27 Burst results for "Yellow Pages"

"yellow pages" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Ability to feed yourself. But it all starts with the understanding of the person with dementia can still learn. The person with dementia is a normal person who has a disability. We need to look at dementia, not as a disease medicalized process, but as a disability. And what that means is that our job then is to enable a person to circumvent their deficits. And to be able to use the ability to stay have as opposed to focusing on what they can't do. So for example, we talk about cognitive ramps, okay? No, if you're driving down the street and you see a ramp that's built up in the front yard to somebody's house, you don't think anything of it. You say, you know, there's someone there who is, say, in a wheelchair, and this lets them get into the house without having to go up steps or be carried up the steps. So for a person with dementia, cognitive ramps are things that allow you to circumvent your deficits. So for example, I remember talking to a woman who said, you know, it's really sad, but when I come to visit my husband, he doesn't know me anymore. He calls me by his mother's name or his Antony. And what I told her was he knows he just can't name you. There's a real, that's not a random choice of names. So what if you wear a name tag in large print when you come to visit? And he can read that and call you by name. And that is a cognitive ramp. And I'll tell you the nature of a relationship changes when a person can call you by name or when they can't. We say it's a little thing that's a big thing. Another thing is, for example, I always talk to staff and I say, all right, so a person comes up to you and says, you know, my wife doesn't visit me anymore or my daughter. They don't know if I'm alive or dead. Please call them. And of course, the person left 45 minutes ago after their visit. And they might not be even home. They're on the way. They're on the way home, see. Why laugh because when my mom was in memory care the first year ish, oh my goodness, all the ladies there, they were demanding the phone in the yellow pages, which of course cracked me up because I'm not even sure they still print yellow pages anymore, but that's what they remember though. Yeah. So what we say is you need to, if this is a community, you need to have a visitor center. You need to have a place where people can go who are coming for a visit who can see what's coming up who can figure out how to get to places, but also how to have a good time. And so one of the things we talk about is what we call a visitor's book. This is a thing that I got actually an Oslo when I was giving the conference, but.

dementia Antony Oslo
"yellow pages" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Ability to feed yourself. But it all starts with the understanding of the person with dementia can still learn. The person with dementia is a normal person who has a disability. We need to look at dementia, not as a disease medicalized process, but as a disability. And what that means is that our job then is to enable a person to circumvent their deficits. And to be able to use the ability to stay have as opposed to focusing on what they can't do. So for example, we talk about cognitive ramps, okay? No, if you're driving down the street and you see a ramp that's built up in the front yard to somebody's house, you don't think anything of it. You say, you know, there's someone there who is, say, in a wheelchair, and this lets them get into the house without having to go up steps or be carried up the steps. So for a person with dementia, cognitive ramps are things that allow you to circumvent your deficits. So for example, I remember talking to a woman who said, you know, it's really sad, but when I come to visit my husband, he doesn't know me anymore. He calls me by his mother's name or his Antony. And what I told her was he knows he just can't name you. There's a real, that's not a random choice of names. So what if you wear a name tag in large print when you come to visit? And he can read that and call you by name. And that is a cognitive ramp. And I'll tell you the nature of a relationship changes when a person can call you by name or when they can't. We say it's a little thing that's a big thing. Another thing is, for example, I always talk to staff and I say, all right, so a person comes up to you and says, you know, my wife doesn't visit me anymore or my daughter. They don't know if I'm alive or dead. Please call them. And of course, the person left 45 minutes ago after their visit. And they might not be even home. They're on the way. They're on the way home, see. Why laugh because when my mom was in memory care the first year ish, oh my goodness, all the ladies there, they were demanding the phone in the yellow pages, which of course cracked me up because I'm not even sure they still print yellow pages anymore, but that's what they remember though. Yeah. So what we say is you need to, if this is a community, you need to have a visitor center. You need to have a place where people can go who are coming for a visit who can see what's coming up who can figure out how to get to places, but also how to have a good time. And so one of the things we talk about is what we call a visitor's book. This is a thing that I got actually an Oslo when I was giving the conference, but.

dementia Antony Oslo
"yellow pages" Discussed on High Tea

High Tea

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on High Tea

"Exhausted in the sense is like, I already have a picture in my head at the time. I already had a picture in my head of like, what is my ideal relationship? What is my ideal person that I would like to be in a relationship with? So for me, if you didn't fit that ideal, why are we still here? Right. So, so for me, it's like, that's what made dating very hard for me because one not only being picky, to having higher expectations, not only for the person that that's in front of me, but also for myself. And three, it's like, not the feeling of rejection, but the feeling of being let down, because I don't give a fuck about reading, rejected, because I reject people all the time. So why should the function I give a fuck about it? If someone rejects me. It doesn't make any sense. So I do understand what you're saying because it's like one, how do you start to, where do you start? And then three, what the fuck is the sense in all of it? Yeah, like is there a yellow pages? Because the last time I checked, there you know yellow placements. Right, we can't flip through the book and find a rice. There is no book of advice for this. And as much as dating coach is want to put on put out books and stuff like that about it, it is so generalized and it's so whitewashed because of the fact that stuff like that does not work. For us as black women, especially when most dating books and dating advice is given two out by cis primer county. Cisgender. Right, and they're all like a heterosexual white man or a heterosexual white woman. So it's just like, your ideal of dating doesn't work for us. So it's always trying to find your own groove in it. And it's really hard. So when.

"yellow pages" Discussed on The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

"Like 6 one. Is that right? 6 two. I'm 6 even and Joe sway is no comment. Just wait. What is this a physical? What are we doing here? It can not come as the president as the president of the guard report players reporters association just waits not allowed to comment on anything medical. It's a personal question and we don't answer personal medical questions about our hype. We're trying to talk about the NBA. Private. We got a job. Yeah. That's private. This is a private issue. I will be ready. Today's we'll have a live. We'll have a live broadcast. All right, you guys can come down and find out. It'll be a bar graph. It'll be Bobby sriracha. Tim's on. 'cause he likes to do that. When he knows doing a report with me. No comment. Just to ruin this one standing. Is that cool? I have worked with many reporters who have stood on boxes and sat on phonebooks, okay? I never have I ever. That's because we don't have any phonebooks anymore, Joe. Yeah, that's nice. What's a phone? Oh yeah. Who do you find a phonebook now? The yellow pages, the white pages. That would be yellow pages dot com. Do we have a do we have a cornet, dunk banner, the people are excited about that one? No, they were. They just want to be you, Bobby. That would be you. Bobby, you weren't 6 two when I met you, man. I swear, you're still growing, but all right. They haven't had the media game in years. I'd be excited for that one. Yeah, hopefully that would be nice to get that one back in there. We've got 5. We can run a garden report 5. That would be something. Bobby, can you help me with your height? 'cause I can play, I can play big if I have to, even though I was a guard. Yeah? For sure. I grew up playing center. You did. So you were one of the tall kids early? Yeah, for sharing. I was up there. Yeah, Joe sway runs point. We'll stick Jimmy in the corner if he knocks down some shots great. I feel good about this group. He's coming off the bed. He's not sorry, yeah, here. He's coming up. On this scene. Come on. Back to my door. He's got to earn him. Getting up and down the floor. That might be the key. I'll put it this way. Isaiah Thomas was one of the few players that I was looking down to her. One on one. Wow. Okay. In other words, he's not what he's listed as, but or maybe he is. How tall is Jimmy? Who's taller? Jimmy or josue. I think what kind of question is that, Joe? Let me just wait. Is that too personal? I hope you know. I mean, it's not even close. Are you considerably taller? Thank you. Thank you, Shira. You got him by Lisa a couple inches, at least a couple. You. Yeah. Yeah. I forgot. I forgot..

Joe sway guard report players reporters Bobby sriracha Bobby NBA Tim Joe Jimmy Isaiah Thomas josue Shira Lisa
"yellow pages" Discussed on Cheine On

Cheine On

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Cheine On

"What? Like, back then they're like, you don't call a band death. Yeah, the who, you know? Led Zeppelin. So he's like, I think that people have such a bad connotation of the word death. He's like, I think that it needs to be like, it's just another part of life. And they were all very spiritual very religious. So the two brothers, they're still alive and they're talking about it. They're like, so we just like back to my brother, were like, okay, like what's called a band death? Fuck, yeah. So they started playing, obviously, people were kind of standoffish by the name death. And their music was kind of fast, kind of loud. And so they had trouble getting to play places. So their mom would let them play and practice the house when that was a three and 6. And they were just and everybody in the neighborhood knew them, they're playing their music, they're going at it. And one day, David was like, I think we should go try to get a record deal somewhere. So one of his brothers explains he takes the yellow pages and he puts him on the wall and he stands back and he throws it dart. At the music page. And it lands on what I think is Columbia Records. So they go to Columbia Records, they say, hey, we have this music. We want to show you. We think it's like, you know, David was the one who was like, this is the enemy. Yeah, it's going to be big. And his brothers are like, yes, good music, but it's just this difference. They go up there and the guy's like, yeah, this is pretty good. Let's go ahead and start recording some music. So they record, and he goes, okay, I want to release this under one condition. You have to change the name of the band. And the other two brothers were like, they thought about it. And Dave was like, no, no deal. He's like, we don't chase the name of the band. We don't change the songs. It all comes as like one package..

Columbia Records David Dave
"yellow pages" Discussed on The Family Podcast

The Family Podcast

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on The Family Podcast

"'cause they fink because they've got the as their basis it alleviates a lot of the pressure I'm actually being helpful to this person because of this narrative you know what some do let me talk about what you were saying before actually had the time to sit down and ten thunder before and the guy explained to me about His thought she is she. Me is wife left him. She told everything and he didn't have any means to any ended up on the street and it was like if i could deliver is related. Trimmed maritza something. Just give him on. Kusano are these people skills. Young people got serious skills. You see the people in the roots and they just got one violent or something. Those people who dedicate their lives to music and they just made of opportunity may not have made it was causing connie pinto producers signed from the from the street. i remember. Yeah yeah yeah so last. Often examples a clear example all these people that have skills but it just not gonna get the time of day time of day rob because of their position and it's upset and is upset and bofill like what you said earlier about helping people for something in helping people Not to but majority of people just fills goods if it was really good to be able to provide something and not just link it matter to him. I said i'll do it. Polish cycle standard directories. Lychee jus- your business owner diary on the platform yellow pages yellow pages dot com yoyo will in london or his examples. You come into directory you will what you and you can find a business right. Confined to paint on your attrition. Your plumber whoever beaten I feel like people who created that not any dishes A ribbon thunder lead the guy who made pages but i don't think people were customer centric enough as guy who says to be customer Your not necessarily well. I'm not necessarily going to 'cause he reviews. I'm not you might take my headline but small crowns might be some but my ballboy you might have a map rubbish experience. You might light allowed barbershop. I might like the quiet barbeque where everybody needs a bit more information. So we've trimmed eretz to go back to my earlier point it's about helping baba's fervored and just exposure visibly aside going into barbershops and just observing holding focus groups awesome. Ooh everybody chabad went into majority. Rumour out always noticed one spitball. But every time i was always spin was struggling to hire. Oh how do i cou. I hope i help. And that is the reaction with a lotta people and knives. She created vacancy listed on. But i feel like a lot of people in our full guessing from you to as well like when you hear someone struggling move something. It's not all may okay. How do i am. I definitely are nothing. that's it. that's the best position to be. It's just it's crazy to say in it by. Its rovner unfortunate. That it's been monetize so much so i know millions have spoken about that people basil's who actually just had a question. Why no one to help people to get access to stop and start like that. And then the money started pouring in because that's usually what happens. Someone just wants to help they sell something. He's you know. And then once you know once you try and help then suddenly people you'll kind of good at what you talk about like you were saying before it's about understanding what does your customers really want with. Just go under the standard because obscene shows. I've seen directory. It's a similar thing like his lack of that business. Okay so we're going to get any bit or just you know we're gonna mock ourselves in a special way or not change your business your business. Eight light a business. What makes you different from that person. You folks some chew cost them on so with the To customers for trim. There's a barbershop and bob. Dole and attention is fifty fifty to both the business started. Because of a bobby show. And then when i went into barbershops i would focus on the bob. Okay would you struggle with so. I need to literally say. Look what you you start. I've gone to. I mentioned causing genre. And i even okay. We are looking for avocados. Are i don't wanna know x said. Nah he's not. They need to tell them if that were incorporated into the actual app. So if you go on it you'll see iraq. We let you know everything from wiza- erris cashpoint to webinars. They have wi find side. Have we got wifi. Ac toilet have ac. They already shared over hairdressers but a shared we have incident cuff whereas in nearby parking is free parking. All right cool was nearby mini next to you in a way for john. I'm trying to say order stuff. It's all pertinent information. Thanks to and you know. Things are gonna affect your bob chauve experienced. You know i think. Paul is you know community as well which i don't know whether you kinda tapped into because for example. Someone may have your app here just because they're trying to figure something out so you know that mother in my young child in montana day. They need to get caught by. Now they're done they put into tesco cause was local. And you're told them they need to go back to the ball Tesco don't have no toilets and a young kid needs to get to the Saying don't lie to me. You've seen this this year. You probably seen it in just a few quotes a few. Okay yeah okay special. Hollywood god go tim. Directors is the truth. Yes barbershop on holiday for free weeks. This never happened. I was in total panic. I'm skeptical about new. Bob is to say the least but the head hog. Oh wow the customer service and benefits from using the apple out of this world me. Find parking and a cashpoint. I mean genuine shock. I haven't seen this dragon then. You have a user for life. And then someone said seamless barbara inexperienced great app. Having moved to a new area. I was a bit reluctant to try new babo however this app has made such an such an easy thing to do i. I love the tools of the shops. Beforehand really felt comfortable. When i was able to see the workmanship of the baba's themselves would hundred percent recommend lifesaver downloaded the app one into book in a headquarters and found some mel grooming services. Which i've never used before more than just another booking at an someone say game change Exactly what i needed. Super easy to you can access all the information. I need at the coach of a button. Perfect when you hear things like that. Yeah does it. How does it make you feel. That's what makes me feel good the fact that like literally you have to understand trimmed or it was once i wanna be able to do this man. I want to help someone in that way on how you just read out. Everything was pen and mama told your food idea. I started working on april twenty nineteen october twenty eight year and these types of things i wanted to do for people i one of those people mentioned video. That is avert utah. I got that from. I'm a big final breakfast club. Yeah on on him going everybody. Dj spending books on watch. And i would know is that every single are done a good interview. I wanted to listen to their poor. Your vice versa. The ones that are deeply lack of china here. It just the powell black ability.

Kusano connie pinto bofill rovner fink baba bob chauve rob basil london Dole bob tesco iraq Tesco montana Paul john Hollywood tim
"yellow pages" Discussed on The HR L&D Podcas

The HR L&D Podcas

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on The HR L&D Podcas

"Back to the hr. The hot cost them joined by fascinating exciting and very entertaining guests. Brian silly now born is someone who has advised the white house and is the only hacker and speaker so successfully wiretap the united states service and the fbi beta that same year. My guess also dino be anonymous the highly valued mobile app secret which put him on the front page of what dot com. Cnn money seen at forbes and the washington post all on the same day. I mean seriously am so excited. Born is a world famous security. Keynote speaker ethical hacker author former us marine and. He's joining us today. To talk about the importance of cyber security now in the uk with eighty one percents of uk assamese conferring that suffered a beta reached soil attack with a considerable too inform but thirty seven percent missing suffered multiple breaches are compelled to contact one to invoice wanted. Stay show because i think payroll and hr particular our department stoller extremely vulnerable. And i want to find out exactly why and what we can do to protect ourselves. And they'll do better during the course of this episode now. Joining us from seattle. Welcome confronts the show how you feeling great. Thanks for having me and tastic well just to give. The missed is a bit of context into some against the detail of the of the questions. Watch you might just give him a little bit of background to your story beyond belief just mentioned. That's giving some science. You're i guess looks like today. I grew up in tokyo My parents worked over there. And i left high school. Two thousand joined the marine corps and have been it since about that time. Two thousand to two thousand four or five six from there and i got divorced and got clean and sober around twenty thirteen. Which is when. I started really focusing more efforts on work in career and just trying to find ambition to play more than video games figured out. I was kind of good at this in some aspects. Maybe not in the decision making process. 'cause i wouldn't recommend wiretapping any federal agencies. That thousand wasn't making open. Introduction listing of still about quiet about sinking. Yet you did. Why atop the secret service and the fbi right. Yeah that was a terrible idea. So it was a. It was a google maps or mapping engines these different companies that have Business listing so. It's like a yellow pages book white pages some sort of business directory. Now it's digital and there's a dynamic ranking system so everyone has a trying to make a play for the top rankings fox what you can manipulate those results. You can make all the money. In every category especially businesses that are customer service oriented traveled to you mobile locksmiths..

fbi uk the washington post white house Cnn Brian united states seattle marine corps tokyo google
"yellow pages" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Mixergy

"Product and you're in multiple seasons era thinking about a season ahead. Why you're you're thinking about. Two seasons ahead wire delivering the future seasons. Get to be in stores before this when you're also doing re deliveries in re ups on the currencies in also the last season so you're trying to predict the future while you're planning it while you're working in the past and present of your late. It's one of those containers late because there's weather in the open ocean macy's siemens sacks they'll discount you it sucks lane or like fifty fifteen percent. Wow yeah all right. How well did that do on the exit. That was about a single for me. Okay and do you do anything to celebrate. Take off one of the eight days of the week. I jumped right i. I jumped right away. Because i was like. Oh had this idea. I was cooking. This idea already k. Cooking versus game for the past fifteen sixteen years. I just had the balls and the wherewithal to do it. You know people tried this. I don't know why didn't work for them in the past but people tried this type of thing before and it hasn't worked before but let's continue. You told our producer while you were artificial flavor. You started noticing that there would be these sales people coming in from like the yellow pages. The yellow pages still thing going into local stores. Just like you were and you said this is not the way that they should be selling. What did you see that they were selling. What were they doing wrong. They also look merchant too. Because there was i had a brand house living in those stores to and so there are south. It was interrupted sales out of and it was a case out. Here's a website. Here's an here's whatever rioting they would come in and say by my by website for your business you need one it will come in or call them on the phone and it was very interrupted the owners the buyers go my god right noticing. This and i felt that too. I saw and felt it experienced has got to be a better way. I hasn't sales experience now. My last jobs right and now's a local merchant experience. Now's like you know what i think. There's a better way. So hence the birth of The last company before this Where we start. I was like you know what. Let's go and automate this. Let's let's let's bridge. Let's bridge the gap credit better ecosystem for everyone involved because it's a nightmare right now. What's the better version. How how are you envisioning making a better The division was to automate it. That was that was the number the name of the game how the sales caused the at the emails that go out automate the sales process. We try to simulate emulate in credit better sales experience by doing all the research upfront by coming up with a little menu of what we think you should buy and instead of the sounds pedestrian perhaps but people hate phone calls we emailed instead and we had a beautiful beautifully designed drip campaign And then people some of them we would get them to be a lead and pass it off to a human of the sale was too complex at a microsoft or yahoo and then if there were sale was simple it would close a sale because by it right there from the email and so what you were doing was reselling ads on search engines reselling yellow pages et cetera. We took whatever client. We had whatever sales products they had and we would resell it on their behalf or kick it over to their sales. In how many people did you have at your height salespeople for us. yeah or you just had automation. No sales people making automation. No says we had people that were partying up like getting clients like microsoft who will yellow pages of stuff like that got it got it and it was mostly. It seems like it's it's sets of email. Campaigns find scrape databases get emailed. Got it message over update. Remember this is a lot. It sounds normal so this is a long time ago. now when is twenty thirteen. I don't remember. I sold this like seven something years ago. We sold seven years ago. All right okay. That was like a double for me when you say double for you. We're talking hundreds of thousands of dollars not millions for you I'm talking you know. I was able to take two years off and get into real estate. Okay got it. How'd you get. How'd you get into real estate. I bought my own property first. And then i talked to some people and i was noticing. What my neighbors are are doing. And then i was like all my places appreciating in i found. I discovered free money. And it's a beautiful thing. Meaning you're faces appreciating so you take another mortgage used that money and go put a down payment. Yeah so if your place makes a couple hundred thousand dollars that's free money. I didn't spend money to do that. Really. and so then. I take that two hundred thousand dollars by another place with that in that place appreciates dude over over again. You take that by to take those by four that by you know. Would you do it where yes southern california. I'm in san francisco by though i live in ece. Okay do me to you. You're in the bay area. Yeah i'm in. No he's still on is okay Yeah so all over the country now really and you could manage stuff from only. Yeah i mean. I don't i don't do anything really. I just have the people that manage you know what your core should not be just about business. How about if you have a second site on real estate. I think it should be about money and just about money. People need to know about money. Accomplices all that you know all right before we get into versus. I should do my second ad. Second ad is for member full. Imagine this john. Imagine if you say you know what instead of me making money from advertising from google. I'm an offer free classes but if people want the more interaction made with our teachers. They need a membership. Or i'm gonna have one free class. But if they want the next level the next level we're gonna we're gonna charge for or maybe it's like email is going to be depart that we chart for because our best stuff.

macy siemens microsoft yahoo bay area san francisco california john google
"yellow pages" Discussed on Unbottleneck - Digital Marketing Solutions

Unbottleneck - Digital Marketing Solutions

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Unbottleneck - Digital Marketing Solutions

"There's a speed to ingestion by apple and that we're getting it there quicker so i think i ultimately starting with really good quality data That's formatted to each of their requirements. You know yellow pages wants something different than yelled wants So that's you know kind of core to our business model overall And then from there. I think you know making sure that you had your core bases covered. These are google of course apple Which i think probably more Into consumers than a lot of the other sites. I think probably apple maps could be more important than being say maybe not from a ranking standpoint. Because it can't be. Scraped measured the exact same way having a ticked off user. Who went to the wrong place from their iphone mac. Here yeah but definitely apple should be a core one on yelp for anyone in the hospitality. Industry You know maybe if you're a corner store yelps not as important but someone. That's you know service is for your business. i think yelp is air on tripadvisor. If you're a restaurant or a hotel. And then from there i think there's another set of supplemental sites. Say maybe five to ten. That google is using trust factor. So they're gonna go and evaluate and make sure your data that you're providing one site yod matching wants. The gators have been in their system. What the places like yellow pages and you know some of these Longer tail saint sites. It's still important to be present on you. Don't have to have every single element filled out you know they're really just looking at your location. Data's have your visas covered an outside of they're definitely go each to your industry so if you're a plumber make sure you're on angie's list and you know if you're a lawyer you're going to have different sites irrelevant and dentists and doctors in healthcare is a huge industry. Where you've got unique niches. But on i think that's really it's like as long as you're wear your customers are typically google is going to be you know kind of scoring you. Based on sure how important of the aggregate these days. I mean back in the day like you mentioned the that the data accuracy is sort of like the the nucleus of a really successful local search campaign right And they aggregated. Were where a lot of these directories reporting their information from and then at some point some of 'em turned into their own like foursquare turned into their own. Ira gator What are what's the importance of of some of these aggregated these days. And what are the big ones that we should be paying attention to. So i think when it comes to the aggregate is you either have. If you're not submitting them to rapidly. I think you can submit to the sites that they're going to be pulling data from Because the arbitrators they thrive on information. So they're not getting from you as a business or as an agency. They're going to get it from somewhere else and again. These are similar places. Like they're going to flip from google or being or apple or yelp or these other these other lists so..

apple yelp google gators angie
"yellow pages" Discussed on Advertising Is Dead

Advertising Is Dead

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Advertising Is Dead

"And do a second question. You're you're you're buying decision of how to make it. Free time in our made a fulltime location is something that is very individual but again i go back to that. I don't believe in when we speak to create us. We don't believe that going and trying to hit maas. Is the necessity need. I think you can define what your elementary superfan is out of super consumers and i think for some people it's thousand for boost thousand but the dude is all doable. Sud says that if you hit that magical number of thousand people willing to buy something that you're willing to put out than the truth. Is that that secretive. Influences going to consistently have of It's going to keep like expanding. Son is keep eating and eating more people. But that requires tremendous amount of consistency. And i think that's the crux of it right. I think it in that first house superfan space and then ensuring that jawed expanding it old i in that particular niche and then of course like i said because something's you'll know your mind is gonna take you again. I kissing point you are and and for the moon listening. Big drew's mind on this very of Is the fact that i do. You start off as a gusto. You think about them stamped and fight and at some point the stuff. You don't instagram on twitter. Now really becomes almost escort as the forecast itself right now. And that's really how. I feel that if you look at it from the fact that black phones revolving spoke with you know everybody has their own clubs and that's happening or everybody has a of stories but at some point walk. You're creating you gonna channeling it out there and figuring to find the superman idea. Actually what he goes i think. That's that's guscott levels the playing field. 'cause you north loaded. Aboard a million followers or lower legs were one group subscribers or In all of that stuff. So i'm putting that levels but lord i feel it also opens up as it opens opens up people who never knew thorndale ever have of mass following really build niches and scale up from there. So i think misha's finally by having additional maintenance jar and it's gonna become moss. I space the your nieces nephews nieces tape in order to every level so i think that's going to be expanding we still have or Guarantee in today. I'm more and more people exposed to just how much consumption stay. At the top of the funding would start to me both downwards horizontally. Not only time will tell you know depending on what happens. Extended seen benza. Be active distract blend. But just getting a boost sticking Getting into that I will go back to the days when we started which you know. We had to kind of almost educate brands as to why they need to be on bitch through Do now dempsey gold part of what they do and then suddenly in pops in what was initially infants On the leg. I would lose. All of this logged on happens. This is the only only media gentle available to me from a brand perspective in holiday taken to water like not goodbye nuggets. What's really been a way of success. Yeah judy and i think that traditional marketing has had what i mean over five decades us julia Systems in place your five fees and your models and all of that has been established straight and the fact is that digital and still. Go back glitch data and went. Wait was that you know the disreputable right else. Those models tubing established may in my view. What i'm seeing is that i see a massive. A massive knowledge would say knowledge gap there different levels of awareness for bands when it comes to do because it's the right here as different levels of understanding of bad. They want to enter the the channel of zuma. So what happens. Is that Bottom it is how educated the behind when the auto into this ecosystem and the bonilla education. Finding that right Susan and i think that The way the am ascribing an being very genetic. My approach is that i think now avoided talk about the. Let's assume that about three hundred candy. Who have access to the best. Nine binds the best advice on building their communication strategy. I think now asking the right questions. They're focusing a lot more on bottom line results which can be challenging for agencies that are servicing them but very critical questions. And i think what they're trying to find is holiday balance their traditional advertising the traditional market with less on and i think the the the largest gap is rebels. Two words actually combined night. What would be called like right. It is the physical legal system. Actually that's what our exists. And if you look at some of the greatest case studies to be if you look at it. Neil doug we gods and if you look at the stuff that's digging home awards truly creating impactful brands. That is the space in atlanta getting rich online but finding a way forward to have physical on his as well to traditional means. You're through activation through various dimensions. That they may do so. I think a tremendously exciting. Because it was june the dinar. Resume the down. It's three thousand brands in the country. Because the data will tell you that that's how many companies are actually studying products on amazon today. Actually if you talk about how. Many companies are on yellow pages on times. That's about a lack of companies ninety seven thousand companies have to potentially becoming online at some point in the future if you just look at those. Three thousand companies are just sitting in saying that education that knowledge of just the point of digital is itself of join me. You know what i mean. So the delude organizations like mine. And whenever i speak with industrial folks as when is that it's an warning patients handling. It's a lot of balance between new gwynn and force us to focus on business and also just genuinely adviser bad in a way that need to go advice on. How did he do. Roy need to go. So that's how i'm seeing it man. Vote i finally distinguished what brands rebating have to enter the standard and for north waldorf days or agencies. Just it's the most obvious thing that you'll you'll go. Got copy faced a logistic what he will do on traditional media duggleby based on that lack the even yesterday of jokes contain somebody. Put up something. Someone put up an ad on a digital with said brackets english version. That it's still there. It still happening so that hasn't gone away. And then it went to the fact that if you're working with a career dirt or what sort of as an influencer and you're giving them a script and you need to be dissolved. We'll some of them have all say one thing and this is what i wanted to say safe. How would normally say and that. They will lucien bellon. And you're gonna sit in the middle of just making sure. That connection is as seamless. Oh that neither does it. Stick out like a like a sore thumb on the on the creators feed But also gets what the brand new leads at an enviable via back. I was abandoned in Thing and liquid three four years ago and nba someone from One of the career dennard said that you know when my Gordon goes downhill is when there's a brand-new degration. That comes in and he said in front of flooded rooms but ends. And i was moderating and i was like maybe not the best. Just say this in front off but especially that that dole unwanted to love it. It's so true you know many It feels forced. You need to find a way to make sure. The midst goes out strong.

Neil doug Susan amazon Three thousand companies twitter Roy today julia Systems instagram lucien bellon ninety seven thousand companie second question three thousand Two words first house judy thousand people Sud Nine north waldorf
"yellow pages" Discussed on Real Estate Coaching Radio

Real Estate Coaching Radio

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Real Estate Coaching Radio

"And then you'll money if we have people right now. They're making a killing doing stuff like door knocking. Yeah i know it's working all that stuff is working so much more efficiently now because everybody's excited about real estate. Well not only that but because the market all these agents again always goes back to essentially wherever your competition. There's two ways of approaching a business guys fair to give you all yellow pages. And i already gave you enough money to start the business. And it can't be real estate and say choose a business that you'd want to get into where you have the highest probability of being successful and the only information you can use to researches yellow pages. Hopefully all of you remember yellow pages this and what you are then what most people are gonna do when how most people that question is. They're going to flip through the yellow pages and they're gonna look for the section where there's the least number of businesses to compete with the actual. There's some there's some intelligence to that but the first move should be is go to where there's the most businesses competing because that tells you that's where the greatest market opportunity there wouldn't be that many businesses that could actually compete for say long cutting services or whatever if you find that there's tons of hair salons well. Chances are that's a good business in that particular market demand. Otherwise there wouldn't be one hundred different hair salons. That's the business you probably want to get into. It's counterintuitive but here's the a flip side to that when you're trying to attract business like that if you see everyone else is doing stuff passively. Everyone is doing online stuff. Everyone is doing anything and everything to avoid. Having direct conversations have the direct conversations because the other stuff gets tuned out. It's like a billboard when you're barreling down the freeway you see a new billboard once and you never see it again. same thing happens for all forms of advertising. Same thing happens for all the things you receive the mailbox. Your brain automatically constantly looking for pruning and it's not even going to see that information but if you knock on someone's door or you have a direct conversation with them and you're telling information that's gonna make them feel good. I guess what you wanna a lottery you own a house. Everyone's going to want to talk to you. This is something that should motivate you and should excite you. Yes and if you don't do it don't come complaining to us when somebody got that listing away from you exactly okay. So you're not allowed to complain about it all right so after you have presented the facts you can then say so now that you know we could likely get at least blank for your home. What does that do to your plans or. Would you like me to.

tons of hair salons two ways one hundred different hair sal first move once
"yellow pages" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"So you start talking and you forget the questions that you have in the first place, but you forget maybe maybe the place on person knows something that applies to your loved one and the sales person doesn't know and so they can inject and say oh, you know your mom dead Well, they have pain in your every Thursday and so they can inject things like that. They can also help negotiate prices. So it doesn't mean that you're going to get a huge discount necessarily but they know what the deals are right then sometimes if they have a relationship with them, they might be able to work with someone on negotiating on my community fees or you know a discount and yeah, it's just can be helpful because they've they've been there and they that's their whole focus is doing placement. And so it people say well how hard can it be? And I didn't think it would be that hard but then I did not I guess I have realized all the parts that go into it. And so I love if I'm taking somebody to a board-and-care home. I can say not only is this the owner dead. This is why I like her because you're going to be working with the owner very closely. I know that the owner has done this and this and this I saw her take care of my other client and did this month in this is our communication skills. And this is Angie who is my favorite caregiver and I've seen Angie when someone was passing away and she was there and she facetimes in to say goodbye to the loved one and I'm like, that's the kind of caregiver of one that well you don't get that from a you know, looking in the Yellow Pages or doing a quick Google search. You don't know all those stories, but then on the flipside is it's also a free service. So the you don't play with most places on people don't take a fee from the family that they receive a commission from the community, but their job is not go to just the communities that they're going to get the biggest Commission..

Yellow Pages Angie first Google Thursday
Poly Styrene Documentary

Bigmouth

09:49 min | 2 years ago

Poly Styrene Documentary

"Today. Polystyrene i m cliche is directed by both her daughter. Celeste bell and documentary maker pulsing charting the rise of marian elliott as she was born. She saw yellow pages ad became polystyrene and formed punk band x ray specs as we know in this foam. Celeste goes through her mother's archive and visits. The places of hutch halted. So let's listen to the trader to get a feel for it. Some people think little go should have. But i think my mother was punk rock icon. People have asked me if she was a good mom. It's hard to know what to say your rebel. Today's society paulie had our own ideas. Student full fully trends. She was a woman of color in. Dc full of white middle class. men was singing. polly was singing about. I fell in love with her. I fell in. The news actually started singing. Because right we will dive right in nora snaps point. He was a big personality but as we see her life was extremely complicated on. This is as much. Her daughter's journey as police starring life story. Was that a good way in. I think definitely I think by this point. We also board like punk defecation. This point know the way. The bbc fool punk document generation. That watches him in the in the same way. That like my dad and grandad generation. What war documentaries old thing again and again and I think it's focus the that it's kind of deified in such a like i wasn't like incredible and radical umbro which it was in some ways but also rian just reinforced the status quo in other ways. Like the thing. I think is really great why i feel like the rohbock of this narrative restarted with like the vowel between book which From a couple of years ago when she you know really gets to the kind of watson order of it in a way that is much more punk than saying like. Oh we great you know like sex pistols type branding and i thought that this documentary was like a really peaceful continuation overseas. Not done by polystyrene by her daughter. And i think it's testament polystyrene like complexity and also to her sensitivity. But then i'll say for her callousness towards adulterer as well. I think it makes were much more well rounded portray of somebody and also no. It doesn't just a pain releasing on her. You know she has her own issues but it looks at how they're exacerbated by the society around like a mixed race woman in london at that time in the punk scene. There's a bit wet don. Let says that she goes and shaves her head while she's a party jordan lydon's house and when winter comes back down they just love her releasing. That seem horrendous. In retrospect i'm sure we're just kind of par for the course in in the seventy s and the other thing i was gonna say i think is important is she wasn't postponed. She was punk like she's really part of the the formative dna not very easily gets forgotten. Like when i was a teenager Bought three for twelve pounds. Buzzcocks clash kind of burundi's wound go from and see a whatever it was but it took a lot longer. It's come across x ray specs and to hear them kind of debt day fight in the way that they deserve She had a rough up. Brixton upbringing. shoes booted at school. Punk rock was a place for outsiders is the cliche but actually you see that. It's inevitable that she is going to get drawn to something that's so creative but also that she can break whatever more that she feels that she has been put into yet absolutely I think one thing that's really striking by the way that she Shared her images. While is the like. Obviously i don't want a undress will. The sex pistols did two like bridge society but fundamentally that kind of just like a boy band put together by iron. Witten really edgy branding. And that whole thing is is about dog individualism. When really it was really nothing the saw. And i think that you know. Even the police die polystyrene style for rewards more individual. She recognized herself as a cliche. And she played with the idea of like branding and identity in a way that i find much more interesting than just like sticking a safety pin on it And i think we have to use it. Today were authenticity. It comes from a very real place whether the sex pistols Taped on summertimes travis. The problems with poly seem to stem from x ray specs residency. Cbgb's in new york when they went over us punks hauled coal. There were a lot more into drugs. And i think that london it seems to say. Was this the breaking point for the band. Is this the kind of crux in the film. I think so. I mean i mean. That's the argument fuel. Makes the About what happened to the u k Members of the dolls came over an introduced heroin to the to the uk seen quite quite a heavy way otten Concur with everything that lord said about film. I think The framing the fact that it has selected celeste stories. Her as she's dealing with navas legacy in some respects her mother had had semi other people's expectations about what she should be being Star as in and being mixed race being hauled somali in britain and she's just so in the clips that they use the archive clips which from most of them from a a great arena documentary from nineteen seventy-nine he was she's just so alive him sparking intelligence on which me a very funny and in most What she's doing. I think you know how easy it is to get coal topping to the move Nexus these achieved up by the film. I descend Points about the breakdown. the failure in a way to work out. How will she is. She's diagnosed with schizophrenia. Kind of putting for bit. has serious by disorder Move into harry christmas On also in places you alluded to neglect which she treats celeste points during the spirit journey and was pursuing a common all and happened. How different thoughts regarding way with the male and female office Think about lockdown about. How much care women having to take on board and also agree with. I think that when another book that i would put in the frame is what is alvin. Is is kathy. Adams was drafted memoir of juden in other key. Figure the kind prison to look look upon pumpkin kind of liberating. It wasn't how you think about kind of male violence. Where is actually to the nearly point it was it was quite at transgressive sexually A lot of the gay pubs and clubs were up with the next to solve it. I'm so i can imagine that. The film doesn't does kind of raise interesting questions. As well as celeste father is interviewed in it on one of us and absent biggest because he died. regional manager. And pau falcons stewart. Now again. Severi seventeen seventy six. He was quite a bit older than when they get and how much care and they seem to hide it to a certain extent as well a friends didn't really know whether they were going out with each other or not. We just didn't look particularly cool Strangely enough this film from that era with hangs connor in it could breaking gloss than nyein and strangely seems to be almost so the police story in way which becomes this incredible figure And has sta machiavellian manage aaron and has this breakdown and so on so until daniels place. This full manager boyfriend Is i think it's really five documentary. Actually i think you mentioned he was a guest. Shot means the fact that one of zoe's earlier books whose how's your dad's some which is a an account to of stars children's. She's absolutely perfect for collaborator. On this end coming book as other as good as andrew. Did you like this a did. I really liked it because as as long as it's very fresh indifference it's a dream like quality. This is very much not your friday night documentary. Which begins with the stock footage of the miners. Strike rubbish piling in the winter of discontent. Yeah i've always about acronyms because hatches and didn't stop not your kind of off the pex tickets sold. It's it is a personal journey. It's quite slow and quite like i say quite dreamlike and which i found very refreshing change from the usual stakeouts poke documentary. I remember when i was a kid. I thought i thought police really disturbing because i lived in a very white suburban middle of nowhere type place and you just seems so odd and the fact that she but were shut brace on top of the pops and i now say that that is really good thing that it should be disturbed a little. You not white kids in places where i lived in in middle. middle class. spices. To encounter is person who didn't look like a boss didn't like pasta but was absolutely transfixed thing

Celeste Bell Marian Elliott Jordan Lydon Paulie Rian Celeste Polly Nora Burundi London Brixton Witten Watson BBC Cbgb Otten Navas Pau Falcons
"yellow pages" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

"For today's episode. And we're really excited to welcome john von as my guest in. He is the ceo of local seo search incorporated. John welcome thanks for having me on. I'm excited to be on your show today. Great so some of you are listening. Might be saying so what does it. Seo search many has to do with when people thrive companies thrive. And what i have to say is as re getting prepared for our interview. John and we're going to talk about working remotely and funny enough. There's a recent episode a just published on if you don't offer remote work options you're going to go the way the dinosaurs so john should jump into it. So tell me about your company had been working remotely all this time or was it a something that you had to implement because of the pandemic and other environmental issues perhaps. Yeah definitely Well thanks for the intro. I started this agency eight years ago so twenty thirteen and the reason i started was Actually i i worked in advertising sales for ten years and the instead longest in was working at yellow pages for five years and i did work in a corporate environment. I went into the office couple times a week But i had a book of business so it was more of a freedom kinda urine sales environment but it was more my independent business portfolio book of business by went in service clients so the last two years at yellow pages. I actually was home-based remote. So i had an idea of how to structure my day how to be disciplined how to perform well Being really focused on metrics right count ability. Making sure that i delivered on all the you know whatever was renewables or up sales or whatever my my boss at the time manager directors advised me to hit targets so fast forward when i first started the company as a business owner now. I didn't even know how to run a business. I was new at everything and just jumping into business. Ownership is completely different mindset as running and working as an employee because all the structures were in place all the processes procedures all the departments. Were already there. So when i first started. It was a little bit more challenging. Getting my foot off the ground. Yes i was a sales. Were up so it was out there selling. But they didn't know how to do all the stuff in the back end. So i had to harvest and learn all that the reason i started a hiring remote was costs mainly and getting understanding what it took when i first started You know working remote in at yellow pages. And i was looking for very specific skill sets based on what i harvest right so i learned a lot in terms of like hiring training evolving. My my staff. And i found that anyone in the world can work in this industry right because it is online marketing digital advertising and as long as customers get good results digitally. They don't really know or care where you're located. I'm very upfront and honest and pure in terms of letting people know anything. They want in terms of my industry. My business and how it operates how he got started but honestly clients all they care about is results who you are as a business person in a human. You know the the leader of it all manning the ship and what is your track record. What is success stories and if you can prove to customers that you know what you're doing and you can get good success and results. They will vet and user gut to decide if they wanted to choose you over someone else. So i've learned that over the years like just yourself right. They either like your and same with harvesting good employees. That are remote. Just be honest right. Let people in on what you're doing they either are with you in terms of value wise and your your leadership and your you know your company or not right and that's okay because there's a lot of people out there that are willing to jump with your your company or not same with clients like the not everyone's going to be a great client. You just learning revolve over the years. So what i find interesting in listening to your story that you know you just started out remote because you've had that experience with yellow pages and then it sounds like that there might have been some education of potential clients and customers but we work remotely whatever. And what's interesting is from. The internal side were hearing from from individuals who are looking to find new employment because their current employer is insisting that they come into work in person and these employees. Don't feel comfortable. And so they're leading. And so what. I find interesting. Is you as an organization may have had to educate your clients about. Here's the value of us working remotely and and the fact that you're looking at the end game. The results are happy clients. Who are well served and does it matter how they are being starved. Zombie well-served so that's the external part. On what you had to say about those companies who internally or say no. Don't we have to be in person and love to lead it. Yeah it all depends on corporate culture. Right it all depends on what's mandated at the top and for more tech startups and companies are more advancing in terms of pro. Just being more forward thinking. I i would say because peop- there's going to be a generation of people that are old school mentality. They're so used to go into a factory. Going to large corporate multinational company with a structure. They clock in clock out. They want to be completely in control and they want to know that even though there might not be as productive they see them. They're right and it's more of a control thing. However i look at more. Like i want the best in terms of my staff wellbeing productivity and less stress and i feel if you harvest a good work environment they will stick with you for a lot longer because you're looking after them and it's more of a good fit for both parties so it all depends right because again do factory kind of work environment or even give you an example. My wife works at a bank. And it's a very large top. Five banks in canada corporate structure and she you know has been working in the office for the last fifteen years during this pandemic. She's move to more homebase because of the situation and we just have to adapt to it and she found that at the beginning was challenging. Because we have a child at home it was more about trying to work around life. Dif- different things that are thrown at us all right But as the months and months gone she found a groove h. He found like you wake up a little bit later. You get more sleep. You're less stressed commuting into the office instead of spending forty five minutes to an hour getting on a train or driving to the office. She saves at my having slow. You know having coffee or breakfast in the morning spending more time less stressed right being as productive as she was in the office but just using technology for you know meetings yes. You don't get that social interaction where you go out for coffee and lunch with people. But maybe there's pros and cons to that as well because when you're done doing that copy break it takes you a you know. Ten fifteen minutes to get back in the groove of actually focusing on productive were but now you're onus is doing ed at work at home and you will productive because you can actually. There's no less distractions. I would say right. And you can actually focus. So i've harvested alive these traits over the years of doing this and even prior yellow pages and whatnot So i've i've kinda got a good groove by doing this for over ten years now right and it takes time and it's not for everyone and it's totally okay to acknowledge that and employees employers. They have to realize there's going to be different types of people for different positions and they have to accept it. They got a fine good matches. Good alignment and focus on. What is the end. Goal is

john von five years John ten years john eight years ago today first couple times a week last two years twenty thirteen
"yellow pages" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Bent to this movie of lake. This is a quote what she says. The world is beautiful. Just as it is and you can't have it all you can only have the truth. Yeah and it's like an but she also said the world was like fine like before all this like everything was fine and she's like and it's like now you like your shit and but that's the other thing like wonder woman rapes this man and does it really caught up on that one. Yeah yeah because this is what it is. Fucked up yeah. I agree with movie. Mayday specific choice to not have them. Just come out of thin air. Like for whatever and i don't know what the choice was because they didn't really do anything with it. They just had him do it. And we just saw chris pine and he looked in a mirror once or something but for the most part the fact that he is in another man's body has absolutely nothing like it doesn't matter dick was bigger like this guy. The guy was taller. I feel like chris. Pine has is really packing. Quite the hough i should. Let's let's let me tax cast from for curious ten because she lived with him. So i'm naked so she i don't know if she saw makers now you live with. Somebody might have seen the package you know. I mean well i mean you know if there is consent involved it would be really a wonderful kinky fun thing to explore to be in somebody else's body for like a week and consent like see but that's like the thing at least have wonder woman acknowledged like is fucked up or like. Oh no what. If i become like there is a point. Where like we're chris. Pine says isn't it weird. The you know. I i don't i look like another man. And she says. I only see you when i look at you. And he said that he woke up in this man's body he cleaned his apartment tidied up and then looked in the yellow pages for diana which is insane. Like there's an insane thing. He wakes up in the future and just goes to the yellow pages. The yellow pages exist would be the white navy. Wouldn't it looked like people. The business world be pre world war two world one headphone books in world. War one google that one headphone back to the future in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. That's how he finds. George mcphee fly. the phone. book of my father's name was thomas and they always abbreviated it to folks because you only have so many tatters and people are your dad's name is no but that's okay so then but then so they so mark you were talking about the montage scene. That montage scene is not because of eighties movies. That montage scene is a reference to the first movie where there is a montage scene where wonder woman is being outfitted. They do like shopping town of a pretty woman shopping spree. And it's just like oh look at me in this..

thomas George mcphee diana first movie chris pine google one thousand chris ten world war eighties one headphone books Pine one headphone nine hundred eighty five two one world
"yellow pages" Discussed on Feast of Fun

Feast of Fun

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Feast of Fun

"Bent to this movie of lake. This is a quote what she says. The world is beautiful. Just as it is and you can't have it all you can only have the truth and it's like an but she also said the world was like fine like before all this like everything was fine and she's like and it's like now you like your shit and but that's the other thing like wonder woman rapes this man and does it really caught up on that one. Yeah yeah because this is what it is. Fucked up yeah. I agree with movie. Mayday specific choice to not have them. Just come out of thin air. Like for whatever and i don't know what the choice was because they didn't really do anything with it. They just had him do it. And we just saw chris pine and he looked in a mirror once or something but for the most part the fact that he is in another man's body has absolutely nothing like it doesn't matter dick was bigger like this guy. The guy was taller. I feel like chris. Pine has is really packing quite the high. Let's let's let me tax cast from auburn order curious ten because she lived with him. He's i'm naked so she i don't know if she saw makers now you live with. Somebody might have seen the package you know. Let me let me try sir. I mean you know if there is consent involved it would be really a wonderful kinky fun thing to explore to be in somebody else's body for like a week and consent like see but that's like the thing at least have wonder woman acknowledged like others is fucked up or like. Oh no what. If i become like there is a point. Where like we're chris. Pine says isn't it weird. The you know. I i don't i look like another man. And she says. I only see you when i look at you. And he said that he woke up in this man's body he cleaned his apartment tidied up and then looked in the yellow pages for diana which is insane. Like there's an insane thing. He wakes up in the future and just goes to the yellow pages. The yellow pages exist would be the white navy. Wasn't it looked like people. The business world be pre world war two world one headphone books in world. War one google that one headphone back to the future in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. That's how he finds george mic fly. The phone book of my father's name was thomas and they always abbreviated it to folks because you only have so many tatters and people are your dad's name is no but that's okay so then but then so they so mark you were talking about the montage scene. That montage scene is not because of eighties movies. That montage scene is a reference to the first movie where there is a montage scene where wonder woman is being outfitted. They do like shopping town of a pretty woman shopping spree. And it's just like oh look at me in this..

thomas first movie google george mic world war one thousand chris pine diana one headphone books chris one headphone eighties Pine hundred eighty War one Mayday five two nine
"yellow pages" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Was moved most of your stuff sleight of hand at this stage. Yes. Had you taken in a young sort of built it up it Yes. I had a lot of restaurants like the bootlegger. Almost identical. Right? Come in. It's 17 like 10 o'clock on a Saturday and table. Yes. And they call them do once once a month and be like the magic the magic evening or something. It would be a set meal for 125 bucks. You get your five meals five course deal, right, plus entertainment man, And that was it tonight actually go table table and I'd hire What they're magicians to work with me, Take 10%, because that's what I do, and that's how I run my business, and I had a yellow pages ad. And so this is how I realized Well, this is great. So it's what I was doing. Birthday parties on weekends. There's dates I couldn't do. So I book the same. A buddy of mine for the show and take 10%. I thought, Well, I'm not gonna let that I'm not gonna pass that show off your show on say, I'm not available. I guess the new that's just great jobs me. So now that they trusted your judge horse they did, and I trust in my own, And some of them were even better than me because they didn't see me. He's not gonna work next week. Exactly. So that's that happened. And then I realized those cruise ships. That's where I thought. Well, that's that's it. You had a cruise ship. You are a star. That is this e mean, because you were getting at the time I heard Chris, you better change your making between 902,000 weak American. I'm Canadian, right? The dollar was stronger. Aquino was stronger back then it is still but a 20% difference. So $1000 American was always 1800 or 1500 Canadian. He has a lot of money, so I started sending stuff to agents always said. I gotta call Vancouver is also sort of work City. It's a port city. So cruise ships were they go from there to L, a Seattle and they also go up to Alaska Toe Major city for the summertime, you know, so I thought, so. I started mailing I mailed to my big agents of a guy named John White fucking dear friend of mine now, and he had everything. He had all of all the hotels and Vancouver. If you're a musician or singer, he had Don't you have any of those contracts and he was kind of the guy and then on ships. He had a big ship booking world. So all of a sudden, I mailed a bunch of stuff and I'm I'm selling myself way ahead of my talent. I mean, my tail was barely there, but I had the photos. I had the press kit all of VHS tapes out of market. Just that goes back to the days of putting your flyers on the newspaper 100%. So I knew how to look amazing. I just wasn't amazing. That's okay. You know, I was well aware of it. I still have so and so I mailed on this stuff. Was sudden. My parents went to the ranch with a wrench in Washington Does state which is 45 minute across the board. Okay, so that was our summer. Think it was all of a sudden They're down there. I got a call at the home by myself, cause I'm this time 19 e gonna call him John wife. Look, Is that the guy? No secretary, no seventh staff, blow him him. He's English, So he's a very obvious Hey, Murray. He's the sig filled of the grass and he's the guy. If he calls you, it's real money, and it's real. And so he calls memory SOCSEC police and I said I said, Yeah, it does. John Lightfoot like, Oh, God fill my foot. I mean, like this is a big gamble on the man is really is a john wife. But that guy's not dead, you know, s all of a sudden e. Yes, there's well, um, I might have a gig for you. Yeah, He doesn't trust us to force that. No, I haven't. Do you have to 45 minutes shows in a 15. Course I d o. Of course I two different 45 minute shows you say yesterday. Hell, Of course, I'm thinking quite a swell It's love $100 U s a week I was passed out. I never thought make that my lifetime And anyway, I'm just turned 20 right E man, This is really and he says this is Monday. He calls me on and he says you believe Friday Montreal, Canada, which is the East Coast is for the seals first. Wait. It's like L. A to New York distance for those. You don't know how to Montreal, you have the ST Lawrence River egos through Connecticut. Down Cape Cod Canal through and new is a two week cruise. Seven Down. Seven back was being seven days down in New York, seven days back to New York to Montreal. Two month contract. Eight weeks. 1100 hours a week. I get 15% Commission. And can you do it? I was like my way. Yeah, I said no problem, sir. Love to looking forward to it. I think. Let me check my schedule. Yeah, I'm free. Okay, delivering papers Exactly Get somebody. Oh, newspaper, and I was still a lifeguard at three different schools and bankers now was a full time lifeguards I was making at this point. Probably 1 $21 in hours, lifeguard. You know, good was very good at the time and you know, and I was probably had 48 5 hours a week, and I was really in the system. And once you're in that system, like any kind of good job like the unions here, you don't leave right urine. And so I was making good money And at my birthday party shows and everything and my business, my old pages ad and I'm still of Mom and Dad's house. So I had my little because with the yellow Pages that you have to have a business line So I had a business line in my bedroom with all my booking and out of a little office. No, no little log 20th time, but it's also a lesson. Yeah. So I need an 80 a case which is big tour in case I had none of those and I need to 45 minutes shows up 15. I barely had 20 minutes of adult material. I mean, I was a kid. I haven't won the best because I was doing I was booking seven shows a week half because I couldn't do because I was busy and I took it out. I was making life easier just sitting at home looking at you and I could drive now by the truck. That's why I bought a truck because I need to take my stuff around. I really want to 69 Camaro. Funny about this is is you're telling this story and I think about myself in the early days of going on the road learning my craft where I had to do basically the same thing. I need to sound system. That's why I need a van. The mic microphone I need you know you you have got to, you know, four shows and I go. Oh, yeah, I'm gonna wait a minute. We have two shows so I mean, but you take it and you invest in yourself. Yes. You take a shot, and you put your money into Yeah. You get the call. You trap yourself, You know, go. We're striking. Do it, little man, Can I And then all of a sudden, literally causes before the Internet..

Montreal New York Vancouver John White John Lightfoot Cape Cod Canal Seattle John wife Aquino yellow Pages secretary Chris Alaska Toe Major Canada Murray Washington ST Lawrence River Connecticut East Coast
"yellow pages" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"yellow pages" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Properties and retirement? I see a lot of houses. I come by for 80 to 100,000 turned him around is Reynolds. I can work on him and fix him up Pretty good. I mean, I'm 68. My wife is too But she doesn't like the idea. What do you think? Huh? Well, I'll tell you there's an old saying all and awards go to heaven. And that is simply because you may go through hell on earth. Ah, specially if you've never done this before. Now, On the other hand, if you're a handyman, you feel real comfortable repairing a toilet or you feel really comfortable doing some minor repairs around the house. You've always been that type of person. I know that type of person. Very well. It was with my my dad was Like this. I thought you're going to say you definitely know that's a good example of my dad was great at this. May I'm terrible. I know. I used to say to Meghan. I used to say to Elizabeth, I can negotiate a really good deal. Just give me the yellow pages and I'll call a couple people and that this so I think it's important when you're really good at that. If you're okay with managing real estate, I encourage it. If if you feel you'll be good at it, I death We discourage it. If you've never done it before you're getting older. You possibly have health concerns. This is what a true retirement plan does. This is what we do at the Holland Group. We put all of this stuff together. There's all these different contingencies and we will build that customized plan for you. Remember, you're going to retire one time. During your lifetime. Elizabeth and I We retire about five times every single.

Elizabeth Reynolds Meghan Holland Group
How do I create an MVP for my physical product?

The $100 MBA Show

07:16 min | 3 years ago

How do I create an MVP for my physical product?

"So in today's Wednesday Lance Asks. How do I create an MVP for my physical product? The good news is Lance and everybody listening is that this is the easiest time ever to create physical products. Whether it's just a prototype or you're going to be producing on mass. There are so many options and they're so cost effective. I wish I had these options when I was getting my physical product a decade ago. Nevertheless I'm going to share with you your options now and some of the things I did that really had lowered the costs allowed me to get a prototype get an MVP in my hands quickly and efficiently. The first thing I want to mention is of course you can do this overseas. Of course the first place people think of as China and we're GonNa talk about that as well as an option big option but I want to encourage you if you can. Your first option should be to try to create this prototype locally somewhere. You can actually physically. You might be surprised in your local city in the capital of where you live. There will be manufacturers to actually create these things depending on the product itself whether it's electronic or clothing item or an accessory like an iphone case many people are actually bringing manufacturing locally. Because it's less expensive when you factor in a lot of things especially when it comes to mass production. We're talking about. You're going to SAVE MONEY ON TAXES. You're going to save money on shipping. You'RE GONNA save money on a lot of things but most importantly you're going to have direct communication with the person that's producing your product. You could touch and feel it and get to know the people behind the craftsmanship of your product. So my first suggestion is to get this done locally. Now someplace it'll be easier to find for trying to produce clothing of this plenty of places that will create custom clothing for you. Even just a prototype you can even just go down the street and go to a local tailor We're talking that simple like you're going to pay a little bit more to get custom-tailored whether it's a hat or a drescher or a pair of pants you're gonNA spend a premium for maybe five pieces that you could sell. But it's totally doable. And it's local now. There are other companies that do this for you. Print shops clothing shops. And you can find them on Google pretty easily for smaller less complex products accessories and clothing. This should be quite easy now. If you're looking to do something a little bit more complex like electronics. Even something like a battery or a Some sort of memory for the computer or something like that. This still can be done locally but it may be harder to find online. A lot of these manufacturers are not so simple defined might have to go old school and go to the Yellow Pages. You might have to do a roundabout search on Google like trying to find a list of manufacturers in your local area in your state in your country where you're GonNa go through the list and try to find one that would fit your needs now. Going locally will always be time efficient. You'll also not have to worry about any kind of miscommunication or a language barrier. This is true. 'cause I've done a lot of foreign manufacturing and this is a challenge. You're going to have to get through that if you go Foreign or if you go overseas so so if you can get it done locally. I highly recommend that. Because you're GONNA be able to get the product quickly possible sell to other people Whether it's in person at a flea market at a You know local market or even on your website. Now if you're looking to do this overseas because you can't find a locally there are options The number one option when it comes to. This is Alibaba Alibaba website. You can check out They have another vertical alibaba express and this premium products that you can kind of buy and sell chronic arbitrage but Alibaba will actually have all the manufacturers there now. The issue with Alibaba is sometimes. These factories have a minimum order or a minimum spent. So you're going to have to do some searching and there's a lot of companies a lot of manufacturers out. There will produce anything from Pencil to a mechanical keyboard to You know computer screens. They can do anything okay. This is where everything is made. Now the reason why people go to Ali Baba's because they run on a review system and you can really take a look at who really gets great reviews and actually delivers is going to take longer. Because it's coming from China and there's GonNa be some lead time and all that kind of stuff but if you have time it's worth exploring especially if you can get it at a minimum spend or minimum quantity. I was selling some accessories with my clothing. Line like cufflinks and I got a done through Alibaba as a prototype and I actually Had Order Lisa hundred pieces. Okay so I spent I think a believe three hundred dollars to get this done plus shipping and all that kind of stuff but I had one hundred pieces. I sold it on the website As a limited time. It's something that we're trying out. And Luckily we sold out really quickly like within a month and I immediately saw what sold what didn't what really sold quickly. Which designs and now I can go back to the drawing board and get a thousand pieces ten thousand pieces and I know price point I can sell a four so I can kind of profit can make to obviously when I order more profit margins are going to be higher because when I ordered an. Mvp from Alibaba. It's going to be really really expensive. Compared to the mass production now you might be surprised. It is actually quite afford Weiss expensive compared to the mass production. Because of course the more units you By the better deal you're GONNA get now. What's great about Alibaba is that you actually can go back and forth on email and even some are willing to get on a phone call Some of the bigger manufacturers have people that can speak English. It's not great but it's it's doable. Right you're GONNA be able to communicate on the phone but Overall their email response is pretty good. And it's pretty standard. You Send Him Designs. You send them specs you tell them exactly what you want and they send you prototype examples this even show you pictures of the first ones they produce and then they send it over even with tracking and everything so. I recommend Alibaba. Because I've used this several times. It's an absolute giant in China. And it's for good reason because they've built a great reliable network of manufacturers. I actually know people that have produced electronics rally Baba computer accessories and sold them in their local kiosk in their local mall and made a pretty good profit. The key here is make sure you read the reviews thoroughly. There's a lot of reviews if you go to a very popular manufacturer. Alibaba you'll see like literally fifty thousand reviews and read every single one that will be applied to your business or your type products so you can understand what to expect it's all back speculations when you're doing business understand what you're GONNA get an understand how to plan around. It's you know when it's GonNa come and what it's GonNa look like and what to charge and all that kind of stuff. So if you can't produce locally. I highly recommend Alibaba. Really really is a great option. If you have some time and you can make sure you can communicate back and forth and get the specs right of your MVP.

Alibaba Alibaba Alibaba MVP China Google Lance Ali Baba Drescher Yellow Pages Weiss Lisa
The Different Agency Models You Can Choose From | Ep.

Marketing School

03:55 min | 3 years ago

The Different Agency Models You Can Choose From | Ep.

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm meal and today we are going to talk about the different agency models that you can choose from. Neil what is model number one the first model that you can choose from low end and you say hey we're gonNA take on. Small businesses charged very little money. And we're GONNA do. Seo In marketing for local mom and POPs or yellow page type of companies and we may charter McHugh hundred two thousand dollars a month. That business model you can get customers quicker easier faster but your turn is also higher harder to upscale customers as well yup another model that you can choose is far more. Riskier we call it an affiliate model or you can call a pay for performance model depending on what type of clients operate with but this type of model is basically what say. I go to one of Neal's companies. Let's say I go to Uber. Suggest and I say Neil. I'm going to help you drive leads. Neil might say okay. I'll pay you fifty dollars per lead right but the difference is I have to front the cash myself so this agency model. If I'm the agency I have to put up the cash. I I have to perform for Neil and then after Nielsen's good performance. He's going to pay me now. The good thing about this is that this type of model can scale exponentially. The negative is really being held accountable to results. And you can literally lose your shirt doing this. And it's very risky too. Because you have to have the float to keep the business going and then you know the other thing is if the client decides. Hey I don't WanNa work with you anymore. You obviously have to have good terms contracts. But because you're reliant on them giving you the cash you better have some type of backup Sarah because otherwise you can lose. Big sources of cash flows another model. Is You just do project basis? It's hard to get consistent income. It is easier to close deals. You JUST DO PROJECT. Basis hourly basis a lot of agencies run with this model. I hate it. Eric goes against this one as well. We both liked the consistent income but that is another model. It makes it easier one off stuff like site. Audits Web Design Shops. Do a lot of one off stuff like designing. Abc doing the. Ui Doubt Model works quite well from you. Just gotTa Keep Doing Marketing. Keep getting more users as well customers. Yeah I do want to go back to what Neil talking about earlier like when you charged a smaller budget mom-and-pop shops this is a tier above that word instead of charging you know five hundred thousand. Us dollars per month you might be charged a little more. Let's fifteen hundred twenty five hundred dollars a month. There's actually a lot of agencies that do that and they grow the revenues to a pretty good size now. You can definitely do that but the problem there is. You're still going to get a big volume of clients were. They aren't necessarily the ones that are the best fit clients for you meaning that they are more high maintenance they are going to be complaining more. Almost call it the well. It sounds bad but it's like the sweatshop model it's like an agency mill where they will sign a bunch of clients and the churn is very high clients will leave but it's a revolving door but because they're signing so many of them the business continues to grow the problem with that. If you continue to sign more clients you have to add more people there right so that's not necessarily a model that I liked the most and then I'll pass it off to to kneel now to talk about Amano where you can charge a lot more and then enter these enterprise type of deals Neil in the other model is going after big enterprise companies. Typically you get from our appease our Pisa requests for proposals. You get them from big conferences or the foresters of the role which is a research company the process to get those is very long time consuming. It's expensive but once you get a client. The chances are the stick with you for four plus years. The margins aren't bad. You can typically operate around fifteen twenty percent ten percent on the low end twenty percent on the high end. If you're terrible you operate around five percent of the people who I know who have the Type of business. The operating usually somewhere around like seven eight percent. All the way up to fifteen percent is the standard again. You can try to aim for twenty percent on the high end

Neil Eric Su Marketing School Mchugh Neal Nielsen ABC Sarah Pisa Amano
Christian Louboutin Reflects On His Career

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:35 min | 3 years ago

Christian Louboutin Reflects On His Career

"I'd like to go back to the beginning of your career and I read somewhere that you dropped out of school at a very young age around twelve. Have to cool till sixteen when you when you live in France but I was. Yeah I started to be expelled. Twelve so of out of school basically right and you were already obsessed with shoes right Yup. Yup where did that? Where did that come from this? Like shoe obsession. It comes from different thing than it. I would say comes from two things. It comes home in a session that I had as a kid for showgirls music Horn and even even movies where I could see dancing and it comes from that and it comes from actually from the place where we are now. Which is this museum which used to be which used to be a African panic art museum when you were answering on? It's a beautiful magnificent building. One thousand nine hundred eighty one so when you are entering a signal which was enjoying it was representing a shoe so it was a sea of a shoe high here on the fifty. But it just wasn't a late seventies so I didn't know that these join may me become sort of conscious that everything stopped by joint because it was drawing of a shoe of women's shoe but it was not existing because I'd never seen such show. It was appointee last appointee. Stiletto so I fought. I understand that. It's a drawing representing a women's shoe but this should doesn't exist so and it was. You showed me sign or symbol. It's a sign saying. Don't wear these shoes all issues when you saw them. As a young person he wanted to create shoes like that is that what happened. Exactly exactly so between my obsession for dancers on that joying. That made me understand that everything. Basically start by drawing and so. I wanted to do something which was not existing for music owned else and I sort of you know for me. Musical go further so they were like exotic birds on. I always love but and so I didn't think that had costume because someone told me but you could design costume for musical food was no costume. You know birds always have further which was natural to have further to those girls but buds don't have shoes. I wanted to create a human thing for these birds of paradise in a way. What what do you think shoes represent in our culture and why what is a shoe? What a shoe represent a lot of things According to different culture it has different meanings to same thing for callers. The interesting thing is at that. Say about work when I first started to design shoes for me on my name that say so early. Nineties shoe was people were always making reference to an accessory and then from accessory it expanded into something by itself. Schumer has moved. The Nimitz accessory has left the domain of just being an accessory it has become its own identity and things that it comes from different things but definitely it come from the fact that it's it's a very big symbol of Liberation. It's a symbol of feminity but it brings to it brings. The person wears issues a different poster. A different way of being a different way to show yourself and and so. It's a very different attitude. It's very small. It's a very small element which gave radiates. Antibody chains the body language. It changed it Sunup. Gravity and shoes whereas a woman of women who opposes by the Shoe Charissa woman right. So you didn't formerly study should assign but you weren't with some very famous shoe designers most importantly house if G. Yes what was that like? Because he's got obviously a you know long and very historic famous history here in France as a shoe designer. What what was that like working with him so what happened. Executive was is that when I worked with him he had ended his career but he was a mentor to me and so I worked. I did a museology type of work so I was ever seeing his assistant. But I never designed for Jose. Never no no. I worked at a period of the retrospective. I had met him before and then he asked me to be his assistant for everything but not designing on. That didn't want to design for him. I was so excited and happy to look at the work of someone that I knew so well and to have it explained but it's mass by his master and so what happened is that when I was ten I started to do. A sketch had seen that museum. Do Undo Redo that sketch always the same profane and so I started to put it every table of my different schools where I got expelled. Because one of the reason was because I was like trashing Zell's tables with my designs and and then one day one person and then it was almost sixteen. Gave me a book and say for you and I who likes shoes I find newsies and someone gave me the book of what it was Gold Makarova on just had his name. When I opened the Book I realized that my obsession with join shoes was also a beautiful work but had never thought of it as a work before it was rare in being shoot as no. I didn't know any design is right and so when I opened at book I fought. This is it. That's jobs and supposedly doing and from that moment I started to change the angle I started to. I was always own enjoying pro fine and when I decided that it could be a designer assured his on I started to free quarters exit down when I saw the work aversion so obviously has been very important and influential because he's sort of opened meat completely to the ideas that it was a beautiful possible word So then how did you actually learn how to design shoes so now so I started so? My first thing was to to jove a to do shoes for showgirls. So I started an internship when I was seventeen at I stayed less than a year and then after I realized that you know this is not Boorda was not going to do was not going to do shoes for showgirls. Invalid just doesn't happen. I was sent to glue to have to bring coffee Which was very nice and I learned a lot actually from dances but to really design shoes. I was not going to be there so I ended up thinking. Fashion is probably the place to go and I opened the yellow pages. I remember there was nobody. The first house was Batmans. Was nobody answering. The phone. Second House was Joel on ice to speak to the director. They say Jericho. What a subject off. Cuccia and on the path maters this wonderful lady quote Ellen. D'amato was direct couture. She gave me an appointment. She looked at my design. She said it's very pretty. And we want to do a stash jokes. Wt BY SEAN. Joel I say yes so. I got sent into south of France for one year and this is why I learned to be. My first job was as a modest so my former education of Mideast comes home sold off and then after I was. Stephen merged like a night club so one year a challenge. Although in in the south in the middle of nowhere was a bit tough but at Shell Joel down the technical aspects of creating shoe. That's where you learned it because it's important you were just showing me that incredible installation to show. How shoes or graded You know and the sizing of it like I think designs a bit like architecture hearing engineering and architecture. That's why yeah. That's exactly what I'm trying to show. It's actually Victor Nick. Yeah it's really precise but it's organization. It's very important Yeah it is definitely. It's very technical. This is why actually it's also often expensive and for instance. It's complicated for someone who would start to do a proper so so much engendering you know so much metal inside formation in order to keep the balanced also to keep the arch. You know you can sort of easily against do address with like a stitching being a needle. You can sort of manage to do something with fabric. But she's not fabric slander component which are complicated. It's orange

France Shoe Charissa Joel African Panic Art Museum Schumer Victor Nick Stephen Batmans Zell Jose Executive Boorda D'amato Cuccia Ellen Director
Jason Brown on Automating Your Financial Life

Wall Street Oasis

10:51 min | 4 years ago

Jason Brown on Automating Your Financial Life

"Hello and welcome. I'm nick and this is moving up a podcast about secrets to success. Struggles along the way in life in general then the pod Jason Brown down the CO founder and CEO Tally. If you don't know a tally is that oh man. You're really going to enjoy hearing this conversation but quickly. The gist is that it's an automated finance platform. That can do some pretty incredible things and really just hearing Jason Talk about what the future of consumer finances is so intriguing rigging okay. That's all for me. Let's get into the conversation with Jason Jason Slocum. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me. We're we're in this weird room at money twenty twenty. I'm glad you found it. Three or six is nice and quiet so all we got that and I just mistakenly said you were an la guy. But your San Francisco are you. Are you from San Francisco. Is that what you grew up. I grew up in a little ski town in Colorado called Breckenridge who grew up in Brook Park City. Oh No kidding I actually prefer park city to Breckenridge so Nothing to complain about Breckenridge but it's a lot a lot faster to get to park city. So that's what proxy has going all the places in Colorado and Sun Valley in Miami and stuff are prettier than park city because they're more remote but easy to get to it is records is a cuter town though. Oh Yeah I mean. That's everything about the Callao towns prettier better everything. Actually all has is the easy to get to. Oh well has more than that but for the I was a good to talk to another mountain. Did we actually have a long comment. I've actually had several not several zero but like three or four other people on the podcast that we uncovered the same thing. Then like you're kind of bonded actually one of the five founders. FACEBOOK Grew up in Sun Valley located. No kidding wow were you on the scheme in high school and I mean pre high school I would ask and then I'm sure with you. It's going to be really serious about school or are you. It sounds like you guys have a winner school. We can go to school all summer. Long have the winter or summer. We did not but I think in steamboat. They did. That's where a lot of Olympians came from but one of the one of the guys on my ski team I went to the Olympic. So it was it was it was still pretty Hardcore data is awesome dickey missing. Yeah I did but it was cross country so proper entry. Yeah freestyle cross-country. It's the it's the kind of skiing you see in the Olympics where they're like skating That was okay see. I don't I don't know anyone that in proxy that that does that kind of scheme. Yeah it was. It was the kids because you have to wear SPANDEX. I love it and of course sucks. Thank you these tally. Sorry for those of you. That are listening if you If you download the tally APP which is fully automated manager. The core experience is the home screaming. And it's actually really a picture of a person sitting drinking coffee with their feet on the table and I wearing socks going no sock. Yeah wearing these socks and so we We've built An automated platform that can do financial thinking financial work for you and we have to financial jobs. We do Which is have my credit card debt and then set money aside for me so are are kind of ethos? Is We set very high bar for what automation means. It's not recommendations it's not advice. It's actually doing the thinking and the work so so that you can have your feet on the table. So everybody at tally. When you join you get you? Get a pair of tally sucks. I love it and we got into a little bit of of of tally there. But like let's let's start earlier in the background. Like where do you up in cool. Ski Town Kid You WanNa like go to a big city for college like I want to do. What's going through your mind? Will it was for me. Actually I had always wanted to be an entrepreneur actually I've a little flyer that my mom saved. She showed me a couple years ago but I went door to door offering would stacking and poop scooping services when I was nine and actually when I was a freshman in college I started my first company which I ended up growing to four hundred employees dot. I built a one of the largest residential house painting companies in Massachusetts so I actually moved moved to To Boston to start this company. Anthony as a teenager and that company got acquired and I built a a couple of other companies thereafter. So I've just always been in love with the idea of You know taking an idea that you're passionate about from scratch and turning it into something and At least for me tally is the thing that's been closest to my heart. Because growing up there was just a lot of There's a lot of anxiety in our household around money and my mom in particular. Is this really dynamic eccentric. SMART person she works. It's really hard. Runs her own business and despite all of that She just there's just a lot of A lot of financial financial stress and she really hasn't been able to reach Chennai ever financial goals. So I was just like man. I want to build a service. That's capable of taking the load off of people and allow them to live their lives lives and so my mom. She's an exercise and she's a Ravi again. It's like you do all that okay and we're GONNA pay all your bills and manage everything for you just like if you had like a team of five. I people working for you and I want to build that into software so that we cannot take take all that All that off of off of the human experience plate and allow people to just do what they love right so this is an interesting kind of play. I always get to it so you grew up in an entrepreneurial family like this was instilled in you from from day one it was never. I'M GONNA go work for some big bank or something you know any my parents were Were Very Encouraging that we we should charter on path. And Actually I was home schooled for the first All the way through sixth grade and end you know I mean even my mom. She's like. Hey what do you Wanna learn and I was like well. I WANNA learn about taxidermy. She's like okay so she went through the yellow pages and cold. Called taxidermists is and found one that would let us camp out in their workshop for a a week or so and like we'd go there and you learn about the taxidermy business in all the chemicals they use and everything things so it was just this idea of. Hey the world is your oyster. You just have to be willing to go you know make phone call or knock on the door and go explore and you can learn anything. You want You just have to be willing to go after it so Feel really really fortunate. It's really empowering way to to educate here's some crappy don't Wanna learn learn it memorize. Yeah like learns actually care about exactly and it's just that that intrinsic motivation. My parents were always. It was all about curiosity and chasing your curiosity so for me. I was never at a point where I dreaded school like I always like. I couldn't wait to go to school like me when I hear my friends talking about. Like the next game of thrones. I haven't watched that here. It's over but when they were talking about the next episode that excitement and anticipation. That's kind of what I felt going to school because I was like. What am I gonNA learn? And what new ideas am I gonNA the House. Oh yeah that was definitely thanks to my parents okay. So then. What's the start of this of this house painting company? Yeah it was just I mean when you're eighteen years old old end Wanting to start a business I was like. Hey I want to do something. That will require a lot of employees because I really wanted to learn about leadership and I wanted to learn about on just like the actual people side of running a business and so that seemed like an accessible thing for me and the first year I had about Fifty employees and then ended up going from there to About four hundred when I sold the company and honestly I mean I I did eventually get an NBA from University of Chicago. But I learned more in those couple years running house painting business than I. I haven't any other point in my life and just just a complete crash course in you. Know recruiting in hiring firing managing on challenging situations on creating a management structure. All all of that was It was just this really really stressful. Suppose the most stressful point in my life but it was the place where I got A. I don't know if you've heard of the ten thousand arose but I I got a good chunk of my ten thousand hours of of building. It managing a company in the in College Shar so you started it in Colorado or Massachusetts in Massachusetts so I ended up going to school Boston University and I went the two classes at Bu but other than that. I was working the entire time. So I don't know a single person from view at least that did you graduate. I did I'm a buckner so I I graduated highest honors but literally. I'd be sitting in the back. I'd have my laptop open. I'm like sending emails like dealing with issues. And then I'd have my notebook on the other side taking notes so it was a very multitasking signs. Do you regret that. I do not I did go to business school for the reason that I wanted in intellectual vacation and when I was in business school I really enjoyed myself. I worked at a venture capital firm. I wanted to. I thought for a little bit I wanted to be a VC. But I realized that. I'm an operator Raider. But I took like a machine learning courses like I just went like super deep in finance and I just had a blast in college or I'm sorry and business school so I made up a little little bit for the sacrifice. Is The path Painting Company Sell Painting Company business. School no I started a new company after the painting company when I graduated. And we It's called Bass Dot Com and We ended up Boo Shopping the company. All the way till seven years in The only money we took was twenty twenty million for maybe S. capital partners after it was already very successful and You know kind of more to the private equity stage but we actually actually wrote our own screen sharing software so this was way way back in the day and what our vision was is that you know. This was in the birth of spyware and like people's computers were constantly having issues so he said we want to have a PC care subscription service so that any normal consumer Ken Press a button and have remote tech support instantly without having to talk anybody and then every quarter. Our our technicians would remote into the computer and maintain it to prevent issues like changing oil in the car. And so that was our our brain child right out of college in down built that up and then I was like. Hey you know what I. It's been a lot of hard work. I WANNA go take this vacation Chicago and it was. It was wonderful two years. That's actually where I met my co-founder from next to company so awesome and so you said you intern. During between years one and two the I did YEP in Chicago. Ah note was in Silicon Valley so there's a A Pacific Northwest Venture capital firm. They do a series they investing called Voyager capital and. I actually really was just supposed to intern. But they kept. Were having me look at deals and do work when I went back to Chicago. Yeah so it really taught me a lot. I learned a lot about fundraising and how bad most pitchers are. I learned how painful it is to be on that side of the table when pitches a really bad And I also learned that. It's I mean no offense to anybody who is a V. V. C. but it's a very passive sort of world you're like you're trying to identify and pick value creators but you're not like creating value yourself in for for at least my disposition. I just love

Massachusetts Chicago San Francisco Colorado Jason Jason Slocum Olympics Jason Brown Sun Valley Jason Talk Intern Nick Facebook Breckenridge Chennai Sell Painting Company Callao Voyager Capital Steamboat Dickey
Scoring a 1967 Coronet RT for $400

Talking Mopars

03:43 min | 4 years ago

Scoring a 1967 Coronet RT for $400

"This next story is from Tony Morgan. Good Morning Chris. The story of my rt goes like this in the fall of nineteen ninety. Nine I was working with a younger guy installing commercial fire alarm systems as things go. We talked about a lot of very topics but as is typical with me. It always always comes around two cars at some point. He starts telling me about his uncle. Who has an old dodging driveway with some weird scoop on the hood? He tells me it has been sitting in for years and doesn't run. I asked if he could check into it for me in my mind. I imagine that possibly it could be some super rare. A twelve option coronet super super. Be Time goes by and one day I asked if he ever found anything out about the old dodge he tells me he has to move and I think he had it hauled off in crushed rushed. My heart sank into my stomach and asked if he could call and find out. He called his mom and got his uncle's number. I called and told him who I was asked about the car. He told me he was looking in the yellow pages right then to find someone to haul it off. I asked him if I could come right now to see it. He said that would be fine. I got the address and since it was only fifteen minutes from where we were. We took an early lunch. We pulled up a dirt road to a yard of old trailers overgrown bushes and garbage. At first I didn't see the car but when I looked closer at a huge blackberry Bush there in the middle was what appeared to be a nineteen sixty seven coronet. Rt now my my heart jumped out on my stomach and started really racing. I knew time was short so I skip the whole not acting too excited routine and asked how much mind you the engine was gone. The trump was ajar as were the doors so I was very concerned about rust. Long Story Short. We finally agreed on four hundred dollars for the car but I had to buy the nineteen sixty eight. HP Four forty he had started which was an additional seven hundred dollars. Deal done the story behind. This was this guy had owned another nineteen sixty eighty seven. Rt and while going over one hundred twenty miles an hour on I four O.. Five he had lost control and flip that car. He was actually saved by a group of boy. Scouts outs on their way back from a campout he had bought. This car is a replacement but what I got out of it by reading between the lines. Is that this car. Scared him and he forgot to put antifreeze in the engine. Engine and the block cracked so was parked in nineteen eighty five until I along with my longtime friends or die. Hartford guys pulled it out onto a trailer trailer. I sold my nineteen sixty seven. Three eighty-three charger another weird story to pay to put this car. Back together turns out. Being parked in blackberry bushes saved the car car as it kept grass and weeds from growing up around it and rusting the car to the ground. My focus was more on getting it running than restoration. This was such a cool car and I have a lot of stories about it and the people I met because of it some of the people are the reason I sold along with a very bad two thousand ten where I needed the money to pay for medical bills. If you want more stories some funny some annoying. This car provides a lot talk to you soon. Hey Tony thanks for sharing your story buddy cash if only we all could find a four hundred dollar coronet. RT In somebody's yard that would be awesome These stories are good because I always hear stories stories about people getting these cars for super cheap. I mean they. They need a lot of work shirt. It's always cool to scored a sixty seven coronet. Rt for four four hundred bucks you know anybody can say yeah I went and bought a sixty seven coronet. Rt for twenty five thousand. But those killer deals that you get no matter what shape the cars in and those are always fun to read funding here and fun to talk about.

Tony Morgan HP Hartford
Fire Starter: John Leonard Orr

True Crime Brewery

11:46 min | 4 years ago

Fire Starter: John Leonard Orr

"The shocking story of arson investigator John Leonard or began back in Nineteen eighty-four a fire in Pasadena California hardware. The store killed four people including a two year old child arson. Investigators examined the ruins and determined that the fire was caused by an electrical malfunction. All except for John or he was convinced that the cause was arson. Join US at the quiet end today. For the case of a fire captain and arson investigator John or with nearly two thousand suspicious fires over the next seven years a task force was formed to find serial arsonists. The task force called themselves. The pillow pyro task force and their methods of investigation. Were both fascinating and effective diff- so it should be a great talk today and this case was recommended to us by Cindy. Well Cindy's recommended a few cases for us. She's One of our most avid listeners. So we always like to hear from her okay so we have a California beer. I've never picked on. I'm from this brewery before I can't imagine my favorite brewers have haven't chosen anyway. This is from Sierra Nevada brewing company. It celebration fresh fresh hop. I P A Sierra Nevada brewing is in Chico California celebrations in American Ip with a six point eight percent Ab Victor. Nice beer are Jamba colour. Little Bit ahead some pretty lace kind of a spicy aroma. peppery aroma. Some sweet mall little bit of hops. And that's exactly how it tastes. He started out with the CARAMEL. Little Spicy peppery Steph and then hops at the end and it's a nice beer. It's not terribly happy. Not One of those hot bombs that are GONNA kill you. I think you to enjoy it all right. Well let's open it up okay so I was really surprised. This is your first Sierra Nevada. Ah Let's take it down to the quiet end. I don't know how I've missed Sierra Nevada. Anyway I had a ton of Beers from that company so if we have other California cases you'll probably more of them great so until the case this is a just a fascinating case to me. It really yes yes. Yeah so by John. Moore's own description. His childhood growing up in the nineteen fifties was a happy one. He lived in a two bedroom middle-class home home behind his grandparents house. He had two older brothers who moved away when John was a teenager. Went to join the navy and the other start his own family Alan China's sixteen his mother left him and his father alone with no explanation. She just took off one day. She called after few days but John didn't see her again for three years and she had moved back to her hometown of Missouri and she never did reconcile John's father. That's kind of a strange thing to happen when you're a teen share I'm sure it was pretty weird and a little disheartening for him. Definitely one Sunday. She's there the next day she's not and no real explanation. Though in nineteen sixty seven John. Join the airforce. After he completed basic training training he was in jet mechanics training then he transferred to firefighting school. He had wanted to be a firefighter for some time. So he's happy to learn. Learn how to operate the equipment as he put out training fires yet. He married his high school girlfriend. Jodi in nineteen sixty eight and they were shipped off to an air air force base in Spain which was near Commercial Airport and they were there for two years but John was kind of bored. He only got to respond to to air-crashes during that time and he really wanted to be more in on the action. When John was transferred to great falls Montana he fought only one fire then when he he was twenty two he was honorably discharged at this time? Jodi was pregnant with their first child. John was insecure and he came across as a bit of a Bragar in order to compensate for this he really wanted to become a policeman or a firefighter. The Los Angeles Police Department invited him to test for position mission and he passed the written tests the medical exam and the fitness test but he failed the psychological test. He was sent a letter telling him that he he was unsuitable. So this was a big thing for him. He had wanted to be a policeman very badly. Your that was his main goal to be a cop. Yeah so this'll be pointed back to. As a really huge disappointment mitch merely might have had an effect on who he became as a man or your. I think you could look at it. That we could also look at it as there is something in his psychological makeup that made him on high rable. Oh sure yeah I think it went both ways after getting past feeling hurt. He was very angry. The rejection letter suggested that he consult another psychologist so so he hired one that he found in the yellow pages. This psychologist didn't evaluation and found him suitable but remember. This is the person he was paying but now he had a second opinion so he took that back to the LAPD psychologist for an appeal of that decision. You know the LAPD psychologist couldn't couldn't tell John Anything specific about why he had been rejected other than the say that he might have been too passive. Police officers needed to be assertive but then the psychologist left John Alone in his office with the file. He said I'm going to go out and get a cup of coffee. I think he kind of intentionally left the father so John read the file and so that one of his co workers had been interviewed and told the psychologist that John was laid to work lazy and resentful eventful of another man being promoted over him so I can't see any other way that this happened. Then the psychologist was really giving him an opportunity to look at his file. Were were absolutely the final evaluation stated that John Needed a few years to mature. And then maybe he could reapply to the force now. John Though would never admit to seeing his diagnosis in that file but he had actually been diagnosed with a personality trait disturbance and emotionally unstable personality. His former supervisors had described him as both irresponsible and immature as well. So this time John was working for Sparkletts marklets bottled water company. He quit that job and entered the management program at a fast food restaurant. It was nineteen seventy three and John was going going from one fast food job to another before he quit and he applied next to the Los Angeles Fire Department. He was couldn't be a policeman. He can be a fireman. Yeah I think it was as backup plan. And he was really thrilled when he was accepted to the academy for training but it turns out he was out of shape and he wasn't up to the rigors of the academy physically. He was told that he'd also done poorly on the written test so he was just given the option to resign or he. It's going to be fired so he was very angry and upset when this happened. Yeah and part of his problem was probably his attitude his after all had been a firefighter for four years in air force so he felt like he didn't need to study your practice now his time in the air force vote. He's half a couple fires Chris couple crashes and he. It didn't have much training. But he thought he did. So he didn't participate in study sessions with other recruits and he hadn't practice handling the heavy ladders and equipment and they were heavy. These big wooden ladders. He apparently in the service they had the light aluminum ladders. So this was a whole all different ballgame per handed so after that failure John was absolutely despondent and by this time he had two young daughters and his marriage was on the rocks. That's when he applied to the Glendale Fire Department and they accepted him in their fire academy in the spring of seventy four. He completed eight weeks of training and he graduated with twelve other guys. He was starting his career as a firefighter and he was super happy about it. Even though the Pay Glendale was a lot at less than it would have been at the L. A. P. D. or the L. A. F. D. wasn't it Glendale lowest paying in the state or something like that at the the time it was. Yeah maybe that's why I got hired. Nobody wanted to work for them. I'm sure that was part of it. Because he really wasn't. The top of the picks no her psychological report from earlier says a lot doesn't it it really does and also at home things weren't improving. He was really bored on his days off so he ended up taking a part time job at a seven eleven as a clerk then he bought himself pickup truck and went on camping and in hunting trips on his own without his family he ended up befriending a woman at the seven eleven and other employees who is also unhappy in her marriage and the two of them decided to be roommates leave their spouses and apparently this was Not a sexual thing at all it was just a friendship allegedly anyway yes so. John left his wife Jodi leaving her just note as an explanation for what is doing a lot like what his mother did. He pay child support and he also began taking classes in fire science in police science. John believed that. The police didn't show enough respect for firefighters fighters and he examined the conflicts between the two groups and a writing assignment is still working at the seven eleven and he used what he was learning to help him spot shoplifters in the store yeah he got really into that his boss at the seven eleven was impressed at how good he got at catching shoplifters John would would watch kids who came into the store after school and he catch them making them empty their pockets and return things so this was a big thing for John. I mean to the point of weirdness really yeah very weird when example in nineteen seventy six. While he was out shopping he saw men running toward a car with his arms full of suits from Montgomery wards store so John or chased. The man knocked him down and helped the store security guard hold the man until the police arrived yet. He and he was clearly thrilled with this moment. He talked to the security guards and he actually asked them if he could get a part time job working in mall security but the mall said they only hired off-duty policeman and not firefighters. So there's another bruise to his ego. That's right he's already been told his second class this anyway. Because he's a Fire Department Dinata Police Department guy. Yeah and I don't know if that's really a thing but he definitely saw that way. He saw a lot of things in a slightly slightly off center. Way That's true he did. He wasn't quite right. We know that so. John was disappointed that he couldn't get a mall. Security John but that didn't deter them from doing other good deeds the same day. He saw an older man. Shoplifting hand tools. He told the cashier got the man arrested. So he asked at the sears store about getting a part time job with security

John John Leonard Los Angeles Police Department California John Alone Arson Sierra Nevada Brewing Company United States Jodi Fire Department Dinata Police Cindy Sierra Nevada Investigator Jamba Glendale Fire Department Brewers Steph Moore Montana Glendale
Yelich's 14th homer helps Brewers beat Mets 8-6

Clark Howard

04:09 min | 4 years ago

Yelich's 14th homer helps Brewers beat Mets 8-6

"Yelich hits it in the air team right field. Racing back. His Conforto that all changes here yelich goes deep and the brewers lead at five zero one he is now tied for the most home runs before may first in major league history that is his fourteenth Dinger of the year in the fifth inning is the brewers. Take a five one lead to the bottom of the fifth with one out Pete Alonzo gets a basic here comes Robinson canal Woodruff's pitch ground ball to third could be to shot to second for one Arshi is the first time and the brewers turn the double play and eating is over. Second time Robinson knows involved in a double play. He had these strike them out. Throw him out earlier on brewers would add to their lead in the top of the sixth inning. Robert gazelle machine comes on to pitch I battery faces. Hey, Seuss Aguilar. He strikes out. But then Ben gambled. Doubles Lorenzo Cain lined up to the second hour of the day intentionally walked Christian yelich to get to Mike loose dacas. Basell brings home the pitch and Mushtaq is ground. Paul left side that's gonna get through into left field. Gambles around thirty is gonna try to score. No throw coming and move stock is drives in another. It's six to one brewers. Brandon Woodruff would be done after five innings. He gives up just one run on six hits junior. Garrett comes into pitch in the sixth inning throws a scoreless. Six brewers would get into a little bit of trouble though in the seventh inning. Alex Wilson comes onto pitch ipad or he faces. I'm Ed Rosario Rozario for two and hope for five the series. It's one torch right-center long run, Lorenzo Cain. Over as head. And this one is going to be gone all run for a metro sorrow and the Mets at around at sixty two next hitter. Travis d'arno pitch from Wilson ride in the left field line is headed for the corner. It's a fair ball off the wall gamble gets too quickly. Fires into second base. Here's at the tag is in time. They got Dr no not perfect draw from Ben Gammel. Yeah. They get them at second that ends up being a huge play, especially when you consider how the rest of this ending would go down. Dominic. Smith comes up as a pinch hitter. He would walk and that would end the day for Alex Wilson. Alex Claudio comes in would give up a base hit Jeff mcgeough or there's also a throwing error on the play next hitter. After that as pita Lonzo. Here's the pitch. Fly ball field. Gambled back. This ball is gone. He Alonzo homerun. Number nine and just like that. It's a one run game. Yes. Six five. So that's where Dr no being out at second really has a big role in this game in the way it was going so one run game. But the brewers would get some more insurance in the top of the eighth inning. Greece. Kamilia comes into pitch for the Mets per battery phases. Ben gamble. He walks Lorenzo Cain. Then gets Basit runners on at the corners for Christian yelich on yelich pitch chopper. First base side. It is a fair ball gambles coming home. He's gonna score yelich beats the Piat. I it's an infield single. The brewers at a run at seven five canes at second wild pitch by juries familiar. Cain would move to third after might moussaka strikes out swinging. The next hitter is yes, Monte GRANDE. All familiar throws runner. Takes office swinging about off the glove of Amelia canes, coming home. He's going to score as Grondahl is out at first base yellow pages in scoring position. Mission. It's an RBI ground for Grondahl and a huge run scores again. Eight five brewers Mets would start shipping away again though in the bottom of the eighth inning. Jeremy Jefferson comes onto pitch. The first battery faces JD Davis. He walks Brandon Nimmo than singles and the next hitter. After that is I'm Ed Rosario Jeffers throws lupin wider base hit field.

Brewers Lorenzo Cain Mets Alex Wilson Pete Alonzo Robinson Canal Woodruff Robinson Brandon Woodruff Grondahl Ed Rosario Rozario Seuss Aguilar Ed Rosario Jeffers Ben Gamble Racing BEN Alex Claudio Ben Gammel Robert Gazelle Jd Davis Basit
Human Lab Rats: Science's Rotten Underbelly

Science Vs

03:54 min | 4 years ago

Human Lab Rats: Science's Rotten Underbelly

"Which taking you back to a time where a group of scientists had free rein to do whatever they wanted to their human Guinea pigs. It was basically the wild wild west of science an out of this time, we got new medicine made scientific progress but things spiraled out of control when research is took it too far. With starting out story with a man who stumbled into this world decades ago. So let me get just coffee, and then we can create his name is Sigmund Weizman or seek. He's a jolly guy loves to laugh, and as we sat down for coffee Zeke told me about growing up in Philadelphia fifties and sixties he's family was working class. No one had been to college. But see be dreams. He'd always wanted to be a duck down. So I finished college, and I was going to start medical school fast, though, he needed a summer job. And I thought well, it'd be interesting to do something that might have some relationship with what I was going to do in the future. And I thought well, maybe there's some research or medical research or either any kind of research, and it's this research that would plunge him into the center of what would become a national scandal. I didn't know I was. Too stupid to to be honest to the think anything more about the full any of that though. Sieg is just an eagle college grad looking for that summa gig. So he opens up the phone book. Yeah. I so I thought well, I'll look up research laboratories in the yellow pages. This is how naive I was. He's going alphabet cly and once he gets to the lettuce. See he sees a listing in small print clover laboratories, it was only a phone number and an address didn't have anything except a listing. Clova libra trees sounded medicine to Sieg. So he dials the number AMAN picks up and seek tells him I've just finished college. I'm going to medical school. And I'm looking for job. He said, you're exactly what we need this summer. Why don't you come to this address tomorrow morning and on meet with? You and you can decide if you'd like to do this this job. The next day said gets into his car and heads to the address he was given. He's driving through pretty residential pot of Philly Yod's, brick houses, and all of a sudden, I see these huge big granite buildings. Scary scary looking Victorian type buildings. I looked at the address where I was driving. I said my God. It's jail prisons too big house, whatever you wanna call them. Did you know you're going to be working at a jail? I had no idea. I thought I was going to be working in a laboratory. You know, benches pouring chemicals and spinning centrifuges. And that was the thing. I was completely flummoxed. What did I get myself into? What did he get himself into? Seek it was about to enter a world where scientists were experimenting on prisoners. And this wasn't just in bad apples a few rotten scientists. Now, what felt like a weed summit job was actually part of an industry where the US government and beak pharma, which testing new drugs imprisons. So on today's show how did this happen and how did people like seek get sucked in?

Sieg Sigmund Weizman Guinea Zeke United States Philadelphia Aman Philly Yod
Home Repair Gets a Renovation

Business Wars Daily

04:02 min | 5 years ago

Home Repair Gets a Renovation

"With pay pal. You can rely on a trusted payments partner that processes over ten million payments per day when it comes to growing your business. Pay pal is your payments partner for today and tomorrow, visit pay pal dot com slash growth to sign up for a business account for free today. Frahm wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, November first home ownership is not easy, especially when things go wrong. Anyone who's been caught short when the water heater burst knows the pitfalls of calling any old plumber? It's hard to know who's trustworthy or water. Pair should cost making it harder. Home remodeling projects are at a fever pitch, prompting a labor shortage and most of us still find contractors the old-fashioned way by asking our neighbors over the last decade entrepreneurs have I dismiss marketplace. In realized there's a ton of money to be made serving his match bakers between homeowners and contractors the top dog is home advisor owned by a sea the company behind dating app, Tinder it's been gobbling up competitors, including Angie's list last year, showing just how avid homeowners are for help the company went public last year and has doubled in value since. Firing Angie's list, but the road ahead could be bumpy last year. A judge ruled at homeadvisor had to stop advertising that it checks the backgrounds of its service providers after discovering bet it only checks those of the business owner's not every worker who may enter a customer's home home is appealing that decision and another well-funded businesses. Nipping at home, advisor's healed thumb tack valued at more than a billion dollars. Thumb tack is also a matchmaker. One of a pack of startups battling homeadvisor and his home advisor faces a crowded field. It'll have to do it under new leadership. CEO Chris Tero who built the company over the last ten years is leaving at the end of this year. These Uber's for home services may seem like the answer to a harried homeowners prayers, but they share the week deserve any gig economy company. The services are only as good as their providers this industry, which hardly existed at decade ago is now a long long way from the. Yellow pages. From wondering this is business wars daily. Hey, we'd like to get to know you better. Please take just a minute. Visit us at wondering dot com slash survey. An answer a few questions it'll help us alive. Thanks a bunch. I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Business wars daily is brought to you by pay pal. Once an attorney in New York City, Linda transformed her resale hobby into a thriving luxury consignment company called Linda stuff. What was once a passion project that started by selling her kids? Video games is now a one hundred person company in ninety three thousand square foot facility wholly focused on designer fashion as a company specializing in high end, previously owned goods, reputation is everything integrity and trust. Or a critical part of how the company operates from day. One Linda has counted on pay pal every step of the way to help. Give her customers confidence and protect her business from fraud, even when selling internationally when it comes to growing your business. Pay pal is your payments partner for today and tomorrow, visit pay pal dot com slash growth to set up a free business account today. That's pay pal dot com slash growth. To sign up for free today.

Partner David Brown Advisor Homeadvisor Business Owner Angie Linda Ceo Chris Tero Fraud New York City Attorney Billion Dollars Ten Years