade you or put food on and you're blige tweet. Yeah and then. It's hard to say no. But you just get this compounding fullness pain you don't really kind of get over it out the way but anyway i've lent to choose the stuff the stuff that i really really appreciate all the stuff that i rarely get to eight and i'll just focus on like three things and will just eight hours and i weren't touch any like anything else so usually when i go like this sunday Obviating the jane foods. And i'll stay away from the rest. Because i don't get it that often so i'll just be having pulsa me like fishing lolo type thing and then i'll have like the korean roti but i went like tried to have the bronzes. Well i try to have. The bucket gave saying slept. All on one type thing is bucket ak say they're potentially fuck that's mad. I want always brings one at christmas. It's christmas fucked up. But i'll just try to stick to the things in in there. I'm going for the traditional stuff. The stuff that the soul food that makes me feel like christmas and it. I'm glad that it's it's mainly hopefully foods those foods as well. So i'm like having a tower with the fish in the lowell and then i'm having carrion rotation like. I'll have a healthy sized helping of those things. Not just like a little helpings of everything in snack on these walk around eight and frigging jesus and the and the you know crack a plot of the for the first two hours and by the time he hit to enjoying it anyway. Limit the snacks but the snacks limit the snacks snacks altogether generally. There's a funny thing that happens to us. Humans isn't there when we're giving like more choices with where we feel the need to to take everything you say to buffets and i think it really is. You know. I fear of missing out. Yeah yeah We alex gave me a ticket to the formula one. And it was like the premium ten fucking yuppies dressed in fancy fancy attire was it was anything but my sane and we watched it was all the food was an all. The food and alcohol was free and estrada here in australia. Yeah was the big one down. At melbourne of course called formula one grand prix. And every time some young girl would come out with like plata's of fancy fancy little orders and stuff like cheesy things and then fucking yet fried sheet and then fishy things and that would be like this fucking horror of vultures just like attacking this plight of people like in all beautiful clothes. Just mulling these plates not come out with lack another trade just just covered in bees and people be grabbing back three or four beers h. I was just like this is fucking growth is disgusting foul even being part of it actually by disgusted me that much as like the west humanity all in one one party. What do you think. I know this. Gluttony rows fucking gluttony. Come from its Well it comes from when we didn't have anything doesn't it and we just needed to three berries on a tray with four of you. Yeah and you just fight for all of you know like it's your last meal and i think it's so it's so inbuilt into our wiring and it's and you know you look at all that the countries where they don't have this amazing opportunity of surplus food supply what people are fighting for it and everyone's pretty lane getting by and whatever you look at all of us in the west and we're all over white puffy. It's like really really bad like crossroads. Aww we've still got the same biology that we've had for all of these millions of years and then we've now got this surplus food supply and it's just like ruining us slack up it's like primal instinct of lizard end like that and that all but you would think that with all of this. That's taking part in the human brian and he said in in like strong communities the ability to share equally could be applied to the wealthy but in this particular situation it was like everyone it reverted back to the lizard. I did a similar thing. I went i went to win a dj play last year and She got we got vip tickets and it just meant that there was a certain section of the club that we could in and it was free alcohol and she doesn't really drink that much and so for some reason. I just felt compelled to make use of the free alcohol for the two of us. So i like drank a bunch of can get belligerent. That was like i was drunk. And i got a truck track and i got more drunk than i wanted to be. I do and i was like fuck that did but it was just because it was free drinks out that i'm like yeah. Get another drink. I'm going to get into drink. This also happens at at the christmas parties like the crack house. Because we didn't we didn't supply free food and free alcohol. But you're working under the big bus and your house. Wait bosses paying for everything. I'm ordering entrees emoting biggest man. I'm going to get biggest. Many alcoholic drinks are can. Who's losing out in. Yes well and that's the thing you don't enjoy any of this shit so like you can have the biggest plate of food which sometimes when super hunger is delicious but usually you kind of enjoy pot of whatever eating drinking and then the rest of it you just like fucking side full and i took so much food and it's kind of it just as the rest of your evening. Yeah it's not even not even a lot of pleasure at the time. Plus there's this ongoing thing of you got overeating ship for three days. To how do we avoid. Been a glutton. I really like what you do. And i kinda do a similar thing. Poll where i i. I just choose like a few things. So i if you think about my favorite the best meals that i've had and when you got a restaurant or someone's house and you really enjoy mail and it's usually when this like one or maybe two sources of protein and like one carbohydrate and then a salad awesome vegetable dish or a couple but this really on the a few things to eight and replicate the same thing. I go like all. There's like a duck salad that my mom makes that i really love. That comes around christmas time. That and then ham. I always like him. And then maybe the we have these creamy potatoes and like an. I avoid the my anti makes to vegetarian salads. There's sometimes like a fish thing i was like. I'm not interested in any of that. I could be if that was all that was here but yeah i just keep you like and it's funny because i always get those comments from family like oh have you had any of the blah blah blah. And my not. haven't like you have to have some. It's really nice but you like it's really nice. Not have to eight it all now creating you can. You can treat the buffalo like a like a menu rather than just a have to trump said. Look at everything and i just. That's the menu and one carbohydrate salad. Green salad is always good. lots of leafy greens. I've christmas is right. You can get your plight filled with that style. Yelp because it's not going to depending on what the dressing is of course but most of the time they pretty safe and you can fill your played up and still involved in and come out the other end could for and then limit limit the options restrict them. I would highly advise either choosing one desert or none just getting rid of rid of desert altogether. I do multiples. Definitely don't do multiple desserts dangerous on big density up. Maybe have one lunch if you want and then you can have one off the leftovers at a time. Limit your booze have ab before i gloss wine and then that's it. You know. Joe cosby yeah. This is a mutual family. Friends of my family enjoys family. She's being coming to. Cates is my mother-in-law's christmas christmas eve actually. She comes to a couple of dinners every year. She like ever since. I've known her maybe twenty years or whatever she's she's never eaten desert at the house she always takes a desert away and container. Well that's enjoys that. Yes you never played anything for her. You always have it in a container. And she liked. She's like i can't she's like i can't enjoy it because it's too full so we've always got one on the side for that's smart not a bad acting as a good tack do you guys. I'm sure you guys probably don't think about this. But a really good guy that picked up. And i don't use this aid. But i think for some people. It's like there's a real tendency to say you do choose so you gotta cal have one or two proteins once over carbs and big things. But there's still this tendency to like over affiliate plight and just just over eight because there is such an abundance of food. Have you guys ever heard of the thing that precision nutrition do with the the hand reference and so they say like palm sized piece of protein and then they say fist fistful of carbohydrate and hand size i believe of leafy greens. And then you can have a thumb of fat so it's like a like a piece of cheese or something like that they're like it's a really simple god just to keep you from overeating. Who who may be realized fuck. I don't actually know not very good at controlling myself with that. It's a really handy reference to go off. Yeah really easy. Yeah also white of your plight. Believe it or not. It's a good one as well. So i feel plights getting heavy like if you start to feel like bicep start little. You're a fucking jet jettison. Some of that. That's right and the more. The more calorie dense foods generally y more. Well yeah hundred percent. That's how these kilogram buff as work. Oh have those in brazil awesome amazing stuff. But you got through peaky plight and then you put on scales. I have a rookie low price. Oh well yeah every every right. The restaurant appetizers it's price out front so they charged and several miles book. Eli gets good. Remember when we in germany and we having those ham sandwiches and the bakeries and they put mayor they have some sort of source. Be slices of ham. Brash hot and then crackling is separate and you. That's by the scale as well as like so many kilogram. And how much would you like. And they get the tongs and they put it on the scalp. You like. i'll get a little bit more. And then they way that and price that separately and then shoved the crackling on that as well as like crush it down crispy royal falko. Good sandwiches I'm jay With the meal thing so because we've talked about the individual meals And on the day there's meals but the planning out of the week of aiding or that. When luke tyler came on and he really opened my mind. The idea of counting calories and looking over the week blocks. And i thought that was just made so much sense to me. As opposed the day as opposed to the day chasing that calorie count on the day. Because really it's very hard to manage. It's a type of micromanaging but if you manage over a week it makes much more sense So yes i you got the big the big lunch and then the next day. I've got like another lunch. So it's just a consideration that when you have the big meals breakfast. Do you usually do when you wake up. And you automatic. Is it out of the muesli. And you just start doing your regular breakfast. I like obviously save it for the lunchtime code but a little bit the fucking muesli. Let me just interject a story about music. So tell you. Wake up. Saturday saturday morning at the camp right drums got drunk ten and he's like a and i'm on that come over. I'll make you breakfast. Come over my tent night as next door to each other back where it was very damp. Quiet yeah it was quite And i was also rapper. Let me make you breakfast. So i put on. Lamb chops brought the lamb chops. Possum fried eggs cooked down the bottom there. Yeah couple of couple of big tortillas. That was winning. Like i haven't seen joa tale morning. Allies fucking breakfast of kings. And he's like you know like this food brought him back to life. I literally watched him transform in front of my very eyes anyway. Tastes like men. Let me help you clean up and i. It's it's my campsite on how everything works like. Don't worry about it. you just made me breakfast tomorrow. Like cooman. I got you anyway. We joined the saturday. Obviously the party. Saturday not sunday morning comes and i kind of wonder up to the camp together and he says. Would you like me to make you breakfast. And i'm like man that would be awesome. You know and i'm like sick once again. Obey bacon gloomy extent. And i'm like dude. What are you got ta said. I've got muesli in full-fat. Good day us. God would you have outside. Allen's cafe soul chicken skews jenkins and barbecue sauce in pita pockets. Yeah have was s. sounds nice. He's such a it's such a man living. Yeah that's funny. i think. Be my sister's kid. He's two years old. Found that betty said oh. We found found allen. Over there allen's like apparently was just fading him like chunks of beautiful mate that he had broughton cooked in the woodfire. Stike is hanging out with the good ada. Okay i missed that one but yeah. That's a great point you make that like okay. If you're gonna have these really quite big males that have very rich then you can just sort of have a smaller meals at breakfast and dinner or you. Can you can tyler the rest of the day or even the next day and then i was also say to to offset that imbalanced that out with movement of any sort holiday style movement if you wanna do some training it's unreal but even Walks going for a walk or going to beijing for for run we're going. We're going up to the central coast. If covered allows it on boxing day. On boxing day we have a lunch. Get this so. We have lunch on christmas day. Boxing family on boxing day. We have a lunch with tushes dad and older sister wives and then on the evening we drive up to the central cars booth layer in all the cousins and then we have like a dna. Oh a big kind of thing. But i Dinner boxing day dinner while. But i've scheduled in a big bush walk on the next morning because we're gonna stay there one. Those like usually hang around. We should just do a big walk after that. So it's just that kind of thing we like email. Do you know it's also partnering and spending time together. Isn't it yup and do something nice. Go for walk tugela. Whatever it is you wanna do. And that's a good. That's a good little transition into like the you know. What are you doing over this time. because it is i think for a lot of people especially like that where you've got family event after family event of a two days or three days different postcards. You're really not moving a lot. You're in the car along sitting down at a table sitting on the couch sitting. Yeah chatting digesting. I think it's a really good idea to have breakfast before you go to a big lunch because sometimes you have this urge like i'm just not going to eight until i get there and you're like the whole day. This is a mindset thing. You know what i mean like on gonna eight eight and pull back the day before so you can go hard when you get there. I think that's a fucking mistake. The better off having the brekke so when you get a alike. I'm actually not that hungry. So he did have a normal size male instead of turning into a glutton say however you know like. Do you ever get surprised when with certain folks who don't like it because that implies that you have like good regulation of your appetite. Yeah so like well. I've had breakfast. I'm not hungry right now. So therefore my lunches a moderate. I've seen i watched people who like. Maybe they have breakfast. And then they're not that hungry and then they still eight the biggest lunch and then i do the same thing at dinnertime and you like you went hungry yet but i can eight. I mean paul's got a little bit of that. Have had have had. But you know what i mean i feel like it can go either way possibly ending on what you like. What you relationship is with food. Yeah i spent five days on a ship filming a commercial for festival. It was very interesting Five days it was funny because we had will filming this fit. Fam- let fit dad fit. Mom fit kids and they're doing fit stuff on the boat and they'd go like fit fit exercise on the islands. You'd stop at really strange because we'd have the scene of fit fame during fit stuff on the boat and then you just got to be looking at that cut. As soon as i say go like vision would expand to everyone also and there were literally no films on the by with four people like big. Why not try to like big and hungry and every single male on that boat. Is buffy breakfast. Lunch and dinner bachir. I've never seen like plights been a lot of pollination of saint some big plights. But i've never seen plates packed up at the sides that played so packed up on and i'm talking breakfast lunch and dinner chases and then during the day it was as big as one yod gloss things like that looked like the look like something should put flowers in. That would fill those. You'd get that filled with like a slushy but like Cocktail that'd be like booze suga and slushy whole landed with lennon's what's a drink vessel vessel next. They can. Yes you can hang. It stuck me laugh to move your arms alto sax suck on it but the weirdest thing was like the hallways of the boat smelt of shit but because shit would slash around as going for the nation like rich would smell smell like the slushy. Yes totally the food. Because it's all like frozen after while you pu started turning into like like self-serve there's no fiber in it was. It was horrible even the settled. Get onto this. Everything had sugar probably keeps it from going off. He's gone on a cruise for christmas. So yeah no was not a big on this half fell light one big flooding shit tank so where it was all. Ain't with that donald books because this couple of things to come out of covid on jumping a fuck jesus flooding surge tanks so fan. So he's a thing that people often say when you when that when you like. Say it's christmas or it's boxing day sometime around then and you you want to go out and try and a little bit. You're like i'm gonna go to put my rings up or going to do something and you get that person that's like our country even relax. It's christmas time. You just take one day off training. Get that yes. That's the person that i like to rope into the into the past. That's the way to it now. What's the the what. I say when someone's when someone says that is my my impression. Is that our. This person thinks that. I punish myself day. They think that i do this. Because i'm like paying for my sins or whatever and sometimes maybe there's an element of that right where i'm like. I wanna do a session. Because i feel kind of lazy and have moved whatever but for the most part. I'm doing it because i like it. And it makes me enjoy my damore and then you know. It has a beneficial effect on my on. My mind said your calories exactly you move your digestive system. People forget the buddies pump ryan. So if you stop moving it and then you fill it with shit. It's not a good combination of you. Gotta get things moving. So we're going to put more food down your job and you should be using the muscular to help digest that cli slushy down there. Oh the pops cleaned. But that's right. I mean it makes you enjoy the gluttony. A bit more like you feel. You feel like you're going to go on this bush walk and you gonna come back and he got sick. We all fuck him. Walked a little bit a little bit challenging in impa this walnut the left now everyone socked to eight. And you're gonna sleep. Well yeah rather than just miss gonna be. I'm going to not do anything but put food in my face and the result of that is that you end up not really enjoying the whole process because you feel like gic year you feel like shit yup. It's the same as when they walk out of the gym. They feel excellent. It's like you gotta move your body will reward you for it totally On that yeah. I just end up hanging out with kids like that as in like the teenagers. Dan moving. yeah. Let's go to off. It's got to the wolf. Takes all throwing lawyers golf and then jump off the wolf and do something like that denting but yeah. I think it's in the way that you think about it. I guess. I think i have had that conversation before i feel like it's less and less. Maybe because people know me now beat old up. Yeah you not hanging around. So many mid twenties friends or whatever. It is yeah If caught all of us ties by now. you've got them all. Yeah and it's not. It's not like a training session. It's like i'm gonna go. And i'm just going to go down to the beach forbid type thing and depending on who you with. You know you don't wouldn't necessarily advertise it. Hey i'm going for a session or something of that but but you're writing the means always a good one really let them know what it is and tell them to come. Yeah come on we give him good one a little play on the all that the tire tube with with ripon up chuck kids in them and you pull them along the beach. That's a good one. It's fantastic sled drag. I usually rope everyone into doing a couple of rounds jan komo. You're not after about twenty minutes. Everyone just completely lactic day. Looks like fun you like elect heaving fucking printing through the water you got ta you just like the white missile and the whitecaps. Oh but it's still like sand sucks you in the water washes out not the white that pie skim board on you have to get enough space to get the tied to like plane rides really do have to sprint cry way to get you got you got this tire yards you take with you. Yep yep that's a cool idea et cetera at least ten out Kids might you do more. Because i don't stop and and then whoever's down there with me i'm disliked your up and you can't really say no to that because the kids just like come on. You're potty behind you just whipping you. Yeah i i i. It's the best. Yeah that's cool kids good for anything like that if you go with them and get in the water up to the plank tip with them tips tips in the water on the shoulders battles throwing them out of the water. The mass all alleyoop slack thirty miles. Yeah they just hang out with the kids. If that also not doing anything pairings hanging up in the local vicinity always always get kids will go to those. And then that kind of encourages. Y'all gotten play ranch. Style hundred percent people have like they have an interest in something like that too. Because i watched the that's interesting. Now how do i do this. How do i do that in front paw stand up or something whereas if you brought the the dumbbell set out of threatening us into a bus up co- come try. Thanks they've gotta sell my stationary block. The one i bought my neighboring. Yes sick when he boxer the bought it so psyched. Yeah matt invest that twenty straight to my super bass training like. It's not like a training session. You just you just get outside and start doing some shape. Yeah there's one picking up or if you if you are going to try. And or if i'm doing like a week or two away from i'm on a need to train over time that that long without a doubt and the best time to do it and this is even if i'm on holiday like out of sydney it's always early because he di get filled up with fun stuff you know kinda visit site saying or visiting friends family so if you can get early training session in get up before anyone else's up just get out and do it then. The rest of is awesome. Yeah it's a good call. Yeah so true. And and your your your your body's digested donate before you do it. Just get out of bed shoes on fuck out if you sit down and have breakfast and coffee then someone wakes up and then all of a sudden you're and our conversation and then before you know it is ten. Am it's too hot and missed that boat and then you had maybe something sheet that shouldn't have eaten and then you're like there's other things distracting and you tell yourself i'll do it in the other during the other before we started dinner process. Got shit feeling in your head. Thinking grenade train. Yeah you get that little bit of anxiety and then someone's like i won't be morning sessions a really really handy yawn the same i am. I'll say i haven't trained since when did believe leave trend since thursday because we left for the camp friday and like sort of three or four days to me is not really a problem especially that because we were walking around. Be quite active at the party but on the dance floor on the dance floor out rugs. Today's of christmas that twerking build benz twice many cows. It was dammed ninety michels. Someone like stand against did she did. It was just a chest wall. Basically the yacking. I'm vented that at the algi did a fantastic. Yeah when i. It was the remember that drill. I do bad line up in your chest wall. And then you you ops through the back stinky obama and then you pull into a good line and then you go to and then when you describe fast all of a sudden extending now as we speak tongue mouth me yeah by. Yeah the calmer what the something something. If ford is like if the family for four days. I'll do the same thing. I might get there on the first day kind of happened. In by the second day i'll i'll think nominee do. I'm going to do some kind of session here. Do five cents of some push ups and pull ups and squats or something. Because i it is so rewarding when i do and then it takes twenty minutes fifteen minutes. Yeah but it's like it's such a mental win and the carry over to the next day into that evenings cement. And when i don't do it i'm like why did i just go to ten minutes of exercise but if you mindset two hundred percent that's really the biggest thing i think and you also get a little bit of time out which i think is also important for yourself and everyone else that live in each katrina for so long i try to your is if the less time you're in a big group more popular. You are not a soccer point if you have a little bit and people talk to you about kind of laving golf. And they're like well. What are you paying already been up. I'll true it tells you a lot about doesn't try i've been i've been around awesome. Seek thing you know what else. I like actually being on the road and i might do it. This year is visiting another gym. They feel like somewhere with his gyms. You like maybe. I can go across three class. They're going visit will get movement. Yes he's doing anything. Because i'll be at mom and dad's But yeah it's such a good time to go and drop in another place and just do something and if you turn up in another gym class you going get a good workout. You don't have to think about it. your could be any clause really if you're in the middle of no and you go to like another gym. That's like a anytime fitness or whatever. It's kind of like fun because it's a novelty and you can do your old boring workout. That usually do. But you know that works for you and everyone thinks it's mad. That's watching these drills. The middle of the white house right can. I just moved the dumbbells gaza. The wool stands exactly so amount true. Get on the bench cheese. Angie's do all the different styles and veggies inclined. Klein lies back. Finding a boxing. Bag is awesome. Chrissy if you're a strike. And i feel like to. You don't have to strike bash it. I'm going to have my wrist. You could hang. Yeah yea practice. Y'all got clogged circled around touching the ground. What do you say. If you're like say your say someone. He done a bit of five factory. Mind having a hit. But you've never really done. You're on kind of boxing bag workout. What could be a real easy little routine that you do with a heavy bag gotta get the tomato tomato time. Free one and set for rounds. I whatever you time. He's just cheese limb round on one leg two minutes and then switch to the other leg and then stripe punches for the next as for the next and then finish on like a freestyle and just goes hot as you can and that could look ridiculous as you want. Yeah it's it's hard to hurt yourself on a on a bag you have to be pretty uncoordinated. Reckless fun pads. It's different because you've got to gauge. How much pressure the person's putting in against you but on a stationary bag you subconsciously. Most people privilege protect their the joints. Right in so you on the power minutes of work and then you take. What thirty seconds. Seconds minute stretch in between so you might end up doing six rounds or something rams just get you you want to leave huffing and puffing with good sweat yeah. I think that's fantastic. Toll hung up at my mom's house. But i also built squat rack and she not bothered rings. You like training. That i had and she's got a big hill up the back. That will hit record my time. Every time i got up there and over the years it's slowly gotten slower all well. That's like. Oh my gosh that now. The at another minute. We'll go along the hill. I usually get gotta go. It's like they're rolling hills and the and probably takes me on average a dozen hasn't been slightly going up it's it it it It depends actually what it depends on the weather. So when it's really hot then goes down. But it's been pretty consistent guy it's been pretty consistent but takes me dollars chain to like eighteen to thirty minutes. Oh yeah so. The big gap there oughta. It's slower much slower. It's one of those for guilt if you if you leave it to light. And that's that's a long fast run eighteen to twenty minutes and it's steep yeah state but it's it's good the sardine run a comeback and all heavy lift or or do some some ring work hills. That's such a good one. Like and just the idea if you do training to jim at door activities outdoor training modalities that you don't usually do. Yeah i'd be so to that. Single trials awesome. Because you're doing a little bit of sightseeing and you don't have to be a good runner to do it because the ground slightly down and everything's uneven so you just going to work it out forces you to run a good technique bush. Walking is awesome. I think you're a little bit sites. Go to this national. Always a must for me anytime anywhere especially in within australia. It's choose at least two or three national parks fund. Some good good walks to a waterfall or something like that. Yeah and that's great and now the kids have been older. We can move faster if you're at the beach. Getting out onto the rocks. Yeah i saw that like you can say like most of us find ourselves the beach at some point but you can take that little trip and sort of scarring along the rocks and stuff always pay pays dividends especially in sydney like when you're If you're staying city and people will because of covid and whatnot but yet catching up with friends and doing the beach debates walks swim something. That's a good one. I was just like in general catching up with a friend or something. you know. Physical walk away to do it. Especially if it's like around a little headland something now that holidays something you don't often do. Maybe for our suburbs. Just a tip. If you lack like inspiration to come up with say you won't do and do a workout and you're like inspiration member. All of our workouts are available. And you want to fight app so you can go back and look at any classes for many time and just choose session so body white would probably one of the best ones. If you don't have any equipment just find yourself a little body weight and just do like the first half of the class right. Yeah or you could even just. Pakistan rings light stockman the gym. Now we need back thousand. Pump him out yeah. People need them Pair of rings at such invaluable thing even if you kind of shit it using them worthwhile having a pair get better over the years and you learn more. Stop more things to do them. Rings always take rings in a set of small set of mitts and gloves. Yeah i do. I take the with every step people you travel. Yeah do all right. I haven't traveled in that way for a long time. But yeah i i typically would i suppose Just thinking what. I do this christmas. Maybe i would say hasn't really felt like i wanna ready front operative you'd have you'd have a bit of a target on your your. There's always your brown blow. It'd be like oh. I wanna roll with that. You brown belt. Yeah tests myself. Yeah pethick tap out. I think i will. I'll take it down south. Who made this year you have to. You have to row will get a yeah. It's a bit of an obliteration. I do love at night. He loves it. he's actually really good. He's like he's. He's good funderal with official. Yeah yeah i wrote him and there is a few gyms. Now i think about it down in wollongong connected with through bulletproof and that kind of thing. So there's plenty of crew to to check out down there but yeah that's right like just having some shit like if i just had my gay with me and you posited that idea in my head and i'm like oh fuck i've got a couple of hours. Google class near may. And i can go and have an awesome training session whereas if i didn't take the gay or you didn't have your rings. I didn't have emits. You just you make it that much harder to do that. You make it almost impossible to do that thing. I should potentially schedule it. Like tell you one they stay. I'm going on this bush up on this. I'm going to be doing some rain on this day. I'm hittin hitting hitting the beach. And i'm gonna pat. Pack the with the rope. You just you just sneak it in there so i want to. I guess you could say You know you have the tools around or pack. Your boot for action. Always be ready for action. I'm like that old time like in my boat. I'd like to know what you have your that i. I got skateboards that the rings I have shorts and soccer ball. I have bowls gobbles up balls. Pose the always have bowls so yet. I'm like ready to go because you know you're you're you're in sydney. You're on the other side of town. The here you're at a lunch and it's like including stuck down in the water kids will go in. i'll go in and and it's just like having his. You know what i take. I take One of the ropes from the gym every holiday go on those For the kids love. Sling it over there over the branch because we got these ones in the gm haven't seen them with an eye leap at the end. So you just kinda cost than thread the open in through it and just pulls and yet we swing on it. Oh just rope climate. Just do whatever i love. those climbs. great Do drug climbs during to try and get out of the pocket show. I think she was just interested. She's a very good climate. She's an awesome climate for under the top of that flagpole when she was like three yes like my daughter is a good calama and she couldn't climb that that i remember that which i do every poll you ever walked by like a poll client. She loves it does something because it was structured. Because i'm like hey let's climb this. I'll put it up. She's letting napoli it's got a. It's got to be my decision. Kinda thing needed a bit of a venture with yeah. That's right with the ripe. i'm leaning. i often look for the economy feed type treason and we got the morton ones at. Yeah but i'm because of the root system that goes all around. You can sling the rope and you can see that. Climb up into the crook of the train. Swing app swing or you just go from route to route to the challenges start on this route and land on that route. That's cool as like swinging land. Fuck yeah the other thing. You need to keep in check. When you're on the holiday season is your sleep. of people tend to stay up later than they should over these time because he doesn't have wick the next day and you feel compelled. Yeah let's stay up and have a drink. Yep and maybe around people haven't seen for a long time chat and you still want to have that still. Have that that time with outs. Where you can sit down and catch up and talk about life but don't necessarily want to be doing it. Die in die out and they kind of schedule. Some early nights and a good way to get around that is to schedule in some daytime activities. That start quite early. No says well the bourgeoisie slack. I tomorrow organ. bush wilkin kickoff early. So let's get an early not forces people to bed everyone guys to bed and then drag them all out and get them up. A up that ten k. Fucking inclined fuck. You know that how. I mean a lovely boy. I got ten people up this fucking mountain enron. You should say that was so fucking state came up with the rights of eight. Am i got lost. Your arm and big jack got lust for that one offer different one. That was different that one we went on with nikki highest point in that was a good one. You like disobeyed like two hours and it was like it was like eight hours. It was a big track. It was fucking huge little cousins with it. Yeah well we all survived. Yeah the one before. We lost two people. It's only a little island. So but they found the riverbank up to try and work their way. Back to to the ocean god. I didn't talk to me for about three days. And you guys got lost on the cross island walk. We got lost on the cross island pretty like when you get lost in that. So thick man. It's quite intimidating. Yeah you got no impression of where you're at sure. It's the same as like being lost in a jungle in fe j. You tend to think. I'll be to figure it out to the top of the mountain and just like look. Yup it's fucking trays like it's dense foliage everywhere and nothing. Nothing's memorable there's no landmarks. I got a fucked up once. A scary It wasn't it wasn't like i was lost. you've been to my village. My dad's really. I basically went up to the the phone tower which is above. Like you can walk that. Walk around the back of the village in the some plantations and fields and this is kind of a road cut. Walk all the way to the top and you can come back downed two in a couple of hours. But i went up there and i decided that i like you can see when you look at some island hills from a distance that just look like cross covid hillsides and then this week. It's here neighbors. Like gross covid. And i decided i wanna goblins up and it's going to walk directly down straight down to my uncle's property and just walked straight to the water. And i started doing that and faulk may it was like i just got stuck a new at go but that grass was like ten foot high and it was all like raises. Shop almost like sugarcane but it was just like you couldn't walk on us slices. And i yeah and i and i wasn't walking on the ground and then i got into this thick bit of bush that was like lantana always carrying a tripod and a bag. Full of cameras took some voters up there and I came through through the gross and it was treacherous. I reaped all my pants so funny. Because when i came out of the bush michael was just laughing at. I'd like i'd like zepa like mad. Columbia ones and i just told them because i came through this thing magin like kind of lantana and just like frigging hundreds of a couple of hundred meters of it And so thick that you're not touching the could see the ground the ground was like a meter and a half below mean step and i was just trying to stand in the end. I figured i've found out that the most efficient way to get across was to roll. So i rolled gone tripod. And i was like throwing it ahead. And i just thought to roll on my side. You know dude. I finding people pay for stuff you can't you can't describe with that being run that your son was going to hate all and john like shooting yourself and so many bugs just want you all. Yeah when eating your calories yourself what happens if you got around paulie ago folks. We're going to wrap rapid there anyways. I think that's i think that gives people a couple good tips on how to survive the holidays but we said the same sheet every year told that balanced man keep moving kim practice a little bit limited on. Have some fun. Yeah 'cause little bit of discipline makes you feel it frames your day better. So it's all it's ultimately all about you having a time that's right that's the most important thing and pick the food try and by the the good bees. Or you know dodger diane. I don't think the stuff this is a good mate. Yup yup declawed could veggies shit. Yeah memorable meals that you can save your shopping at kohl's or will these fuck that if you're in the hood and you want come tried jungle wherever the for a little bit between christmas and i just get in touch jungle brothers dot com and you better say it on a timetable there anyway. Come visit where. I'm going to visit his shara especially. I have christmas. That stopped in sydney. Jimnah ryan the one who failing a bit lethargic from eating too much shit. Come see us. Yeah bringing friends love it. Thanks boys catch you guys next week. Thank you so you so.

boxing joe eddington hamid colo river yellow river yala ramar kyron Vooc Jim junkies vicks puhl Bob y Tashin jacob John kelly nina simone Joe cosby hammett royal falko Jamba luke tyler nikolas
Ep. 544: Joel McHale

The Fighter And The Kid

2:09:19 hr | 11 months ago

Ep. 544: Joel McHale

"Many men can we stand my punch? Obviously obviously a for sure Senate going to set a here on them. Black belt and chips chicken. I think you'd be surprised you'd be surprised. Havoc any fight club. Spiked Clubs Spike Club. Kid got a cutie pies. I still got it baby. Lift Your Shield and now from the on its studios in Playa Vista. California is the moment you've been waiting for the filer and the kid is coming at you. Laugh not live that does make sense. I don't now it's a fighter and the kid shot live station news age. Offensively saying karate. Oh good I think I should have said gut proper Asian all Asian Piroska no toll. This is my problem when I watched the we're already getting into it. Watch the news good. I've told me call me when you hear someone on go there on a local. La News and they are doing a live report for more and they're like well. This is Maria Gonzalez from Pomona. And then I go okay now I get it and but then I go but then people say well. It's it's proper to do it that way. But then I got what region of either of of a Central America or Mexico or or Spain container. Where where does that mean that when someone says I would like some Chow Maine that I have to say jump in? Does that mean does it has a white dude really likes so typical to ask that white. Obviously I haven't I haven't exotic sort of your hair tents. There's an up rush going on. Oh there's and your body body looks african-american oh a little bit a little racist. It's racist Wednesday Brian. Now hold on. He looks athletic and muscular. Here's the interesting part. My audience is American Samoa. Longreach long again. So many subpoenas diabetic home funding is really fat in the lower part of his caucus says Moana Tattoos right just under the head. Just right up on the war tattoos on that so my gosh no no. No good go worked it out. This is a very nice studio served. Me Really shows your success. We've we've done very well. Congratulations to you. Well thank you. You said You city of Athletic Bilbao. Did you know play division? One Football Night. I receive with that but I heard that a long time ago. I think he played tight end at USC. Dot Washington man. Thanks you only PAC twelve school. That matters why is that right? Yeah I see that's a fun intimidating thing to pull out but then I look at you and your ears and I go. That's the most intimidating thing on the planet. Different types aren't it's that just shows you. You've done it. Yeah he's I guess. I wish I could just cauliflower my ears now you could just I could start but then played a Colorado you play Colorado four years. Did you play for years? No I quit after half. I never played a redshirt walk on. I was a walk on then for so then they saw how bad I was an then I got better and then they red-shirted me when I was a sophomore and then I My adhd kicked. In and I left richer like walk on. So you're like the run so you run your the scout team so let's say he was playing. Sc He would have to be the scout team guy infused. He'd have to be that guy does. It's the worst job in the world. Not What he had a scholarship. And we're there for a reason I hold on. I was a walk on for a year and a half and then got a scholarship. Good for you and he was also like a like Ivy League or of saw. You Played Lacrosse. Fresh Ivy Freshman here. Yeah I played Lacrosse at another. He's he's a real athlete. Vassar right knows no good athlete at Harvard. Yes but he was funny. He's he always says to me. I don't know from this but I I look at Michael. You're huge and he says not that huge you guys. I played football with you. See and then I'll see guys who and I go. Oh Jesus Christ. That's that's what you're competing with so you're a big guy and I go am I crazy. Joel's bigger the meal you. I'm sorry Baba now. Look Joe is how big kiss for. Yeah kid but you hear different purposes but you have the call. Watch a hipster thing beginning to twenty two fifteen. I thank you for saying that. No I'm not to seven to seven percent down a bit now. I don't know he's dropped down to one ninety about a year. Now feel that would be partially free. My stomach muscles shred. You know when you got jacked is in that movie that movie dankner seeing it bring it up the whole that a little bit and I. It's one of my favorite hormones. So goddamn good near you deliver St Livers for me. Yes thank you you. You were acting heavy and you could've been acting heavy. You know who took your job your job. Who in a quiet place? John Krasinski. No He never played Joel. Well Yeah. They're them yeah. That's that's A. Oh there's me being interviewed were with detector. And they're they're they're hunting. This bad die down already Jackson thin. That's how that's Eric Bana. Yeah no and it described in the thing it said you have to be. You're much bigger than Eric. Van and he eric was big and I had. I went to the gym like he was hulk. I'm a fan of his. He's such A. I hate them. I'm going on the record here and say he's a piece of Jesus God. He is way too so when my wife? I met him she was like yeah. He's very attractive. And I said you hit very as in you. Don't put that word in front of me He he was like he just looks like a movie star and I was like okay. Is He Australian? He is dying sketch useless. It'd be a comic. Yeah he had like the number one sketch show in Australia. Oh well then he got this movie called chopper which you guys would love saw ever seen. And it's all based on a true story yes laws real guy and oh based on that. Take a look at got. Yeah Plus Shit. Oh yeah you wasn't joking about Jell O. And then he and then he started getting cast internationally in all these serious roles oh well and no one knew knew him as a comedian. I mean that's that is a Oscar winning perform chopper one of my favorite movies that and Bronson with Tom Hardy those Chimoio. He's you go. Oh and there. There's the real chopper. Yeah we did you like Tom. Hardy's Spiderman. Ben See. I Love Them. Everyone hates him. I thought it was great Were you distracted by his accent. No not really look like Tom Hardy. I get that a lot. You know what I think it's compliment couldn't be bigger. He's one forty naturally. Well we're not we're not. He didn't say you're the same size. Hardy you're probably get all the time you probably Tom Hardy size. Who'd you a little bigger taller stronger? Hold on don't don't do that. Go ahead no go from when I say that because I did a movie with them now with Tom wet with Tom Hardy. But you did with which one Tom Hardy which movie a movie called warrior. Hell of actor though. Joe Yeah yes the Brothers. Yes a warrior. You'd let it has nothing to do with fighting. You'd love it. It's a story about brothers phenomenal movie. We have to fight to pay the account open. Feel like you're being okay. So ask you. I played you see was Jackson County. You've played bass the Joe Rogan the Joe Rogan role. Oh you did I did. Did you be so that was? He's a lot bigger point. You played only thing. I keep doing it quietly. And you're being in a socratic thing you're asking questions but I think you know the answer. So thank you for saying that I am socrates. Didn't give you a copy but I was a handsome son of a bitch. Take a look at me. Let's zoom in on that picture. I'm listening you need to fill up. The 401K is going to be a lot of money. And you WANNA put it away. And that's us when you're sixty because it'll grow worked too fucking lines shoot was tailored well. Actually it's tighter superman to that angle right now are you. It looks like you're you're in a fight in seen my natural. I have a martial presence. My natural tilt Muslim my out. So if you swing at me you're going to catch for head mowing Joel. Edgerton that too. He forehead monster and a good writer director. Yeah don't both guys are those are two of acting. Yeah and and then you got you in there and that's just great for you. I'm trying to track what you're saying that I'm doing and I don't really do realize it. I really just don't go shoot just a job. Do you have anything to do with talk soup coming back? Did they call you like? Hey is this cool to do the soup? My friend does soon. That's called soup. Talk Soup though. And this is the soup right. Well no mine was okay because that when that talks who was only about talk shows way back when before you were born when you were getting out of graduate school. This is what I'm doing. She's not I don't like it okay. Well don't enjoy appropriate on this. Is there hey? Yeah that was me. Yeah a lot of different hair. Yeah going on a date no they. I have nothing to do with the new one. Nothing I mean. I was fired for years ago so three years ago. Just I'm fucking the no they They they you know they were like we're not doing the show anymore and Well I felt like it was a hit. It did was did very well but now this is you can just cut this out because this is boring as hell at that time you had Chelsea and Joan rivers and myself and they we. It was like comedy that they added like two hours of comedy. day basically and then The writers guild came in and said. Hey you guys are have written comedy and at that point and still to this day one of those cable networks that does has there's no unions so there's no actual writers they're all producers so that's why with the Kardashians. There's no writers right even though everything's written But and that's why they can air. The show. Endlessly can area show twenty five times a week so they used to run the soup like Thir- thirteen or fourteen times so then they said you've got you've got pay raise or we're going to protest and I was in the writer's like fantastic and I was like great. They'll get paid more. But then then chose. Chelsea left Joan very sadly died and then we were the last Matlan man on the island and a and then we saw every rerun costs this much money that does not fit our model. This was very this was very boring. What I just said so then you realize interesting goodbye. And we're like okay and then and then uh that. I hope the new girl does well. Do you know her at all. I I met her a few weeks ago. At the fact Gore the The world exploded. And now you're here Kovic free. Hopefully well my gonorrhea is pretty own cages. We're GONNA take a look at that you don't you? WanNa don't mess with this couch afterwards and turn up the heat okay. We'll turn the heat them. Any of your friends have it. No no and I will go home. I know Jay Jay Leno for her. It's a big deal for her. I hope I hope that I don't know what does in this. I've worked a ton I don't know what does well on besides the crash. It has very much tougher. Come the KARDASHIAN NETWORK. But they are some of the most recognizable people ever. They're doing it for a reason. I mean they've steered into it very smartly and I mean it's still a huge shoot but I don't know what's I. I'm not sure what else is on e. these days. It's not like I I lo- botched all right. That's that does well that does well. Yeah I'd like to go in there. What are you know? Watch botch want to fix my ears. He looks great. You Know Botswana. Fix My Now I like your ears. Yeah do they hurt. Ever know does. Isn't there a thing though that it can become painful when it's happening. It's like awful hurt so bad but then it gets hard calcified but that but can you. Can they break can intro? While he can't like there's been fighters where they really hardened they'd like scuffling like rip off some. That's not good okay. So yours is from wrestling my grappling. Ufc heavyweight man for ten years. Ten Years Yeah Right. Is that fair. Not Ten Years Hicks was in the six up for body. Your face is that there's no Thanks man big broke Brian. What's your excuse sometimes? Yeah from what to Quando Quando cut they confer? I mean whatever. It is my box. You box at boxes this morning. Okay so I just today was hitting just minutes again. Emit no admits see. Now you're doing you see what I keep doing and I apologize okay but I don't know why killing you. What do you do for your workouts. I pretty much just a lift weights and then your house. Yeah and I have. An air dined bike. Of course you know the airline thing that it's such a beast. When I played football they would say on that thing for ten minutes. No problem keep it above sixty or whatever and the Diet. The best athletes on the team would fall day. But then you have like a strict diet you have to be doing something you just genetically. Thank you and catch He's Norwegian. He's a Scandinavian descent. I'm what explains the now listen? I'm Irish Italian. Oh yeah nation in America. It's a rare combination. Italian didn't get a lot of the height. You got some nice hits on there that I don't. That's not a good example. Well that's thank you. Jim Rash some weird dieter. What No I just strategically so this morning. I had two cups of coffee. A gram cracker. Yeah that's something new. I liked him. Did see because I was like. I'm never going to not eat pasta. I'm just not gonNA eat all of it. That's right Portion control is and then I. Have you know six bottles of wine at night? And that is yeah. That's what I do I drink. I like to drink obsessive tire king. Oklahoma's download it. You're almost done. I can't believe I need to. I need a show I had because this is your show at seven series some part series. I because I knew call of duty the war zone thing just happened and I can't not play that really are you are. You are video games. I love video games really go much. How old are your kids? Twelve and fourteen. They're boys yeah. They're so it's five. They're so good. Well one of them is a man like he. I watch him kick people. He's twelve and online. Yeah and he kicks people's asses all over the place and he was like he will just he will watch this heal. Drop back as the quarterback and just run all the way backwards. And I'm like I think you're going to probably get tackled here. And he just dazzles around them and I was like I never thought about that But they play a lot of four nine. You know what's weird is when especially when we were try beaming but when we were kids like kids my dad say you play our game you gotta go outside for two hours are beating him outside for two hours now. I'd like okay make sense. I don't be a loser. But now kids are making millions of dollars playing video game. Millions millions upon millions of dollars. It's like legit career. He's been played. Get on twitch. Make money the. There's there's teams guy you know what you're talking about they sell. Us staples people want US kids. I love these new jobs that come along technology. Nobody thought it's just tough 'cause they're now used to be like dude. You're GONNA BE ALOOF. I just play. Games gives me shut your fucking mouth. This makes twelve million dollars. A year I mean injure kind of broke. P P probably is the most famous Ninja Deal WITH ADIDAS. I don't And then there's like a new cell and you've got your loser fruit and you got your Lachlan Sir. Not they're huge and like twenty years. We'll just play what other kids play video games when I was a kid. I like an hated watching people. Play Video Games. Yeah I was trump at the bit to get the state. Yeah of course. These kids are off to the sides watching these old you. I've been to Overwatch League turn. I've gone to them to watch them play on movies crazy good. They're all people are screaming like their Attasi. They're so good. My son who is eight watches on Youtube watches really good fortnight players. Yes and the other day came running down and said he was like mad because I suck at four hundred up garbage and I go well. What's the problem? What's the issue? Let's isolated I keep getting killed and I. I never killed anybody out. So there's no point playing well so we want to get more kills and get killed less goal. Is there something we can look up to to`real we can go to break down? I know he's looking up. Comes running down he's like. I got three Kale's I got three kills freaking out at at eight. I was good. That was really good parenting because our dads are gonNA like. Oh you know winning your video game. Yeah we're GONNA run outside dummy give a fuck but also when I was a kid. The big thing was arcade games like mortal. Kombat was huge. Amer there's always that one nerd who knew all the fatalities. Where did he get those? I don't know where the fuck did I learn those. There's no Internet. There's nothing that kid just watched other kids and he put in the time and he spent the money and now and now doesn't end. Well I do stupid. He's a serial killer yes because he's obsessed with all these fatalities as much time. The violent is fuck. I had to stop myself from playing some Zombie game because these he's chopping zombies heads off and everything else. I'm like I don't about this now. Why bought myself looking at his mother. Gone what do I do about my son than intendo switch? Because he wanted to play Mario. Yeah and then you can download games on there like advertise love mortal Kombat. There's more combat eleven and get the joking at spun who I love so I downloaded. It didn't think you'd get to it. I look over shoulder that he's four aren't you? I look over shoulder. He's fucking rip and do all this. Isn't you downloaded it? Though I download good game download figure out how to switch the. What do you do about that? I'm not sure what to do about the inevitable. Surge of technology. The kid is kid. Look at me. My son goes it. There's some real relaxing to differ lacks. Dombi it's sad because there's a huge number of adults that power prepared for Zombie Apocalypse. Yes I went to four real when I was an army surplus store and there was like those Ambi- apocalypse preparation center. And I I knew. The guy's name is Jack. He owns the place and I'm like And he's like if you only knew there are people who really think it's real. I WANNA do that. When it comes to wireless your buds you got that. Boomer man where wireless ear buds. There's nothing like it if you want to zone out the world man. I'M CORONA YOU WANNA zone it out. Yeah you need to get you. Some ray com array cons are half the price of any other premium. Wireless here but they're actually what I use instead of my other earbud so you didn't boy. The new model. The everyday e- twenty-five ear buds are the best ones yet. Six hours of playtime seamless Bluetooth pairing more base. More compact design. That gives you a nice noise. Isolating fit right there so comfortable to perfect on the go with your running with your ears. You can do everything you can run. Joe Exotic Tigers does he. I use them when I do my martial arts. I swim with sharks. Listen Man Yeah. You've heard me talk about before. How about ray? J Snoop Dogg Cardi B. They're all about man. Now's the time to get the latest and greatest from rate com. Get fifty percents off your order at by RECON DOT com slash T. F. at hey that's by recon dot com slash t fat K. For fifty percent off RECON wireless ear buds by RECON DOT COM slash T. no wires. No stems what do you think of. When you hear the words citrus. Is it orange slices after a soccer game or a lemon wedge and your water at your favorite restaurant yes and yes but another thing that citrus springs to mind is sharing because citrus was literally made to be shared and no one knows that better than sunkist sunkist grows the type of citrus? 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Six guy where he likes to these civilians about what they would do tactically and he shows you like scenes from movies where seal team guys come in and do stuff and he goes now. What was wrong with that right so I was like? I duNno new uniforms. They're all wrong. They took like little things. When you're high level soldiers like that I go well. They came in. They used silencers. They shot people so that nobody here goes silencers. He goes not silent very loud. In fact that's a sound suppressor and also The the and I said Yeah. Yeah well they gotta make quieter and he goes well. There's also the fact that the bullet breaks the sound barrier. Did you think about that? And I'm like no I don't know about these things and also subsonic rounds those. Don't now you now? You're speaking my language. Also not navy seal dude now but it's just funny. How we we go through all these things about how to. How what would you know any else so I said why am I go? That's why I would use. I'd have a crossbow division. And we'd all come in there with and very quiet by the way right through and you write this you go easy to reload twelve. Oh okay okay. There are probably contraptions where you can be. Let them better than that. That little spinning thing you because the thing you can crank reload or you'd be you'd be my reloaded behind me. What's what's this. What is the situation we're in are? Are we breaking into a home or breaking into a compound with some bad guys? Okay we're going to have to hoof it all right you big kid you can have to carry most of the gear to carry you know tone blaster lifted that you have to carry the first aid. You have to carry the water. You have to carry the radio the answering thing and the crank wrangler you can my loader when we come in we signal load yeah right means load up to load up goat up. That looks like we're touching Dick's two centuries okay so when you see a person in front of me that I can't see how do you signal to me like silently? I stroke your head Channel here? Uh-huh dubbed Beer two fingers on your ten provided record free. That's making noises and you're saying hey who's that you could just say there's a guy over there if you're allowed to talk talk this way your smoke. They smell good you too. Thanks still fucking straight thank you. Your eyes are blue with what's going on. I'm just I'm going to take them out. I'm going to stack them. I gotTA wait till they stock how you stack girls when stock those guys. How do you stack a girl? Okay you put one on top of the other. Okay you do doggystyle. I'm I've just seen an important Okay Yeah it's called. How some so then. This all part of it is going to wait till they're sitting on top of each word stacked or like ones behind the other. Okay go straight through him. Yeah now I'm GonNa make I'M GONNA sound. I'M GONNA do this out of a night bat. I don't know if you know. What a night pat sounds like but I don't know a night back to pleasant. It's like a seventies easy listening very hypnotic and and so that relaxes them and then took symptom. Now Watch how you die from crossbow. It's GonNa go through my make the sound of going to it's that it's that quick. You don't think he's going to be like this. No because I hit the heart Bubba and so you think maybe they'll be the moment where they go your and the guys like and then it just bleeds. And he didn't even it at entrance. What I think okay. Yeah I think that's what happened. This your knee navy seal friend recommended this no. I recommend it to him. What did he think he says? This is the apocalypse. Yeah you're prepared. He didn't think it was a great idea to seize your wearing a winter cap. You're wearing God. You're on it today man and you're an alcoholic so yeah a little bit and that's okay. He drank this entire Obama. Two thousand dollar bottle of whiskey. Is that really what is it? It's she twenty-three age twenty three years one. More Time Ponca Pu. Yeah to Mogo whiskey drinker young. I love whisky well at all. We we break open. Try this region. Tuck your your Oh. This is like a high school party. This very pure pressure go ahead and Kennedy axed moves that smooth whisky whisky ever have Brad and had some of that. It's very nice. Isn't that smooth? Finish it and finish them all SIP. It Tiger King Piss. I Love I love. He's drinking. That's great and then Nice. Yeah I drink. I have a lot of alcohol to my home. I I have a storage unit full of it so you love that you see. I'm very impressed with the guy. He's a guy's guy collection and collection collection collection and two jeeps. This is know this is. My Penis is not cannot be not kicked up on any device so small. It's so small but what what do you do you own. Be Stolas Stolas. Yeah I own one gun from eighteen. O Five really no joke. It's one of the. It looks like a challenge to a duel. You prefer to deport all. Joel mccower Oh yeah. This is incidentally Do the one where I'm standing there in the sun. Yeah Watch this. You prefer to launch this. Yeah this'll be going to small walk. How vital manly thing to do I hit a person with the corked and then swipe over swipe over and that is the core how it comes off looking. I meet in this shot to just to you and my friends. My writer friends sent that to me. And they engraved on the blade it said slide up the shaft until it explodes and there is you have an easy bone structure you have. Ben Affleck Bone structure. That's the first thing I want to congratulate. I think so denzil better but yeah you believe Cubans. He's thank. You both can go up and down. I'm proud of you. Stay more up to seventy two so I die. Here's my toast Yar doesn't matter though. Yeah but I don't to seventy heavyweight is what you want retired. I'd be stand up comedy for last five years. Yeah all right well. Here's my secret again. How much were you when you play when you fight Like to forty something to forty two. That's why I love watching that stuff. Because no never never brian when you broke one fifty. What did you all right? I wasn't blessed with that too. I'm very much to see the. It really looks like I am some so I have no. I'm just just clinging to masculinity love him. My goal is like I cook the perfect stake at all. I'd like that is now about to do. That is similar tonight. Can you give me your your perfect steak recipe? Yes what kind of a stake is it? It is a is a New York. Strip all right. How thick is about that thick about everything? Yeah well it might be a little thin near an inch an inch from whole foods. No it's from butcher box okay. So it's not on me. Phenomenal phenomenal. Meat is also the name of my book and I know journey of Porn Star. Now a here okay. So the key I. The key is take that thing out of the refrigerator. The two hours before. You'RE GONNA tempt and definitely if it's yes Don't let it if there's other stakes on. Its separate all that okay. You do not need to put salt on the steak beforehand. Don't know there's different philosophies like oh it tastes like salt. When you get up you can add salt but a lot of people would say that. The hydrates So then are using a barbecue using pan using a Pan. Unfortunately and that's fine. That's fine all right so I would recommend so you. Preheat your oven to like Three twenty five okay And you want to get that pan so if you have like a g g without the okay Aghia butter without the fat clarified butter. Because or you can do the brown butter method which also is probably the taste butter method. Yeah where that just takes a little bit more time So when you put you put the butter in and then when it turns Brown you can see the little black but those are the solids fat coming up. Then you well okay. D- do the first method all right so you get that Pan Smoking hot right and you don't use olive oil use either. G. Or use a canola oil because they have higher Smoke yes smoke points and then you WanNa do one minute aside on that new one minute one minute. Okay and I'll get that hot though that oil you want. You want that to be smoking before you even you and I've done stakes at three seconds side thirty seconds aside then you stick it in that oven for about six minutes. If it's one stake more than one stake one stake. Then you want you. Oh sorry I asked you know. then Second Blue and so. Then you want to do that. Like five and a half minutes six minutes in that oven because you want like a medium rare right. Yes you wanted then. Why do I pan out off the stove? Yeah pick the whole pan any of not cover it do not cover it out tomorrow and put it on the lowest level of your oven. Okay and let it loose do. It's three twenty five for six minutes. Pull that stakeout. Walk away from it for ten minutes. Let's IT ready. I get off the ground. The buttery so yeah and then and then do. I put some salt and pepper on there. I wish we had talked beforehand. I would've brought you some salts over meals. I have way too many you WANNA put. There's so many different than you can put anything you want and you can solve and pepper. You can There's I put some Chili flakes marinate. You're so I have done that. Yes definitely So we'll we'll the brown butter method. I love So I like that with Bonin rabbi Because it's a little bit of a thicker bigger steak but you get pan you put your butter in it. Turns Brown put that stake in there and and you start putting that butter on there and even though it's burned It is burned absolutely burned. But that there's a nutty flavour to burn butter. Yeah I don't know I'm turning because you knew the point that infuses into the steak and wondering is the best cut. Yeah that's my favorite remember when the bone is in then it that legislative labor out. But New York's are so good because they kind of have the combination of flaming on his no fat at all which he makes it in a weird way it still tastes people also go but then you get some of those new dryades rib is like eating. I don't like dry aged. You don't like the I don't like driving a Funky to me. The meat fantasize moist. It's almost like a PL steakhouse my friend and have their to place. The Best Steak Felix Republic on a Republican Scope Scopus team only bad taste. Sounds like we need to do a little. Yeah where we because AP L. Ages stuff for four hundred days out doesn't have a skunk so you really see. I don't like the skunk this. I mean it is rotting meat. Technically you've seen it before. They cut off all the fungus discussed. I mean it's controlled brought about what's Yoga. Yeah that's good and that night. He makes the knives which hank to even marriage is. Where is this restaurant at the taft building at Hollywood and vine don't know anything about it? What's it called? Ap L. Steakhouse it's a new place. It's been there for about two years. That's folded metal. He's making his own is. He's folding the Meta and he had there are about a thousand dollars a piece. You can't buy them and then one guy try to steal him and he got it back. Wires Adam. Oh He's awesome. I love maniacs. He's obsessed he also trained in France. He's trained in France and then And then he worked for a billionaire in Arizona who had a ranch who never showed up to the ranch because it was like a vacation and then the grounds crew from Mexico taught him how to barbecue. Let's go there tonight. Dude Well they look at their takeout menu. It's take out. I mean be now. They have to go. Every restaurant did not know anything about that. Everything's been in Hollywood and you live in Hollywood. I live in studio city. I people they do a Matzo ball soup They got these got anyway. So it's par republic is also his Greek. Yeah it's it's fantastic. Is that your favorite restaurant? Where do you guys live? I like I have several favorite restaurants but you know as far as in Hollywood republic to me is the best food I've ever had. Wow it's some of the Best I've ever had period. Oh well have you not eaten there? It says that the the bread and the butter just just the Normandy Butter. They give you. It's is that with the number of tables they have. The qualities is a big room husband and wife team husband from San Diego. I had to meet them because you know I just pay attention to these things. He's such a buck an artist in everything he does neak and different. His wife was a runner up for a James Beard Award for desserts. Her desserts are just unbelievable. And oh by the way it's in Charlie Chaplin's studio was what was the first round there beforehand. Kevin What's that there was another restaurant? In that Felix Company lay in companion yes Felix Felix is down on Abbot Kinney. Felix's have you with us. So so Rogan is obsessed now because I took him yeah and I played him in a movie. He played his account. Joe Joe Again. That's a question. I think you know the answer to now I play. Oh my sounds about this yeah. I played Brian. Cowen all right so so yeah no. You're not you're not no I came in here it'd be. We're advocating that. Where the old Joe's to be. Come on Bob Bob. I can't believe you haven't been there. I'm going to take you know Travis got bought out. So he doesn't own Juliana or Juiston the Rhonda's his his part he has been to that Nomad downtown. Nobody heard good things. Look up no matter and you will see the knows. It's the most beautiful setting for but it is what you're taught outstanding. Oh yes I love places. The bathroom type of nomad bathroom Los Angeles ending a pool Tom. I've heard good things about that place. The bathroom got damaged. Look it's safe safe. Yeah Oh come on. It's fantastic. There was a time in America. Yeah there was so much money and like the most beautiful building you've ever seen and we'll put your money in it. Are you guys buying that trump saying because the economy will be backed by Easter? I'd like to be back by as well. I'd like to be but yeah I think that's realistic. I don't think you can make that prediction. The WWL that ain't having well. How can you predict how the disease is spread because right now? We're on the trajectory. It's like New York like we are going up like things are gonNA happen. One is that. Hopefully some of these drugs will mitigate the severity of the infection. Absolutely and then to I D. I think I'm going to back this up in the second. The mortality rate will not be what people feared so when you do a mortality rate and they say one percent and they say that could be if a hundred million people get it. You know the problem with that. Is that that yours. That's all you gotta you gotTa take people in fact it the people infected. It's a skewed statistic who is infected and of the infected who actually have it. How many people actually die if you take diamond Princess Seven hundred people on board the crucial? Yeah Yeah I think they would study case. Yeah it is a one percent more at seven people died right They were almost old. Very old Many had pre existing conditions that would be in that case in a in a very very tightly controlled. Petri dish were nobody had everybody was so exposed to to each other that was a one percent mortality rate So you're saying because it's the you think that the rate is going to average out. It's something very low. And which means a warning to open up so epidemiologist out of Stanford Wrote on the Wall Street no Stanford but no in Stanford Stanford College State University. Yes that would be. No that would be in California and you know that now. Here's the thing. They had a very interesting breakdown of of how all of these statistics were hearing of a four percent and they are very unreliable and and almost certainly false And they're they're hardcore scientists who you know. I know I agree that it's hard to know what to believe at this point but we do our thing as we are gaining this knowledge but to say. Hey it's going to open up to say like in to reckless. Seems like it can't really plan but a friend if you were to start working out for the first time in two weeks. I can't say I'm going to be the Olympic. Eif thank you know you've done that again. Now I trained. I trained my shirt off and and and so be careful because I'll show you don't show. Trump trump is saying shirts today. We both I keep my body warm. He still wears a wife beater. Like he's seventy makes me feel a little more muscular? Get that makes a lot of sense. Highlights my shoulder think what trump is saying is yet krona's bad but when you look at the statistics is pretty low but the economy going to shit is what we can't have so anybody under fifty don't have outlined conditions hundred percents. Get your ass back to work and the old people because of the boom remover virus. The old people around them stay away. I think that's reasonable and the question that has to be asked as to. What like to mitigate how many actual we sacrifice how many as always sacrificed for I freeze so we can but where where do we to mitigate infection there? You have to take certain measures. Where does that and and we are W- Does anybody know what thirty-five percent for unemployment looks like that's not a pretty sight my life. My thing is is China. It started right there. Eating bad soups started there. And there's how many billions of people in China and they had it the worst and they're out of it now they're boom and now in sixty days to two months but that now this is. I get too much looking refunds. Where's Your Cup dirty away? I prefer Oh man genius egg about I just I go. I hear all the plant. You just can't plan if you look at what China did. When the way they locked down was way more severe than we're locked down and but if you look what they did also South Korea. As soon as those as soon they started easing it. The infection rate went right back up. Yeah so I I just I. I wouldn't people by this date it's going to be black and I'm like When you make that plan that's going to California. Governor says eight to twelve weeks I don't know before people. What Gavin Newsom as fuck and talking about because Gavin newsom would have to explain to me how he's to keep the economy from literally because he's a fucking dummy like I this kind of stuff that drives me crazy your fan. He's a good looking dude. He's got long span plum. Jack He makes that one he does. That makes me angry rate one. It makes me very angry. I'm a white guy. Go take him and Gavin Newsom Plum Jack. Fuck that you see the best looking governor. Probably he's a good guy ladies man bilingual problem with him. Yeah he's sitting there. Yeah Yeah career politician custom he does look like the looks like yeah he looks. He's he's the movie version. The plot. Jack Winery Yeah got damaged and you enjoy that one. It's a very good wine. You're welcome. It's a very good but I do think you need to plan that whole thing like every Epidemiologist says when you talk to them like plan for the worst and hope for the best like A. It's going to be fine yeah Yeah I think you have to. That's true so so eight to twelve weeks. That sounds like an eternity. It does but I think twelve weeks is unrealistic it also. I think it's unrealistic as well. But we're all kind of guessing here but the the fact that we can spare a trillion dollars or whatever it is. I was hoping that. Who Truly we're doing. Great that's a thousand billion. That's a thousand billion. It's two thousand billion dollars but we. I don't think any of us were questioning. How many million. That's two thousand billion dollars. How many millions is a billion? How many millions a thousand million man? So there you go. How many ten thousand all right man? I don't know man. This is getting a little crazy. Now I'm just I'm I'm reducing the number anyway so in conclusion we've figured it out wait I just I. The country is obviously dealt with. When I hear people like it's scary. We're all hunkered down. We're not touching each other that much and but great grandparents there was two world wars. Yes and a huge depression. Yes and how about h? One came out with that. What yeah or SARS. Yeah do you remember. You're in lockdown but each one one or SARS h. m. when killed strangely unprecedented but and this is truly novel because the ever seen it might have been engineered. There is evidence that nobody they see the clouds for the rain. In the last two weeks a disrespect. Pull God dammit choice Joe. You're trying to Alphabrain right all right. Fuck man he's run big Duffy. Yeah you can't do that with your feet because you're clearly trying to one up here on a here the how it was all playing. Well he's e and there was evidence. I didn't say that I'm just saying that people D- yeah I may know some people all right. Scientists who are noticing that it does look different. Can you give us the name of that? Scientists could have escaped from the Wuhan it could have escaped from the Wuhan Labrador. Backup Wuhan twice to say it. Even as if you knew how it's pronounced because I speak different languages like like the ones that were depending on where I've been. I am pretty perform language. Do they speak an will haunt speak. What what are they speak talent? What he's saying so quietly saying slightly different way. It seems like to hide the way your shish he told me he is it racist to call collect call it mannered from Dan. He's like death. Mandarin is language. Mandarin is the mainland. Mandarin is the main form of Chinese spoken in the main. Why didn't you visit Mandarin in a certain way that you've been saying the other Mary? I'm marrying him. I see but you insane. These is spoken in Hong Kong two different a lot of different dialects but mandarin for the most part because the young and the Yellow River. It kept people speaking the same Yangtze and the Yellow River. It's not the same river two rivers. It's called yellow in Chinese and the other one's just called the yellow because it depends on me as you're talking about the Yellow River in China and bring it up. Bring up the fucking. Yeah bring up. The Racists River believe river. Don't you think trump's reelected if he pulls pull this out? I think it's a very interesting time and I think yes uh-huh right. Yeah that's the Yellow River. I should is yellow hall okay swimming. That's the principal river and in the basement and the Yangtze River. You have you have the difference. Okay I Apologize Fan. Right and I knew because you're you're so small and these chairs I go. He can't know this thing that's small. He's a young person. But then you're older and now see and so. I'm really sorry you've been. You gave me a you apologize. But then you insulted me twice so win oh just just the Yangtze and the yellow. Yes so Mandarin is the main language spoken okay. So it's not racist say Mandarin. No Mandarin is. Why would your dad say that when you Chinese you study Mandarin Chinese? I didn't say you if you study Chinese did you study influence but Oh yeah yeah well and what does that mean? I just said thank you and known Chinese world what John was out. That's F. That slang for dog talk to type of food can get it almost any okay in. Hong Kong Taiwan. What did they speak in session? Swooshing session Szechuan twenties. Who said that recently? I love when certain people like like. What the fuck did trump say? He's he's not articulate. He said it's less bad though. It's much less bad now. Very very bad but it's much less less bad Chinese virus. That was hilarious. Yeah he got a Lotta Shit for that. It's an interesting thing to talk about it. Did it did start in China. The puel was it. Where was an engineer on laboratory laboratory laboratory there is there is a bio lab there by a war lab there so they do make an engineer viruses. So which means that. Must've there's a. There's a theory among scientists that actually is considering dot looks different scientists. The one eight t okay. Well I'M NOT GOING TO NAME NAMES GLASSES. One it's classified. It's a good one John Stevens. John Stevenson John Patch Google. Why not because it's it's alias? Yeah it's probably probably yeah there you go. Yeah George Stevens by Donald Harry. Did he come up with some sort of Elixir? You're saying his work is what I'm saying. John Stevenson China and making forty eight. He's Corologis taunts. Tv's if I could get a wider name okay. So I would say great guests. Yeah thank you so okay. So then you. You're saying from this lab that you're saying it's a thirty where they created this right out actually no well so so my sister so weird thing to say because my parents live in Park City Utah and they're actually friends with scientists who are not only working on this who are viral virologist actually know something but they're actually staying at the house they were there some interesting to house scientist in. Your Dad's House Show Hospital Utah. Hostile for high near beaver scientists. Call my dad and asked him on. This series is full shit as you ought to see this. Let's say this. Watch my dad. All that on he lives in Park City Utah and scientists. Stay at this Airbnb of your parents. Yeah and not. Their house was now. What's Your Dad's name Mike? Atolicy six huge six for three hundred pounds by two fifty two full bullshits. Mike How do you well? I'm sitting here in the car with your mother. Same one mother food to be delivered. I sing How is up how? How is your stock portfolio looking? Well less as I can't complain it was up a quarter million dollars each day Today the market came off somewhat from its a level of because Pelosi and Bernie Sanders got into the act on this bill again. I mean at least I understand from a- from a textile received powder something was I don't believe what I read because it said that Bernie put a hold Birdie is one senator and doesn't have the authority or power to put a hold on anything he gets one. Vote let me you this. What is what is is anti Dan. I'm doing my podcast. My friend Joe Mikhail's probably GONNA ask some questions. He's a friend of mine comic. Now let me ask you this AMAC. Is there any evidence that the that the CO vid nineteen? I know you have some scientists staying with you guys at the House. Is that true or false one scientists once I signed. That's what kind of what kind of epidemiologist all right. And then and factious. She's tonic very obey. Split every category into subcategories interesting to see rain is a chronic disease epidemiologist mandy nothing to allay person but it makes a difference so so it it is so did they mention or is there any talk about the virus may be having been engineered in a lab and not being maybe more manmade than it is nature made. No I don't believe the I think that's the kind of conspiracy theory that you'll always run into another world day soon. News actually had a report this Koreans created spread it around because they want trump to lose interesting by the way on that subject. A LITTLE. Bit Off of your question There were Gallup poll. Came Out Yesterday showed sixty percent approval flow with the way trump is handling us and is a forty nine percent and this is coming from a man who doesn't who's not a fan of trump's naive. I else fan of facts and I. I've got the like science a lot as opposed to see. I think we have a lot of media and everybody has to write their headline right there. Story they all have to have Something to fill the twenty four seven news cycle and now there are an endless number of So I feel sorry for him but I get over it I managed to get past my sympathy. And so he's got a discount so much of what your eerie one thing. I heard which would be very very good to dealers they. Andrew had a press conference. And I've never been a fan of his ear but he had a press conference Yeah I think it was this morning and I listened to the whole hour talking. About New York's cases what they're doing how they're dealing with a lack of ventilators how they're dealing little lack of hospital beds and they're a rate of infection is coming down a little as three. He says not all bad news and the New York is fifteen times worse than the next state closest to it which is really kind of interesting and the reason is now that makes sense because they orcas more global than any other. Okay I'M GONNA have to get back to the podcast but I appreciate. I appreciate the insight. Know How can we fix the economy? Go guys I'll call you guys. Later for more info shop opening it up and over under we opened back up in two weeks or not now all right. I don't think you've got you've got a consensus on that. All right all right bell sealer talk to you. What is that well there? It is lazy longevity a hand and body cream. Yeah Fun doing so. Obviously it hasn't been engineered. I thought maybe there was some about that. No scientist yeah. There's all sorts ermal. Yeah well how? `Bout that? We believe in conspiracies. I don't thank you read the book you'll believe in any JFK. Now that I'm right with the moon none of that. No nothing September eleventh. Now here's why now none of that do you need anytime that thought enters your brain. You need to call a flower. That thought you need to scrunch it up and beat it up. Beat the shit out of it because whenever I hear like There's one of them is the The Rothschild family controls all the government and I was like. Oh yeah it's an anti Semitic when I go to the totally antisemitic was like when I go to the DMV. It sucks and what can they can barely. They're doing a terrible job. Yeah and conspiracies are hard enough to keep a secret between two people and they're hard enough to camp between A thousand see I think they loose lips sink. Ships was all through Yeah was like. Do not tell anybody where we're going. Don't go to a BAR I. It's so hard to keep a secret about anything. So the Fuckin- staged moon landing. I mean that's living ally rugged Clinton said if you were able to thousand people keep their mouth shut and and still yes. I I mean that would be the greatest feat and human the government and people. Don't behave that way. And I'll tell you something about the federal government they all have their agendas and everybody's backstabbing each other. Thank God but what about Aliens Go? I haven't seen any proof of them believing them well. I don't I believe absolutely. There are other living things around our universe. It'd be way too vast vast for that not to be happening. That the coincidence and of of other planets being able to sustain life is absolutely. The percentages are very good for that. Have you seen like some of the tape like some of the pilots in the Air Force where the recording this now when I see stuff like that I'm like well? That's a real thing and that makes me go okay. That's an actual their things. You can't explain but it doesn't mean that was the same thing when people like there's there's chem trails and I was like what chemicals. Why would they do this? My favorite sins that come out of your body. Well we gotta sweat the toxins out and they asked all these people who run these detox and they were like and it's true that doctor you can detox for your liver and so when you you've been an alcoholic there's ways to detox. There's ways to get heavy metal out of your body but but for the most part when they talk about detox when you talk about being detained and they'll asked all these I kind of like healers and these people. What are the toxin named them if you could name the TACO right and they go conspiracy theories more of its John. Stupendous way to go like this. One hundred percent natural. Well everything is that's exactly. It true toxin would be toxic to your body. If you ingested diesel fuel you would truly have so that said so when I hear people go the earth is flat which is a whole thing when when I hear people say like well are the they'll say stuff like And I'll be like well. How do you explain that as well haven't seen that and I go like? Have you been to Tokyo how do you know what exists? How do you know Jerome Exists? How do you know Mercedes is so? It's just so it's on your skin and eating a hole in your fucking plates. I ate more people want their missing something from their lives and they want to have a knowledge or they also want to be part of a. Yes trolls on the Internet. But it's also like you only knew you're the conspiracy that the government's against them or just your the government is a huge messy place. Every government is it's always a mess and the simplest explanation is usually the right one. Which is everyone's backstabbing and doing some of my JFK assassination. Here we go. You're not again. Just watch the first ten minutes of full metal jacket and they'll be like I was marine. Who was a darn good shot and and why he did have a good shot though all right so I've been I've been hard. Shot to me having shot dear person and I also shotgun. There's I mean that's why the onion was so funny when in our dumb century when it was like Kennedy assassinated from twenty-five different angles and then it just listed everybody who was a teamsters Have you looked into it though I? It's it's interesting we can see. How if you are a person. Who believes in conspiracies out super easy to come to a few conclusions? I. It's the same. No no nothing now. I got a suspect and these things come out eventually. I mean eventually even even with trump because we have all these files on JFK goes. There's a portion. I can't release because it would create some sort of pandemic among there. There's an interesting thing I will say. No not paying. The one thing that I think is suspect. The one thing that does raise my prick Myers a little bit. Is that when Jack Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald? And he was a mob guy and they let any shot to the police yet. He shot him and we don't know why and he died of cancer in jail so there was something going on. I don't doubt wouldn't try to kill Lee Harvey Oswald unless there was a reason. But then what about what about this about? This car really hammered. My name in the end of that. Joel Joel will be how about the car. Usually if there's a murder they take it in for forensic stuff like that you know. They cleaned it out and then returned it. Yeah there's a lot of things that okay maybe. You're you're not giving enough credit to either human stupidity. That's what I was GonNa say and you might be right. So you're saying there's a lot of mishaps are you if you try finding a any case criminal case where they didn't screw up something on both sides and a you'd it's also people want to believe a certain thing right so they go for that so find it. You'll find if you're looking for that sort of exact what about Epstein that. I do not doubt that those cops were in jail. I don't think he was killed. I think he absolutely ready. I believe he was absolutely ready to hang on to I don't know why. Why would you get your position and hearing stories about negligence of You know the time. Yeah I mean just watch lock. Well it's not just that like one of these my my father. Who's eighty one? Six almost eighty said WHO's worked. Govern government had a lot of friends in government says. Yeah one of these is this. You'll go and anybody who I know who works in government. They're way more apt to say. Well there's huge incompetence in the government. It's not it's not a well run place there are. There are major mishaps major floods. There's all kinds of backstabbing. That's what's actually going on for the most part so the cabal of men who are organized enough to set things in motion and everything goes according to plan is Hollywood shit. It's really hard to do. It's just people don't cooperate. Things go wrong so for me. It's not that I don't think that people would want would be conspiratorially minded if they could but for me. I think it's just too hard to pull off. I don't think those things are EA- as easy to pull off his people. There's very good book called conspiracy conspiracy. It's called conspiracy conspiracy about the take down of Gawker the website. Yeah it's one of the whole consortium. Yes and it's a great book and when you they go over. It's so great because almost half the book. Here's how can real conspiracy goes down and they talk about when Peter Thiel expanded to two people and then two three people. All of a sudden things are getting real. It can all it. It's getting very tense on whether this secret of what they're doing gets out. But that's a true conspiracy because because Peter Thiel one or two essentially sue them until they out of existence that guy had the Pentagon had had outed outed him as a gay man. He's a billionaire and you went. I don't care what it takes. I'M GONNA take them down and I'm GONNA find a way to do it without anybody. Knowing the book conspiracy. He used Hulk. Oh Conspiracy Gabe Hall. Kids just called conspiracy. But I don't WanNA NAM NAM leading up but it was very convenient that the whole thing went down that that started happening like he took that it wasn't the. Oh that's an opportunity to exploit to to Take to take them down great. It's a great book and It's have you read a book called give and take no I'M GONNA START RECOMMENDING BOOKS. I it was apple book. The two thousand seventeen I think by Adam grant really good book. Now do you. Are you a reader? I am wildly dyslexic. So I've read nothing but I listened to everything. Listen ON TAPE. Yes and right now. I feel like when I listen to books on tape. I don't get as much knowledge. Fired action practice. I used to be the same way and then I practiced now. I have to sweat listening. Yeah because what happens is your mind wanders you're driving and stuff podcast L. I glean so much more from listening than reading. Now I do I'm just reading all the Jack reacher books now so oh which are great But conspiracy is definitely I would. I would recommend it and the battle the beautiful poetry of John. Toyland pages giving give and take us Really fucking good book about. He kinda like talks about how there are. Three people in the world are takers. They're givers and then there are matters. So I'll give you as long as you give me that kind of stuff and he makes it very very compelling case for in Politics Hollywood everywhere including business people had give but give strategically people are who are worth it not just giving idiots but and people who are generous over the long period over the long haul always come out on top is a really really powerful book in that sense. He does a really good job. I and people who take takers scumbags whoever they might be with them it catches up with them. Because and and what happens is when you're a giver. There's there's you could make the argument that people start to really like you and they conspire to help you. When you take what happens is people go fucked you over to and it becomes his naturally. Annette neural a web of people who go guys a Dick Things just nath. Yeah and you'll have those comics. Though go of course lights I would also say when like the me too thing came up and the people who knew that people were Dick's they could not be happier to go. Oh that guy. Oh yeah just guys a piece of shit and it happens all the time with movie stars who get out of Control. And then they find bad. Move on flop. And they're like you're out that's it. Yes does they dare. I'd get it out trying to trying to confer reason right and did you do. This isn't a conspiracy where me too thing but Maybe a little bit. But there's that calm I forget his name Derrick Post and was really close with them But he was a he was a Christian comic really really clean. But I'm selling fear huge theater. Successful comic is got caught with a side piece was married got caught the side piece. So the you know the Christian communities like Oh hell no his entire tour for two hundred twenty and granted. We didn't go but it also got pulled Kennison Kidding Poor Guy Russell sin so his entire tore everything can't doing in Lebanon fucking. Forgive man well yes. That's a really good one. Oh so you what you do. Is You have to run happen Japan. He will do classic. I'm going to go to Rehab Rehab. For some reason and he'll he will be super sorry for a year. Here's what he did he he girls would ask for tickets and I can't get too hot. Girl asked for tickets like tickets but let's hang out afterwards you know. I'm it. Sounds like he's got something. He's a normal there. It is sexual sin and addiction struggles. And so he's going to go into Rehab. Which is a classic move and about four weeks you get out repet- get back on tour dude. I mean he'll he'll have to repent and then he'll go back to doing things for or maybe just or maybe just go. Hey Chris Community. I'm going out on my own. I'M GONNA start forming centers. That's what I would do. Well drafted towards the end. I mean to got to look at to Jesus hung out with. He hung out with prostitutes young with all the centers on the Christian American thing where they've been how they it's very strange talking about sex. It's a puritanical but it's also like you must be perfect. Which is ironic since the crowd was. Oh no no. Everyone's fucked up Dan. That's that's how it is such a bummer. I feel for that. Yeah I know it. It's it's well he all but he created this whatever He created the also helped stoke the image probably of. Yeah yes guys. I go to church I have to tell you. Do you believe in that stuff really. That's but do you. Would you would say my act is definitely not You got your Christian or what are you so you believe in that but not conspiracy is what I think. Y- Yes but I don't believe Shannon conspiracy or Islam or these are that you can metaphor. You can use that. Jesus was you know. Dieting came back for it but seriously or is that just a faith I would say he said drinking a little bit ridiculous to believe that. Not believe in some this other thing because if you believe that the house at any different than believing in zombies well 'cause zombies me my belief in terms of like there's faith which is saying yes. Yes I think the value of having a perfect man Christ right would be that if you can see what the example perfect example is and you as a human being knowing that you're flawed can reach for it and try to emulate it as best you can that that to me is what the symbol of. Christ the one another thing radical whole thing would be like the more you give the more you can also loving. Turn the other cheek and love. Your enemy is a radical content. That never been really. I think there's some great lessons can learn from the Bible. I think with a believe it you know by pay fundamentalists do of course. I mean when people took it as a science book. It's not. Yeah Yeah but you could in theory say those. I like I there was nothing there was light. You could be like. Yeah that was the Big Bang for you can use medicine use that as a great met metaphor people have people have found the Christian Bible the Jewish Bible the the the Islamic the Koran They've found great value in them when they treat them hundred percents You know when they treat them as metaphor for how to live your life. There are a lot of great lessons. It seems just the idea of restriction of self restriction. You know kind of like having command of your appetite sort of have a blueprint of how to live your commandments. Don't kill people. Don't walk across the street and Bang your neighbors. Why don't like some trouble? You could create a society based on those things it saves it be re running. You know it wouldn't be any and that said Yeah I think a lot of people would say that people having fade sounds crazy and all that and I was like yeah. It sounds pretty crazy crazy. And I'm on a judge and you know John. Even that is as great as bleeding conspiracy theories. Oh I disagree with that concerning because I think there's very good evidence that we landed on the moon. Yeah I think that's not staged and what I'm saying is there's no evidence that Jesus came back from the dead dare is no evidence right. There's zero But there's very good evidence. We walked on the moon. So but that's one conspiracy theory. Well I think the earth isn't flat. Yeah very good evidence. There's no sasquatch very good evidence that that's not a chem trail that's just a concession vapor that's made from jet going through the atmosphere no. I think I think what Brennan Things. Yeah. I think there's inconsistency when the fundamental tenet of being a Christian is the idea that you accept the fact that Christ was man and there was a person but he was father and son. You raise three days later. His body was seen by Mary and her friends are whoever and some other people and Cuma my rib. Well that's that's that's that's Adam and eve that's in the Bible. That's yeah that's right. Yeah there would be justice. Yeah but that's in the Bible you came from. I read right right right and then I fucking so what we've learned. Is that that Guy. Frist who I'm Chris Ida to stay in that. I just thought that was crazy when Dirk was telling me about. I'm like what the fuck he lost. All his basically his entire family look at a lot of the traditional especially fundamentalist Christians. If if like a mega preacher comes out and says I think it's fine for gay people to be married and it's good. They'll lose their entire. How ridiculous is that? That's ridiculous. It's so ridiculous It's tiny western. Replaces John with? Who are Chris well? He's been doing his Sunday service thing you know and I hike and they're so loud. It's so loud yet. Allow Wow Thandi. Wes replaced on shitting me. Do Nineteen December. It's also ironic. Because I mean you look at someone like Connie who's who's had a center center but then once you once you commit in that in that in that world that culture and then I'm like Oh everything's fine you wanted. But he'll Chris will come back after he's made his big huge pies made probably a thousand apologies now but after his resembling bottle of booze but a- but he'll be I guarantee in a year he'll be back and too because if he had said if he win with that woman and left his wife that would probably throw. But he's he he he. I was lost now. I'm found. That's what'll happen. Which is a long. It's a weird to dive. Yeah I mean the question your faith will. I'm saying I'd no point. Do I feel that? No no but see I. I absolutely see your point. But he's not going to help according to the Bible aren't on a height restriction or if you're taller than certain thing you're fine when I first came to Alaska in those Bible studies the to this with my buddy who's balls deep in the Bible and Jesus Christ and I remember that we all deepen Jesus accounted for us that man credit you back the So I go. So what happens if you don't like give yourself to Jesus corn you're you're going to hell. I know but my dad my brother to the nicest most people I know in my mom and they don't believe in. Jesus Christ sucks dude. They're going to hell like Oh. I'm not doing this anymore. Yeah I'm out now a fucking crazy crazy crazy. That's crazy dive when I hear stuff like that. I'm like you gotta be kidding me nuts. That's stopped going. Yep they still friends with that guy. Yeah we're cool even though he thinks you're going to hell. Yeah we're cool. Yeah that's what he was raised on. That's his beliefs. And like I get it. Do you know we were all raised. I was raised Roman Catholic. But I don't believe in the pope So you can make those decisions but God. I was raised with no religion. Even though I'm Catholic Roman Catholic now I was an altar boy. You're you're you're in it but I wasn't in any of it. I thought it was all I didn't like any of that stuff. Grown up. Yeah. My Dad went to the seminary now. He couldn't be more of an atheist. What happens when you die goes extinction? Aren't you go to church with if I didn't if I didn't believe Like if I wasn't like a Christian I would definitely be an atheist. Yeah absolutely would. Was it the agnostic? What's the that's where you believe in a higher being? But you don't believe in like I. I believe I believe no. That's where you're just like I don't WanNa think it back. That's what I am. I going on going on figured out. I believe this I. I think there's definitely a higher intelligence a higher definition from me to you. You said you did. Which would be a deity is a god but a. d. d. would be somebody who believes that? God made the world and just let it go and his his it supreme being goes to to it's I created who does not intervene in the university up chiefly and he let it call He. Just let it go. You know. He's a thing that I made this an agnostic. So is someone who doesn't who who says I don't know essentially somebody who's like I'm not going to not going to say no I. I prefer to be sort of on the fence. There of I'm agnostic. Switzerland I yeah but but a DAS. To someone who believes in God and that God created the world but does not interfere in daily life. So let's have there are laws to the universe. He set those laws in place and go and so the earth continue to spend according to its own so there are laws of nature. There are laws of a lot for someone like yourself been around. Awhile Dude. Been around you me. Yeah Forty Eight. Oh Wow are you a good in the room. I'm the youngest in the room. Oh No cats. The young is clearly. She's three fifty three fifty three thirty seven. Forty two forty three I would. I'm not being Shitty Chin. I'd say he looks young. Yeah I don't I thought you were like well. I thought you and I are similar age. Yeah he's got tight skin but I'll tell you something but wine really breaks down now that after you hit about fifty fifty one you start to age quicker. I swear to God the difference between fifty and fifty three. Where like this trainer who's been around forever and I said my don't be sprinting and stuff. Your tendons are fifty. I was like I noticed that I noticed that. My fucking cavs on my tendons hurt more. Sprinting right yeah why would you spread? I don't know who told you not to sprint on Tono now. You should sprint chased. Three so like zombies. I hated squatting right now I hate squats and then I'm like I'm not good at them. Would you do in college getting old? I did a lot of squatting a you did the same thing and then I was like you know what? I'm just GonNa Squat every day and I'm and I'M GONNA dead lift every other. I'm just GonNa Start and 'cause I couldn't my back was bad and I couldn't dead lift. Forty five pounds and I couldn't deadlocked the bar and then I was like screw it. I'm doing it every day until I don't even think about it and I stopped running as well. It was like It's hard on your body and I was like no. I'm just going to do it and strongly you do that so now. I can dead lift more than I did in college practically I well thank you for asking wrapped with like three fifteen and then I can go up. I can get up till like four but I don't do a lot of way ever sure you were the trap or you're doing the street bar. Straight Bar Dank. You'll do four hundred right now for wraps. And that's his warmup for not joking four dead lifting. Oh that's that's a lie. He laughs at that. I watched him do ready for four hundred. I saw this. Yeah five fifty five fifty five five hundred five hundred five fifty ready. Yeah he did ten ten reps hold on. He did ten fifty now ready. He didn't ten sets. He did a hundred reps with five hundred fifty pounds. Joel or dad lift and he did. This is my watch lifting Dick Jokes now. It doesn't help. I was like Oh my God and that his brother told me that when Brennan was really dead lifting when he was like dead lifting over seven hundred pounds the bar would bend he was bending the bars hero and they were mad at Brennan because he was bending the bars. He's there's as and ruining Bar Lauren. Landau said this strong. And then there's Brennan Shop. Yeah that's that's That's a God given weird. That's what you should believe in God. It's weird gifts because he's a piece of shit and he just thinks that that wasn't God. A lot of hard work has been where he offered up. How many of your How many of your friends like the big. The great athletes. How many could do that? I don't know let's go with zero zero zero zero Turkish get up with the full barbell with hundred and fifty five pounds Turks. Get up just got up to stood up without like holding it like that do this. This is video video. Do thirty pull ups when he was there with Tim? Tebow fifteen upbeat deal. Hey Tibo when he's already. I would beat him in Polish that he would beat me anything legs. Yeah he was his legs are so and I said to him. I go Brennan stronger than you. Because he's competitive. As he goes he goes. I mean when it comes to legs. I'll give them that. Beat him though. You beat her upper body. Yeah pull up yeah. I met him once and I couldn't believe how big was Jesus. Gronk is smaller than him. He's a big Tim. Tim's a free grants of Freak athletically. Obviously Tim Psych his. I mean his workout coldly. Well I've ever met my life whether it's UFC NFL. This nobody more disciplined and Tim Tebow Kito Diet. Oh my God. He's like he's like he's like how much better you could be. You know he's he's he's he's already do if he saw us. He's never had a drink in his life. I don't think right now he did want. I think what maybe once I. I don't know that do you know he's he's the real deal. He's a Susan real deal. Greedy Nice I love. You just got married. He did die in peace south up. Miss South Africa's in price. Yeah he's a good guy no I when I plot to his black girl just kidding like. Oh can't believe he believed Emily Peter's she's how tall when I met. Jj Watt one time. And I was like okay this guy. He's three hundred pounds though. That was like this guy. Can this guy is not tim? Jimmy's wife congratulations stemming. The busing. Kids out like crazy three have seventeen kids. Yes he's raring to go. He's like What's his name. He just got traded to the colts. The Philip Rivers. Yeah like how many kids did his his eleven kids or something like that. Poor woman is he. He's more magin. Every time he gets near. The House. Wife must be like tied volume. Comes DAD definitely getting pregnant in the next many kids he has? That's fucking routes that I would love. That is so impressive. Holy Shit my aunt had ten kids. My Dad's one of I think. Eleven or twelve and nightmare chilling advocate as the just do it. Sweater is just pointing to his. His wife is amazing. Well done young lady nine there. Yeah that's up to ten pit. Yeah I think she's actually giving birth to twins he's a bad ass I love. I love that. He's constantly just annoyed. Yes and just talking to shift. So he's just Gonna. I'd love his attitude that he he doesn't hide it. Did you hear So off the whole in San Diego and they castle look small. I moved to L. A. He didn't WanNa move his kids so he left all of them there. They built one of those sprinter buses so he would commute everyday when that practice and the Games from San Diego to La. Been THAT SPRINTER bus. He had a whole setup. So you just watch hours and hours of tape in this so you get to the game be ready. Got Good make sense just such. He is a stuntman. He's Matt Big Guy by the way. He's fucking huge. How big is? Jj Watt compare your your quarterback Russell. Yes you love him love him. He's so underrated. I feel lert well. He's everyone always goes. Oh He's not that big. He's not that. Have you seen the legs on that? Leads to shoot Russell. Wilson was on when I had the Netflix. Show thank you. I watched the clapping. All right man. No one right. The netflix show is tough. Because Netflix isn't it's not like a regular TV station. So here's what listen. Here's what I'll tell no daily show based on Netflix. Right but it but no but he first of all. He came into the sketch and he accidentally left his Sweatpants Oh and they were like the legs. They were triple X. But like the waste was taken in but his legs were. It's hard to tell there you can see how thick is right there. Show him running right there. He's short though. Let's not listen. He's he's a quarterback you short for quarterback you yet for quarterback but it doesn't seem to matter. I mean look at drew brees. He's superstar Russell. Wilson might be the best quarterback in the NFL but people always underestimate him and huge arms Yup at the You can all his also his twitchy muscle thing. Yeah I mean you can be super strong but his twitchy muscle when you see him. Make the decision to run with the ball instead of throw it. He didn't have a lot of help either. Mvp I Johnson. And then Lamar Jackson so stupid that they give MVP or the playoffs. That's really was. He accused them be made to help and they almost made it. I now is the we should have beaten the forty niners at home when Marshawn Lynch that delay okay. I'll stop talking about anyway. That said Yeah. He's such a I like when he goes hip hop Russell. Wilson have seen that not only call. Sexy just doesn't really fit his demeanor. It's like awkward in the pictures as one of these. No I mean looks pretty swaggie there. He's also a guy that yeah that's right there. Yes this is growing up like no. He's also one of those guys that doesn't take a drink doesn't mean so crazily disciplined you commitment to superstition like you don't WanNa fuck anything up. No they're so disciplined. Yeah they don't they don't have dental. It's hard job. There's so much pressure on being that's how I feel and then I hear that Cork come out of the bottle and I'm like yeah. We got to obviously sweet. Yeah I wish I had. His girl is a fucking Tennessee. Have you seen her in prison? Sure haven't show on Netflix. It's a tough. Oh well gay plan will stay. Of course they I. We were one of the first to go like are. We're going to do this thing and I was always going like I know this sounds like I'm just trying to take your money but you need to leave us on for a long time because you did you sell the show net flix. Yeah a look there. We are but no. I was just like any other talk show. You need to leave this thing on for a long time to find an audience and I was like An. It's harder with with It's harder with this streaming service. Because that's how you know. They were like yeah. Sure Buddy Were were the the most accessible company next to Amazon or whatever But it doesn't work like that but no but so they did. I want of course I was like just leave it on to have people find and That obviously wasn't part of what's weird is then. They doubled down because they did you. This in similar show Michelle off. Yup It was just like these aren't GonNa work because it's not well that's why they had to career in my mind. I like do you need to create the The you need to create the atmosphere where people would go to what every week where they go. So why with like when James Gordon I got on people like who is this guy. Nobody knows them. And Les Moonves says what a Guy He Business Wise and business wise. He was very smart around your girl. There's all that other stuff. Yeah the part where he was masturbating in front of his own doctor. If that's not Recommended yes that's what he and that's one of the people that well she was. Yeah and she. He was jerking off in the in the in the doctor's office and she walked in and you'll have problem and he was like I really do back. That was part of the dialogue which was just like how she was what happened. What happened with all of that? The everybody off and just go quietly into the night losses gig but he got paid off like two hundred Mil. It was. Yeah he was. His wife was a smoke show. Too and she's she's on big brother as Continues to be Very Nice Asian. But she's off the Jewish. She's off the talk. But what am I going back to o? James Corden came on. He was just like yeah. Don't worry people we don't know who he is. We don't know if he's GonNa last. He's like don't worry about it. I'M GONNA leave him on for a year out and let them figure it out and get his and then he did. Carpool Karaoke and it exploded. But it's one of those things where you wow. When Conan I went on? They gave him a year and a he encountered will tell you like they were always like you gotta be more. They were giving him notes obviously Conan very smartly stuck to his guns and now he's Legend Ken But But you gotta let that stuff. I mean like with when I I did the soup. Nobody watched it for a year. But because we ticked up like two point zero Ratings point the point edge just barely anything on that night like Cost Nothing. Let's just leave it on. And then all of a sudden we found the show your idea or did you audition for that. Because a show would they started bringing people in two thousand and four to go if we were to bring back the show in a certain way. What D- How would you do it? And so I know that brought it had me do a I was so dyslexic that they had okay. You're GonNa read these jokes that I wrote with my for these. These writers that I'm the guys that gave me the sword And we re these jokes got written and I had to memorize it because it was so bad that bad at five minutes of like you you just. You're you've always been that dyslexic so yet can't beat a stand up. Comic probably helped you. Because I wasn't a stand up then. Oh you weren't torn now. Stand up two thousand five. When the show began to work a year later he went on his agent was like Oh you gotta go out and you got to. You got to go. You'RE GONNA make a bunch of money because people know who you are and you just bring your comic friends with you. You don't know if you've ever remember me meeting you longtime ago in a clothing store and I came up to fan fan. I don't remember. Maybe we were told you America agresson somewhere else and I said I'm a fan. Sir Thank you and I said What are you doing stand up because I thought yes we totally did? Yes I said you should. I think you said you were starting to or something trying and was I eating it. Well I mean stand up like anything. I don't get the fuck how funny you are until you have an act. It's a you eat chick. Yes it takes a while. It's a different thing. Well it was weird. 'cause I had this weird defy had started when people didn't know I was on the show. I would have eaten shit for in a good way where I was like. Oh that's not funny. But because they liked the soup they like they were like. Hey It's great and I was like Oh and then so then I'd do it in front of a crowd that didn't know the show and they'd be like this is the worst. This is worse than the Holocaust PA and so I really to It took me and after doing You know two thousand shows then. Finally I was like took me long because sometimes talk shows that. Come on to stand up and I was like I talk a lot about television clips. I don't think it's going to necessarily translate but now I've way better than I will confidently say way better than it's all fucking like hard. I'm trying to tour now. Yeah A ton. Yeah I do. I now need because I did this special. I need to start over and would you do the special at San Jose in that Chaplin tie very very old theater? What's IT called Live from Pyongyang which? I don't think anybody's watch very good and I went on the Kelly Ryan show and I told Kelly the title and she goes you know. No one's GonNa know what that is and I was like. Yeah you're right very good. I like thanks for the money. But the number of people you'd be at the number of people that said. How did you do a show in North Korea and I was like I didn't? How do you think that would be possible? I would be shot. Yeah it would be in jail. Come let me do a comedy show in front of a bunch of people who don't speaking. I mean colors impossible yet so I don't think it did very well but you know it's coming with company dynamics as well very nice people yes What was the name of yours? Mine was called complicated apes that was I wanted to call it American Boehner. But he's too much. I like American. About what is your. What was your dad? Think of American bone Well he probably wouldn't have listened to how old you dead almost eighty. Yeah is he proud? I think he is yeah. Your Dad Proud Warriors. Yeah Your Dad's proud. I don't Know My dad's property me you don't know I don't know I've hazard out of her said. Hey His dad his dad is not going to be his dad's not a guy who's like great job rented but his dad's quietly very proud. It's Dad's a very present man in his life and always has he doesn't say you're GONNA get a real job. He doesn't say he's my house he's in. Your House leasees my house. He's like well whatever. You're doing works. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah I once told just lip to my dad. He somehow came up how much I was making. At a certain point. They have no clue. Yeah and then you. Then then. I saw some cousins like a month later. And they're like hey we're here. You're making started telling his brother okay. Yeah Yeah I'm glad some current events Jin sure current events. Yes we already talked about. We would your life change if I give you one hundred million dollars Well RIGHT BY MORE STAKES YEAR BY A LOT. More stuff One hundred million. Yeah no it would free berry significant in what sense Follow Ron Renzo example with donations. Finish your thought. No this is a really in what in that? It would be a lot more money that I have. Would you buy a different house? Would you move to different area more car? Would you day to day? You're successful dude. So it's like one hundred dollars wouldn't change houses no I definitely get a nineteen sixty. Six oldsmobile Tornado K. That's twenty grant but then I put like a sure so Boy No. I'd buy buy another house. Atl Okay. down concede that thing because with that car so far. I'm not impressed. You can do both of those things. Ryan's actually twenty six grand. So you'll get your right. I can do both things right for sale. Just asked you how change okay. I mean you could fly a lot more privately. That's right now I would be spending. I'd be spending money on private. I'd be flying travel. But even that's what That rich who donate Oklahoma state the billionaire the fucking billionnaire though CL- buffet. Now that's what they asked him about it he he is my life. It really didn't change Drove buys house when I was in Nebraska. Yeah in Omaha. I drove is out and we stopped. And you can't park there that's it but it's a very blessed. I did not. I did not dry guy was driving around showed us. We just took us by Warren Buffett's house because you want to see their legend. Yeah he's ninety years old. I did like it when you know. Like trump wouldn't riviera never came back from real his tax records and then he buffalo. You haven't seen any did above releases taxes to- right while he's being audited by the way. How's your stupid That's a lot of money I would. Yeah would you we definitely? I'm like you guys. It sounds like I'm like Ocd WORKAHOLIC WHO? I can't stop no matter how much they pay. I'd say that will always will hold onto those handlebars with white knuckles. Where's that coming from? Where do you think that comes from? But don't you think that's why we're kind of our stance on the corona virus back by Easter? Let's fuck into it and then I know some people chilling puck in worse. I'm afraid debris I'm afraid of the. Yeah I know I wanNA keep this going man I I mean I just WanNa fuck. I want to get back to where I wanted to stand up and come on Man. We all yes. I think that's why that's our perspective. We all know you're here doing this though right now and you're not worried about I mean. Obviously everyone's been washing the hell out of themselves but But this while you're doing podcasts. And doing everything else that you can because we were given that I don't know what it is that. What is that hair up our asses? I've always had a chance in our pants. Dads I might come from the fact that you know what you're capable of doing and you wanted to be able to do before you die out. I just saw I also really enjoy it. I love to work like it's my passion. It's not it's not to me this but what's the note? Let me ask you this the feeling you get from that though right so this House faction happiness but let me ask you this in when you are a walk in walked on at Washington right retrieved shit. Did you get a chip on your shoulder from that to come over to entertainment? No I of that. I know that was I always. I never thought I was going to be a good football player. Try always lie. I was like I just want to do like Rudy. Yeah I was like I'm GonNa. I'm GonNa Trauma I mean I'd gain. I got up to two hundred and forty five pounds and and I was I was like what am what's happening But that was more to see if I was more like Oh. This is strange challenge to that that I took up. No but I always knew that I was going to do something like this entertainment. Yes but I don't. I think this is a the the never gonNA stop working thing. Yeah it's an Anson the that's I think that's just again like if you can dead lift. Seven hundred pounds does nothing right. It does not do anything for but you're given that thing in I wouldn't you were stopped. You were born like that you were. There was never an option for you It was never in your wheelhouse to go. Well I mean I go to college and then get a Lotta agree in. That means. I'll get a decent job and I'll make this much money and all we're doing this for a long time correct. That was never an option. It's a great option. For A zillion people we all win. No no no. I'm going to stay on stage and take each it for years and That's something that and we don't care of. We didn't care about the torture of it now. I almost I remember one time. I was Patty Jenkins. We're in New York City and and I was a young comic and it was packed. David Twenty nine hundred was everything lit with candles lit with candles and as chaplain the small dachshund was going over. All I know and there were no vaccines but I'm Dave Chapelle been up and Some of the people in and I I was a new comic and I remember looking at Patty and I go thereabouts. Call me up and I get so nervous when you're young and you're GonNa do it for a fucking packed room. I just looked at her. I go hell of a way to try to make a living and she goes. You'll be fine and I remember going. Why am I doing this does moments ago? Why am I doing something this crazy? Why am I why am I? What is wrong with me? I hate myself this much that I have to prove myself that I have to get up on. He says it's Hey. Yeah no I agree with you. Or you're striving for something. Yes yes yes and yes. I just wanted to be different. I just wanted to be the person being talked about. As opposed to but that was nothing. That was nothing you ever learned. That was so that was always in you. But I remember as a kid watching Westerns and so I would see the gunslinger and the hero Neutron Street fighting and I would see the remember when the Barbara Guy would be who and he shut his window. He'd go shut the doors and lock in and be retreat inside and as a child I as a child I remember going. I'm never going to be that fucking. Do what the spectacles who's WHO's like. I want to be the dude in the street fighting. I remember I remember thinking that like whatever that was. I had to be the one doing the activity that people were talking. You saw Sweeney Todd and you realize oh wait markers are just action fucked up and it's murder. I know I but I I they. Yeah we yes soon as this thing lifts then. We're the only business where I get. Maybe it's not work. We're calling our agents going. So do you said you always going to happen? I remember I said you started doing. Stand up you're making a Lotta money. No I said I said you you were. I know you're nervous about it. I was nervous about it. Was like stand up as a crazy thing but I I said to. You let me ask you something. Go back all the when you were a kid. Have you found your way to the near top in anything you've ever did and I've never done anything in my life where I didn't find a way to get myself at least on that. Varsity team in one way or another right. Yeah but I just would figure it out. What do I have to do to get bad? Just don't WanNa be this and so that is a personnel perfectly. And you figure it out figure it out you know. Being dyslexic was terrible in school. So I'm just going to cheat I'm GONNA cheat through. I'M GONNA get great grades because I'm just GonNa Cheat whatever you gotta do so when I go to colleges and do standup how was your college. Experience cheated everywhere just taking. Oh yeah but it yes. So one hundred million dollars would it change your life. I don't think so at all less stressed. I say that I find something to worry about. I would find something health but as far as four hundred dollars gingers. I'd buy more cars more shoes. But no yeah. I mean that's the House that I WANNA by trade. If he charity I would give. I would give more figure out a way to get more. That's for sure what I would do. Good and that would that would come. I would when buying the I mean yeah now I do that now. I do that now. I have charities now no I mean I noticed the Guy Could Never. I already feel like I have too much money so I already have charities right. I don't see how I could do. Have one hundred million dollars then. Then I'd really. The guilt factor would be really through the roof. Yeah so I'd have to be like fucking I'd have to figure out it. Just be a headache. I think one hundred million dollars. I'd I'd tell my brother. Quit his job. My Mom. That's charity you're gonNA take care of. People might do that now. Yeah but but if I two hundred MIL it'd be way it just back. Oh no you. Here's this you stop doing everything. Yes but they all of your brother or whomever a million bucks and be like here take it and then two years later the my brothers make three million. He'd be like so would make your brothers and give some current events in current events. Here we go. What's happening okay. This all a freak out hot so a couple of days ago Ryan Reynolds made a statement that going to be donating thirty percent of all proceeds from gin which is his Liquor Company to out of work bartenders and Bryan Cranston and Aaron. Paul also did the same thing where they're saying that they're going to donate a portion of the proceeds from their brand. I believe it's dose hombres. They sell mess gals They're going to also be donating to out of work bartenders. It's also a great way to get your your booze out there but also gives back like it's you know it but didn't run around and give them a million dollars to another charity. He and his wife. I believe aviation think but I know that he pledged a million. I know what smart and we should nice but rob mcelhinney from always sunny in Philadelphia. He started a GOFUNDME E. He's their goals. Fifty thousand got one hundred thousand now. He's in that I think to the hospitals or to feed the hospital's down. It's pretty don't Who was a DECK SHEPHERD AND KRISTEN? Beller doing something similar where they Own a a real like a company that owns several different apartment complexes and they're saying for the month of April and until the krona viruses over. They're not going to charge anybody for those months in school so a lot of people are doing really great like this favorite people matching donations up to twenty five thousand one hundred thousand already. That's a nice what are we doing? I'm actually fee in the hospital tonight paying for the entire staffs Dinner Look Dass one hundred thousand dollars. At least they get food. You can ask me the same question what do you. What was the question off for charity? Troll? Can we talk about and it's move on this helping the The Union Rescue Mission. Who because homeless people Now would they feed their donations during times? Like this just disappear so they literally do you guys have some coffee beans over bringing them much. Get coffee or something. We'd love coffee with this so I believe it was last week we talked about how porn hub was giving away a bunch of free premium memberships to people over in Italy while they're in quarantine they are doing this worldwide now. Businesses a booming. Everybody is once again a thirty day. Free trial of porn hub premium. They also said that they're going to be making donations to first responders as well as medical staff within the nation. I love you porn hub. This is great news given back. This is giving back and they give me a sex workers outreach project. Also making it a point to give all of the money that the Models and sex workers on porn hub would make. They're not taking any cut of that from that they're giving them all their protests. Can the actors work? They are getting paid for less than one storm. They're working despite. The virus being rampant thinks. The lean on that added to the list is not transferred through apparently so fickle right. There's no mouth to mouth no assets bound to think Mazda caucus fine actually heard it gets rid of it well. This is very credible story lab apparently but the scientists sign. You just said that was true. They're like your mom in the background. That was she was very good. So Cardi B. Made A way. What about Idris? What the Prince Charles Prince? Charles he's supposed to be having to. He's seventy seven seventy one but he dicey I. Yeah that's Apparently he hasn't Michael. Yo has it did have how did he he's He's an Oslo. Yeah he hasn't it His I think from what I heard through third party. His wife and child did not have it but he got trouser strong human being when he was only play it costs. You play tells you where Georgia no yes. Yes Shit Up. Jen IOS told you that I've worked with Mike. Glad we've never taught. I remember when he started doing. Stand up I've never seen his E. J. Right yeah. I've never seen a stand up. How is it? He's funny he's still put up for Joe coyle Michael's Great Great Guy. Very nice man. Ugly wait a minute. Very nice How ugly look at that? Have you seen his kids to start looking kids? Biracial babies are. Yeah Michael Chinese Chinese and black or something. Yeah he was Blocked off at WLAC DOT. Because I did notice how he was while I was talking to my University of Arkansas. Excuse me clay is not too many concussions. He came up. How long was he goes wikipedia? How long have you on the long? Look at Pedia I worked. So you've got too many concussions and the concussions. We all do yeah. It's called. Football ironically. Didn't get well. I had a skull fracture skiing but that wasn't the same did but every time I you know how fell at the end of every football practice. You just had smiled like you just had a beer and a half your bell got. You're just like Oh yeah you feel pretty little the little buzzed. Yeah all right we call it getting your Bell Rung didn't they? Yeah who would have known that years later? You can remember anything okay. We got down to the Mike. Michael get better feel better. We'll he played at Arkansas. Got Few others. You guys want some more sure most fascinating part of the damn right news. It is obviously krona virus related so this is Italy's mayor's going off. It's actually it's pretty. It's only two minutes twenty seconds. Maybe like watch watch how they talk to their plimmer. It's translated though so it's wait. They didn't speak English. Just move on. Now it's funny and WHO's this go? Hong Mayor Different mayors station big that sound medical advice fan but I do not say the Spring Break Florida Kid. Who's Shit. He got krona virus. Yeah no he got he apologized. I'm not sure if you've got kids in Kentucky that through Crowbars Party and of course one of them ended up getting crowded virus. That's what her because they're young. Italians don't follow rules. They're here now. They are now for the most part. Fuck off other grandma. They had cups because This Portland the Portland Oregon. So I love sports got. She's she's a she's pretty just as the Tattoo on her. There's different weird tattoos. Or how about the evil twins? Sean Claude Van Damme. I think this might be from army of darkness Bruce Campbell. Yeah it is. I thought those are the other guy. Wow that great tits in a positive attitude. She said she's my lady right there. I love this. How many Justice does your wife of boom just to to what did you say. How many chest tattoos to Well my axe yes. She has none. She has the nicest now none of you know. Do Your kids no I. I still I came. I was like I think I missed the age where I regret all of them. Do you really. Oh I never my up onstage. Why it's a distraction of how I got a full sleeve here. See I disagree with clever in the mighty. They're good they look great bars very successful. Stand up comic. Goes TATTOOS DISTRACT? Unless it's your audience your tattoos and I will. I was told by way back. When they're like you can't be in really good shape and be a comic. Those days have definitely changed and I was like what I heard comedy body. That doesn't make sense because Eddie Murphy was fucking shredded in red leather back in the day. Yup He was a stupid those kinds of those kinds of things. And when I hear that now no because I was like oh maybe I maybe I could just eat. I've been hearing that since ninety fucking five. I did laugh at it and like what are you talking about right but my house. This body right skinny. Anyway I can give us one more comedy We'll just one official this one. Then so there's strimmers yeah. These are strippers at important Organ Club. And then obviously customers to stop coming in. Because they're worried about the bag so now they decided to do some call. Buber eats with wages. Go Up to you know order food. The customers ordered show up firstly which they were just showing their tits. But now they're covering them up with pasties. Yeah and then I asked him. I do way more discreet. The helium there and I went to go find this Mexican place over until we go eat up this Mexican space. I go to the bathroom. And there's bathroom hair and there's a black during the right. I go through the black during the right into strip clubs all the Strip club in Portland. Fantastic how old were they brio? Strippers now this one. Okay dear posted chapelle. Lacy is e. That's Portland though. You don't have the most strip clubs per capita than any other city not Atlanta nope Portland number one. That all right well. That's pretty much A. That's the news. Everything is all krona virus. This was another one that conor McGregor really went off. He wants Ireland and basically go into full lockdown mode. He also released a statement though about the Goethe's twitter because really released the numbers people sent him the of the success rate as well so just sent me this good news. The success rates like ninety eight percent eighteen thousand tests ninety four percents success rate. We're just for said negative or no nine nine four percent success rate. Meaning if you get it you're flying out of eighteen thousand people ninety four percent or five six percents the doozy. Yeah then you're but but even the numbers game right so that but the problem with it. So you're gonNA be fine The problem is if a Zillion peop- because it's so contagious zillion people get it. That's still the hospitals are flooded. That's the problem we don't ha so it's when I hear you're just gonNA be perfectly fine. Yes if you have mild symptoms terrific. I need a respirator. Stay at home. You might but but that's still means if if you get the one was in the lab the lab who's a nurse and she says their house right now it's kind of dead because so many people are that they don't know if they have it for sure they think they're hospital surrounded with people that have it so they're not coming in now. I heard Ibuprofen is not the health. It makes it worse than it's possible. No real studies connor saying they're worth watching. I also read that like people get zinc and then I looked up. And they're like yeah. It doesn't say vitamin C. Helps Z pack. That'd be so money. No Hydro just take your hydrocare Quine hydrocare or Kwan- yeah well then there's Choksi clore quite a definitely help similarity this. Then there's that guy in Arizona who took the he died but he took a different version and he did with that but that's the problem when they go. We think it could be this close enough dumb dumb. I misread it than people start hit. Jin got very impassioned. Hello everyone do you think you could beat him? Address my niche. Oh that's a look of a man that could be. Michael D Higgins Vice. Let me put it full screen. Hello Everyone Hello Ireland. I would like to address my nation to the people of Orlands to oppress. Seems nervous. The Higgins Vice Admiral Marc Mallett to Garda Commissioner Drew Harris Chief Medical Officer. Tony Houlahan Leo. The to Simon's mayor me hall are a spiritual greatly and we'd like to played a minute. Who'll hands on this? I wanted to say that. We are all currently debating a full lockdown. I feel that we must any time spent debating. This is needless time from the clock. I know a good to fight when I see one and we have one on one Hans Now. I want to call upon my people that great people of Ireland. This fight needs us. All we are all in the red corner. Get awaiting the bell. So let's get it together and ring the bail ourselves including the people of the rest of the world. True lockdown must begin at most went through every country. I locked down to get a lockdown united. We must coast airports. We must goes all non-essential business. We must call it all. Non-essential Travel Commissioner Harris and Vice Admiral Mallet. We must prepare deploy you could use of his platform. Honey known built of every country now President Higgins. You must give these great men and women the power to enforce this task if necessary. Surprisingly it's in the politics credit when the seriousness of this is on the store as it is now he he could be your president. I love what if he was vice presidents? Every bit you right be. He might be one. Eighty five so joan gap. That's it. He's one hundred five. He might be there. He's pretty big fifty pounds shoot. I feel terrible. We're in the middle of a pandemic and you came on the podcast now. You've been battering me out. I don't I don't I don't know you do so. You see a deal. I feel Tehran. No you don't see feel you're crazy that staying at home every two second throat boys well and they socially they can talk with their friends and do all that on when they get on a four game or like. There's eight guys from like my twelve year olds classic. They're all playing all chatting and there. I would have loved it if I was like twelve. I'm Michael School Hell. Yeah Oh wait I think for kids. It's it's It's heaven I don't want to be in a very serious time when crazy shit's happening but I think yeah the kids have that same sort of like. Oh no we. Yeah we don't have to go to school. Yeah I'll for high school. Seniors can suck so no no prom sports. Well think about any graduations. Can't like Ken. John was gonNA do the Duke. Commencement speech and the threat. And that's not going to happen can don't will you do? That's on the singer right and Joan. Ken John John. What's that pronunciation? Is that what? What PART OF KOREA? I'm glad you asked us from the outskirts of Seoul. Why did you say soul that way? Now you're singing. You do mass singer with him. Though I've done it. Yeah I do like twice a guest judge. Yeah have you seen that? She'll be no no. I hated it. I WANNA fuck. These people were in suits and then there was on TV and that kind of get into it. You know I don't like is the judge's I'm I don't know if you've done this but there is that the way behind the fucking skeleton suit like hey man can do the show. You know what I'm saying. Well you never know. You're right right here on Fox for enough money but can and I are doing a podcast. I should mention. Oh yes he's an actual doctor and so we were like. Oh well who Kim Jong? Ok John Scrape McKenna and I was like. Why wouldn't you can't do it or not? A weird literally. GonNa tape it because we were like we should talk about. We should talk because he's very good at the medical stuff and I'm really good at as you can tell insulting people I love. That's a great idea to goodwill but if we ever get a place like this. I'll have this. I'm I'm retiring. She can have the retiring. Let me be a really a guest. I don't know it's just a family members share revenue. Okay how much money he has Mike. Can I get taught? We came here by by chopper. That's chopper Uber. Chopper isn't that blackbird service. Yes it is ever done that now. That's that hoover for played blackbird. Different ones I would like to do it your sense that things are coming to an end but this is just starting. I've been here for two hours. Twenty three minutes. Is this a record? Well no guests. Rogan does like three hours. You're an excellent guest task very true. We Love You All right inclusion. What have we learned? We've learned that. You're six four year of Scandinavian descent. Interest thank you conspiracy theories. I enjoy Christian theories. Yes yes could be. Which could very well be a conspiracy. Call me how to make a steak me and Brian going to hell where I didn't say that your friend said that. Yeah you're right if anybody's going to hell it's me your anchor. I loved drinking. Yeah we should. We should do a little wine so you like wine. I'm wide but you wine I way too much when things get back to normal. We need to go that steakhouse. Yes we do. I'll take you all full disclosure. I invested in it so oh mandate yeah. I wouldn't have invested in if I didn't go. Oh I'm on there You deal cat. Give me ten cent Joe my number and vice versa. Oh Yeah Group tax. I'M GONNA head over there right now. To pick up some of their takeout so jealous me get their short ribs but I'll have a Fillet at home with my wife. And I'll tell you how it could fillet the next time. You're the best man this kid we're out.

Joe Joe Again New York Joe Yeah Trump trump scientist Joel mccower Tom Hardy writer China California Joe Rogan Lacrosse Jack Winery America Central America Yellow River American Samoa Brian Ivy League USC
The Great Wall of China

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

09:58 min | 5 months ago

The Great Wall of China

"Welcome to bedtime history. Hello this is Brek a quick shout out to our newest donors, Lucas, Oscar, and Axel bond from San Mateo California. We're doing episodes every week now and it's all because of our generous donors. If you'd like to donate to bedtime history, go to bed time history stories, dot com, and Click on donate in the menu Our. Website has more information about each of our stories and links to our favorite videos, books and movies. Be sure to check it out. That's bedtime history stories dot com. A big. Thank you for the great ratings and reviews we read all of them. Now onto our episode. Imagine you're walking along a path in the forest around you are beautiful mountains covered with. Lush, green trees. you see tall bamboo trees and birds in the sky. Nearby as a small mountain village where families are cooking dinner and playing in the common areas. As you walk further along the path towards the mountain range. He suddenly look up and see gigantic stonewall cutting through the forest. You place your hands on it and look up. It's incredibly high when you look left and right you see that stretches in both directions as far as your I can see. You at one of the most famous structures in the world, the Great Wall of China. The Great Wall of China was built over two thousand years ago and runs more than thirteen thousand miles across northern China. But why was this wall built and how is it lasted? So long the Great Wall of China was constructed by emperor change she hung in the third century BC well, actually parts of the wall were built earlier than that, and it's doubtful that Emperor Chin did any of the actual construction work himself. But Emperor Cheng united a number of different independent states in China and was the first emperor to unite all of these different communities together as one. Chinese. country. This happened around two twenty BC. Before that, there were many different kingdoms throughout China and different groups of people lived on their own. The land that these Chinese people lived on was very fertile fertile means the land is good for growing lots of food over time. The people that lived in the area started to farm and grow crops as more people farm the land they needed to create a system of order in government help manage the land and how it was used. At this time, Chinese people developed irrigated fields and grew crops near the Yellow River valley. Farming Large areas of land required people to work together and form a government to work the land peacefully. This is why the Chinese formed one empire and also built walls around them to protect their communities against attacks by the nomads. A nomad means someone who doesn't live in one place but moves from place to place the nomads didn't farm, but instead moved around and an animals since the nomads needed to move with the animals, they had a completely different type of society in order they needed to hunt animals or trade for them. This led to the nomads trading with the Chinese or in many cases attacking them. The nomadic tribes often came into contact with the Chinese farmers. Friendly. And they would trade with each other but often they did not get along the nomadic people wanted to use the farmland to hunt and move around. But the farm people wanted more land to farm. This led to battles between the farmers and the nomads. The Farming Kingdoms also fight each other often for control of different territories. This is why this period of history in China is known as the Warring States period. The help avoid attacks many of the kingdom's bill walls to defend themselves. The walls were made out of rocks and compacted dirt that was tamped very tightly to form the structure. These walls were shorter versions of the Great Wall of China that was later built. They stretch between the border of different regions. An often included towers block houses for soldiers and beacons to send smoke signals. When Emperor Chen became emperor he wanted to put a stop to the fighting between different farming kingdoms. He declared that all these kingdoms were now part of one country called China, but the nomadic people that lived outside the area didn't care about this. They continue to attack the farming areas help stop these attacks into continue to unite the new country. The emperor ordered the walls between different states be removed and that the shorter walls it existed along the northern border of China be joined together to form one long wall. Emperor Chin thought that this would also help protect them against attacks from. The North China's biggest enemy lived Mongolia. The Mongolians were fierce fighters and very dangerous to the Chinese the project of building the Great Wall was a huge task requiring a lot of Work Emperor Chin his army to work on the wall. So much of it was constructed by soldiers, but they needed even more workers to get the job done. So Emperor Chin ordered that prisoners work on the wall as well. This is called forced labor, which is when someone is forced to do a job without getting paid. It was hard work an estimated that around four hundred, thousand workers died building the wall. Conditions, we're probably very difficult due to the long stretches of mountains and deserts where the wall was built. Today, there are some areas of the Great Wall where no one lives because the conditions are so difficult and there are parts where the winter so cold that no one goes there in the winter, can you imagine having to work on building a large wall in those conditions? Because much of the wall is built with rammed earth. Most of the materials they use to build the wall could be found right where they were building. However some additional supplies and workers had to travel a long way to get to the wall. This made construction, even more difficult sometimes, the young men that were forced to build the wall had the hall boats loaded with baggage upstream in rivers in order to bring food to the workers, the work was so hard. The many people tried to escape and sneak back to their city or their hometowns. Many individuals died in the wilderness trying to escape because the conditions were hard to survive and the journey homeless so long. Eventually. People living in the newly united China started to revolt against Chin Dynasty. To revolt means to fight against and overthrow. Emperor Cheng was a strict ruler and not everyone agreed with his rules. As Emperor, he lost the support of the Chinese people over time and there were less and less soldiers that were willing to go out to work on the wall they stopped listening to his orders and as a result construction of the wall slowed down. Later, Chinese rulers carried on the construction and eventually the wall was finished. This included the Han Sui northern and Ming Dynasties each repaired rebuilt or expanded the wall during the Ming Dynasty major rebuilding work took place and sections of wall that were originally built with dirt or replace with bricks and stone. Instead, these new materials helped the wall, the last longer and in good shape. One of the first mentions of a wall. Built against northern invaders is founded upon David in seventh century BC and is recorded in the ancient. Chinese. Book of Classic Poetry in Twenty Twenty one BC. When change she hong united the Chinese states, the walls were known as Ching Chang, which literally means long walls. The walls were mostly constructed of Tamworth with some parts built with stones or natural barriers like ravines and rivers worked enough for defense the walls were erected sparingly. Often. In addition to the wall defensive systems like garrisons and beacon towers were built inside the wall and watchtowers on the outside at regular intervals. Unfortunately, the Great Wall never totally prevented invaders from coming into. China. It was a useful way to stop raids but several points throughout its history. The Great Wall failed to stop enemies this included in sixteen forty four when the man shooting marched to the gates of Shanghai Pass and replace the Ming Dynasty as the new rulers of China. But the Great Wall came to be seen as a symbol of the ongoing power and strength of the Chinese civilization. Eventually, the Chinese were forced to move back from the northern part of China when the Mongolian people attacked in the north and conquered and took control. The Mongols were led by Gingas Kahn a famous violent leader. The Mongols didn't need the Great Wall as much as the Chinese had in the past, but then signed soldiers to man the wall in order to protect merchants and travellers traveling along the Silk Road. Trade? Routes. Eventually the Ming Dynasty took control of the area again during the Ming Dynasty. The rulers were very strong leaders and Chinese culture grew stronger. They build a lot of additional parts of the wall including bridges, temples, and pagodas. Pagodas are like western Gazebos or covered areas that people can sit under between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. The Great Wall became the most common symbol of China for the Western World Today, the wall. Is generally recognized as one of the most impressive building feats in human history in one thousand, nine, hundred, seven UNESCO, an international heritage organization designated the Great Wall a World Heritage Site at the time it was the only man made structure that could be visible from space in modern times. Thousands of tourists visit the great. Wall of China. The most popular part of the wall on the most famous is called data lean. Runs forty three miles northwest, Beijing. Would you like to see the Great Wall of China one day if you do think of all the people who work to build and maintain it throughout time walking along the great. Wall of China, you will surely be walking along part of history.

Great Wall China Emperor Chin Emperor Cheng Ming Dynasty Emperor Chin Emperor Chen North China united China BC Yellow River valley Brek UNESCO Chin Dynasty Beijing San Mateo California Twenty Twenty Mongolia Lucas
15. Mandate of Heaven Redux

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

22:35 min | 7 months ago

15. Mandate of Heaven Redux

"Welcome to my podcast, rise and fall of the Ching Dynasty Cup of solid gold. This is episode fifteen. Mandate of Heaven Redux. The prior episode I talked about the treaties that resulted from the first opium war. Also talked about the Dow Guan Emperor. And that he died and his son she and fung, the emperor ascended to the throne. Clearly. China and the chain dynasty. Were a mess. The great Chinese civil war or the Taiping Rebellion had begun. and was still ongoing. In this current events road. I'm going to talk about another rebellion the neon rebellion. And get to the Second Opium War. As well as a continuation with the Taiping rebellion. And much much more. Before get any further into this material. Is Important. To ask yourself. Everything? We've been talking about an everything that's going to come. Is this consistent with the mandate of Heaven? I. Think as we go through. All of this history. It's really important that we always ask that question. Did that Emperor. Does that dynasty? Have demanded heaven. And what might have the people thought about that? These an important question and something for all of you to think about. In terms of what we've just covered. And in terms of what is coming? In Eighteen, fifty three an offshoot. Of. The White Lotus Society Express their faction of the events in China and they began to rebel. The events I refer to were primarily focused on decades of flooding along the Yellow River. And the Cheang dynasties failure to provide relief. An infrastructure to that area. Persistent flooding had destroyed China's richest area, and also negatively impacted the chains ability to collect taxes and trade duties. Obviously the ability to collect taxes certainly hampered the dynasties ability to help the Syria and its people so vicious circle. Some have even argued that the neon uprising may have been a protest to female infanticide. That was going on at that time. Due to poor. Conditions and that area. The female infanticide enormously reduced the number of females. To, marry? And this led to misery. By the unwed males. The rebellion was another of the many peasant rebellions. I have talked about throughout this podcast series. It began by villages being rated and it spread. To Shandong Non Jiangsu an we provinces. All of these located in eastern and central China. The neon rebellious to place at the same time, and in some of the same regions as the Taiping. rebellion. I have seen it referred as part of the Taiping Rebellion. But it was clearly not part of the Taiping Rebellion. The neon rebellion never really had a firm goal unlike the type things. At its height neons had about thirty to fifty thousand soldiers estimated. The chain dynasty eventually defeated them in eighteen, sixty eight. But it took some fifteen years to do so. It has been speculated that if the Hi Ping's had combined with the neons. That might have been the end of the Ching Dynasty. Of course we'll never know that because the type things had an aversion to join with any idolaters. Which included the neons? But it's an interesting thought nonetheless. contemporaneous with the NEON. Rebellion and the Taiping rebellion and the Russian issues. Problems with the chain dynasty and Western nations and the opium trade resurfaced. It was clear. By the Mid Eighteen fifties that the treaty gains from the First Opium War were insufficient. And did not address all the issues. The Western nations particularly the English wanted more open ports legalization of opium, Duty Free Trade. An end to piracy. Regulation the COOLIE trade. And diplomatic. Ambassadors in Beijing. The Chinese or The Shan funk emperor refused in. Any of these desires. So, to no one's surprise, all it was needed to restock. The flames was an incident or excuse. And that came in eighteen fifty six. The incident is shrouded in contested facts and mystery, depending on who tells the story? The usual story is. That Chinese officials boarded a ship called the Arrow. That was docked at Canton. And these Chinese officials arrested and removed several Chinese, they alleged were involved in the opium trade. But from there, the story is not clear. It was claimed by the English. That the ERO was an English registered ship, and that it was flying the English flag at the time that it was boarded by Chinese officials. The English also claimed the Chinese officials lowered the flag. Not, surprisingly, there's another version, however, and that is the era was not registered to the English and was not flying the English flag at that time. And that the ship may have been engaged in piracy. Needless, say this. Seemingly harmless incident turned into a reason or or excuse for the English to push forward their agenda. The French claimed at that same time that they were offended by the murder by the Chinese of a French missionary in eighteen fifty six. So both the English and the, French would joined to assert their complaints against. The Dynasty. And so begins what is famously known as the Second Opium War or also known as the era war. For the ship where begin. I think it is best to fully appreciate and understand what is happening. If you think of the second. Opium War as a continuation of the first opium war. With a twelve to fifteen year interregnum. This is a very similar viewpoint. Many had made. That World War Two was a continuation of world. War One. So with the spark lit the English and the French began joint military operations, eighteen, fifty seven. The allies also requested that the US in Russia help. Both the United States and Russia however just minimally helped. And did not send their military's. It did not take long. For, the Allies to capture canton. and. In May, eighteen, fifty eight, the allied forces reached t engine and forced the Chinese into negotiations. Remember. The Ching Dynasty were. Predisposed fighting the Taiping and neons at this time. I'm sure this was a big reason. That the dynasty quickly agreed to negotiations. At the most the allies fighting force numbered only a few warships, and probably no more than six thousand troops. But the Ching Dynasty were again vastly out weapon. In June of eighteen, fifty eight, all the parties met at t engine, or also known as teen sin, and worked out the treaty bearing the city's name. The parties were to this agreement of course, the Chinese the English the French, the Russians. And the Americans. The Ching Dynasty or I say the emperor she informed. Sent, his brother to negotiate Prince Gong. She. Had fled Peking in humiliation to the Summer Palace. He absolutely refused to concede or give the appearance that he was doing so. The agreement reached a Jim. was breathtaking. Eleven more seaports seaports would be open for trade. England France Russia and united. States would be allowed permanent embassies in Peking. The restrictions against interior interior travel in China by foreigners was lifted. Foreign ships would be allowed free and full access to the young Sir River. China agreed to Pay England in. France a large amount of silver as an indemnity. And Open was legalized. After the agreement shortly after the agreement was signed, the allies left. T engine thinking their work was done. She in phone however had no intention of signing the treaty. Let alone abiding by it. For the Ching their refusal. To sign the treaty and a by was based on their faulty notion that their country was superior. The manchus could only envisage the foreign envoys coming to Peking as tribute voice. Wearing Chinese clothes escorted by Chinese officials as guest of the King Emperor. And maybe only do this once every several years. The emperor's biggest problem with the treaty were the foreign embassies. He felt. Four embassies would damage the dignity of the dynasty. The acceptance of permanent foreign envoys. Implicitly meant that the Ching Dynasty considered these four nations as equals. The emperor in refusing to sign the treaty incorrectly assumed that as long as the four nations got free trade from China. They would retreat. From the embassy demand. And the indemnities. However for the four nations, the permanent embassies were a major issue and they would not back down from it. Once the allies had the teen in treaty commitment. They of course withdrew. But came back. In the summer of fifty nine. With the allies were their respective envoys and ambassadors to officially formally ratify the treaty. The emperor however prevented them from going to Peking. The allies pushed back and waited for reinforcements. In August eighteen, sixty, a much larger allied force relieved the envoys and they went forward toward Peking. The allies eventually captured Peking plundering. And burning it along with the summer, palace outside of Peking. It was not. Long. Then that. The chain found themselves at the negotiating table with the western nations. These negotiations culminated in a series of meetings in Peking in October of eighteen, sixty. The resulting convention of Peking Agreement was ratified. On. October twenty fifth eighteen sixty. The Ching Dynasty settled with England. The next day they started with the French. And the terms were. That the Ching Dynasty would fully abide by the eighteen fifty eight treaty of t engine. That the English would be ceded the southern portion of Joe Joachim Peninsula next to Hong Kong The Ching Dynasty would pay added indemnities to both France and England. The opium trade was legalized. What additional treaty port was opened. And the chain dynasty would return to France the religious religious Chiro property that they had confiscated. And finally the trade would be legalized. Cooley were a sort of a Chinese indentured servants. Put in use by Western nations. After it was all said and done. The treaties had opened nineteen. Ports in China And with that. The opium wars would come to a close. It's important to reflect a little about what just happened and put some of this in perspective. I'm referring of course to the two opium wars and the other pressures. Laid upon the Ching Dynasty by foreign nations. I will reflect separately about the typing and the neon rebellions. In another podcast episode. Let me say this given everything going on in China at that time and China's situation, it did not appear. There was ever an alternative. For the Ching Dynasty other than to reach into. Other than to reach an agreement and sign treaties with the Anglo Franco demands. At no time was China effective in responding to the modern West, and it's industrialism in Merkin to mercantilism and its military strength. While the effects of the Treaty of Nanking from the First Opium, war. Could be accepted within the usual framework of foreign relations. Within the the comedy of Foreign Relations. The eighteen, fifty eight and the eighteen sixty second opium war treaties dealt a more serious blow to China's sovereignty. Beside the fact that foreign people ships and Christian evangelist could now roam freely in China. The treaties established a permanent diplomatic presence at the heart of Ching Dynasty power. The foreign powers could now by direct pressure on the imperial court. Superior Foreign Power Commercial Financial Military Milt, military, industrial, and technological. All would generally impinge upon China's traditional society, state and culture with devastating effects. In looking back at China's weaknesses during this time. The Ching Dynasty's military weakness and administrative capacity. was exposed. By the Western powers and the chains, institutional incorrect assumptions about the western powers, and how they fail to take that into context was obvious. Irony to me. Is it the Ching. Dynasty refused reciprocal intercourse with Western powers. Until it was forced on them. By unequal force. On the other hand. In a sense. The Ching Dynasty. We're relatively successful in responding to foreign powers. Perspective is everything. Unlike Vietnam, Malaysia India and Burma. China did not become a colony of the West. The extra territoriality that the Ching Dynasty gave the Western powers was common, unusual and usual combination given to other nations. To our modern, western is the thought of forcing China to legalise. Opium is outrageous. But context is important. It must be kept in mind at the time. That time. Opium was legal. In most western nations. Think about the wide use of Laudanum, an opium derivative at that time. Channel was the outlier here. It had the full ban on opium. In the end. This period of time. I just spoke about. was summarized. Beautifully. By a modern Chinese historian. and. He said the lesson from the opium wars. was. If you are backward, you take a beating. As simple as that? Think about the mandate of heaven thing. I'll end the episode here. I still have much to say about what was going on at this time. The next episode. Continue with our chronology. Will Finish Shin Funds Rain. Finish the Taiping rebellion. And introduce. Maybe one of the most influential persons. Certainly, one of the most famous. Of the entire chain dynasty. The empress dowager. So thank you. It's been a pleasure. Is

Ching Dynasty Opium China opium Taiping Peking Dynasty England Dow Guan Emperor Beijing Foreign Relations Mid Eighteen France Hong Kong The Ching Dynasty Peking Agreement Russia fung China Yellow River
Murder, Duke, and Grayson vs Collins Hill for the State Championship

Gwinnett Daily Post Podcast

11:31 min | Last month

Murder, Duke, and Grayson vs Collins Hill for the State Championship

"It's wednesday december. Thirty two thousand and twenty in here your top stories for today's gwinnett daily post podcast when police investigate a peachtree corners. Martyred a dream come true for grayson high school student. The state tackle the clock bring on the chipper and finally all eyes will be focused. Tonight will georgia state stadium as collins. He'll take on grayson for the seven state championship. These stories and more coming up on today's edition of daily post five guests. Hey guys it's amanda lee your local host and gwinnett native thousand twenty twenties. Been a different year for sure but if the time has come for and your family to buy sell or rent a new home hegi sloppy. Properties is here to help. Peggy and her team have been in gwinnett and surrounding areas for thirty eight years. Now helping folks just like you and me pegging her team or a little different per team of thirty five plus realtors realize that. Fostering strong relationships within the community is the key to their business. Peggy's team of professionals can work with you regardless of circumstance residential homes new homes rentals with listings all over the county in today's climate. You hear a lot of noise from others on how they can help you. The difference is at peggy sloppy properties. They're buying and selling for neighbors family and friends. Don't you believe you'll get the most value from a team that knows. The lay of the land. Visit peggy slap properties online at p. s. p. online dot com. Or give mccall seven at seven seven zero two seven one five five five ply. Peggy delivers the very best gannett and georgia real estate. Because you deserve no less gwinnett. Police are investigating a peachtree. corners extended. Stay hotel murder. That's right gwinnett. Police are looking into a murder of a man who was shot at an extended stay hotel in peachtree corners. Sunday morning corporal. Michelle pinera said. Police officers were called to the hometown sweets on cartoon boulevard just before eight a. m. about a victim being shot. They're the victim identified as forty one year. old college. Park west resnick qantas. Williams was found in the room of the units three hundred building. Investigators believe that there were two other men originally staying in the room at some point. Those men call a women. She arrived at an unknown time earlier that morning. The woman called another man to the room. That man arrived with another woman. Argument broke out in one of the two original residents in the room. Shot mr williams. The suspects fled the room. Investigators have yet to determine a motive for the fatal shooting but they are looking to speak to any hotel guests are passer bys to see if they have any information about the crimes. Anyone who has information about the shooting is asked to call detectives at seven seven zero five one three fifty three hundred or crime stoppers at full four five seven seven eight four seven seven drain comes true a gwinnett county senior shares her acceptance letter to duke with their light mother. That's right like many senior. Schuyler hughes has a full plate every day in addition to maintaining one grade point average at grayson highschool hughes has two part time jobs. An internship at the yellow river game ranch. Wildlife sanctuary suffice the site when night time rolls around huge generally has no trouble getting to sleep but this past friday night she had troubles you say. She received her acceptance letter via email at seven pm from duke university and she wanted to share it with her mother. Her mother rashaan to who's who passed in two thousand sixteen well scholar said she wanted to go to her grave site in open the letter. Well she did. In the good news is scholar was accepted to duke university. She indicated she was very nervous when gop. Monday in new. She wanted to open it with her mom at her mom's grave. It was a well circulated social media video. Here's open the email and learned that she'd been accepted to where she plans to major in marine science and conservation. Congratulations again to grayson high school. Senior scholar hughes. And that's an awesome awesome story there. Why by at kim mall of georgia we provide award winning customer satisfaction and have been a family owned business for over twenty years. Buying or leasing with us is fast and easy and you can get pre approved online in four easy steps. We offer top dollar on trade ins and have new vehicle specials that are updated every month are factory trained technicians make servicing your vehicle convenient with extended service hours. Stop buying shop with us on the lot or visit us online at love. Mike dot com. Georgia senator ben watson of submitting. It doesn't care whether the peach state observes standard time. You're daylight savings time watson. A physician just wants georgia pick one or the other. Because studies show switching back and forth every six months and calls heart disease and sleeping disorders watson pre filed a bill two months ago. One calling for a non binding advisory referendum asking georgians whether they would rather than the state observes standard time o year daylight savings time all year or whether they would rather continue switching between the two under the measure. Georgia would observe standard time all year bypassing referendum. A third bill followed in the month by state representative wes. Cantrell of woodstock calls for observing daytime savings all year long. The senate passed. Legislation introduced by watson last march calling for a non binding referendum on the issue but the general assembly. Shut it down three months. Short due to coronavirus pandemic hawaii in arizona. Remain on standard time all year as do the oversee. Us territory of puerto rico. American samoa guam northern mariana islands. And the us virgin islands any state wishing observe daylight savings. Time all your must seek congressional approval. Watson said is gut is most people would like to have daylight savings time all year long. It may be better to put it on the ballot and see if we can get some consensus in the state of georgia. One of the largest trae recycling events in the southeast will come in starting this weekend as when cleaning. Beautiful begins collecting live christmas trees from local residents as part of its brain one for the chipper initiative the organization has drop off sites at fire stations around when county and the trees from each site will be collected through january. Twenty fifth the trees they will be taken to bethesda park and lawrenceville on january thirtieth and turned in too mulch instead of taking up space and landfills live. Christmas trees may take decades to decompose. The trees are recycled. On january thirtieth. And we'll be given a new live right here in our community. They'll be turned into mulch and made line. Pathways and local parks can help beautify. The flower beds in and around schools and public buildings in gwinnett county. Claiming beautiful is asking for volunteers for the january of the man to volunteer interested. Parties must go to. Www dot cbc dot org download a volunteer waiver form live. Christmas trees will be accepted through january. Twenty fifth check the gwinnett daily post website for locations atlanta this jay and lewis owners of engineering solutions jordan lewis. What should a homeowner do. They have a crack in their block wall corner of their door window or concrete foundation. Well jay if it's diagonal crack this. Lets us know that they should be concerned. There could be a serious problem then. They should call our office at six seven eight. Eso g now in set up an appointment to have one of our qualified professional technicians. Come out to their property to take a look at the problem. I'm consumer investigator dale cardwell. I've done the research already so you don't have to. You can trust engineered solutions of georgia give engineered solutions of georgia. A call at six seven eight. Eso g now. John evans shocking. Finally all eyes will be on georgia state university tonight as the seventy state. Football championship in the highest class of occasion will take place. The number one wearing grey some rams takes on the number six ranked collins hill team in a rematch of a game earlier this year. That grace one. One and heavily favored in the game is led by many all americans as well as teamed shutout norcross last week. Twenty eight ten. Nothing this is a rematch of these teams in which state championship games. Though original winter is three and two for more information on the game. Make sure you turn to georgia public broadcasting at seven thirty and follow the gwinnett daily post is. We will have full updates concerning the game later this week. This podcast is brought to you in part by. Am nine twenty. The answer atlanta's home for news opinion and insight. Just go to am970theanswer.com to listen live. That's am nine hundred thousand theanswer dot com. Thank you for joining us for the daily post. Podcast your true hyper local news source. Grab a copy of today's paper. Visit gwinnett daily post dot com for complete details on the stories. You've discussed more stores affect you and the residence of gwinnett county subscribing share this podcast to get all the latest hyper local updates or ask alexa or google home to play the gwinnett daily. Post podcast for you. Share your thoughts or questions with us in the comments section or paul the podcast common at four zero four nine nine seven eight six five five. You might even share your comment on an upcoming episode of the daily post. Podcast is produced by bgi. Group amanda lead producer. Jacob sutherland director copyright. Two thousand twenty all rights reserved looking for a way to find out what's going on in your neighborhood and across the north atlanta suburbs. Now you can get the hyper local news. You need anytime in cobb county check out the marietta daily journal. Podcasts live a bit farther east than the north fulton neighbor. Podcast has you covered in gwinnett. County folks be sure to listen to the gwinnett. Daily post podcast. We didn't forget our friends. Cherokee county the cherokee tribune ledger news. Podcast has all your local news to. You can find these podcasts work. Ever you get your podcast. Subscribe to share the only hyperloop. 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gwinnett gwinnett daily post grayson high school Peggy georgia georgia state stadium amanda lee peggy sloppy properties Michelle pinera Park west resnick qantas Schuyler hughes grayson highschool hughes yellow river game ranch gwinnett county rashaan duke university kim mall grayson mr williams gannett
LA River

PODSHIP EARTH

34:22 min | 1 year ago

LA River

"Welcome to punch path. This is your host jared Blumenfeld in the La River is the reason that Los Angeles exists prior colonialization by the Spanish in the seventeen hundreds. There were more than four de Tocqueville native American villages along the river in what's now Glendale L. as Los Angeles with developing the river provided the city with its main source of water after number of devastating floods in the nineteen thirties the the army corps of Engineers was charge with encasing forty three of the La Rivers fifty one miles in bank to bank concrete. This Cement River became the backdrop for drag races in movies like grease and viewed as a garbage filled Eisele rather than an asset then in two thousand thousand eight to prove that the La River wasn't worthy of protection. A brave bunch of Kayak is led by twenty nine year old biologists have the widely kayak the entire length of the river which helped prove that it met the legal definition of a navigable waterway after that community activist Vista then politicians realize that revitalize La River could be the lynchpin to greening the entire city ten years later millions billions of dollars have been spent to begin the long and complex journey a bringing the La River back to life says reading about had this trip down the La River. It's always been my goal to get in the Kayak and see the river for myself last week. I got my wish I met with a group of five amazing people working to protect the La River Financial Gomez who's the chief ranger with the mountain recreation come sedation authority and his colleagues Sarah Roscoe with Suzy Santillana and Edward Belden from La Eric Garcetti's office and Jolie Magnon from the Tillman Treatment Plant who helps keep the La River flowing okay susie. Where are you right now we are at. La River pretty far upstream near the Supreme Basin Okay and it was standing on some cement. Just this initial launching point right. That's concrete but we'll see as we get there. It'll get more and more soft go upstream liberal these yeah those Oser That's legit flock of Canadian geese flying in a V formation. How many times have you counted before. I've done it twice. This is is my third time so third time's the charm I haven't tipped over yet but we'll see what happens this time. I'm excited. I mean like there's a little we know. The kind of looks like rapids. Almost you go herron. I mean it's it's legit wildlife here. There's some definite riffle action happening bening and the water yeah we might see some eager to might see some Herron hopefully chief Gomez can point out some of the wildlife we come across as we're going down on the river so it's exciting like it so tell us. What are we gonNA do today today this morning. We're going to be the Alley River in support the basin it's going to be about one mile mile down you're going to explore and see what the elevator has to offer especially being in a soft bottom very minimal concrete longcrete so you'll see features similar to just any other wall river that you'll see it anywhere across the country so you'll see a fish sometimes even coming out of the water and breaching you'll see Blue Luke blue herons. You'll see snowy egrets night herons green herons. You'll see the vivid La River you'll get to experience something that most folks skits experience from the outside from the bike path of the walk path along the side but get your perspective from when you're on the river and looking outward and there'll be areas here where you'll probably be thinking thinking that you're walking actually pal into the everglades because it's so lush and green and thick. You'll you'll see what I'm talking about a little bit. Do you remember what your time you right down the river. Yes it was eight years ago. When we first started a pilot program here on the debate seen as well and the very first time was casino because we did a couple of tours before like just run run it skeptical very like I don't know about this but I'll tell you eight years now into the eighth season now and you get a different respect river again. You know what I've told. Fox's at the river has been here for many many years way before any of us but it's now now. What's what's actually changing. The big change. Is that how we are now view the river and the the the actual possibilities that this natural resource has and being deemed as navigable water then you know what it it's it's a resource in our backyard and that we need to really explore and we really need to have other people. We'll learn about it and respected so you can flourish this river and make it you know people. Can you know come on here and do more things with river because right where we are now. No one would ever think I think we were in Los Angeles light still in the city right. Yep We're still in the city of Los Angeles and San Fernando Valley so it is smack in the Los Angeles and the reason why Los Angeles is years because this flowing jam is here and you have to be like an expert paddler or can like anyone do it. No you don't have to be next paddler because I'm not we've actually actually had vets out here. We've actually had vets who have lost their sight and had their canine and we know accommodated them on special boats inflatable boats and taking a modulus on your soul debts that that's the the level of you know paddling so we can you know anybody competitive out here in the Yellow River excellent. Let's let's get going for sure hi my name is Sarah Roscoe and I work for the Marta Mountains Recreation Conservation Authority and a fun in fact is that ninety percent of the water in the Alley river is discharged from a reclamation plant tillman. I've been there. They have a beautiful Japanese garden very famous further Japanese garden also so they wouldn't be any flow here if it wasn't for recycling the water historically the alley rivers risen ephemeral river so flow would vary and it would be much less but I think that the amount of water is representation of the highly engineered river for that we have before us today even though it kind of looks natural absolutely it wasn't natural river so there are aspects of it that represent its historical markle depiction and like we'll find out today but it seems like the city of La others like trying to bring it back to life absolutely it's there's a huge momentum effort by many many groups the city L. of La's definitely helping lead the charge L. as a special city and you're very dense so wherever we can develop and preserve open space that that's our goal so the US EPA in in twenty ten deemed the La River navigable waterway so because of that we are able to have the recreations that we have and my goal was to Kayak one day taking eight years for me checking off the list now that it's inevitable waterway King Kayak and bird and fish sean have people actually access an embrace the La River and it also holds us to the Clean Water Act Standard so we can get wonky and talk about meeting Lina Standards to lean get through five micron screen nothing out next to where it discharges to the river so there's other things that end up in this water because has its the river but literally Julian like nothing. Five microns is like what's a micron like compare that to a human head of human hair air is thicker than some of those are talking about Reggie whose Reggie Suzy Lake. Is that someone that we missed famous. He's a fame. Thanks very famous celebrity in L. A. He's an alligator in our zoo currently but he originally came from one of our lakes apparently someone had him as a pet and released released him in Machado Lake and he was found like he was quite large when they found him and now he's been captured and putting the La Zoo so you can still early on visit him. was there like a whole such pod defoe him ooh. I don't know but I'm sure there was panic and there's an alligator kind of it does look like the by I mean we could be anywhere anywhere other than La this does not feel like La this. This is not your typical L. A. There's no concrete around us right now. There's all these plants around this open water beautiful sky other than that plane flying overhead. You would not think we were one hundred miles from any city yeah no. It does look like we're in nature now and I think this is. This is healthy for L. A. People to get a little dose of nature who you live here where we live. I live in south. La in Chesterfield Square super urban even prettier been okay. Let's keep paddling so so chief Gomez. How up deep is the river right here. And have you ever had to rescue anyone who fell back then. I was telling you about how do the bottom here on the bottom. I WanNa get so essentially so this river are really deep again. Planners pattern here now you think about how deep in the in the wintertime when the water is moving through here. We have a really good season like we did. your your nap ago. The water gets up and and I'm looking at the at the tree line you see with the plastic is probably about what ten fifteen feet up high this water will have to come in here. as Marcy Rangers. I also swiftwater trained so we tag team with the Los Angeles city fires swiftwater teams we get deployed out here as well and start popping out most when they come into this water mixing very difficult because convenient but it's meant to be flooded out and but it's not meant for folks looks to be obviously in the water why makes his challenging to try to make these rescues whether with boats the helicopter or working off of nearby bridges and of course a key of this whole thing to prevent all that is doing pre warnings so our rangers come out here. Duprey warnings for folks. Maybe living actually I'm the embankment hills. Is this the river. There may be one or two that have popped up just recently homeless encampments were constantly busy. We're getting those calls. you notice there's people in the river playing by the river so we try to you know try to educate folks to try to stay away from it so we don't put our first responders and in harm's way as the financial like you were saying that you can tell the height of the river by weather plastic bags are in the trees like there's not that many plastic bags though. I thought it'd be a lot more. Yes that's correct. There's not many plastic bags. Since this program began the pilot program our first year we saw an enormous amount of plastic bags but since the inception of the plastic ban plastic bag ban we have seen a significant reduction of plastic bags in the river and I think there has been a positive impact of many times you say oh what what's the actually outcome of this. Where do you actually see this and I personally can attest that I have seen the reduction in here and we don't. We don't see as many bags in here anymore so I think that's helping out and it's been a key thing to what the impact of those plastic this is flying or being dumped how it affects our waterways and we're seeing this because that means also predestined reduces. Everything is into the ocean swab. It's amazing hummingbird right yeah eh right above so again. The elevator like said you're you're working. People can see us right now surrounded by Willow Sycamore. We've got all this natural vegetation here. You forget where you're at again. The water being deep is about until ten fifteen feet here and again. You're still within the city needed. Los Angeles and you and you forget about this. I I would never I grew up in in England and this little village and the river was cold. Cam like the camera. Everyone looks exactly like where we are today. You never think that was in. La I do nice well they have. They have guns. Let's you like a longboat with a poll where they had. This is very much like that. Yeah love it financially. Well said so. There's there's not many homeless people. Have we just passed a homeless encampment like what's the story we the actually the one we just passed right now. no. I've actually personally been working with him and while skilled gentlemen but he's one of those outdoor enthusiasts he doesn't WanNa be living indoors doesn't want to be doesn't want anything to do that. He really wants to living outdoors. we've attempted to get him help with the homeless advocates he groups and just refusing abusing to you. Don't blame the person in front of this river and you know the beauty that it actually has however it's unsafe because you know we we do have the you know we have federally protected endangered species birds out here so that affects that so we definitely have to be kind of find a balance and manage the the usage of the facility the so it can you know both folks can actually enjoy it but at the same time our wildlife can also use as a refuge to be able to you know to survive their species being in an endangered species. You definitely want to be protected as well and at this time was to protect. We know we were right now. We're surrounded by a rundle. What is Iran does like a massive a green bamboo kind of caney thing it very very difficult to get rid of whether they come from I believe it's Asia than it actually comes from and this this highly invasive minimum. Rondo those things where Army Corps of Engineers Sube. La La County flood-control spent a lot of money to try to get rid of it. I've personally seen it burn with diesel because it was after a traffic collision and three weeks later your sprouts were coming up on the same spot and the Legion valley so that-that's tell you how resilient this vegetation is but then along wells out castor bean. That's a invasive in here as well again things that are that are really you know out of their out of their element but but they thrive here because they've got water. They've got the right eight elements for them to be able to start. Try to take over. We're just saw light little fish swimming by that was the fast fish. It's amazing like the the rivers alive yes you've got eight different types of fish here while one of the bigger ones that you've got carpenter and you've got river channel catfish and here's well the one. I've actually saw when one guy was actually fishing here. He caught it was an eight pounder a ponder he he was just catching releasing however there are folks out here for the consumption of the Fisher catching here and just recently alley times relievers Allie Times did a special on it fish cotton here the river and took it up to the Mount Washington area for like a cook there and and they put out a feast they're and enjoyed it in a sonic really good actually saw pictures like let's say a place where the Sushi that might just the night before so I'm super the cool thing about where we are right. Now is how accessible is to so many people in the city. Many folks may not have the means to get to a Colorado Colorado River occuren- river and having this resource in your backyard's is something that is attainable something that they can take public early transportation to it bike their way here so there is there is something to be said about this little sound. Jealous River no I when I was growing up we would buy from city alimony down to the real Honda River in the spillway as well again. It was probably not the right thing to do but somebody placed a rope there and guess what that was watering watering hole growing up so we would use a rope woman right into the water until one day though and my mom did the same thing that the dive she drank some water and the her expression her her wanting to gag and everything was a still laugh about it and and I'm still now because she reminded him on. Remember remember when you did this. I can't believe I'm like hey you guys but then we've come a long way though because right now I mean if people eating the fish in it. That's a good sign. Yes a fish do get tested for mercury and also their studies that come on and people can follow that to see what what we you know what kind of fish you can have consume and in the end. I'll tell you that it's people consuming it and people have been doing this for decades and so if there is something it'd be set of Los Angeles River Amazing where we what are we going to see next Fernando right now. We're actually going to when we come cut this corner here. We're going to be entering an area that we call the Grand Canyon and why it's called the Grand Canyon. I will come to your imagining. He Start Thinking Okay the Grand Canyon this massive. You know you know just crater whole river at the very bottom and you'll see what we're about to the walls. Are you know not. It's you'll see what die but you also see in. See why we call all at the Grand Canyon. I'm excited with paddling. Thanks so so ed used to be in charge of getting rid of these invasive yeah so when I worked kind of upstream before now working in the mainstream up here in the Sangare your mountains there's substantial amount of Rondo that comes from here all the way to the foothills and higher elevations the mountains in this watershed and when you can take out one Nacre of a Rondo you can actually put back into the system twenty. Acre feet of water craft and it's a tremendous amount of water to twenty doesn't sound like anything right but one acre foot of water there is enough for four households for a whole year so these small putting we're seeing here some pretty big bunches of Rondo and if we're actually removed that it would ensure that all of this vegetation really thrived for longtime but then we'd have more water downstream. We'd have more to consume. We working upstream where that was kind of these source of water water for L. A. so when we talk about local water supply we can take that plant out we can return tremendous amount of water back to the local system but it's a how do you remove. It looks like incredibly I believe resistant to removal it is it's a really resilient plant as most invasive are so it has a a root structure it's kind of like ginger but ginger on steroids and it will regrow anytime you cut it down from that route ball and so you really have to either somehow will remove it mechanically and really ensure you get that root out which is can be a really big challenge or a lot of people do use other types of Chemical Michael Methods after you've cut it down so so you only have to apply a minimal amount do not apply the whole thing and that's successful just because you can ensure ensure that the chemicals actually going down at the roots and kills the whole plant but you know there's there's challenges in the controversy and their issues with using those kind of pesticides herbicides. That's if they can use manual treatments. That's out there. It's just it's really labor intensive. It's labor intensive even if you no matter what even if you're using to have a a chemical approach you still have to cut it down and treat it because if you leave it just as giant F- potential fire source on so it's a threat no matter what okay now we're at the attending around. This is the part of the the end of the river while we got waterfall in front of us heading back home. She's always fun to see the river from a different perspective Edward. I guess I mean certainly most of the remedy. It doesn't look like where we are right now. This is a very unique area where you have that much native habitat and such very specific location. I mean there's probably about two miles here in Willoughby's in the has this natural space and we don't have that in many parts of the river you can see it in Lesion Valley has popped up in autumn portion but for many other areas it is right now kind of a river in concrete straightjacket as they say and we do have a chance to use this as a reference site to help bring back some pockets of natural habitat R. N. Even some pockets of just greenery landscaped landscaped areas that that everyone can appreciate love the sites along the river. We use a heavy industry in the past right so they seemed like they need a lot of cleanup they do. There's a lot of brownfields that need some cleanup when you have to take out some contamination and then we want to transform those into areas that have recreation space habitat and just a a what you might expect to see along a river and at the same time we want to increase the number of paths that are long river so we have thirteen miles a gap that we we. WanNa fill here in the valley. We have another eight mile gap section that goes between downtown. La and once those are filled in you'd be able to go from Canoga park all the way to Long Beach fifty one miles else and you can take your kids out more importantly when they Olympic comes you can go between venues on the river so it. It's a tremendous asset to see this. This is Jim the place where the city was founded. Come back to life. Why is it so important to this incredibly dense urban city Los Angeles to to revitalize most people think of is like just seeing 'cause drive through you know cement basins and you know I never until today seen this wild side of the river and its spectacular like it's allowing the million people that are about a mile on each side of the river to have a whole new place to come experience nature. Get Healthy let some species habits life back have a place pack and a two CD transform into what I think we all WanNa see and that's nice natural landscaped areas and Parkin clean storm water clean water for all of us to drink terry. You've been kayaking and and actually being super quiet save said tell me a little bit about the river ranger. Program Rams sounds like it's an endo. He's a ranger on the river a river ranger tongue-twister tax mix right so what is a river ranger a river ranger is a division entirely dedicated to the La River Year Round Sunrise sunset which currently there is no one overseeing the river in that capacity. We we manage the recreation zone from Memorial Day to Labor Day so that's like when I go from Suzy's. She was like you need to get in the river before September second because the program kind of closed down so we just made it but what happened in the rest of the year the rest of the year are Rangers. Don't patrol we we need to get as many people on the river as possible. This is this is the city's river and through activating the river and making people feel safe has helped people will really really start to embrace it and use it as a natural resource. You spend a lot of time with the communities that live alongside the river. We just talked about this twenty two cities or more like well how out of those folks who live along the river feel about this resource like being activated. They WANNA feel safe on the river. they want is on the river aside from the community. Mm Unity. They want a cohesive program that brings people to the river and helps educate about the history the water quality they don't. WanNa see trash. There was the number one thing that people like afraid of as it relates to the river right now when he told to communities safety which Zhang has a lot of different issues for people safety can mean maintenance or lack thereof trash makes people unsafe trashes as Chiles who is less about the physical might people and physical security more just like the health of the river is making it feel unsafe. Health of the river is important and seeing a uniform seeing someone in an official capacity up and down the river is important to community not necessarily policing the river but activating the river through various forms of staff is is important to the community susie. Thank thanks again. You've been amazing in and thanks for helping set up the entire program today but PA part tired of Your Day job is to is to help the man make sure that stole more either get cleaned up or captured before it goes into to the La River. Yeah and it's both what happens when it rains. Where's that water going It's also what happens when it's not raining how people water their yards cards in the water. Just runs off the fertilize. It transports fertilizers. Whatever gunk is in the street. Metals like copper and zinc are huge the problem for the wildlife in a river so you know where we fit in before that water even reaches the river we try to intercept it in either use it for something better or clean it up so how do you how do you do that like it's a big project. Yes we have a number of big projects that we can use it as examples else but what they'll usually do is find a large storm drain. That's about to empty into a river. Find a location where we have some space and put a big tank there. You're or put some filters there some sort of treatment technology to get to that water before it gets to the river and green infrastructure is another big component of that. That's so that we can use vegetated and natural projects that can clean water and filtered through plant life and soil instead of just letting it run and bring all all those contaminants into our rivers. How do we get people to understand all the cool things happening in. La Yeah well I think it's important to show off some of the things that we've already done like we have some really great projects that not only protect the water quality but brought recreational opportunities to the areas we saw the Albion River Park. We were able to get a parcel of land right near the river and expand the park opportunities there we put new soccer fields there but also underneath we have of areas where we can now capture a lot of water and treat that water and utilize that water so I think having those multi benefit projects where not only are you cleaning up water but you're providing other benefits to that community based on what the community needs. is a really helpful way to show off the many benefits of padding these sorts of projects so ultimately is like is about environmental justice which is communities that had been overburdened also don't have access to rivers. Don't have access to parks that poll that you and I went to Albion was the former contaminated say there was a very very small pox and now there's a huge beautiful park and we're literally up cycling thing a piece of land that was once contaminated and disgusting into something that's now benefiting the community and I think there's sort of a paradigm shift on how we develop urban areas now we're instead of putting concrete everywhere and letting all that pollution run into our rivers channelize ing everything to prevent from floods alone for taking into account other needs like what is that community need what does nature in the area need and so we can find ways smart ways that we can integrate all all those different needs together when we design projects and that just leads to better project with more benefits and the mayor recently came out with really audacious goal which his I think it's the largest ways for the treatment plan west of the Mississippi is called high period and currently most of the water gets discharged into the Pacific Ocean Mitch's closing ocean acidification. He said we're going to recycle all that water by twenty thirty five that's definite ambitious goal but it is achievable especially if we leverage all of our partnerships and bring everybody together to work toward that single goal and it's a really important one because our our water resources are going to become more and more important and just in order to protect ourselves from any upcoming natural disasters that might come any impacts acts of CIA climate change. It's so important that we utilize all the water we have right here and by doing things like recycling that water instead of just discharging it to the ocean and also helping to prevent the amount of greenhouse gases and carbon footprint of the city by not having to import it and you know such energy intense intense water from far are way and being able to use what we have right here and to clean up what we have right here that was an absolutely amazing down the river uh when now back where we started right next to the Sepulveda's dam and to be honest. I wish I was staying out here. All days just amazing mazing anyway you get the chance to go kayaking on the river hotly. Recommend it amazing day now. How did we lose on my it doesn't matter who's you're still here on Saturday. Okay all right. Well Guy to be sent a party back to look for suzy the game okay. We're going all right folks so again. I want to say. Thank you guys for coming out today. I really do hope that again. If the first time you've done it you've got that different perspective and it's up to us to protective for others to enjoy and the hard work that we do now is really really important so thank you all for what you do. Thank you for giving you opportunity to share my my job what I do as as as a ranger and the protection but you guys see the fruits of the work that you guys are all doing so before you get lunch fishing to get lunch we actually we did but with your past fisherman on lunch for us yeah so you know about sewer salmon. Yes Oh they call suicide. It's yeah that's not a good name. No it was put out. Fisher good good so anyway so thank. You guys very very much great time. We really appreciate it. Thanks thanks and then thank you very much before I retire. I would like to actually Kayak they'll tariff fifty do one miles of the Yellow River. It's honestly that would be a great sendoff for me as a retirement when a new way to I mean that's I said he is but you know what come up by you. Creep up on you very quickly the Great Wizard League and I'm not gonNA stay for them. Beautiful wanted to maybe they're smaller with their neck is so long right now a huge thanks to Chief Ranger Fernando Gomez for leading us on this amazing adventure and for all the work he's done to give so many fest hand knowledge of the River Ah to Sarah Roscoe who's also with the mountain recreation and Conservation Authority for being a treasure trove of information on the river to Susie Santillana who helped bring this Kayak trip together and for her work saving water and the La River and to Edward Belton who among many other things helped me pull up and transport out invasive species from the La River and finally to Joe Lean Manila's helping keep the water flowing from the Tillman Treatment Plant into the beautiful La River. I was so impressed excited my few hours on the. La River the energy that has emerged to transform this formerly garbage filled and concrete on Crete lined waterway back to its glory days still has a long way to go. I have no doubt that the folks I met with today and thousands of light them will make happen in the next episode of Japan. They talk with a mom who's fight to help a young daughter. Battled cancer turned her into an environmental advocate commission. Thank you so much for being part of the Japan Jenny from the entire podge birth through sound engineer ropes fate executive producer David Kahn and for me Jared Blumenfeld keep paneling even when it's against the current.

La River Los Angeles Colorado Colorado River occure Yellow River La River Financial Gomez Alley River Cement River wall river Honda River Chief Ranger Fernando Gomez Rangers Albion River Park La Sarah Roscoe River Ah Grand Canyon La Rivers La County Tillman Treatment Plant Susie Santillana
New Music Friday: Jan. 22

All Songs Considered

34:32 min | 5 d ago

New Music Friday: Jan. 22

"This message comes from. Npr sponsor nerdwallet. They bring together the smartest credit cards mortgage lenders and more so you can compare and shop all in one place. For all your money questions turned to the nerds. Nerdwallet dot com gunsmoke. Grey's anatomy choose me. Game of thrones. You know nothing jon snow. None of these shows would exist without one guy and his very famous white dizzy or nasr inventor television as we know it on. Npr's planet money. Podcast happy friday. Everyone from npr music in all songs considered. I'm robin hilton. i'm here with. Wsvn's john morrison. Hey john hey over over. It is new music friday. And we're looking at the best albums out now on january twenty second. There's a new one from rye and a surprise released from the band typhoon but we start with a group called thirteen and their debut album at magnificient. Day for an exorcist. Betamax start for the last of the mcmanus. The way he was never from an upper class of the season they mocked him. The best of breed is over now. I've got something sane. Let's see who listen. I've got a magic trick. Say listen yada. Magic trick took hit him up. Cinema cinema pin. I'm up against the back in the my never really been in that position reno. The minimum amount of venom and breath. And that's amazing. Yeah thirteen is the band. The album is a magnificent day for an exorcism and this incredible song is called the magician. This is a new group. Fronted by the rapper. Fairmont is probably best known to some for a hit that he had back in nineteen ninety nine called. simon says john. This is as i said a new project from him. This is their debut album. What's he doing with this one yet. This is really interesting like you said. A foul much celebrated veteran. Mc and as he displays you know all over this record probably technically the greatest rap virtuoso living on the planet right now and he's joined by a marcus machado on guitar and daru jones the drummer. Who's you know. Probably best known for playing with jack white but he's also a very dope hip hop producer and his own right and in. It's really you know in the vein of bands like living colour may be led zeppelin that sort of thing. But it's like farrell march like a dig in and spitting over top of you know really a musical environment that we haven't seen him occupied before. Yeah i thought of living color. A lot and yamaichi such an unbelievable lyricist. I kept making notes as i was listening to it. There's a song called amnesia where he rhymes nostalgia with fibromyalgia. And then there's a a it makes total sense and then he's got another one where he rhymes trysts guy deca phobia with trapeze. Ius nova scotia yet. Farrell has always kind of had this over the top fire and brimstone almost like preacher type energy in thematically he's dealing with politics and white supremacy racism. There's a song on here called racist this kind of like an update of organized confusion song hate where farrell and his partner prince. Po run from the perspective of a neo. Nazi so racist. Kind of flip stat concept in revisits it again. You mentioned fire and brimstone. I found a lot of this record to be very creepy but in a supernatural way you know i mentioned the the line where he where he says triska deca phobia which is the irrational fear of the number thirteen. But then there's another another song called six six and then on one called the exorcist and this is all some sort of as you say. Fire and brimstone metaphor for the collective sins of society particularly as you say the the country's long history of racism. There's a lot going on here. And it's cool to see someone who's been around for so long as pharaoh has leading up a project that's so different from the rest of his music and that new project is called thirteen their debut album and magnificent day for an exorcism. Thanks so much john. Thank you robin. I appreciate it and from thirteen. Let's go next to the electronic artist yu-su she's got a new one called yellow river. Blue this is you sue the artist. You sue her. New one is yellow river. Blue in the song we're hearing from. It is called klein and here for this. One is npr music contributor christina league. Hey christina hi robin. I cannot tell you how many times i discover an artist. Who's completely new to me. Only to find out basically everyone certainly on the air music team and extended families already fan. And that's what happened with youtube. Multiple people hit me up this week. Saying you've gotta talk about the new record from you. Sue so tell us who is used to in which you're loving about this new yellow river blue so you so it was really interesting trae. She's originally from kaifeng china but she moved to vancouver and effectively launched her music career around twenty fourteen. You know she moves vancouver she discovers this really exciting left field electronic seen With the likes of pender street steppers. And the before you know it you know. As she gained notoriety as an artist herself she finds herself touring mainland china only to discover that there is just as exciting of a mainland electronica scene there. And so this particular. Gilbert blue is very much in conversation with that. It's hard for me to put her music any specific time. There's a song called melaleuca. The it almost has this yawn hammer of feel to it. You know very eighties and then another one called touch me. Not this more of an are peggie. It'd tangerine dream. Feel you know. And i feel like that certainly on purpose. One of the touchstones that i read about was andrew jackson's mister heartbreak in particular and that particular example of that russia. I'm sorry i love that. Much i never. I never hear anybody named check that record. That's so cool. Yeah and so. That's really exciting right. Because i don't know if you remember. But there was some japanese instrumentation that was sampled on that record. And that's what a lot of musicians were calling. Cancer like fourth world ambience. Where essentially you're Incorporating all these like sort of quote unquote old world. Sounds with like these electron touchstones and so this particular album definitely builds upon that and i think that's what makes it so exciting she does nice sort of sleight of hand in these songs. Where it seems pretty sparing you kind of drift away with them and then when you suddenly snap back the whole song is completely blown up. And they're all these different layers swimming in and out yes. She is like a really intricate producer. In that sense. I found that throughout the album. I was in some state between like feeling totally that it's like nervous excitement. I think this album is the epitome a sort of like nervous excitement where there is sort a lot of going on a lot that can catch your attention if you're paying close attention to it but the way that i think those sounds are sort of like invalid. Has you feeling very present. Let's say you sue as the artists. That's why you and the su record is called yellow river blue and let's do something completely different and go to the rapper b. r. s cash. His new and his called cash only dorothy. Dorothy nickel worked some michael. Michael works some michael luck with. Don't don't talks at the back door to door. Pipe aka working papa. Gilady working golden safe the us on the golden teaching dorothy dork. Dorothy this is the rapper. Be r. s cash cash with a k. His record is called cash. Only the song we're hearing from it is call do it. So like a lot of atlanta rap superstars robin bureaus caches lived a couple of different lives. I e like when the dude was eighteen he was signed to a completely different label. headed by travis porter. Who's kind of like a land robbery. Alty in their own right but you know it just so happened that this time around. He manages to strike ahead of something. That's kind of a lark and that would be the song and i'm so sorry throat baby. Go baby yeah. That song super descriptive. Yeah you could. You could say that you know what's so funny too. Is that pretty much once. Inked his current record deal which is with love renaissance and interscope starts to take off on tiktok. But what's funny. Is that these particular influencers. They even seem to be a little sheepish to dance lawn to this song in particular specifically because of how explicit is. It's like they're doing all the moves but then they have this look on their faces just like oh what am i doing. Well i mean this whole album is is kind of over the top explicit and there's so much sex in it and it's interesting because you know when i when i listened to music very often. I'm trying to tease out. What's real from the persona you know. And i wasn't sure what to make of him or a lot of the cuts on this record. But i read an interview. He did with deejay booth where he said he was actually reluctant to release throat baby because in his mind he was just joking around when you when you wrote it right. And he and he was actually worried that people would take. It's wrong way. Yeah ri- right and apparently the story behind. That song is even more explicit than the lyrics lead on right. I've never heard that from rapper. That they're actually trying to hide something and make something seem less excited than it actually is but i think regardless i mean this is in part of the atlanta rap tradition right like i'm thinking of throat baby s sort of like the modern version of love your mouth which for those who don't know is by keila lee and atlanta rap pioneer from before even at times so lake to me like that song very much is in tradition with that which is interesting because i think over the past couple years from the men i would say like me and my friends and i've been wondering where are the sexually explicit rappers. The women have no problem giving the ikea directions of what they want. But somehow the men have been very shy. There seems to be some change going on. Well i found the album overall to be pretty irresistible hooky and it is so hokey just like right out the gate. Yeah he understands that people love bounce music like you can tell that he up listening to juvenile but he also has like a real clear sense. That atlanta's really into that sort of melodic hook rap. There's there's a lot for people to like on here. B. r. s. cash is the rapper. His debut album is called cash only and christina. Let's do one more before. I let you go. It's from another rapper. New york rapper. This is romy banks. His new one is called the phantom of herod ice this splinter in fees fish slightest second night once hit night is kicking the dust on nigga no force jersey knows are the days twenty seven next on live my father would age gotta pasha say saint face only difference s second. My college shane on me for glass. Got past twenty-five off the plane. Any kid play on my mind. I don't mind peace key selling piece in mind. It ain't nobody else. God this is romy banks. The rapper rimi banks is new. And it's called the phantom of paradise. This cut is called tomorrow and christina. He sort of like the complete opposite of r. s. cash right. You know what. I mean like cash this outsized personality and i think the music to go along with it and everything about remmy. Banks is more restrained and introspective. I think this album is particularly interesting. I think part of that introspection comes from the fact that whether with his crew world's fair or just on his own like he's always sort of been hell bent on bringing past image of new york back into the right right before. Like new york rap started to become hip again. You know he and world's fair we're really trying to evoke like that feeling that you have when you listen to wu tang for the first time or nas for the first time they were basically saying new york wrapping dead yet and i think that's part of where that introspective feeling comes from well. I love the restraint in. And i think that's what i like most about this record. It's very spare. And i think it's also unexpected in that way too because i think when you're engaging in newark rap nostalgia it's very to expect like those boom bap drums to not that those don't show up on here they do show up but I think by sort of paring back down on the percussion in made sort of like this whole nostalgia. Trip seem all the more dream right. It kinda gave it like this quality that i haven't really heard In new york rap previously interesting. There's a song called dreaming to where i thought he was bragging about all his accomplishments and then of course i realized you know maybe the name of the song was the first clue that he's you know. He's daydreaming about how he wishes his life. Was you know an and apart from wishing that he was a millionaire which okay sure we all do. His dreams are all like he. He wishes he owns his own place. You know that he that he put his siblings through college. That is families living comfortably right right and you can only just hope that all that is sort of within his grasp although as the album's were too proceeds it gets harder and harder to tell whether that can actually come true for him or a good one from remmy banks. His second solo effort called the phantom of paradise. Thanks so much cristina. Thanks for having me. We still have a few more albums that we wanna play for this week's new music friday but first we need to take a short break and we'll be right back support for npr and the following message come from better. Help offering online counseling. That help therapist has you. Joe explains the importance of creating a safe space for therapy. I can't tell you how many times i've had clients that. Say that expression like. I've never told that to anybody. That's what i know. I've made some kind of momentous move with this person. They feel safe enough to expose that part of themselves and doing that together with somebody else can be very powerful to get matched with a counselor within forty eight hours and save ten percent. Go to better help dot com slash songs. It's new music. Friday from and all songs considered. I'm robin hilton. And we're doing a quick run through the best albums on january twenty second we start the second half of the show off with the band. Ri- they're back with a new one called home town this. This is the ban. Rai their new one is called home in the song we're hearing from his called black rain and npr. Music stephen thompson reporting back from his fortified pillow. Fort for this one stephen. You've been missed. It's great to be back i have. I have missed not you exactly the show for sure. Oh yeah well. The show has missed you too. So ri- the forecast is always steamy. When it comes to ri- from and mike neil oc- man that dude. I just hallway through listening to this record has had he so smooth he really is. I mean you referred to rise a band and you know in the very beginning when riot got its first album woman. It was a duo and by the time rise. Second album blood came out in two thousand eighteen. It was really basically a solo project for mike milosz and this record is the same but it is a very fully fleshed out vision. It's very big blooming sound and he found ways to work with collaborators including the danish national girls choir. So you have this. Really rich. And seductive record that i think will really appeal to people who like kinda. I hooked into this band in two thousand thirteen. You mentioned the danish national girls choir. They are heard on a song. Called a intro. The first song ins the record with true. I wanna play a little bit of the intro. So that people can hear what they sound like and it's just gorgeous But when i heard this at the top of the record i thought you know it really suggested a totally different kind of album than the one that was on the way which ended up being pretty disco in parts but the more i thought about it. I thought you know this is. This is apt for mike milosz. Because there's sort of a divinity and spirituality in in the love that he kinda ties in with the rest of this record well. I think those book ends really are tone setters. And they're setting a tone of lustrous nece and warmth that i think is consistent even with the soft disco of a song like black rain the kind of string infused bop that you get with the song coming closer. I think i think those songs really are all of a piece. Right is the artist record is called home and stephen. Let's do one more. It's a surprise released this week. An unannounced record a brand new album from the band typhoon. It's called sympathetic. Magic did isn't turning a north dakota metastasized as a darkness as this is typhoon. The album is called sympathetic. Magic in the really incredible song is called empire builder. you know. it's only like four minutes long or something like that but it goes through so many changeups in just this one song. I wanna jump around here a little bit so here. There's a bit of this symphonic guitar rock and then here toward the end of the song Sounds like this. You know a a. Which is this fantastic group. Sing along you know about basically what everyone is feeling right now. Yeah the last words of that song empire builder. I wrote them down because they really struck me. Everybody's angry everybody's lonely. Maybe it's hopeless and maybe love is not enough. But let's not rule out the possibility. Yeah and that is typhoons kind of lyrical approach in a nutshell. Kind of throughout the band's career there's a real undercurrent of darkness to the point of almost like an apocalyptic quality to some of kyle morton's lyrics and at the same time there is this sense of celebration and joy really infused with this idea that our lives are finite and so we have to enjoy and appreciate them and find some sort of hope in spite of it all i love how just soaring and majestic the songs get which i i can't believe he made this isolation because it sounds like this massive group of people making this music together all in the same room but but i love how it never gets overblown. You know like. I think it'd be easy for music as conceptual as this and is driven by big ideas. Is this music is to take itself may be too seriously and it never does. It's always just pitch perfect typhoon. Is the band. The new album is called sympathetic. Magic all right. Stephen thompson thanks. I hope you're on again soon. Thank you robin arrived from the serene majesty of the band typhoon. Let's go next to pal. Berta the band pal berta. They've got a new one called pata five thousand down to close down stead Clothes back and word from people. This is the band halliburton. Their new album is called alberta five thousand. The song we're hearing from it is called fragile place an music's mercer larusso back for this one hamer's k. Robin so this is the band's fifth album and i have to admit i hadn't really listen to them before. I had no idea that they put out that much music but why i really love their sound. That's garage rock and punk in a little bit of new wave all mixed together. Yeah but it. Has this like delicious. Weirdness about it. The three members of the band. Everyone plays everything and everyone sing so like during a set after a couple songs. Everyone rotates bass guitar and drums and like picks up a new instrument and it really feels like the three people in the span. Just speak their own language there so tuned in with each other. They're just having so much fun and they have. This really frenetic exuberant kind of goofy energy. But then the melodies are so sharp and then they have those like super fun unique three part harmonies. They throw in there as well. Yeah you just hit on something. That i caught when i was listening to this really love. And that's this needle that they thread where they managed to sound like very thrown together but also very intentional ramshackle choreographed. Does that make totally. It feels like it's not that anything. They're playing is like super super technically advanced. But you also get the sense that no one else could be playing these songs the way that these three people play these songs and the lyrics lyrics to there's a there's a song called cow where they say. I will be there with my hand on your chest. I feel your rumbling internal mess. And i've never heard anyone refer to the anguish that someone's going through as a rumbling internal mess but it is so perfect. They really sneak in as profound moment. Yeah well the band is paul. Berta and their new is called pal. Berta five thousand. Love this record. Thanks so much marisa thank you. We've got one more album that we wanna play for this week's show but As always it's another busy release date and there are a few other notable albums in. Ap's out today that. I want to mention. And i'm going to go through these quickly but definitely check them out when you can. The irish electronic duo bicep. Bicep has a new out today called aisles also new electronic ep today from the australian artist known as logic one thousand. It's called you've got the whole night to go. The band karm a collaborative project from why music trumpeter. Cj cameraderie and a whole bunch of other artists including bone bears justin vernon karm self titled. Debut is out today. Bob boylan featured on all songs considered back in november eric the architect of the hip hop group. Flatbush zombies has a solo. Ep out today called future-proof there's also this really wonderful arresting new record from a band called the conductor. it's called spirit of a ghost and features bonnie prince billy on a couple of tracks sort of an experimental americana music really love spirit of a ghost from the conductor and as always we'll put songs from these releases and a whole bunch of other new tracks out this week and our new music friday playlists in apple music and spotify so do give listen to all of those all that music is out now on january twenty second along with this last album that we wanna play from the country singer willie jones. It's called right now. Young man young man the drive of a while young young man middle watch i still. You'll grandma doesn't win. He'll say for granted you would. He ran young man bruised. And you don't know what stand proud of brave and the free. Your mom in that. American boy is the american dream into one man on the braids. One one on deep in the streets but the dreams to meet one on foot same thing. This is willie jones. The artist willy jones. The album from him is called right now. In the song we're hearing from his called american dream and joining us from nashville for this one is npr music contributor and w xp editorial director. Julie hi julie. Hey willy jones. This is his debut album and He makes music that leaves you wondering what exactly it is. That is true that is true. He is a young black country pop artists from the deep south. And you know more than so many other artists in country pop who have attempted to lean heavily on hip hop. He just has an ease. And you know much deeper. I think understanding of how to use elements of it. Obviously there are tons of people. Making music over programmed. Beats in nashville. And that's been going on for years but he often will actually freestyle over a beat literally on the spot. Improvise a melody or lyrics. Vocal cadences whatever and that is different. You know that is a lot more like a hip hop or pop or r&b process and the thing that strikes me about listening to willie jones is i feel like instead of letting himself bear the burden of trying to quote unquote properly perform blackness by the standards of nashville or the country mainstream. You know and and properly in that context is to minimize blackness. If you are actually a black art. I mean minimize difference. You know minimize the specifics of identity. He seems very aware of it. But not inhibited by it or beholden to it lyrically. There's a lot of familiar territory here drinking too much partying too much and breaking hearts and being broke but then you take a song like american dream where it's also very patriotic as you expect so much country music to be for him confronting the country's troubled history and protesting for change that is inactive patriotism. Oh absolutely and there. Are there aligns where he's talking about the meaning and symbolism of the american flag. That just you know really land in a powerful way because he is clear that he is familiar with the lineage of patriotic songs in country music. And beyond it to you know. And he's making his he's making his contribution to it. Willie jones's the artist. His debut album is called right now. Thanks so much julie. you are. Welcome pleasure if you'd like to go back in here full versions of older songs we featured on this week's new music friday you can see and hear the fullest along with a bunch of other singles. That came out this week on our website. Go to npr dot org slash all songs. You can also listen to an apple music or spotify. Just open those absent search for. Npr's new music friday playlist and for npr music. I'm robin hilton. Stay strong everybody. Be well and treat yourself to lots of music.

robin hilton romy banks npr Wsvn marcus machado daru jones atlanta yamaichi triska farrell christina league christina hi robin Gilbert blue danish national girls choir peggie mike milosz john Dorothy nickel Gilady dorothy dork
Rare Earths: The Hidden Cost to Their Magic, Part 2

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

31:33 min | 1 year ago

Rare Earths: The Hidden Cost to Their Magic, Part 2

"Welcome dissipations a podcast powered by the science history institute. I'm Alexis Pedrick. And I'm Lisa berry Drako in each episode of distillation. We take a deep dive into a moment of science related history in order to shed some light on the present. This is part two of rare earths the hidden costs to their magic in part one we told you the story of a Chinese fishermen who woke the world up to our dependence on rare earns is this the moment of maritime drama, which sparked the worst political row in years between China and Japan. A Chinese fishing vessel is ordered to stop by Japanese sailors. We told you what we're arts are how he found them in the first place and have we used them or not used them throughout our history. In this episode we're going to dive deeper into the cost of their magic. And if you haven't already, you should probably listen to part one first chapter six how China became the rare earths capital of. The world. I think what's fascinating is that we used to one hundred years ago. No, where everything came from David Abraham is the author of a book about rare earths called the elements of power, if would was cut down. It was cut down from somewhere nearby and even if it wasn't nearby you knew it was would. And as we start to, to, to use these products that are far more complex each component comes to tremendously complex lie line to get to us because of that complexity people often don't realize that rare earths are not truly rare. They're everywhere most countries have enough, rare earths under their soil for their own needs. But they aren't equally easy to actually get out of the ground, and they're hazardous to mind, they can be very expensive to get if you want to source them in a social in environmentally responsible way. And so the solution has been to cut out the socially and environmentally responsible part and just go for cheap. All of those technologies come with costs that are borne by some people had born in some places and benefits that often accrue on two different people in different places the places where historically it's easier to get these things on the cheap. Marginal former colonial frontier, remotely populated areas, which is why despite the relative bigwigs air elements in the earth's crust. We tend to see mining in Inner Mongolia, interests in mining these things in the Amazon. You know the mountain pass. Mine was located in eastern south eastern, California. Right. These are not heavily populated places where mining interests are going to have to answer to a lot of people are concerned about what's happening in their backyard. The Chinese government developed, it's rare earth industry far from Beijing. And the backyards of powerful people China began its dominance in rare earths with or leftover from iron and uranium mines in Inner Mongolia, and starting in the nineteen eighties China was setting up research programs to unlock their power and the US actually played a role in making it that way. Thanks to Richard Nixon, and his brother Edward Edward Nixon was a geologist, and environmental scientist actually helped convince his brother to form the EPA in nineteen seventy he did to a lot of consulting work for industrial concerns. So his solution at the time was actually, to facilitate the transfer of, of heavy industry from the US to different countries. And one of the reasons was honestly to move heavily polluting industries outside of the United States. And so, from nationalist environmentalist standpoint and makes perfect sense. Protect america. Preserve America's environments move polluting industries overseas. It was a conservative environmentalist patriotic act to establish the Environmental Protection Agency. This is part of the deindustrialization of the west. In other words, we get to keep the magic someone else gets to pay the cost. If you look at the textile industry or the automotive industry, there were a lot of people who can. To be very angry about the fact that these industries left the United States for earth's, maybe not so much because earth mining is extremely hazardous. If you're bringing up rare earth elements, you're also bringing up radioactive waste, and this is very expensive and very controversial to manage well. Chapter seven sacrificed zones. We have this attitude that, you know, there's no way to get the stuff that we need without sacrificing some place somewhere, someone's going to have to bear the burden. There's a term for the places that bear the cost of making the magic in all of our gadgets and tech sacrificed zones. We're going to tell you about two of these sacrifice stones in Inner Mongolia and on Thomas region in northern China, Inner Mongolia is also a disputed territory like those islands in the East China Sea. The town of Byeon Obon is one of those sacrificed zones. This used to be a windswept grasslands you know it's not a barren desert. It's not a wasteland. It was a place where he for millennia nomadic. Pastoralists grazed today. Do still see herders moving with their flocks. But of course life is much different for herders in this contemporary. Context, because they live in the shadow of the largest, rare mine in the world in nineteen twenty seven China came across iron reserves. Here they found rare earths ten years later of mine them ever, since the mine is basically two giant pits and big tailing ponds and couched in the middle of this is actually, the town of by an oboe. There's another sacrifice own Inner Mongolia called bowel to- city, which is ninety three miles south of Bion opo, and this is actually where most of the rare earths mind by an oboe get refined. It's not a frontier outpost, it's a glistening modern metropolis with lots of high rises in neon lights and things like that much like other major cities on China's eastern seaboard without adequate protections. Rare earth, mining, and processing can produce devastating effects, not just to the land, but to the people who lived there and it's not just the rare earth. Themselves causing damage. It's the things that come up alongside them like Floride and arsenic, these two can cause skeletal fluorosis. It's a debilitating condition that causes bones to become brittle and break bones can grow radically and become out of sync with their muscles, ligaments, you can identify maybe who was born in raised just outside of the city because often, you're looking at stunted growth, people who have skin lesions, or even, you know, acute cases, skeletal, fluorosis, which look like bone deformities. So one of the things that you notice when you visit bow to are these really large hospitals. I'm talking twenty stories twenty story hospital dedicated entirely to bone medicine. It'll say in big letters at the top of the twenty story building. The bone the regional bone medicine hospital, and it's not just the deformities people around bell toll us a couple of terms that signify, the devastation one is cancer villages places where the cancer rates have skyrocketed because of the pollution. The normal ratio of people diagnosed with cancer is to, in one thousand in belto. It's one in seven, it's become a rallying cry to protest the human toll to say. Look look at the human costs of this way of doing business. So this was a grievance advanced on the part of Chinese citizens against the industry against the government, right? What did they want? They wanted they wanted to be moved. They wanted to be compensated. They wanted medical treatment, and they also wanted the cause of, of the illness to be taken care of the hazards of rare earths come at four stages. The mining itself refining the ore manage. The waist and disposing of it. I the mining blasting rare earths out of the earth's crust means blasting out other elements to elements that weren't harming anyone in the ground. But once you blast them out of the ground pulverize them into powder, what you're doing is you're transforming them into a form that they can be inhaled that they can stick to your skin that they can be transported on the wind and enter into the food and water streams, and it isn't only people who work in the minds were affected. Everyone downstream is affected too, chances are they're eating meat from animals who were drinking contaminated water, and they're eating contaminated vegetation, refining the rare earths also creates pollution. This is where the elements need to be separated from the rest of the or the process requires acid baths, and extremely high temperatures and it doesn't happen in by an oboe, but embattled city and the reason that you have this. Disconnect between the mining site and the processing site is simply because the processing requires a lot of water and bow to- city is located on the northern shore of the Yellow River, it gains its name from the yellow soil that bleeds into the water is the river descends from the Tabet plateau in recent years. The river has gained another more notorious claim to fame as one of the most polluted rivers in the world for every ton of rare earths produced dozens or even hundreds of tons of radioactive waste water water, contaminated with heavy metals radioactive materials are also created and those radioactive materials, also create radon gas which can cause cancer. This is a city of several million people, and, you know, downstream of the major industrial facility. These are traditional agricultural villages, historically. This has been a really. Food base for the city. And so, historically, people have been consuming vegetable produce, and meats and fish protein that, that are contaminated with the waste from rare earth, refining processing minds from across the globe. Now ship their raw or to China to refine. It processing is happening everywhere. David Abraham visited a few processing plants in southern China. Here's him describing one. Felt like a small warehouse that you bet you'd walk in. It was a pitched roof but really wasn't wider than about twenty feet, and it was about seventy feet long and along the side of the building were about seven furnaces, all wailing away. So you could really feel the heat when you when you came at you when you came in the room and after being there and watching these cauldrons bubble with, with, with some type of metal in them. I started to look around and feel that my, my nose was burning in my eyes were starting to water. So these guys are working there five six days a week and couldn't imagine the toll it's taking on their bodies refining bear. Earth's has become such big business in China that people are setting up their own individuals small scale operations, especially when we're looking in southern China. A lot of these mining facilities summer were were quite rogue. And to produce rare earths was very easy for local minor to do. They could just take a little bit of earth. Throw some acid on it and boom they had something that take tell. So when that's happening it's very easy for, for individuals to create very inefficient, very polluting, but very profitable for the individual material processing. But when you're mining you as we're mentioning before ninety. Percent of the material is useless. So you have to put it back. And this brings us to the other two ways that rare earths production is hazardous waste management and disposal all that stuff has to go somewhere. And so what minds typically do and or have historically done as they dig a big retention pond nearby. And they pipe their wastewater, which also contains the remaining the remaining or that what that wasn't wanted and they dump it there. Right. And gradually over time the water drains out into the surrounding soil or evaporates, and what you're left with is kind of a silt or slurry, and what some mining operations do is they then haul that away somewhere else. But the scary thing is we don't always know where that somewhere else is. This is really what kept me up at night, you know, these are people who had other plans for their lives. And I really identified with that. I mean I talked with people who were dying of cancer, and to me, it seemed such terrible, needless waste simply because we are collectively globally not willing to pay a few more dollars per kilo for a rare elements in order for them to be sourced. Stain ably. Now, maybe this is surprising, but China has documented this devastation pretty well there's often an assumption. Oh, you know this environmental degradation is happening because they're incompetent. And they don't know any better. They have. They must have no idea the scope of the of the damage that they're doing. But in fact, if you go to the municipal library in bow to- city. There are shelves of studies dating back to the seventies, and that monitor changes in soil quality and water quality. There's a number of a scientific journals that are devoted to the questions of radioactive waste management of soil and water via Billiton from what are called exhausted industrial areas and it's not just the research. They're also responding to people's demands the credit of China's institutions that. They built hospitals a number of people have been resettled compensated. Of course, is a lot of problems with that. And actually China has been working really hard to reduce its share of global Rarick production. This part is really he China wants to produce fewer rare earths so that it can get its environmental problem under control, but we wouldn't let them in fact, China would be punished for trying to be environmentally responsible. Sounds wild, but it brings us back to the fishermen incident. Hay listeners, we just wanna take a moment and reminds you to check out our website, distillation dot org. That's right. Because does delay shins is more than a podcast for also multimedia magazine. We tell stories about the intersections between science culture and history. You can read about the pain relieving potential hot peppers. You can watch video about an interactive astronomy textbook from. Seventeenth century, and you can find every single distillation podcast episode ever, also you can find episode transcripts and research notes, all at disinflation dot org. Back to the show chapter eight the two thousand ten rare earths crisis. Remember our story about the Chinese fishermen, who set off an international crisis on September, seventh two thousand and ten Jen. Gee Jones Chula was fishing, the disputed Japanese controlled islands, the isolated incident, the fluke that freaked out the world unnecessarily. Well, we left something out before that two thousand and ten incident, something bigger had been brewing for a few years, China had been limiting the amount of rare earths. They were exporting since two thousand six because they were actually trying to get a handle on the pollution their minds and processing facilities throughout the country were harming millions of people and their environment reducing production would slow things down reducing. Production. Domestically is a victory for China's domestic environmental movements. That's victory for public health advocates in China in two thousand and ten just before the incident with the fishermen China reduced. It's quotas by forty percent. This raise the prices of rare earth, significantly people around the world. We're upset and the two thousand and ten incident fueled, the fire when American media outlets incorrectly labeled it as a total embargo prices shot up even more, but even more importantly, it justified the United States, Japan and the European Union in bringing a case against China to the World Trade Organization. They file joint lawsuit in two thousand twelve saying that China shouldn't be allowed to deny exports, such critical elements. We gotta take control of our energy future. And we can't let that energy industry take root in some other country because they were allowed to break the rules this morning. We're taking. An additional step forward. We're bringing a new trade case against China, and we're being joined by Japan and some are European allies. The World Trade Organization ruled against China in two thousand fourteen the rule said, they couldn't restrict exports by setting national quotas. Now, China has a good case to limit production, but you won't hear Chinese officials. Talk about it to the English speaking world, you environmental contamination, and associated unrest, is a very sensitive matter for the Chinese government. It's not something that can really safely be talked about, and it is, also the Chinese government is also acutely aware that this is a point that very easily and immediately draws international criticism. So in a way, but maybe downplaying or understating the extent of the environmental harm to the outside world, the Chinese. Has kind of undermined its own very reasonable case for actually controlling and for actually getting rare production under control during the in between years. A black market appeared inserted filling the gaps left by China's legal production. And as you might guess they were not doing things in an environmentally responsible way. They were doing things in the cheapest possible way. So really a sizeable portion of the rare elements that were being consumed worldwide. We're coming from, if informal or illegal channels, we're at the point now where we can't live without rare arts. There's a huge demand, and all it takes is for someone to come up with the supply, whoever does it cheapest when's. Meanwhile, in Brazil accompany, was starting to invest in more ethical, and sustainable method to mining, rare earths. So the story of the other Russia mine. In Brazil, it's a tale of hope and disappointment. This mine produces about eighty percent of the world's niobium which is used to make stronger steel. It's not a rare earth, but has similar properties to wear earth's and it's usually found alongside them. This mine is also the only one that has a certification that guarantees it complies with local laws and other strict environmental requirements. The only one it's known as an ASO fourteen thousand one certification, and it's been running since the nineteen sixties. So why do we care about this mine? If niobium isn't a rare earth because they're collecting ton of railroads in their waste ponds. And so shortly after. The earlier crisis happened at the at the beginning of the decade, one of the things that this company decided to do is to fast track a program to reprocess their existing waste and to extract, rare elements from it, and they manage to do this for a number of rare elements, and to achieve very high levels of purity. The tail of hope is that this company has developed a technique that could signal a paradigm shift for how we get the elements. We need this technique could get us out of the twentieth century way of mining, the tale of disappointment is that they just can't beat the China price. That's the despair. Once people get a taste of not only magic but cheap magic. It's hard to go back especially as long as the ugly costs day hidden. But there were also a number of people who were driven by the need, or the desire and the commitment to figuring out and environmentally and socially responsible way to source very elements and the market didn't support these people, the two thousand ten crisis. Fed a gold, rush fervor in rare earths sanfer. Millier people are prospecting all over the world. So you had prospectors in Greenland claiming that they found the world's greatest for deposits. You have reports coming out from North Korea. North Korea has the world's largest rare deposit. You have reports coming from Afghanistan that if ghanistan has the world's largest rare deposit, and you have reports coming out from Brazil that, Brazil has the world's largest where deposit and the interesting thing about all of these claims that it was poten-. The world's largest rare deposit. Is that each of these deposits were located in places that were either legally or logistically impossible to mind, even Molycorp home to the former mountain pass mine reopened in two thousand twelve while Corp side higher sales volumes and prices, all due to growing demand for so called rare earth minerals? But it closed after only three years and the main reason why was that it simply couldn't compete with China, but there might be another reason after the two thousand and ten crisis. Some companies are trying to learn to live without them. Chapter nine replacing rare earths so up until this point, we've been talking about rare earths as these indispensable parts of our lives. We got hooked on their magic, and now he can't do without it. So we want to know is why can't we all make our own magic. A hey, find our own earth's wherever we are turns out, not that easy, despite the fact that they're everywhere opening up. A new mine is expensive, and it takes about twenty years to get them off the ground. And we don't have that kind of time, because it's are critical for green technologies like hybrid electric cars. In other words, we need rare earths to solve our climate crisis. It's really a painful paradox and producing them sustainably in places like the US seems to be off the table right now. But there are some alternatives. For example, enter Ames laboratory in Iowa becoming of the atomic age work with radioactive material has brought an offensively. For special laboratories with special equipment, such is the case at the research center of the Ames laboratory on the Iowa State college campus, roughly food of all of the uranium that was used touring. The Manhattan project was actually produced in by the Ames project. Aims, laboratory is now a department of energy lab that research is rare earths, Alex King was the director until two thousand thirteen so all the technologies that would develop to work on uranium have since been KOMO Shalayel and got into the commercial sector. But the lab still use his a lot of that expertise to carry on work on rare earth elements after the two thousand ten crisis. The US department of energy created a critical material policy, they pumped almost five hundred million dollars to open the critical material institute at Ames laboratory so-far. We have something. Hang around AT, inventions, and they include things like processes fall recycling materials aim scientists at Cana Lebanon developed a new method of recycling, rare earths for manufacturing waste on the, the goal is to dissolve magnet, as fishing could be dissolved us our recover high period theory elements without resulting in toxic waste recycling is definitely helping, but aims is taking it a step further. They're coming up with ways to keep all of the magic without the rare earths. That's right. Scientists are working on replacements for rare earth, and they've already come up with some like replacement for some applications of your opium. Remember that particular rare earth made the red lights and color, TV the material, we've invented to replace EuropeaM works very well in one of the places that European is used. But not in all of them. It works great influence, and lights, not so great in the smartphone or computer screens, that also used rupiah, any one strategy may made part of the challenge, but nodal. So what it does is it releases some of the arro- PM that's going into fluorescent lights. And that can then go into other areas where European is needed, so you need to have a diversified strategy beyond the lab, other companies have found ways to cut their use of where earth or replace them altogether. Tell you what I made its Prius, motor smaller, so the using fewer Erz Ford redesigned, its fusion hybrid teas less two and they moved away from neodymium, the rare earth that makes magnets, more powerful, tesla on the other hand recently started using the odium when they weren't before. But at least one success story is that wind turbines are moving away from using rare earths altogether. So piece by piece. Does this mean we won't need rare earths in the future? Well, unfortunately, time is not on our side. We still need rare earths in a lot of green technology. And we don't have the time to completely overhaul how we make green technology. Here's Roger Turner again. We need them in minutes twenty years over the longer term. I think it's certainly it opened an open question. But these are metals that matter for our future. In two thousand nineteen rare earths are in the headlines again. President Trump is talking about the fact that the trade war with China is maybe going to go away, but there's actually no sign that it's going to the trade war is wrapping up with China over something called rare earth minerals. If we continue to frame, the challenge in terms of China, potentially holding the rest of the world in a stranglehold. We're actually overlooking, the common ground that we have not only in. Maintaining globally secure supply, which means that diversified supply. But also getting ourselves out of this nineteenth and twentieth. Century mode of mining that just takes devastation for granted the assumption that the way that we've always mind, rare elements is the only way that we can mind earth elements is to me, a profound failure of imagination. For clinger. There's actually a simple solution, the US government and companies should demand that their rare earths come from a place that has an ISO fourteen thousand one certification. Think of it kind of like the sticker, that's on our Ganic food to notify the customer, except it's for rare earths. And if you're freaked out of what you can do as an individual. Honestly, one of the best things you can do is hold off on buying that new iphone or that new gadget the second that it comes out less material that we need on a day-to-day basis. The less high phones, that someone needs to have the less stuff someone needs to buy likely they're making a green decision by not. If you can get another year out of your smartphone. If you get another year out of your computer the green decision is to stick with what you've got. But there's something else. The best thing you can do really, if we wanna get down to it is educate yourself understand, what rare earths are, and what role they play in the world. So the next time you hear a politician, talking about green technology or here mentioned on the news. You understand what they're talking about. And you can demand that they get answers do research and make more sustainable decisions. Distillation is more than a podcast. We're also a multimedia magazine. You can find our podcast videos and stories at distillation dot org. And you can follow the science history institute on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. This story was reported by Rico, Hernandez and produced by him. Mariel car and myself. And this was mixed by James Morrison for distillation. I'm Lisa berry Drako. And I'm Alexis Patrick. Thanks for listening.

China Earth United States Inner Mongolia Lisa berry Drako Chinese government David Abraham science history institute California East China Sea Alexis Pedrick Amazon Brazil Beijing Ames laboratory skeletal fluorosis Environmental Protection Agenc Japan Richard Nixon World Trade Organization
Rare Earths: The Hidden Cost to Their Magic, Part 1

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

25:29 min | 1 year ago

Rare Earths: The Hidden Cost to Their Magic, Part 1

"Hello, and welcome to distillation a podcast powered by the science history institute. I'm Alexis Patrick. And I'm Lisa very Drako in each episode of dissolutions. We take a deep dive into a moment of science related history. In order to shed some light on the present today, we're talking about rare earth elements, and this is a big story. So we broke it up in a two parts both of which are available right now. In part, one, we're going to tell you about the magic, and in partout, we're going to tell you about the costs. Chapter one, the fishermen on September seven two thousand and ten a Chinese man fishing near disputed islands in the East China Sea set in motion an international crisis with the facts that would be felt around the world. Here's what happened of maritime drama, which sparked the worst political row in years between China and Japan. A Chinese fishing vessel is order to stop by Japanese sailors, ordeal. You Lind's have periodically been a source of geopolitical tension between China and Japan for years. The islands are uninhabited, but they're claimed by China, Japan and Taiwan China and Japan have a peacekeeping agreement that says no one from either country is allowed to get within twelve nautical miles of the islands. And if someone did get within twelve nautical miles of the islands, then it would be the. Ability of whichever coastguard was patrolling at the time to escort that person back out into international waters. This is Julie Clinger a geographer and an assistant professor of international relations at Boston University, the agreement, she describes sound simple enough but things got complicated for the fishermen. This fisherman had gotten a little too close to the islands. His name is John cheese shown and instead of complying with the routine escort back out into international waters. He instead, rammed his fishing vessel into Japanese coastguard vessel. And because of this he was detained Japanese voices. Apparently wall Chinese captain is turning towards them and they brace. When news of the arrest hit Chinese and international media, the part about him ramming his boat into the coastguard was left out as was the fact that he was drunk. And so what it actually looked like at the time in September of two thousand and ten was that Japan detained an innocent Chinese fishermen, and this was interpreted in China, as an active esscalation. And so this took on a real. Big significance, I think far beyond what the actual incident called for. And so Beijing was working with a thorns in Tokyo in order to secure the release in the repatriation of Mr John. Meanwhile, the public wasn't really hearing a whole lot about this. And there were several people who felt like Beijing was not responding appropriately enough. People were angry. And some of them decided to take matters into their own hands. There'd be nationalistic protests in both countries in China, some of turn violent despite efforts by security forces to keep them under control. But one way that handful of people decided to teach Japan a lesson. Was actually by withholding exports bound for Japan. It just so happened that some of these exports were earth elements. If you only have the Vegas idea of what rare earth elements actually are. Or if you've never heard of them at all, you're not alone, and in September of two thousand and ten most people around the world we're in the same boat that was all about to change. Fall of two thousand ten. The whole world wakes up to our reliance on rare elements, rare earth, elements are often called the spices, or the vitamins of industry because what we don't need them in large quantities. They're in pretty much everything we associate with our modern world, my favorite metaphor is that they're like, yeast and pizza, the only need a little bit of it, but without it, there's no pizza another way to say is that with elements are essential for both the hardware and the software of life as we know it. They power phones and computers. They're in wind turbines, hybrid, cars and power windows, there in dental implants x Ray machines. Lifesaving cancer drugs, that shipment that was held back in China by just a handful of people could have contained anything. But it happened to hold rare earth elements, the essential tiny components that make our modern lives possible. Nobody really knew or even really missed of the fact. That these shipments of rare elements had been held up until Japan's customs authority inquired, China's customs authority what happened to the ships. And so people start asking questions where gets out that. That some brave Chinese nationals are teaching Japan, some humility by reminding of its economic dependence on China. And then the story sort of took on a life of its own China surprised governments around the world by halting shipments of something called rare or national concern soared higher on September twenty second when China stopped all exports to Japan following the arrest of Chinese fishermen in disputed territorial waters amidst rising tensions. A lot of people had to learn a lot of things very quickly. I what I rare elements. Why are they important enough that China would embargo these things against Japan? And why does that matter people began making obvious, but incorrect conclusions, like, for example, this one? So these things called where elements are being embargoed by China. That must mean they're rare. And the fact that in too. Two thousand and ten China produced ninety seven percent of the world's rare earth elements led to another obvious yet. Incorrect conclusion, oh, China produces the most rare elements because China has the most rare earth elements and all of these assumptions lead to a big frightening conclusion that China was holding the world hostage through it supposed rare earth embargo that China was engaging in some kind of economic warfare. This was the narrative that blew up overnight, and, of course, the markets reacted accordingly. The prices for certain rare elements increased by more than two thousand percent, the fishing boat incident had worldwide implications this unleashes a gold, rush all of a sudden everybody is looking for the elements. So there's a sort of swashbuckling like gold, rush sensibility, that was really. Fed by the two thousand and ten crisis. But you're probably still wondering what this really has to do with you. Why should we care so much about rare earths like we said earlier, our entire modern world is made possible by this collection of elements, seventeen seventeen elements that are sprinkled in small amounts through some of our most powerful futuristic and dairy say it magical tools while we don't need much of them. Rare earths are what make the magic happen. They have unusual magnetic, and electrical properties that make our stuff faster stronger and lighter. And we've been coasting along enjoying their magic for while now. In fact, we've come to expect magic. Nothing less than magic will do. And if you're a scifi and fantasy nerd like me you already know what comes next. It's the twist that the evil wizard doesn't recognize until it's too late. Magic always comes at a cost for us. The cost of our magical devices and technology is environmental devastation, and it's a big cost, but it's invisible to most of us in the western world. So we didn't even realize we paying for it at first back at September two thousand ten when a Chinese fishermen, rammed his boat into a Japanese coastguard ship. It did just make us all aware of the existence of rare earths inserted making us aware of their price tag. And it turns out that magic is usually better left a mystery. Because when you pull back the curtain, it's usually complicated and ugly. But we're distillation and pulling back the curtain is what we do. So here we go starting back at the beginning. Thing. But first chapter to a brief rare earths primer, we realized that, if you're listening to this podcast, it's entirely possible that you are familiar with the periodic table. Maybe you've looked at it on occasion, maybe more than one occasion even numerous occasions since eleventh grade. But for those of you who have not, we see you, we love you and you're not alone. So on the periodic table, you've got all the elements sorted together into groups things that have similar characteristics are near each other like, for instance, the elements in group, one are the Alkali metals, or as I learn them, the things that explode if you drop them in water, the rare earth elements, are mostly in group six, they're generally silver, silvery, white or gray medals. They're shiny, until they had the air, when they tarnish, they also have high electrical conductivity, and this is where the magic comes in one of the most important applications of rare earths are in magnets. The magnet basically changes electric city into motion the stronger. The magnet is the more motion, you can get, so a strong tiny magnet can make your iphone vibrate itself off the table and the same idea works backwards to magnets. Make it possible to change motion into electricity. Like when the shaft of a wind turbine, spins inside a magnetic field. It becomes an electrical generator and the scientists started discovering in the nineteen eighties, you can make really strong magnets, when you combine small amounts of rare earths like neodymium and dyspraxia m- with metals, like iron and boron. These powerful permanent magnets are partly would allows our gadgets to keep getting smaller and smaller and smaller. Rare earth aren't radioactive, but they're often found in rocks alongside radioactive elements and this is the big thing they're hard to separate from other metals and elements around them. Instead of thinking of it like panning for gold where you can just wash off the dirt and boom. You're done. Getting rare earths. Is more like played? Yes, Plato, stay with us. Picture bunch of differently colored pieces of Plato if you've ever watched a kid mush them together, you know how hard it is to separate those colors back into their original containers. So that's what it's likely. Find rare earths in the crown, that's a bit about what they are. But perhaps more important is also what they're not despite their name. They are neither rare nor earth's at least not in the way we use that term now and that's part of the problem in the eighteenth century, when they were discovered people understood rare to me, new and earth's was because before we understood. Tron and atomic weight we classified elements by their properties gases medals, non medals and earth's in some ways. They're actually the opposite of rare. They're everywhere. But while they're spread roughly evenly over the surface of the earth. It's hard to find a lot in one place and extracting them like trying to pull apart that ball of Plato, their jumbled together with lots of other minerals in different concentrations, and thus ends are brief rare earths primer. Now, they're all back on the same page back to the story, chapter three the excitement of discovery even though it wasn't until two thousand and ten that most of the world realized our dependence on rare earths, they've been around for a lot longer. Charlotte Abney Salomon is a research fellow here at the science history institute, and an expert in eighteenth, century, Swedish mineralogy and Sweden happens to be the place where the first rare earth element was discovered I have made a pilgrim. Image to the to the quarry and interbay where they original stone was found. Ater be Sweden is a tiny island off Stockholm it sometimes called the Galapagos island of the periodic table, because seven elements were discovered there for them are named after the island in the seventeen eighty s a Swedish artillery officer who was highly educated in chemistry was looking at, at some of the rocks, that had been found and identified one rock that was unusual. And it found its way to a chemist by the name of Johann gotta lean in Finland who, analyzed it to see what was so unusual about it, it was a rock, unlike anything he'd seen before and got lean got credit for discovering, new type of quote unquote earth. The excitement was mainly that it was new, but the rock didn't really do anything wasn't magic yet then nature of their. Chemistry means that they behave very, very, very, very, very similarly. So they really do appear as one pure substance. And so over the years, they were able to assess them with finer and finer distinction and actually make the distinction between these elements at the turn of the century Swedish natural historians were obsessed with cataloging and categorizing nature. Practicality is absolutely a stereotype of, of this character, and it's as a as a scientific community. They absolutely went very, very deep over a very long period of time in an attacking the question and mineralogical for also obsessed with the idea of chemically analyzing every new rock. They found on the ground so they separated out rare earth elements and began to organize them the first rare earth they identified would eventually be named. Trim. The second cerium. Then lantana. Di Demi 'em with turned out to be a mixture of praseodymium and neodymium. Then it trim Irby 'em and Turbie, then LARs Friedrich Nilsson another Swede detected an element in eighteen seventy nine which he called wait for it. Scandi m. After scandinavia. So one by one. The rarer are discovered until finally are seventeen the only problem was that no one really knew what to do with them. I have seen a periodic table from about one hundred years ago that says rare earths, and it has an asterisk and says, they're so rare and so an important that we won't be naming them here. And so certainly a hundred years ago, they were definitely considered just a kind of trivia of the periodic table. So the years go by, like a hundred of them, and there's lots of discovery but no application until until a chemist went looking for some. Hey listeners, we just wanna take a moment and reminds you to check out our website, distillation dot org. That's right. Because does delay Sion's is more than a podcast for also multimedia magazine. We tell stories about the intersections between science culture and history. You can read about the pain relieving potential of hot peppers. You can watch video about an interactive astronomy textbook from the seventeenth century, and you can find every single distillation podcast episode ever. Also, you can find episode transcripts and research notes, all at distillation dot org. Back to the show. Chapter four Karl our von wills Bach and the mixed up metal. It's not until the eighteen nineties that any of these elements become commercially useful. Roger Turner is an historian and research, fellow here at the science history institute, he's telling us about Karl our on wall, Spock wells back was a German. Chemist NATO, eighty he was at the university of Heidelberg studying under Robert Bunsen of the Bunsen burner. Yeah. That guy the one who invented it. NATO eighty two wells back went to Vienna where he worked as an unpaid lab assistant doing chemical separations of what else rare earth elements but wells Bach had dreams. He wanted to be a powerful wizard. I mean industrial tycoon but there was only one problem in the eighteen eighties. Big business was in lighting, and one guy named Thomas Edison, pretty much have that on lock so well spot had to come up with something else, and he did better. Streetlights urban is going gangbusters in the late nineteenth century. There's more and more. People are moving into cities, those people wanted the streets to be lit at night and wells back makes their wishes come true. He creates the gas mantle. It's basically a fabric bag that creates light when it's heated by a flame. And it's powered by one percent thorium and ninety nine percent cerium of rare earth, and there, it is magic his lights became big business by the nineteen thirties, wells box company has made five billion of them, and he's made a ton of money which let's face it is one of the higher forms of sorcery. But there's a problem with his process. He's left with this kind of great piles of waste materials, which have this annoying tendency of catching on fire, so he put two in two together and realizes that perhaps, he can use the waste metals as as part of a fire starter. He calls. The leftover material Mishna towel or mixed up metal and with it. He makes a model of the modern cigarette lighter. But remember, Bajic has a cost all these brightly lit streets, and cigarette lighters weren't free, the first costs came from mining or to track, the rare earths needed to make the gas mantles was no easy process. And it did terrible damage to the water supply anytime you mining basically the water than reaches groundwater flows into streams that can poison streams and, and kill off the animals, and the plants that are in those streams finding rare earths caused other problems acid baths and radioactive materials were involved but at the time these costs were hidden to western consumers because they were happening in faraway places like, Brazil, India and South Africa places at the European nations using the materials had colonized as nifty. Streetlights and cigarette lighters are rare earth still hadn't permeated our lives yet for that to happen. We've got a fast forward to the Cold War, because what the history of science story without a chapter on the Manhattan project. Chapter five from uranium to color TV so the history of rare earth elements is tangled up with radioactive elements because rare earths themselves are literally physically tangled up with radioactive elements. That's one of their defining characteristics that they're bound up in deposits alongside things like uranium so win the Manhattan project needed uranium for the bomb during World War. Two it makes sense that they asked for help from one of the few rare earth chemists in the US after World War, Two the US all uranium as crucial to national security uranium made the bomb. Now their countries had to join in the arms race. They also wanted it for nuclear power. Their goal is to find uranium of wherever it can be extracted around the world and I use international sources as much as possible while preserving. On domestic deposits for, for future use in times when perhaps international trade is, is disrupted, and this sets off a wild mom in US history, if you can imagine it. It's the late nineteen forties. The US atomic energy commission, announces it will buy uranium or from any American who finds it itself uranium gold, rush. They found uranium beyond their wildest dreams, they were so successful because you're eighty Bouma going to great of mineral hunts we ever had done by the government. And I don't think we'll ever anything like it again. I know you'll be hugely surprised to hear that the public uranium prospecting initiative, did not go very well, newspaper accounts, describe cattle, stampedes people threatening each other with guns, some prospectors, reminding without protection and inhaled radioactive dust, the US government decided a little belatedly that they shouldn't encourage amateur mining anymore. One. National minded open in the Mojave desert in mountain pass California. The mine was operated by a company called Molycorp, and at first rare earths were kind of a sideline business for them. But that will change in the nineteen sixties a world of color, and the men of television long greened of capturing the old paint part of nature and brushing it on the screen color television was dope. But the red color onscreen could only be produced by the rare earth, element, EuropeaM, color, TV's, became big business, and the mountain pass. Mine was the largest supplier of rare earth elements to the world from nineteen sixty until the nineteen nineties, all thanks to color TV because once you have color, you can't go back to black and white. I it's magic then we expect it and then we can't live without it. But there's a cost there's always a cost. And this time, the cost was a lot more visible because it was happening in our own backyard judge. With wells box gas mantles the European had to be bathed neces- and heated up in high temperatures. That's what separated it from the rest of the Plato, ball produces a lot of ways to produces a huge amounts of radioactive water, and it produces a lot of acid byproduct, as well, common strategy to deal with all this contamination is to use something called a tailings pond. They're basically giant pools particles from a mine mixed in with chemicals and water to separate the stuff that you want from the stuff that you don't want. But these tailings ponds leak and poisoned the groundwater. And so that's the kind of repeated violations of California environmental law regarding the poisoning of groundwater that eventually played part of the role in shutting down the mountain pass mine. Federal investigators found that there were more than sixty spills of radioactive water that seat into the desert floor. Eventually the mine closed in two thousand and two but of course this didn't. Mean we were all ready to give up the magic. You know already. That's not how the story ends rare earths become an even bigger part of our lives. How did we do it by getting someone else to make the magic? You see something else contributed to the California mine closing China was quickly becoming the biggest rare earth supplier in the world. And neither mountain pass nor the US as a whole could keep up. Find out what happens next per to available now. This deletions is more than podcast. We're also a multimedia magazine. You can find our podcast videos and stories at distillation dot org. And you can follow the science history institute on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. This story was reported by Rico Toronto's and produced by him Mariel car, and missile, and this was mixed James Morrison for distillation. I'm Lisa berry Drako. And I'm Alexis Patrick. Thanks for listening.

China Japan science history institute US East China Sea Plato Lisa berry Drako China Alexis Patrick Beijing Taiwan China partout California John cheese Julie Clinger Lind assistant professor Boston University
Isle take it: Turkeys adventures in the Med

The Economist: The Intelligence

22:35 min | 5 months ago

Isle take it: Turkeys adventures in the Med

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host, Jason Palmer. Every weekday, we provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. Part of the national story that China likes to tell itself and the world is that the longest continuous civilization in history. That claim is very much up for debate, but a new archaeological dig allegedly holds some improve. And the world is losing its oldest tallest trees. Deforestation continues all over the world and climate change is driving further threats to old growth forests. All that adds up to a worrisome environmental feedback loop. I up though. No Today Greece and the United Arab Emirates will begin joint military drills in the sea around. Crete. Over the weekend Turkey carried out naval and air exercises in the GNC. And on. Wednesday. Greece is expected to sign an agreement with Egypt on maritime, boundaries? There's a lot of diplomacy and posturing going on in the eastern Mediterranean and it's mostly about the stores of oil and natural? Gas Beneath. Turkish ships have been conducting energy surveys in Greek Cypriot waters. And after some clumsy maneuvering earlier, this month Greek and Turkish warships collided. Given Turkey's reason expansionism and involvement in wars in the Middle East, these maritime skirmishes are drawing in power to. Turkey seems to be on the wrong side of its neighbors and their allies and so far shows no sign of backing down. Turkey. Has Been sending ships into contested waters for two reasons to Sean. Joshi is the economists defense editor. One of them is challenging Greek maritime claims and the other one is the status of Cyprus. The island that has been divided since nineteen seventy. And as for the first, what was what exactly is the challenge on on Greek maritime claims will Turkey does not like the fact that it is geographically hemmed in by this huge number of Greek islands in the Aegean at some extent in the eastern Mediterranean to the south anyone looking at a map can see how Greek islands kind of scattered really close to the Turkish coast and Turkey. Rejects the Greek claim that these islands generate their own economic zones and that they stretch Greek maritime boundaries right up to the Turkish coastline and so that's a long standing dispute and he's been sending fixed to a particular island around a reach. So very close to the Turkish mainland saying we do not recognize the right of all these Greek islands to create exclusive economic zones in ways that effectively. US Our own maritime rights in the area. But why has this become such a flashpoint now? Why? Why such concern around these economic zones will toss the reason is that the has been a huge energy boom across the eastern Mediterranean over the past ten years it was Israel's discovery of an enormous gas reserve called Leviathan ten years ago since then we have also found. Egyptian and other separate discoveries. Now, the question of who owns these isn't all that disputed the not necessarily in very ambiguous places the challenge in Cyprus is that Turkey says. Is GonNA exploit these reserves around the island you have to have equitable representation not just for the Greek Republic the big recognized by the European Union and the rest of the world you also have to involve Turkish Cypriots, and if you don't recognize him if you don't give them representation, well, we're not gonNa let anyone get any of this and so that is part of the reason they've been sending these ships in that part of the reason that France and other countries have been piling in in defense of Greece and Cyprus. Those other parties what have Greece and Cyprus. Said in response to Turkish aggressiveness Greece site participant very angry Greece has sent its warships detail some of these vessels. That's what caused the collision that we saw earlier. This month Greece has also tried to close to allies in Greece and Cyprus EU members. They've tried to pull other you members in to get the attention of the block to put sanctions on Turkey they have tried. To conduct military exercises with other countries in order to ward Turkey away and they've done that somewhat successfully particularly when it comes to froms just off to we have a collision between the Turkish and the Greek warships. We had a conversation between the Greek Prime Minister and French Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron, and Mackerel said, he would be sending in military reinforcements to push back against techies. Francis connection to all of this France has been getting increasingly involved it partly simply please itself is supporting the rights of a fellow European Union ally fellow European Union member, who's maritime boundaries being challenged France as as we know, has been big on the idea of European sovereignty of a Europe that is more strategic minded. Of course, the cynic would also say French energy companies have interests in these areas and France is also increasingly at odds with Turkey, not just oversight personnel not just over these maritime issues but also over. A whole bunch of other things like Turkey's invasion of. Syria. Last year Ed Turkey's involvement in the Libyan civil war on the opposing side to froms, and of course, the fact that Turkey's government in recent years has been supporting political. Islamist across the middle. East something that France simply opposes on ideological grounds as well. So in other words, France in Turkey are kind of enmeshed in a kind of broad strategic competition, not just in the eastern Mediterranean all the way from. Europe. To the Middle East in increasingly poisonous way. But old hold. It sounds as if quite a lot of countries are pitched against up Turkey for all four, all of these reasons but in particular because of the eastern Mediterranean reasons. We've looked at Franz with up to Cypress and Greece but there's a number of other countries also lining up on the anti-tick side Israel for instance, is increasingly deepening its military cooperation with Greece, and Cyprus over its own concerns about Turkish behavior Egypt and the United Arab Emirates to Arab countries again lining up on the pro French side. That's partly because they are against Turkey in Libya conflict and overall we're seeing a new block develop cool. The East Mediterranean Gas Forum, which comprises Cypress Greece Italy Israel Egypt, and indeed a lot of these countries that we've been. Discussing, who are all coordinating their energy policies on pipelines and those sorts of things without Turkey and Turkey has tried to kind of push back at all of this partly by sending troops to Libya to Libya's government to try and keep yourself relevant and build influence. But also as we've seen by sending ships into eastern Mediterranean in the way that his driven this recent crisis, well, that seems only to have exacerbated. Right. If it is a club of interested parties, it's even less likely to get in. Now I mean isn't isn't this a recipe for for even more pointed conflict? I think that's true. We're seeing tensions grow Turkey has vowed to press on with exploration although eat it is still being pragmatic. You know it's it's being careful where it goes it it hasn't yet entered the very sensitive potentially rich waters of Crete which would be a major provocation. On the other side Thursday mixed appetite to confront Turkey I've talked about all of the countries that are lining up against the Turks. But if you look at the European Union although they are expressing solidarity with Greece and Cyprus as you said Jason, they're also divided right. The Germans for instance have been trying to mediate between Greece and Turkey, and they do not want to see a full blown clash all the countries like the UK awfully aware that Turkey is still a very important member of NATO and they don't want to see a complete breakdown in relations. So there are still a number of breaks on this crisis, which is preventing it from getting completely out of. Sean thank you very much for your time. Thanks Jason. Byrne. This podcast is sponsored by light box lab grown diamonds. They've act a billion year process to grow stunning lab grown diamonds in about two weeks, and there's some of the highest quality stones that exist there are always near colorless always vs clarity always a very good cut and always eight hundred dollars per carat. They come in three colors to white blush pink and soft blue after they're grown in the lab there transformed into jaw dropping lab-grown diamond jewelry. Its beauty meets brains go to light box jewelry, dot com slash intelligence, and use code intelligence for twenty five dollars off. Right now, small businesses have to be more efficient than ever and that means every higher is critical indeed is here to help indeed, Dot com is the number one job site in the world because they get you the best people fast you only pay for what you need can pause your account at any time, and there are no long term contracts right now indeed is offering our listeners a free seventy, five dollar credit to boost the visibility of your job post at indeed dot com slash Intel indeed dot COM slash I n. t. e. l. conditions apply offer valid through September, thirtieth. During a state visit to China in two thousand Seventeen President Donald. Trump. Engaged in Genteel tussle with his Chinese counterpart. Xi. Jinping. As the pair explored the Forbidden City in Beijing Mr Trump ventured that he had heard that while China had five thousand years of history. Egypt at eight thousand Egypt has eight thousand. Lung on meal Willett. Would into she explained that while yes, Egypt is more ancient. China's was the longest continuous history. In fact for decades, China has tried to prove that it boasts the oldest unbroken civilization on earth. Now officials claim that some archaeological finds have proven those claims. I recently went to an archaeological site in the middle of China in the province of Hun near the banks of the Yellow River at Shanghai shoots. A Neolithic settlement was found about seven years ago but it's become incredibly important to China's historians. David Rennie is her Beijing chief to look at it's not that special. It's kind of scrubby plateau quite high above the river flood plain the most exciting more life. I saw was dragonflies and very loud crickets and on one side you have quite. A noisy highway and behind you have to steam belching power stations, it may not be lovely but you can tell it's importance and one way is that the chief dig technician on duty guy called Joe ming-chung who was introduced to me by his boss as a Doug War going young national level Craftsman, and here's known as the softest hands in the business. So the fact that he is there this kind of Sun batted tousle-haired ex Pharma tells you that national officials care about this site. So. What is it? That makes this site so important the background is that since Chinese archaeology began in the nineteen twenties, you cannot separate it from politics and in particular the claim that China has the oldest unbroken civilization on earth China's leaders and state media say that China has five thousand years of history. The frustration for them is that China's written history only goes back about three thousand. So if you want to try and push it back another two thousand to get that boast, you have to push it back the era of the founding yellow emperor who by. Tradition ruled over just this area of central China five millennia ago although foreign scholars have the impudence to say that he's actually mythical never existed. This site has been declared a royal capital leading archaeologists say that it has the right location the right age it's grand enough and has distinctively Chinese cultural elements. So it was immediately hailed by state media. Early this year as proof, the China does indeed have five thousand years of continuous history in in what way is it proof what exactly has been found here? I was shown around by the Director of the dig one shoe. We went John. To canoes rule women. And he points out signs of what he calls the royal level sophistication. So it's got large houses he talked about agriculture. You can see signs of raising pigs and chickens. It was an elaborate city with three layers of defensive walls around nine Uruguay. Wins out on you that Now, he did admit that foreigners again grumble that it's actually a neolithic site because there's no written records a tool. He says that maybe we're judging it by the wrong standards that perhaps there missing symbols that will one day be deciphered such as patent pottery as that tricky question the Yellow Emperor maybe we're wrong to expect him to be a little person maybe he was a tribe and so the age still matches. What When nine? And it was interesting. One of the final things he said to me is you can't keep using western standards to apply to Chinese ruins. But why is there such a pointed question in China this proving that there is five thousand years of unbroken history the goal of Chinese nationalists since the beginning of the twentieth century was to convince the Chinese people this very large very diverse country was united had a distinct Chinese civilization and always had done. One of the interesting things about Chinese archaeology is it's been through several stages of political influence in the Maoist era it was about finding evidence of. Feudal oppression and the wickedness the past it's now much more about the glories of the past because patriotic education has replaced class warfare as the favorite tool for mobilising the masses and so you've seen since the ninety s the central government taking very ambitious steps to prove written history way back to assign dates to the very earliest Chinese dynasties. If you want to sign of how political this is back in May the chief spokesman of the Chinese Foreign Ministry put out a tweet complaining about American accusations that China was trying to steal the covid vaccine from American researchers and tweeted out wide we have. Stolen this remember China has five thousand years of history while the US has less than two, hundred fifty. So even in a Rabakov it, they can't help but bring the five thousand years of history and is Sean who the only place they can help prove this the surely, there must be other sites. There are lots and lots of interesting Chinese. Neolithic. Sites from the same time all over. China so why have they picked on this particular one? Well, it's because it's where it is because Chinese written history begins in those central plains around the Yellow River the fact that is their means that it's. A kind of symbol of China as a united place. So you have some scholars who described those competing Neolithic cultures, starry sky. But when I interviewed one way, he runs institute of Archaeology at the Chinese Academy is Social Sciences. He said the stars gathered in central China and a nation was built on top and so swung high shoe is in exactly the right place to tell a story about Chinese national greatness that always begins in the same place and then later ties into kings and emperors who we do have good historical records for. So it's a cleanly political project rather than simply archaeological one. One way what the point of Chinese archaeologists is it to research what's under the ground or is it to try and say something about China? He was very clear. The most important mission of Chinese archaeology is to study the origins of Chinese civilization and if you're pushing it back that far, you can't separate that from a claim that suits today's communist leaders that there has been something distinctively unified about Chinese nece that goes back five thousand years. UNTHOUGHT is a very appealing argument if you'll sitting in Beijing trying to hold together a country where. Tabet or in Hong Kong or in Xinjiang are separatist forces tugging at national unity so If this all sounds very political you're right. It is and the truth is history and politics in China have always being inseparable and that has been true for thousands of years. David thanks very much for your time. Thank you. For more analysis like this from our international network of correspondents subscribe to the. Economist. To find the best introductory offer wherever you are just go to economist dot, com slash intelligence offer. There isn't much forrest left on earth that hasn't been touched by human activities such as logging and mining. The old growth forest, the remains is disappearing fast more than a third of it has been lost in the past thirty years. Add to that rising wildfires, droughts, and insect infestations in the world's oldest trees are under serious threat. Of course many are replaced with younger ones but those can only go so far in doing what trees do best absorbing and storing carbon. The world is losing its big old trees and that's problematic for a number of reasons. Matia Ville. Check rights. For, the, economist in Poland. These. Ancient Woodlands are the boreal sentinels of their ecosystems. They hop a by Vesey down the younger trees which are often planted to replace them trees at largest source of carbon on land, which means that by cutting them down when not releasing heaps of confidence the atmosphere but will send using rolling carbon sink. The loss, these old trees plainly makes it harder to fight climate change. Yes. That's right. Because as these ancient trees die and decompose or if they if they bun in fires, heaps of carbon dioxide which are stored in them, it trunks and route southern released into the atmosphere. If we just look at two thousand, nineteen, the loss of primary forest was associated one point eight Gigi tons of carbon dioxide emissions is really two equivalents of what's produced annually by four hundred million 'cause that's according to a global forest watch, which is monitoring service. So what we results is a form of a vicious cycle as the temperatures rise cools it's more of these ultra to die, but then as we. Lose these old trees Mokaba is released into the atmosphere and that gets even warming on. So the cycle continues now many of these old trees are replaced with young trees, but these while they suck lots of carbon while they grow on the east of the effects will be offset and so is this trend sort of uniform across the world? It's more pronounced in some places done in office in terms of what this new study published in Science magazine has shown, which is to the average age of trees has plunged sharpest in Europe that the average age of trees is falling by almost half but that's because Europe is bucking. The deforestation trend is being planting and loss of new forests. So these younger woodlands have lowered the average agent, the mix whereas in other places such as South America where the scale of deforestation has been massive many of these older trees have been cut down to make room for cropland will pass gem city's no longer than counts as forests, and they drop out to the calculation according to this new Papa-, and all of this loss is down to deforestation human activity in short. Yes. Much of this loss is a consequence of human activities about changing land use Usually I being replaced with cropland pasture and also forest harvesting but surprising global temperatures have also had massive effects. They've produced more wildfires which have ravaged across Siberia Australia the Amazon in recent years droughts. Longer, more frequent and more severe and also insect infestations are becoming increasingly deadly problem for trees. That's because scientists suspects that the fires in the droughts which have become more frequent have may trees less resilient to the deadly insect infestations. So one example would be in California, where the giant sequoia trees, which are the largest living organisms on earth have for the first time being ravaged by Bach Beatles, and that's despite these trees having bug repelling. TANNIN's so if You say it's sort of a nasty feedback loop. This looks bad for all the old trees the stage. Yes. That's right and also for the young ones because although higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere usually assumed to nourish tree growth. The study in Science magazine suggests that this may only be true. We'll to a nutrients are abundant. So since dry periods happing becoming Lunga, these water stressed plants tend to shed leaves include up polls to avoid moisture. And as a result taping taking up less carbon dioxide and that's been stunting growth as the A. Who leads the research projects described it to me. It's like being at all. You can eat buffet with duct tape, opio mouth. So it doesn't matter how much food there is if he cannot eat it. So we'll. This means that the world's forests saw collectively becoming smaller younger shorter and mobile. Thanks very much for joining. Matia. Thank. Thanks, Jason. That's all for this episode of intelligence. If you like us give us a rating on Apple podcasts and see you back here tomorrow.

China Turkey Greece Mediterranean Egypt European Union Jason Palmer Sean France Middle East Europe Cypress Greece Italy Israel Eg United Arab Emirates Beijing David Rennie Israel ward Turkey Cyprus
Forgotten Emperor

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

18:24 min | 10 months ago

Forgotten Emperor

"Hello welcome to my podcast. The rise and fall of the Ching Dynasty Cup of solid gold. And this is episode eight Forgotten Emperor Emperor that I'm going to talk about is sandwiched between his father and his son. Both of which had very long reigns of sixty years or more together. The three of them father son and his son account for nearly fifty percent of the chain dynasty so huge as I stated in the last episode this Emperor I'm going to talk about was the fourth son of county to live to adulthood. And he was born December thirteenth. Sixteen seventy eight in Beijing. His name his given name would have been Yinjin. So it's full name was icing Gelo Yinjin. But I'm going to use his more common in his official name your gender and he would reign about thirteen years so very short reign from December of seventeen twenty two to October of seventeen thirty five and he's easily forgotten for the following reasons. He had a very short reign. He was book end by long reigns held by his father and his son. Also his reign characterized by a relatively peaceful time in China and for at least the first half of his reign he had to deal with questions regarding his legitimacy to the emperor position over the succession crisis that was caused by his father's death. I think this is a good place to begin this. This episode is to talk about that succession crisis. And I've mentioned this regarding Conte's sons these questions these legitimacy questions of Yong Jin would haunt him his entire reign and still today. You read the historical journals. And there are still constant rumors of his nefarious actions that he allegedly took to secure the throne to keep the throne and how he silenced dissenters for such things and his cheat centers really center on three groups of people some of his brothers high ranking court officials and some in academia some of the sampling of the rumors and allegations that followed young. Gen Not all had to do with questioning his legitimacy to the succession to the ascension to the throne but these are just rumors allegations that seem to follow him around and some of these are still discussed today number one. It was rumored that he killed his father that he gave his father when he was dying. Poisoned Ginseng Soup. Another rumor was that he killed his brothers that he troubled his mom. The executed court officials that he was a womanizer then he was a murderous drunk that he was greedy and that he surrounded himself with sick offense that he altered official records to hide his bad deeds. And to bolster his character needless to say there Comey Point in Yanji Rain when he'd had enough of all this. He ended up eventually charging and arresting at least three of his brothers for usurpation and this disobedience he stripped them of their titles and their banners and at least one of the brothers who was expelled from the family any imprisoned the others Yongzheng reassign their banners and directed at all the remaining Bannerman. We're to attend training on what was to have duty. Honor and obedience and this seemed to work. It seemed to unify the other Bannerman so that he never had trouble from the bannerman again during his life as for court officials there were primarily two of them and I mentioned both of these. The last episode was Long Coda. And the other was non. Cagno both high-ranking court officials let's start with Neon Gung y'all. He was a political military leader at the time in the province and Y'ALL JANNINE. He were friends but he supported that is Mian Gun Ya'll supported one of the three disgraced disloyal brothers and so young. Gen fell suspicious on him and he was eventually arrested and charged demoted charged with over ninety crimes and was sentenced to beheading. Yongzheng however committed him to forced suicide where he died in seventeen. Twenty six. The other court official long quota again. You remember him from the last Episode Young. Gen and him were friends. He was chief of the Peking local police and he was in charge of the palace guard. Young Gen however grew suspicious of him for some of the same reasons that he grew suspicious of the other fellow. Longkou walk would have supported neon during his troubles and in seventeen twenty seven long quota was found in possession of family genealogy records. He was arrested and convicted over over forty crimes. So which of those crimes were possessing possession of genealogy records bribery usurpation and he was sentenced to death by slicing which the Chinese word for it is Lincolnshire death by a thousand cuts young Gen however commuted to life in prison where Lunka died a year later after imprisonment in seventeen twenty eight but in each one of these cases he may have had legitimate reasons. That had nothing to do with his succession to the crowd. As for the decision of his father to pick Yongzheng the record support that decision. They give credence to why his father chose him. One was young. Jen's mother was one of Kangxi favourite. So it makes sense that he would be favored. Another Yongzheng did not openly if it all get involved in Palace. Intrigue as other brothers did to curry favor with country in three. According to some sources young Jen's conception and birth there were auspicious omens at the time that portended his success and the family would have noticed these and this would have been good for his future another is Kangxi nurtured him more and saw him and received saw to his education gave him a good education also consciously appointed him to one of the trustee. Bela positions at a very young age. Can't she also entrusted your Jen with numerous special projects particularly the Yangtze Yellow River Flooding Rehabilitation? And the success in doing that. He accompanied his father many times on official travels. He also assisted in stayed with his father. His father was fading away on his deathbed. Maybe more importantly on his deathbed Kangxi had the meeting with his sons where he allegedly had verbally. Praised Young Gen as a man of moral character designated him as heir apparent. I'm not aware did not come across of any historical records suggesting that any of these witnesses that on the death bed evening refuted any of this also is highly unlikely that young. Gen would have altered the last will and testament as it was written in at least four languages however I realize even that can be explained away with stuff such as Jealousy. That of course was a lot at stake. The the emperor ship of China he could certainly take advantage of the uncertainty with all of this young. John ended up changing the succession protocol. Where there would be no public declaration of who the Crown Prince would be. It would be secret would be written down and sealed in a lock box at the Imperial Palace and only opened on on the death of the emperor very similar and if not the same thing that his father did so unfortunately this accession questions in his legitimacy to the throne really haunted him throughout his entire reign. And the media. That is that. It seemed like he was a pretty decent emperor. He was a workaholic like his father. Efficient vigorous well educated. He fought corruption vigorously. He imposed systematic administrative administrative changes to the government to prevent corruption instituted. A snitching network. And I'll get into that a little bit later in the episode at the time of his succession young Gen found. The Treasury was badly depleted. So Young Jan studied the matter and determined that the issue was from embezzlement by Tex- collection officials so he granted amnesty to collect the sums that were Ching and guilty persons turn themselves in and revealed their schemes and reveal other schemes. Other guilty persons overall. This was appeared to be a success and by Yang death. The Treasury replenished itself there was more money in it then that entity time during conscious rule. His father's rule of course during young Jen's reign was relatively peaceful time in China and it was also a very short reign. There were major incidences to test any of this. Young Gen also consolidated the administrative state and concentrated more power in the emperor some Saul however him as a despot ruthless that is civil forms however good intended they were were bound to upset someone and upset things. He also implemented agricultural forms to stabilize food issues. He furthered China's frontier program to promote more stability in the farthest reaches of China. There are many historians have argued. His reforms ushered in a modern major country. Territorially Young Gen subtle. The South West region of China which had long been unsettled. He also hastened the further population of Taiwan or at least parts of it in seventeen twenty seven. He negotiated the Kayak the treaty between China and Russia and this treaty stood until the mid nineteenth century and established trade relations between China and Russia. It also established the northern border of Mongolia which was part of China. Then the treaty help China expand to the West and to the north and annexing what is now Xinjiang province which is north and west of China in China the northwest part of China. Some of the more interesting edicts that Yongzheng did during his reign was he banned smoking of maddock which was tobacco. Opium Mixture and blend. Most interesting was the expansion and more reliance on what he called the Secret Palace memorials. Basically this was an end around the clunky administrative systems. That was used in the past to report misconduct or questionable people or practices. Instead it's streamlined. The ability of someone to come directly to the emperor to make such allegations cutting out a Lotta the intermediaries making it. More efficient. Young Gen died unexpectedly on October. Eighth Seventeen thirty five. He was fifty seven eight. He's buried in one of the chain tombs southwest of Beijing. The official cause of his death is unknown so we have to assume it was by natural causes but that did not stop the rumors in some of the rumors of his death or cause of his death are that was murdered by a daughter of a man that he allegedly executed. Another rumor is that he accidentally poisoned himself to death that he'd been taking for many many years and he licks her that he believed gave him mortality after his death it was revealed. He had named his one of his favourite sons. It was the fourth out of ten sons and his name was homely and he would go on to become the emperor. Chino and Chino. Long was a favourite of young JEN's Father Kangxi. And that's another reason why they believe the. Gen may have been named the emperor by Kangxi is because Kangxi Light Yom Jen son his grandson chin-lung and wanted to assure that she long would someday become emperor. So what we find with. The short reign of young Jan is at Sanchez between two giants. Inching history and I know I've not talked a much about she along but I will spend the next two episodes talking about she along and I think you will agree. He's another major emperor of China during the dynasty and unfortunately for Young Gen. The succession crisis has kept him hidden or at least his accomplishments hidden it was a peaceful period. Chadha so he wrote of Lee Speaking. He never really had a chance to test. He was never tested. What he did do. However was immense and was pretty decent instituted civil forms and improved tax collections. You also expanded the geographic boundaries of China all lead to better things hopefully for the future of China and the Qing Dynasty. He certainly left the dynasty no worse and arguably better than when he started. I think he was a good steward and he might have made a good emperor. Hey live long enough. The next episode the next two episodes I will talk about his son's Long Reign. She along and will come to the point at the end of Chan loans reign of probably the high watermark for the Ching Dynasty. So with that let me say thank you and it's been a pleasure.

Gen Taiwan official Yom Jen Yongzheng Beijing Father Kangxi Treasury Long Coda Kangxi Yinjin Bannerman Yanji Rain Ching Dynasty Saul Conte Imperial Palace Qing Dynasty Mongolia Yong Jin
19. Boxer Rebellion

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

25:20 min | 5 months ago

19. Boxer Rebellion

"Hello again and welcome to my podcast rise and fall of the Dynasty Cup of solid gold. This is episode nineteen boxer rebellion. Just a little review of the last episode. I discussed the death investigation. Of the Emperor Guangxu and how it was determined that he was poisoned. He is the emperor that I'm currently discussing. I also talked about a lot more about. The empress dowager. We learned about one hundred days of reform edicts. Issued by the Emperor Guangxu in. Eighteen, ninety eight. And how those were not effective. And I talked about the continuing humiliation. Of the Ching Dynasty. By foreign powers. Before we get into this episode. As a reminder or notice if this is your first episode you've listened. Following the last episode of this podcast series on the Ching. Dynasty I will begin season to. season. Two. Will be about the Japanese Meiji Restoration. But with a twist. The twist is that I will compare and contrast. The modernization efforts of both the Ching Dynasty, and the late Eto and Meiji Japan. Leading to the question that I, answer in that podcast series. Why did Japan respond so much better than China. To nineteenth century aggression by Western nations. After, all. These aggressions to place nearly the same time. Listen and find out. In this episode, the humiliation continues. And we get to the boxer rebellion. After the loss of the Chinese tribute states, Vietnam Burma Recu. Islands. was, all that was left for China. Korea had long been considered a valuable buffer between north China and the rest of the world. It was the leading tributary during both the Ming and chain dynasties. And the history between Korea. And the Ching Dynasty. Is Vast. Over five hundred envoy trips to Peking and at least one, hundred and fifty two Korea. In fact, Korea had modeled a lot of their society customs and institutions to China. And since the start of the Ching Dynasty career maintained virtually no foreign relations complete isolation. Than to the Ching Dynasty and to a much much lesser extent Japan. Korea had well-earned their nickname, the hermit kingdom. And as China Japan open to a trade. Korea inevitably would be caught in the middle. Geographically Korea is very close to Japan. So it makes perfect sense. There was increasing Western pressure on Korea for trade and diplomatic relations. It despite careers attempts to rebuff the aggression it came anyways I, from the French. And then by the Japanese. China by this time was too weak to defend and help its protectorate. And Japan began to pressure Korea. This began in the mid eighteen seventies. And the Japanese used. Gunboat diplomacy. Against Korea. And it worked. By eighteen seventy, six career was forced to enter into an agreement with Japan. The agreement recognized. Korea. As an independent nation. Because, China had acquiesced in the agreement and did nothing to intervene in this agreement. They, essentially, implicitly agreed. To. The Independence of Korea and China lost its suzerainty over. Korea. Ten years later in eighteen, eighty, five China, and in Japan what enter into their own agreement regarding Korea, the Treaty of Tinson. And in that agreement both countries agreed to withdraw their military's from Korea. Not to train anymore military forces in Korea and to inform the other nation when they would go back to Korea. This. Did Not end the hostilities between. China and Japan. All the eventually led to. The Sino. Japanese war. Eighteen. Ninety five. It was mainly a naval affair that resulted in more humiliation for the Ching Dynasty and additional loss of territory. It started because the Korean king had trouble with rebels, religious groups in Korea. And he reached out to the Ching Dynasty and ask for help and the chain dynasty sent it. Japan took this violation of their earlier agreement. The Treaty of. and. So Japan responded by sending their militaries to. That resulted in the Sino Japanese war. And in that war. The Chinese lost a portion of the Leeann Dome or Liaoning Peninsula. That is part of mainland China they lost that to the Japanese. The Japanese were particularly interested in the port city on the southern tip of that. Peninsula. It was called then. Port Arthur today it's called Dalian. And it was strategically located seaport. Right as I said on the very southern tip of that peninsula. The Japanese now had a foothold on mainland, China and mainland Asia. The hostilities ended in another agreement between the Japanese and the Chinese called the Treaty of Shimon. Or Seki. She Mona Seki. and. That was done in April seventeenth eighteen five. The treaty recognized Korean independence. The Chinese agreed to identify the Japanese. and. The Chinese would cede to Japan. Taiwan. The pescador islands and the southern tip of the Leeann Dean Peninsula. The Chinese also agreed to open up five more. Treaty ports. To. Trade. And the Japanese right to open operate businesses in China as well as reciprocal privileges and rights that China had already granted the Western nations. Another. jaw-dropping humiliation for the government. A further sign. The. Restorations. were. Failure. And the treaty to make things worse only really gained China. Temporary piece. The immediate reaction in China to the treaty was outraged. Taiwan itself protested. It did not want to become a part of Japan. But to no avail. Japan formally annexed Taiwan. In October of eighteen, eighty five. So what happened here? Well Japan was fully modernized and organized like the early Ching. Dynasty. They had a single focused purpose at this point in their history. Japan, put everything into the effort to capture territory. The Chew Dynasty on the hand we're distracted and sent poor leaders to fight it side the Japanese sent their best. was also massive corruption. Sushi. The. Empress Dowager. Diverted millions in naval funds. So, she could fund the construction and rebuilding of the Summer Palace. And finally once again. The chain dynasty did not fully understand foreign politics. They wrongly believed that either France Russia, the United, states or England when intervene. China's defeat proved that the Mont Shoe Dynasty was incapable of coping with the challenges of that time. The self strengthening movement or the tone jer restoration. were. Only superficial. However within one week of the treaty. With Japan. The Treaty of Shimono Seki. Don't always pronounce that correctly she mon no Seki. By the way it's a small town on the. West Coast of Japan probably the nearest point to Korea. Within. One week after that treaty. Russia France and Germany sent a joint. Note to Tokyo. Warning Japanese that. They're possession of Liaoning Peninsula with threaten China. Make Korea's independence seem illusory. And upset the general peace in Asia. In other words they wanted Japan off of the Chinese and Asian mainland. Russia however was really more concerned with itself. It did not want Japan to have a foothold in the Asian continent. Russians, themselves had always wanted Port Arthur. Port Arthur has one advantage. It's a deep sea, ice free. Year Round Pacific seaport. Germany went along with the. Intervention with Russia. And protested the Japanese. Move because it wanted to keep Russia's attention away from Europe. France. One. Along with the intervention because it had interest in. Indochina. Vietnam Cambodia and it wanted Russia to at least. Acquiesce or acknowledge the French interest and not to disturb that. member. At this time. World War One is only a near twenty years. From this point. The three nations. It's called the triple intervention together assembled. Worships and troops along Russia's eastern seaboard. Japan got the message. Japan let it be known that it would return on and abandoned leading peninsula to China for additional indemnities? But. The Ching government did not have the money. So in a secret alliance between Russia and China Russia agreed to loan. The money. That the government needed. The Ching Dynasty was grateful to Russia and in return it allowed. Russia. To build a railroad across Chinese territory Manchuria and seed to the Russians the land necessary to do that. The sides also agreed to defend the other against an attack by the Japanese. So, let me boil this down. Just a little bit here. From the Chinese perspective. Japan got paid. Initially in the in the treaty they signed with China. An indemnity. For, territory that they took from China Taiwan, the pescadores in Liaoning. Peninsula. Then the Japanese gave it back to China. For, another sum of money. So essentially the Chinese government paid twice. For the Liaoning Province. Wow. This arrangement. I'm sure. was enough to enrage any Chinese patriot. And if there was not already, there was now open discussion about the future of the Ching Dynasty and if regime change was necessary. The Japanese were actually participating an encouraging it. Anyone thinking it can't get worse for the Ching Dynasty in China. Will be wrong. It got worse. Much worse. About the time of the one, hundred days of reform from the Emperor Guangxu. There was a noticeable uptick in Mt. Western. Sentiment in northern. China. At first, they were protesting the ubiquitous te. Christian. Missionary settlements. The Anti Western sentiment though eventually spread throughout China. Fifty Years of foreign humiliation had taken its toll. contemporaneous. There were poor economic conditions, many of which were rightly and wrongly blamed on the foreign occupiers. Specific instances of events that outraged many Chinese were foreign owned railroads operating in China. The Free Trade. That was allowed the four nations in China. The railroad particularly threatened traditional Chinese Transport Systems. Unemployed Grand Canal workers began to riot. There was also a major flooding of the Yellow River in eighteen, ninety eight. was followed by an extreme drought in northern China. Locals blame the foreigners for these disasters and at this point in time blame foreigners for everything. Particularly the Christian missionaries whom the locals believed. Had, disrupted the KARMIC balance in China. Enter. The boxer sect. Their Mandarin name. Is Year. One. The West call them the boxers because of their ability at performing magic. Martial arts. Kung Fu. Stunts gymnastics and self defense exercises. The boxers believed. They were impervious to bullets. And were immortal. The sect could trace their history back to the White Lotus sect. That had rebelled in China in the late eighteenth century and early nineteen th century. One Hundred Years Later, the SEC head turned anti foreign. Xenophobic. And in one thousand, nine, hundred northern China the boxers began to riot and sought the violence to express their displeasure with foreigners. Initially, the Chin government. Asserted force to stop the boxers. But that was not enough to stop them. As the boxers approached. Peking. They begin to cut communication and transport lines. They burned foreign symptom settlements. and. It became clear. The boxers we're going to occupy Peking. At that point, the empress dowager shifted her support. She now favoured the boxers and wanted to curry favor with them and take advantage of the anti-foreigner animus. By the summer of nineteen hundred boxers were in Peking and burning and looting foreign residences. There were stories that the boxers had gone as far as exhuming. The bodies of dead foreign missionaries. They burnt. Churches. And they killed Chinese Christians. Ministers and converts. We're all victims. Four nations grew increasingly nervous about the safety of their legations in. Peking. Probably because the empress dowager felt her safety was in jeopardy. She made a public pronouncement that an all out attack by the boxers was necessary to purge China of the humiliations of the last fifty years caused by the foreigners. This was basically and interpreted to be by the four nations. As a declaration of war against them. It was clear. The four nations would have to send personnel to Peking. To protect its property in people. The very famous fifty five days from June twentieth of one thousand, nine hundred to August fourteenth of nineteen. Hundred. The. International allegations were under a vert a siege, not virtual cj siege by the boxers. A consortium. Or an allied force if you will of Eight nations sent military forces to relieved. To relieve their beleaguered legations. The relief force were I resisted by the boxers and the Chang's? But he's second force came. Of around ten thousand troops. And this one. Got Through. The. Siege. The four nations that made this alliance acted as a single force. And, the famous eight nation alliance would comprise of Japanese infect Japanese were about half of them. Russians. English. Americans French Australians Italians and Germans. And there were led by a German commander. Incidentally, this alliance provides the only example in history. Of the Armed Forces of all the great powers operating under the same commander. The boxers were overwhelmed by the allied forces by August. Sushi and the imperial court. Along with the Emperor Guangxu. In tow. Flood, we fled Peking to Xiang. I know I have not mentioned or said much about the emperor recently, and obviously that is because he was not in charge. But he did oppose the empress dowager 's. Support for the boxers. There's also a rumor. That the Emperor Guangxu was encouraged by his favorite concubine. Known as the Pearl Concubine. To, stay behind and make peace with the foreign. Nations. Allegedly the empress dowager. Getting wind of this through the concert Donna well. Anyway, the boxer rebellion ended. Their estimates of one hundred thousand cal judy's both boxers and. Chinese citizens, but it's hard to say. Peking was also a victim of this incident as it was burned by the four nations. To say the least the rebellion was another. humiliation. For. The Ching Dynasty. The alliance reached out to the chain dynasty and they sought a settlement. The alliance insisted on meeting with the emperor himself and not the empress dowager. She apparently stood about this slight. Guangxu returned to Peking and in September of one thousand, nine, hundred, one, the agreement was signed. And it's known as the boxer protocol. And the terms were. That those responsible for the rebellion would be punished. That the Chinese would pay or the Chinese government would pay a sixty eight, million dollar indemnity. Over thirty nine years at four percent annual interest. A permanent. Legation Guard was created in Peking and formed troops will be permanently stationed in Peking. The boxer rebellion. Is misnamed. The rebellion was against foreigners and in that sense, not a rebellion as we understand the normal meaning of the word. The boxers started a hundred years earlier disliking the chain. MONCHU leaders. But but as a result of all the foreign, Shenanigans Came to support their main you leaders. The boxer rebellion. was a backward-looking Zena phobic uprising. I. Think that sums it up. That's enough for now. Next time I'll finish out Guam shoes, rain and his life. And the life of the empress dowager. As well and much more. Thank you.

China Ching Dynasty Japan Korea Japan Russia Emperor Guangxu Peking China Japan Peking Taiwan Japanese Meiji Restoration Chinese government Liaoning Peninsula Meiji Japan government Seki China Taiwan Mont Shoe Dynasty France