13 Burst results for "Yellow River Valley"

"yellow river valley" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

06:34 min | Last month

"yellow river valley" Discussed on EconTalk

"It's it's very possible. I just feel like there's a certain Academic Bent of that evolutionary psychology literature. It's like let's see how far we can push this. It just seems to be simpler expansion. Which really the. I think the way. I understand your book. Which is we're basically self interested. There is some non self restrained for our relatives and friends and sees me or close relatives. That's biologically driven but a lot of what drives us to be generous with our resources to strangers sculptural. It's something that we have passed onto. Our children accepted from our parents. Those around us our friends and I think without that it's kinda hard to explain a lot of the details in the real world but what are your thoughts. Oh i completely agree with you. I i think that the answer to why we're kind to strangers. While we take an interest in their in their wellbeing is largely because of a kind of cultural ratchet. That's been working over. You know many many millennia but that is interacting you know. The these twists and turns of history are interacting with an evolved psychology. That performs cognitive jobs for us. You know. I mean you can think of the sort of I mean ultimately. I think a satisfying answer to any question about human behavior is going to have to invoke genetics obviously But well maybe that's not so obvious to everyone invoked culture obviously yeah we're not robots instinct in every aspect of her life. Right right So you know. The cultural influences are enormous. But you do need a mind that's receptive to culture. You know you do need a mind. That's receptive to conversation. That's you know because not all minds in the world can do that. You minds can do it but You know there. There are people who might disagree with me a little bit. But you know you're not going to find a dog mind that's well tuned for culture cultural learnings. Mish a great. You're right so let's let's do what i think is the is the tricky part of this which I'm not sure is in the book. Which is i think. The economists way of writing about this is we're which is totally sterile by the way. So i just want to defend it exactly the way. I'm going to say it but the economist view is well. We do things because they they make us feel good And i think that rather banal and hard to argue with argument hides a lot of what is actually going on so let. Let's take the golden rule which you spend a lot of time on Do unto others as you would have done to yourself. It's also the silver rule which you didn't mention but it's a it's sort of the flip side don't do to other people wouldn't want dundee you and these ethical mottos. Ah why do we follow them. In your view you talk about them as they're very important It became very important in western certain western civilization and eastern civilization elsewhere other religious precepts came into people's minds. Why do you think they're import. Well i think The reason they the reason they became import. I think is is is a really interesting story. And then we can talk about why they're still important. They have causal power. Now you know. I mean the reason. They became important is because in the last few centuries Before the common era a variety world religions popping up in the indus river valley The yellow river valley in china Ancient israel classical greece. All discovered assembled a new kind of religion and spirituality that was more cosmopolitan less tribal more universalising More devoted to putting putting our moral preferences into law. Codifying our ethical intuitions or ethical. It hard one ethical experiences and in the midst of that all of these traditions discovered arrived at the idea that the way to be right with god was or to achieve enlightenment or satisfaction or spiritual wellbeing was through concern for everybody and karen armstrong the writer. She writes a lot about religion Her her way of describing this kind of ethical discoveries that somehow for spiritual fulfillment and all of these traditions. Somehow you have to stretch your compassion so that it can embrace the entire world so this was deeply yoke to spirituality to sort of the formalising of ethical thought in a way that people hoped would be generalized at least over the if not over the entire universe of human beings at least the people in your civilization society. So that's how it came about. Originally i mean all of these details are lost to time. obviously These are special. You know these are exceptional changes in how people thought about compassion. And it was really up to spirituality in a deep way so the question. I wanna pro for a little bit. Which is tricky is the thing about how self in how altruistic that is because you can easily say this again. The way economists thing. I think it's wrong. But we're economists would describe it as okay well. Nothing's really changed. So there's just self interest rewritten. Because i want to go to heaven or i want to be right with god the way you phrased there too like So i do these things. I don't like them in themselves. But overall it's worth it. Because i want to get this other benefits and investment.

china indus river valley last few centuries yellow river valley israel karen armstrong greece Ancient
"yellow river valley" Discussed on The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove

The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove

03:59 min | 6 months ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove

"We don't know if you know we don't know if SH- she's been quoted out of context I just don't know Anyway, but she doesn't strike me as right wing adult she's strikes me as a very middle of the road classical liberal Well I reckon, we probably began long enough. You mean you and I've been going long enough. Twenty minutes. Okay, Hunter and seven day. Minute's actually next week to bitten sovereignty. The American Mexican war liberate Texas Yeah because when you talk about. China's Aggressive foreign. Invasions over the centuries. Nightly, bit as sort of. What's your? What's your case sort of aggressive? China. Make up ninety percent of the population. They started in the Yellow River valley and the young see river valley That's that's the home home turf. Yes and over the centuries they spread out and in mid and occupied and controlled. Literally dozens of minority ethnic. Areas around this sort of hung. Creepy. Start off in the mayflower in. Maine just soon of spread out in a similar fashion but that's Another story. How far do you want to go back? Well, that's not the point is this is the story of human history. Well, that's the point is when you talk about the aggressive Chinese foreign sort of shelley, how you do it counts doesn't it? Yeah. And I'm not saying that inviting Mexico and taking. By force was a good thing. Yeah. But. There's no denying that the Chinese have aggressively occupied other people's land rods and this is more an ethnic. Group taking. Iva. Back is that like is that oh? That's thousands of us. Like. I mean. It's been a very sort of Marshall Culture for a long time Chinese culture where I think it. Okay next week. Okay. How Far Tony's way next week? Listener that's topics he wanted to what us to discuss send us an email message. Since voicemail message would be good. Thanks to Steve. For the beer. Thank you. Steve that was very nice job if enjoyed that. Thank, you the patrons who support Mostofi lightly you thinking of It'd be good saying. If you've been listening twenty, twenty, five episodes enjoying it. Please sign up as a patron because I think is good. audio equipment. Yeah I. Like. I would definitely going to do some calls next week I think it'd be good if you've. If. You'd like to be like zoom in and argue something habit this. Then send me an email with a bit avert one paragraph a bad the concept that you want to argue or discuss and. And then let's put on a list for tomorrow. Next week that'd be good and consuming and had some interaction guys. It's not just us the opportunity to attack Paul Rudd. is so ideas plays, sign. Play the ideas not the mandate. Ordeal Listener thank you for your attention. Thanks in the chat room for all of your comments. It was a spirited debate you again, gentlemen. Thank you very much bud. Tonight we renew our resolve that America will never be a socialist country..

Yellow River valley Hunter China Steve America Paul Rudd. Texas Maine Mexico shelley
"yellow river valley" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on Science Salon

"So the way I like to think of it as that these rulers found reasons they were self interested reasons but they were reasons why they should prevent exploitation in addition to the ways they might just be bad for business right? So so once you've got those and. Each of these hinges hinges of history I talk about I'm trying to identify reasons that people might have identified for the changes they made. So for example, when we get to the golden rule, you know what would be some reasons that you might discover I. Don't think they're actually any new encounters with suffering, but as our religious and spiritual system started to change around, let's just call it six hundred BC. In each of the societies where we see the golden rule pop up Indus Valley Yellow River. Valley in China obviously. Ancient Israel. And so forth, what what seems to be happening there either because we've become more affluent, we can begin to sort of think transcendent. Post. Materialistic things or because we are our value systems and our our sort of world views are actually being dislocated by urban station war. Whether it's though one of those are both we start to ask new kinds of. transcendental questions about like what does it mean to have a good life? What does it mean to have a a life of suffer? A life of of transcendent spirituality rightness with God and or harmony broader harmony and society or even with nature and what each of these society seems to have discovered. As Karen? Armstrong. Is You have to somehow extend your compassion. Extend your compassion to the entire world. I don't think there was any new confrontation with suffering him but the ideological changes that were taking place connected. spiritual pursuits idea lot ethical pursuits to concern for strangers. So, this becomes a new reason. If you want. Ethical. Fulfillment spiritual, fulfillment. Rightness with God that involves a deeper engagement with other people suffering and not just like suffering suffering truly miserable people..

Indus Valley Yellow River China Israel Armstrong Karen
"yellow river valley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

"You place your hands on it and look up. It's incredibly high when you look left and right you see that stretches in both directions as far as your I can see. You at one of the most famous structures in the world, the Great Wall of China. The Great Wall of China was built over two thousand years ago and runs more than thirteen thousand miles across northern China. But why was this wall built and how is it lasted? So long the Great Wall of China was constructed by emperor change she hung in the third century BC well, actually parts of the wall were built earlier than that, and it's doubtful that Emperor Chin did any of the actual construction work himself. But Emperor Cheng united a number of different independent states in China and was the first emperor to unite all of these different communities together as one. Chinese. country. This happened around two twenty BC. Before that, there were many different kingdoms throughout China and different groups of people lived on their own. The land that these Chinese people lived on was very fertile fertile means the land is good for growing lots of food over time. The people that lived in the area started to farm and grow crops as more people farm the land they needed to create a system of order in government help manage the land and how it was used. At this time, Chinese people developed irrigated fields and grew crops near the Yellow River valley. Farming Large areas of land required people to work together and form a government to work the land peacefully. This is why the Chinese formed one empire and also built walls around them to protect their communities against attacks by the nomads. A nomad means someone who doesn't live in one place but moves from place to place the nomads didn't farm, but instead moved around and an animals since the nomads needed to move with the animals, they had a completely different type of society in order they needed to hunt animals or trade for them. This led to the nomads trading with the Chinese or in many cases attacking them. The nomadic tribes often came into contact with the Chinese farmers. Friendly. And they would trade with each other but often they did not get along the nomadic people wanted to use the farmland to hunt and move around. But the farm people wanted more land to farm. This led to battles between the farmers and the nomads. The Farming Kingdoms also fight each other often for control of different territories. This is why this period of history in China is known as the Warring States period. The help avoid attacks many of the kingdom's bill walls to defend themselves. The walls were made out of rocks and compacted dirt that was tamped very tightly to form the structure. These walls were shorter versions of the Great Wall of China that was later built..

China Emperor Cheng Emperor Chin Yellow River valley BC
"yellow river valley" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

Layers of Learning Podcast

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

"And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and.

Yellow River valley Norte Chico South America China
"yellow river valley" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 6 months ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

"So, , what what do you do with history? ? What's your basic? ? Approach, , while I will say this, , you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. . When I learned about historical figure, , it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. . Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. . I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, , I had no concept of win. . That was I thought they were very, , very ancient people that was my impression. . And that turns out not to be true they actually were. . More. . In the colonial era, , they were much more modern. . Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, , the places, , the events, , I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. . So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. . Know when and where things happened. . So, , let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. . What do we mean? ? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. . People. . Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. . There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, , but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. . Well. . And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. . It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. . Any records at all of them, , they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. . The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's . what is. . I often tell my kids. . This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. . That kind of. . With time and so history we're looking at, , Hey, , let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. . So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. . Yeah. . We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. . That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. . How did that happen? ? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, , we always start there in history and then as we go along, , it includes the story of human beings, , nations, , cities, , especially the great figures in history the heroes, , the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. . And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. . It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. . Right right now, , we are living at a point in history. . We're making history were part of that whole subject, , and if we study history, , we can study all of the things that led up to. . Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, , and some of it is regression. . We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, , and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. . I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, , and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, , and actually if you look back in history, , my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, , they probably had pretty much what we have today. . Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. . They were very much like we are, , and then it collapsed. . Yeah. . Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, , but you know thousand years earlier. . So it has happened over and over through history. . So it's really interesting. . One of the things that we learned from that is hey. . Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. . And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. . It has gone through cycles of change over time, , and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. . and. . Partly for that reason, , Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, , we study history in order, , and partly for the reason, , we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. . Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. . Those progressions are important in history. . So to teach it in order, , I think vital.

Aztecs Michelle
How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 6 months ago

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
"yellow river valley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Alaska radio hour of the week in this the second dialogue of the Hillsdale dialogue series in the new decade I have been talking about great power competition with doctor Lori on for many years this week he is joining us as well as Dr David Stuart a professor hill down the hill in the history department who learns been hiding from me because he is a double degree from the Ohio State University doctor Stuart welcome I am if I am ashamed to say I did not know we had a Buckeye up there alone surrounded holding out against the minions of Michigan on every side of you and I'm glad to bring you help thank you what how long have you been up there twenty six years oh my goodness then you had to put up with Michigan fans for twenty six years yes Sir do you hide in the weeds you put your scholar in grand the bottom drawer no I put it out where we can see it just to make sure they know we're here very good art is not yet woken up Serena proceed without him the background to this is this over the last three months I read doctor Kissinger's on China Michael Pillsbury is the hundred year marathon Graham Allison is destined for war Roger Robert Kaplan's Asia cauldron it's clear that the great power competition of the next twenty years thirty years fifty years is between us and China do agree with that professor Stuart I think it's a very safe assessment yes okay so what do we need to know became my major question because I've got everything from now forward down pretty well I even have a pretty good grip on she's in pain but I really don't know what are the historic forces that American should be aware of in the way that we're aware of the founding where where this sars were aware of of Bismarck were aware of Queen Victoria we don't know anything about China I think generally speaking where do we begin I think that probably the most foundational troops under cannot China is that they see things in a very very long term I'm much more so than we do in the west they have a long history six thousand years of essentially the same political and cultural tradition it's been inflicted at different points with that that that single perdition that we don't have enough what we would think of as being long term they often would think of a short term that's only five hundred years ago the only a thousand years ago and we just don't think in those terms often doctor Stuart that's twenty five United States histories when you say they have a history of six thousand years that's twenty five times a history of our Republic that's remarkable and even some of the roots of our Republic before there was wrong there was China well okay so how does that move when you say that what are we referring back to in the in the mists of time do we have a good history of how they function as a people in other developed their institutions better than many parts of the world certainly there's obvious or is it always like more information more particulars but we have a lot of solid understanding in a broad sense not particular details but many of the current cultural and political understanding of China we have solid archaeological evidence going back to two and three thousand BC and so does China welcome first of all historical scholars to come in and examine that evidence today have a narrative that they agreed upon even through the CPR the Cultural Revolution or is it all wiped away in the service of the party can I say yes to both yes yes you can there is a way welcome scholars there's once that they don't really care how was interpreted there are particular how much particular stories that certain people at least within the party one understood in very particular way he's but broadly speaking there is more freedom of interpretation person this ancient history then we might expect doctor Stuart the the thing I remember from doctor Kissinger's book most vividly is he told the tale of the yellow emperor which is China's founding myth but he was an eighty E. took great pains to emphasize their founding met like Romulus and Remus like any S. their founding myth presumes a China in existence already which means they don't have a founding myth they just have a first story and then something the last twenty years a lot of archaeology is brought out how many competing cultures there were in the middle of the Bronze Age China that simply aren't mentioned them for example well the Chinese history tends to start with a long shot and the the three thousand BC or so and they dominated the eastern yellow river valley three thousand years before Christ right okay so we are going back a ways the Peloponnesian wars I always kind of think that that can go with Alexander the great and then the Peloponnesian War you you can get a good handle on time if you start work on the ancient Greeks but you're basically two thousand years before then correct so when do they emerge as a people about whom we have you know I centrality of a figure a historical figure what what kind of time and we talking about the first unequivocally historical individual we know come to the right of the jin dynasty around the time you were to sign up to twenty or so BC but there's clearly a people a Chinese people from long long long before that it is a Chinese people a genetic subgroup is there a geographic gathering is a cultural identification recent studies have shown that there's was more genetic diversity then perhaps some today would like to admit but it's clearly culturally eight eight group okay so distinct group that we can see tracing even today with some of the kinds of things they eat the way the way they Brooklyn sells politically and socially the even some of their architecture goes way way back into the two thousand BC or more but let's let's get back to the chin dynasty because what you gave me there is a place to get a rock cold because it is at the same time the Greek world is coming into being that will form the west in in alliance with Jerusalem we sent you know Athens and Jerusalem you're telling me the Chen dynasty is where we are to begin is that where the emperor's begin that's the first person to adopt the title ample the Chinese will retroactively ascribed that title to the wall of the shoe and song dynasties well much earlier the back to fifteen hundred or so BC those guys are using the title emperor and there's some disagreement about it all these guys really exist or not there there's clearly a policy there and so when we were used the term dynasty which is familiar I've got a whole list of dynasties in my notes here right what does that mean what is it dynasty mean in you know in in the west it means succession by blood until it's broken is that the same within China broadly speaking yes it's it's not necessarily patriarchal patrilineal the way we tend to assume in the west father son father son directly but it is a family until that family is this what Dr oz join this doctor and I'm learning that I don't know anything about China and it's a lot older than I thought how much time have you spent in a long academic career studying China probably forty five or fifty minutes I like to read four books on my head of you are you finding a new found interest in it yeah I've been sitting up last night and this morning reading about China David the man they teach that so brought me up to two hundred twenty one B. C. so we've got a western we've got an east at this point what did your reading tell you last night well I have been thinking about this for many years China eight same been posted David grace of that China is different from us that chat channels that religion is not the same kind of thing they're not monotheism is that it's the old it's that it's early doctoring getting drafted the the the pre air here president general sector in Congress party he is interested in the history of China and the ancient practices and that's tied to ask what nationalist when we come back from break we'll pick up with the the Chen dynasty and move forward my gases Dr David Stuart he is a Buckeye Larry aren't is kept in locked away in the basement at Hillsdale for many years but we actually have an Ohio state doctorate and master's historian who is here to shed light from the lantern of sweet reason in the north hills they'll college all think Joe fell collected Hillsdale dot EDU I'll be right back with doctor Stuart and president Larry on when we.

Alaska Lori Dr David Stuart professor
"yellow river valley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Alaska radio hour of the week in this the second dialogue of the Hillsdale dialogue series in the new decade I have been talking about great power competition with doctor Lori on for many years this week he is joining us as well as Dr David Stuart the professor hill down the hill in the history department who learns been hiding from me because he is a double degree from the Ohio State University doctor Stuart welcome I am if I am ashamed to say I did not know we had a Buckeye up there alone surrounded holding out against the minions of Michigan on every side of you and I'm glad to bring you help thank you what how long have you been up there twenty six years oh my goodness then you have to put up with Michigan fans for twenty six years yes Sir do hiding the weeds you put your scholar in grand the bottom drawer no I put it out where we can see it just to make sure they know we're here very good art is not yet woken up Serena proceed without him the background to this is this over the last three months I read doctor Kissinger's on China Michael Pillsbury is the hundred year marathon Graham Allison is destined for war Roger Robert Kaplan's Asia cauldron it's clear that the great power competition of the next twenty years thirty years fifty years between us and China do agree with that professor Stuart I think it's a very safe assessment yes okay so what do we need to know became my major question because I've got everything from mild forward down pretty well I even have a pretty good grip on she's in pain but I really don't know what are the historic forces that American should be aware of in the way that we're aware of the founding where where the tsars were aware of of Bismarck were aware of Queen Victoria we don't know anything about China I think generally speaking where do we begin I think this probably the most foundational troops understand that China is that they see things in a very very long term I'm much more so than we do in the west they have a long history six thousand years of essentially the same political and cultural tradition it's been inflicted a different point with that that that single tradition that we don't have enough what we would think of as being long term they often would think of a short term that's only five hundred years ago the only a thousand years ago and we just don't think in those terms often doctor Stuart that's twenty five United States histories when you say they have a history of six thousand years that's twenty five times a history of our Republic that's remarkable and even some of the roots of our Republic before there was wrong there was China well okay so how does that move when you say that what are we referring back to in the in the mists of time do we have a good history of how they function as a people in other developed their institutions better than many parts of the world certainly there's obvious or is it always like more information more particulars but we have a lot of solid understanding in a broad sense not particular details but many of the current cultural and political understanding of China we have solid archaeological evidence going back to two and three thousand BC and so does China welcome first of all historical scholars to come in and examine that evidence today have a narrative that they agreed upon even through the CPR the Cultural Revolution or is it all wiped away in the service of the party can I say yes to both yes yes you can they welcome scholars there's what's that they don't really care how was interpreted there are particular how much particular stories that certain people at least within the party one understood in very particular way he's but broadly speaking there is more freedom of interpretation person this ancient history that we might expect doctor Stuart the the thing I remember from doctor Kissinger's book most vividly is he told the tale of the yellow emperor which is China's founding myth but he was a he took great pains to emphasize their founding myth like Romulus and Remus I like ideas their founding myth presumes a China in existence already which means they don't have a founding met they just have a first story and then something the last twenty years a lot of archaeology is brought out how many competing cultures there were in the middle of the Bronze Age China that simply aren't mentioned that for example well the Chinese history tends to start with a long shot and the the three thousand BC or so and they dominated the eastern yellow river valley three thousand years before Christ right okay so we are going back a ways in the Peloponnesian wars I always kind of think that that can go with Alexander the great and then the Peloponnesian War you can get a good handle on time if you start work on the ancient Greeks but you're basically two thousand years before then correct so when do they emerge as a people about whom we have you know I centrality of a figure and historical figure what what kind of time and we talking about the first unequivocally historical individual we know come to the right of the jin dynasty around the time you were to sign up to twenty or so BC but there's clearly a he bore a Chinese people long long long before that the Chinese people a genetic subgroup is there a geographic gathering is a cultural identification recent studies have shown that there's was more genetic diversity then perhaps some today would like to admit but it's clearly culturally eight a group okay so distinct groups that we can see even today with some of the kinds of things they eat the ways they group themselves politically and socially the even some of their architecture goes way way back into the two thousand BC or more but let's let's get back to the chin dynasty because what you gave me there is a place to get a rock cold because it is at the the same time the Greek world is coming into being that will form the west in in alliance with Jerusalem we sent you know Athens and Jerusalem you're telling me the Chen dynasty is where we are to begin is that where the emperor's begin that's the first person to adopt the title ample the Chinese will retroactively ascribed that title to the wall of the shoe and song dynasties well much earlier the back to fifteen hundred or so BC those guys are using the title emperor and there's some disagreement about get all these guys really exist or not there there's clearly a policy there and so when we were used the term dynasty which is familiar I've got a whole list of dynasties in my notes here right what does that mean what is the dynasty mean in you know in in the west it means succession by blind until it's broken is that the same within China broadly speaking yes it's it's not necessarily patriarchal patrilineal the way we tend to assume in the west father son father son directly but it is a family until that family is this what Dr oz joined his doctor and I'm learning that I don't know anything about China and it's a lot older than I thought how much time have you spent in a long academic career studying China and probably forty five or fifty minutes I like to read four books ahead of you are you finding a new found interest in it yeah I've been sitting up last night and this morning reading about trying to get David to mandate so rob me up to two hundred twenty one B. C. so we've got a western we got anything at this point what did your reading tell you last night well I I have been thinking about this for many years China is save big Bucks a day the grace of that China is different from us that check trying to that religion is not the same kind of thing they're not monotheism it's that it's it's that it's early doctoring getting back in the the the Primera here president general sector in Congress party he is interested in the history of China and the ancient practices and that's tied to what nationalist when we come back from break we'll pick up with the the Chen dynasty and move forward my guess is Dr David Stuart he is a Buckeye Larry aren't is kept in locked away in the basement at Hillsdale for many years but we actually have an Ohio state doctorate and.

Alaska Lori Dr David Stuart professor
"yellow river valley" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The main radio hour of the week in this the second dialogue of the Hillsdale dialogue in the new decade I have been talking about great power competition with doctor Lori on for many years this week he is joining us as well as Dr David Stuart the professor Hillsdale nail in the history department who learns been hiding from me because he is a double degree from the Ohio State University doctor Stuart welcome I am if I am ashamed to say I did not know we had a Buckeye up there alone surrounded holding out against the minions of Michigan on every side of you and I'm glad to bring you help thank you what how long have you been up there twenty six years oh my goodness then you had to put up with Michigan fans for twenty six years yes Sir do you hide in the weeds you put your scholar in grand the bottom drawer no I put it out where we can see it just to make sure they know we're here very good iron is not yet woken up Serena proceed without him the background to this is this over the last three months I read doctor Kissinger's on China Michael Pillsbury is the hundred year marathon Graham Allison is destined for war Roger Robert Kaplan's Asia cauldron it's clear that the great power competition of the next twenty years thirty years fifty years between us and China do you agree with that professor Stuart I think it's a very safe assessment yes okay so what do we need to know became my major question because I've got everything from mild forward down pretty well I even have a pretty good grip on Jeez and paying but I really don't know what are the historic forces can should be aware of in the way that we're aware of the founding where where the tsars were aware of of Bismarck were aware of Queen Victoria we don't know anything about China I think generally speaking where do we begin I did probably the most foundational first understand that China is that they see things in a very very long term much more so than we do in the west they have a long history six thousand years of essentially the same political and cultural tradition it's been inflicted a different point with that that that single tradition that we don't have enough what we would think of as being long term they often would think of a short term that's only five hundred years ago the only a thousand years ago and we just don't think in those terms often yeah doctor Stuart that's twenty five United States histories when you say they have a history of six thousand years that's twenty five times a history of our Republic that's remarkable and even some of the roots of our Republic before there was wrong there was China well okay so how does that move when you say that what are we referring back to in the in the mists of time do we have a good history of how they function as a people in other developed their institutions better than many parts of the world certainly there's obvious or is it always like more information more particulars but we have a lot of solid understanding in a broad sense not particular details but many of the current cultural and political understanding of China we have solid archaeological evidence going back to two and three thousand BC and so does China welcome first of all historical scholars to come in and examine that evidence today have a narrative that they agreed upon even through the CPR the Cultural Revolution or is it all wiped away in the service of the party can I say yes to both yes yes you can they welcome scholars there's once that they don't really care how was interpreted there are particular room how much particular stories that certain people at least within the party one understanding very particular way but broadly speaking there is more freedom of interpretation person this ancient history then we might expect now doctor Stuart the the thing I remember from doctor Kissinger's book most vividly is he told the tale of the yellow emperor which is China's founding myth but he was a he took great pains to emphasize their founding met like Romulus and Remus I can yes their founding myth presumes a China in existence already which means they don't have a founding myth they just have a first story and then something the last twenty years a lot of archaeology is brought out how many competing cultures there were in the middle of the Bronze Age China than simply aren't mentioned that for example well the Chinese history can start with a long shot and the the three thousand BC or so and they dominated the eastern yellow river valley three thousand years before Christ right okay so we are going back a ways in the Peloponnesian wars I always kind of think that that you can go with Alexander the great and then the Peloponnesian War you you can get a good handle on time if you start work on the ancient Greeks but you're basically two thousand years before then correct so when do they emerge as a people about whom we have you know I centrality of a figure a historical figure what what kind of time okay we talking about the first unequivocally historical individual we know come to the right of the jin dynasty around the time you were to sign up to twenty or so BC but there's clearly a he bore a Chinese people from long long long before that it is a Chinese people a genetic subgroup is there a geographic gathering is the cultural identification recent studies have shown that there's was more genetic diversity then perhaps some today would like to admit but it's clearly culturally eight a group okay so distinct group that we can see tracing even today with some of the kinds of things they eat the ways they group themselves politically and socially the even some of their architecture goes way way back into the two thousand BC or more but let's let's get back to the chin dynasty because what you gave me there is a place to get a rock cold because it is at the same time the Greek world is coming into being that will form the west in in alliance with Jerusalem we sent you know Athens and Jerusalem you're telling me the Chen dynasty is where we are to begin is that where the emperor's begin that's the first person to adopt the title ample the Chinese will retroactively ascribed that title to the long of the shoe and John dynasties well much earlier the back to fifteen hundred or so BC those guys are using the title emperor and there's some disagreement about get all these guys really exist or not there there's clearly a policy there and so when we were used the term dynasty which is familiar I've got a whole list of dynasties in my notes here right what does that mean what is the dynasty mean in you know in in the west it means succession by blood until it's broken is that the same within China broadly speaking yes it's it's not necessarily patriarchal patrilineal the way we tend to assume in the west father son father son directly but it is a family until that family is this what Dr oz join this doctor and I'm learning that I don't know anything about China and it's a lot older than I thought how much time have you spent in a long academic career spanning China and probably a forty five or fifty minutes you and I are alike read four books I'm ahead of you are you finding a new found interest in it yeah I've been sitting up last night and this morning reading about trying to get David to mandate so brought me up to two hundred and twenty one BC so we've got a western we got anything at this point what did your reading tell you last night well I have been thinking about this for many years China is seen the same day the grace of that China is different from us that check trying to that religion is not the same kind of thing they're not monotheism is that it's it's that it's early doctoring students acted the the the pre air here president general sector in Congress party he is interested in the history of China and the ancient practices and that's tied to ask what nationalist now when we come back from break we'll pick up with the the Chen dynasty and move forward my gas is Dr David Stuart he is a Buckeye Larry aren't is kept in locked away in the basement at Hillsdale for many years but we actually have an Ohio.

Lori Dr David Stuart professor
"yellow river valley" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In light mint comes from the inside out the most important mystery that we encounter Jason rights is our endeavor to be free in this life and it is what we see but we already possess it continuing he says the accepted notion of success is to assure that our very existence is wrong and that somehow we need to make it right the idea he will show us as he does the readers of his work is that we already possess enlightenment this is not generally accepted among most people or traditions and so I ask is it really that simple is it possible for each of us all of us to find peace within in there for each of us all of us to help manifest that peace in the world join us for a wonderful and compelling journey through the landscapes within us now thank you for joining us Chasin I tried to be on the hard always a pleasure to speak you you know of course you upset many apple carts a spiritual death disciplines in the world tradition with this book which is one of the reason I love that I'm going on my god this guy writes exactly what I think so let's where you do because you know you don't come to this awareness by just sort of sitting down and studying traditions and thinking about it and I'm writing a book so how did you find that the path itself was the journey and the tools are not the journey itself wait for took over is a long time and to to realize that basically say like yourself probably as well as I but yeah basically you know I've sewn lied core teachings are followed for a long time of being mainly is and what isn't and I fight dividend to in in India then and both of those traditions actually always speak about yeah and then they always speak about life we're all we're always being in Nevada but we don't realize it and and so forth and so on and an invite to the dance today they always tell you to give up the search you notice such of striving and and so forth and so on because state from their opinion you know we already have it what whatever that might be the end and with the enlightenment we are seeking you know so we already have it but the problem is is there a search for and the further we go out into the world striving for success striving for spiritual enlightenment strong for whatever is always getting away from actually nice repertory aha so it's a it's basically about coming back into that realization that we already have that so I for me personally I haven't really lived in I would say western society for a long time for five years now but over the last ten years for free only a few years of being in western society and I've mainly been living in Asia and so I've been around a lot of teaches a lot of people practicing these this this type of philosophy and you know actually applying it to their loss to see if there's any truth to it so you know maybe I've always been pretty curious about everything so I I did as well off of the flight it's mine life and I've seen the benefits in my own life and I've seen the the truth in it actually you know you can just if you if the listener looks at you know just basically if you if you leave your familiar varmint you put yourself in a different environment with nothing to do completely nothing to do what you feel is your complete and your whole nervous system will begin to relax your mind will begin to come back down to the ground more of more of the root level where you're not either thinking about the toss that you have to do today and and this and that and then you said you'll you start to feel is old on compass seems sort of peace within yourself that not even in in the external world you you not that disturbed by distractions of why whatever whatever may come your wife is sorry you know it's it's as simple as that for me like I've been away from my familiar environment which is a strategy of full a long time and I've been in places like to remain on the light in India Ole often the Himalayas in the poll and being disconnected from Saudi and have realized this but again it's you have to eventually come back to society and all sides live live it from that perspective as well so that's also a challenge but out that's like sort of came to it well in in our what I like so I mean it's so interesting because we talked earlier with Joseph Emmett who wrote finding the blue sky and he also is a teacher of Zen Buddhism in the dharma way of took not Hans tradition and so I read both of your books and his first and then yours and it was really thrilling because his work is focused this particular book on that happiness and that we can cultivate happiness and through cultivating this we can cultivate peace post peace within and then obviously peace in the world and then I read your book and of course you throw all to the wind but that's after having done it all before it went back to the wind and and so it's it's kind of like you know sometimes if if if one hasn't done the long work of self refinement and self cultivation and it just sounds like a bunch of words like oh yeah you can be happy shore you can have peace and and then like you said and I always joke it takes no effort it was just the thirty years of preparation there's no work at all okay so you point out some really beautiful I think tripping points that our civilization is subject to and this is one of the ways our our godliness our divinity are our innate in light mint capacity has been bailed and one of them has to do with time concert share with us this perspective of linear versus non linearity of time it's a good point especially if it's a good point when you consider sorry when you consider the differences of western and eastern thought and in general like now when we go back into history when we see the for example the evolution of Greek civilization in Chinese civilization there's a distinct focus on a different a different focuses on you know you for the for the grades for example I'll focus on individuality which was just a result of the environment and and and with China was a focus on collectivism more about more of a holistic views because because the environment dictated those times took towards any other in the yellow the yellow river valley area of China and you needed large populations of people to cultivate rice and so forth and so on so what this leaves into is that the Chinese that he's not just trying to the east always had a perspective of everything you know it takes a long time everything is a process I'd of toward something or it's just a process in itself you know we're not going out trying to see individual achievements or individual success which is doing what is required of us in that present day you could say so I'm not saying that all of the philosophy came from this sort of holistic thing but what your soul and he's even if you go into India role Southeast Asia is that they see the world that there is nice sort of beginning or end they see that everything is is just price says sorry it doesn't matter yeah it it doesn't matter in a sense that you know if you want to succeed at something like for example I I set out to write a book of course I want to complete the book but what do you resonate more with you resonate more with the prices or the achievement of getting it published and so forth and so on is nothing wrong with that you know you can you can take both as well which is why I choose to do but from the east and the specter of the the the point of the whole exercise is the price as sorry this is why when you go into China or Japan and they they train you in calligraphy for example calligraphy just about trying to disengage your mind from thinking about it she is nonsense beginning to end and just be in the process of having what they would call at and if it was mine so having a mind it's not stock that's just in the motion or you know as me hi chicks might would say in the floor of the immediate moment where basically your mind is converged with nature which is what the Chinese probably would say and so yeah this goes way back like what we said like and this goes into a white man so when we look at in light and then when we look at it from a site safe we look at it from our own western mine went when the west was introduced to the east for example the notion of enlightenment was there especially in Buddhism and Hinduism and say people thought well hell how can I get this you know because the and then and what meant the comes this golds achievement that we we need to strive to succeed where is you know in the in the heart of a lot of the the British tradition and Hindu tradition is that we have to sort of get away from that way of thinking that way of thinking is actually a clips the lightning but we already have sorry we have this almost re trying out out out the section to see that that the that life itself is just prices even even L. live side you know I I I can see my life is being born and dying in the physical safety of that from the east in perspective everything is process and then once that process is finished in about well I should say finish with when that process is sort of Rick reached its pinnacle eight eight it moves on to another process and then and this is heather I have the the concept of reincarnation and so forth and so on so I you know I do you said the the ideas but again it's about training online to think in terms of process rather than beginning and and so I always having the the have listed few that the the big picture in mind instead of the small picture in her hand and then there was another component and I thought it was just a brilliant insight you were talking about monarchical consciousness and that we have this within ourselves and and this whole notion of hierarchical realities describe for us why this impinges basically one each of us experiencing this enlightenment it's a good point yeah well basically what it this is a this is are not just a a western problems also in Houston from was well where we find sort of the mind we have a monarchical sort of perspective of around the world the universe we could say and this goes back into stars the first in Persia where you know we had a block of time where you had quite figure is conf I thank arcing race we had louts certain Confucius in China we had got to move the border in India and all of these individuals what sort of under the same agreement in in certain times about how the universe is about it's connective itty about it sort of unified perspective about how it's sort of the universe is an organic structure not something that's created roll all night and then you have dar's the first in that same people who came out of nowhere he brought in the king of kings tradition which is basically that the universe had has achieved the goal of gold he darted ten got itself into a little rule into a real aside in we had from that perspective in that infiltrate into is also Saudi into even out of the fabric of the way that an individual thinks and this became an aspect of obviously Christianity and Islam Judaism to some extent and also you know in some of the Christians you see the idea of the the creator god of the rule of the Rula you'll Marty and yeah you can see some benefit in this from a spiritual perspective but what happens then is that you take L. net yeah elle naturalness away from us and you you build sort of a I'm an article structure you know in the data Ching they say.

Jason
"yellow river valley" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Music has charms to soothe a savage breast to soften rocks to bend nodded oak. When William congress wrote that in sixteen ninety seven all hazard, he never could have imagined the variety of musical instruments. The world would produce over the next three centuries or even all the different instruments that existed around the world in his time. Mankind has been using materials at hand to make music since the caveman days, and now we have triple neck electric guitars. My name's moxy, and this is your brain on facts. If you've ever found yourself wishing for an episode with more sound effects in intricate editing. You're in for a treat today from simple flutes two enormous self playing. Art installations, the breadth of the heading musical instruments is enormous. This is another one of those topics where I had to decide where to draw the line. What makes the list, and what doesn't some instruments are machines some are sculptures. Some are one off inventions just to see if the designer could all of them are instruments in their own, right? Even if they don't make the list. There are four main types of musical instruments or five depending on who you ask percussion would win string brass and Hiebert each appearing as mankind's ability to work different materials, evolved like the soundtrack for fiddler on the roof. Let's start with tradition. Every culture on earth began making music with percussion hitting one thing with another thing to make a sound you like the earliest evidence, we've been able to find drumming dates back one hundred and sixty five thousand years evidence of this and all other prehistoric instruments is hard to come by not only because of the vast chasm of time, but because they were made of materials that would have decomposed millennia ago like wood bone and leather that doesn't mean that no evidence exists fragments of bone flutes have been found. And archaeological sites in south western France dated between twenty thousand and thirty five thousand years old. They showed evidence of being used extensively with the finger holes having been burnished smooth by the players fingers. A very nearly complete bone flute was found in Germany and was nearly twice as old as the ones in France, slightly older. Still was a flute made from a cave bear femur on which archaeologists found evidence of chewing by the ancestors of modern hyenas. This flute may have been carved by Neanderthals expanding scientific opinion about what they were capable of. Full an intact bone flutes have been found in the Yellow River valley of China dating back some eight thousand years, they're the oldest playable instruments ever found and luckily for us someone recorded one the recording doesn't sound so great. But just think that someone in our time is playing the self same flute that a man or woman played not eight centuries ago, but eight millennia ago. How different the world was the first time that flute sang. After pounding on things and blowing through things early man began to experiment with strings, the earliest records, referencing stringed instruments, come from Batavia three thousand years ago and fragments of stringed instrument over two thousand years old have been found on the isle of Skye. They are liars little harps held against the body. Plucked instruments were eventually joined by bowed instruments. The first recorded reference to abode liar was in the ninth century in Persia that it was called lira that we don't have recordings of that. We do have the Chinese ear who which evolved from a two stringed lute Tej in key a thousand years ago and is still played today. Over

France William congress Persia isle of Skye Hiebert Yellow River Batavia Germany China thirty five thousand years sixty five thousand years eight thousand years three thousand years two thousand years eight centuries three centuries thousand years
"yellow river valley" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"yellow river valley" Discussed on Giants of History

"The first of these four civilizations is of course message mya mess batavia sprung up between the tigris and your phrase rivers around thirty three hundred b c e mess battaini actually means between two rivers and if you look at where mess batavia was on a map you would see comprised mostly of parts of modern day iraq iran syria turkey and kuwait the earliest coherent form of writing was called cuneiform which used wedgeshaped characters carved into clay tablets and shoot a form originated with the sumerians in southern mississippi tame taymiyya now the second civilization to emerge out of recorded history was egypt in the nile river valley around thirty one hundred b c e this ancient civilization obviously a focal point of this particular series existed primarily in the same geography of modern day egypt and as we all know it was hieroglyph fix that the ancient egyptians used as their primary system of writing and recording and before we move on just to round out the other two of the four earliest civilizations which arose on the world scene and also to mention that there is some mild dispute around the dates when these two civilizations emerged but we can safely assume that they came together soon after message tame in egypt and these two civilizations were the indus river valley civilization and the yellow river valley civilization the indus river valley civilization was made up of parts of modern day india and pakistan and then the yellow river valley civilization existed in what would be today modernday china.

batavia mississippi nile river valley egypt india pakistan syria kuwait coherent indus river valley