35 Burst results for "Yellow Fever"

"yellow fever" Discussed on Not Another Horror Podcast

Not Another Horror Podcast

02:47 min | Last month

"yellow fever" Discussed on Not Another Horror Podcast

"House is gorgeous. I think stacy in her husband did a phenomenal job decorating. It and i cannot stress that enough when you go into it. You probably won't be looking at the goal of me thinking. Wow where can i get this. But yeah. I just wanted to tell you guys like if you wanna legit haunting you wanna see some real ghost. Go there I'm a believer. But i went with Someone that wasn't a believer and let me just say they are a believer now the whole history of the town of holly springs from the cemetery to all the other houses. I'm also you a little bit about it. With most places in the south like this including new orleans Yellow fever took out half hot springs back in eighteen. Hundreds the well to do people where he will leave. The people that weren't stayed in died and the four years in the house was basically used. Because you know at the time the dead people were brought there then the corner will come pick them up but so many people died from yellow fever in holly springs. That's they actually had to take all of the bodies and they place them on the courtyard of the courthouse. So yeah now if you know the history of things like this you also know that. In new orleans. The same thing pretty much happened in people were being burned in powell's not it's not very fun history to think about but whenever you anywhere down here in the south just remember are the north anywhere. Just know that someone probably died there and it was horrible and it's probably haunted. Does i if you guys today is an fine chatting with you and help you know a little bit more about me next week. We will have the episode that i was supposed to have this week. But i'll be honest. I've enjoyed recording this. When a lot more until next week guys stay safe. Stay saying you know the rest by..

stacy holly springs new orleans fever yellow fever powell
"yellow fever" Discussed on Mango Kush Podcast

Mango Kush Podcast

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Mango Kush Podcast

"You give me a fucking iphone seven. The has i o. s. eleven on his shit. But we're operating a fucking ios. Fourteen point eight was says fucking make. I'll tell you absolutely fucking non and they use fucking fearmongering and false stats to fucking scare people to a listener emotional response you know. Everybody should elicit emotional response to get shit. Okay and more stupid shit people. I'm not sure it'd be any listeners in here in our listeners. The listeners later on that there's ever been a so called worldwide. Push for a fucking vaccine right now. Has it been a worldwide push for did broke Or the fucking teed up shot or the flu shot or yellow fever or malaria or sars or h wayne. One bird flu swine. Flu or bola or sarsour. The first ours a spread on us has been in those nationwide or international. I pushed for vaccines. They're fucking has not. Have they ever required anybody to show proof of assignation immunization or any fucking shot regular medication. Job a cheeseburger. Have you ever been told. You cannot fucking go in a restaurant because we'll know how healthy you are ever now mind you. There has been a slew of other fucking daily as disease and bacteria viruses that. Go on all over the fucking place and not once. Have we ever had to hear the pressures of taking fucking shots. Not once but you know what. Hey i'm just. I'm just eating hordes bars and i guess i'm just a fucking maniac. You know change shit. But i'll be that way. I'll be a fucking maniac night right but you never had any fucking push for this shit. You've never had any division over the shit right prime example. If anybody has in recent events west. Virginia college yes west. Virginia college now is demanding. While was demanded. we'll say mandating mandate our get back nation. And if you don't you have to pay seven hundred fifty dollars unpack stacks about issue. Now you you you gotta pay seven hundred dollars for not taking a shot go to college however though there are so many fucking diseases in colleges and universities outside a code had to take a shot for show proof or any musician for the only probably do what meningitis. 'cause yeah that should fucking kills people. You know what i'm saying but you don't see them fucking damn saying haters meningitis outbreak. You know ena viral marriage. I the bacteria ones goddamn killer. Seo together rollercoaster ride again. Upon chime make is they. Don't fucking stop you from dig initiate. I mean they don't stop you from getting the school ship exams. I am so no one sees a patterns. Emiss- shit at higher gang is fucking slowly being taken away from us or interred in privately. You know what i'm saying. I understand about being safe. And that guy dab you know Release i had to worry about but again you do sign things the elicit shit i mean i know sounds fucking crazy but in is when it fucking is that should not by fucking. You know.

flu sarsour Virginia college bola yellow fever malaria meningitis
Who Was Ida B. Wells?

Made of Mettle

02:32 min | 3 months ago

Who Was Ida B. Wells?

"In today's episode we will be covering the impassioned the influential the inspiring ida b wells ida. B wells was born ida bell wells on july sixteenth eighteen sixty two in holly springs mississippi. Ida was the eldest. Born to james and lizzie wells. Who had seven other children. All were born in slaved as they lived on a plantation in mississippi whom or members of the confederacy during the civil war in the previous episode. We talked a bit about president. Lincoln's revolutionary decision to issue the emancipation proclamation on january. First eighteen sixty three during the civil war ida in her family were officially freed from slavery as they resided in a confederate state before either was one year old immediately following. The war was the pivotal reconstruction period with a divided territories of the union in the confederacy. Determine how they would begin to come back together as a single nation. Ida's parents were dutiful in diligence supporters of african american rights in particular the right to an education. Ida's father james was directly involved in starting in serving on the board of trustees for school for freed african americans that school rushed. College is still a notable inactive university. Today falling under the umbrella of historically black colleges and universities ida would begin her educational career at this school attending in her early teens. Sadly heartbreaking circumstances would find ida early on in life in eighteen seventy eight while visiting her grandmother. I learned harling news. Ida's mother father in her youngest sibling. Just an infant had passed away from yellow fever. Her parents sudden-death turn ida from a teenager with no children into a parent of six suffering from the grief and loss of one's parents. It would be understandable for a child to shy away in resist taking on a role with such incredible responsibility but did ida shy away from her obligation torture family. Absolutely not

IDA Ida Bell Wells Lizzie Wells Mississippi Holly Springs Board Of Trustees For School F James Wells Lincoln Yellow Fever
The History of Smallpox

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:21 min | 3 months ago

The History of Smallpox

"Smallpox is a viral disease that has existed for millennia when it was circulating in the wild it spread from person to person through the air usually through face to face contact and it can also be spread through contact with contaminated objects and surfaces people who contracted smallpox typically developed a high fever and body aches and that was followed by a distinctive rash. There are two different strains of the very ola virus that were causing smallpox areola major and burial a minor now that name suggests burial a major caused more serious illnesses as many as a third of people who were infected with very all the major died. As many as ninety percent of babies died it was also particularly lethal anytime. It was introduced somewhere that hadn't existed before such as when european started arriving in the americas and in those cases smallpox usually killed about half the people who contracted it among the people who survived the disease. Smallpox could also be both disabling disfiguring. There was and is no cure for smallpox so even as science and medicine progressed it continued to be deadly but it also had some traits that made it a good candidate for a worldwide ratification campaign. Smallpox was easy to recognize in diagnose unlike say the flu which can resemble a lot of other respiratory infections. Smallpox passed directly from person to person and only infected humans so there were no hidden reservoirs of the virus that could potentially start a new outbreak. That's different from something. Like yellow fever. Which also infects other primates and is transmitted by mosquitoes another plus wants. a person had recovered from smallpox. They were immune for life for a number of reasons. Smallpox outbreaks also tended to develop relatively slowly. Once people were contagious. They were usually also too sick to really leave home. So outbreaks tended to cluster around members of the same household and their immediate neighborhood and then once an outbreak was identified. Swift action could keep it from spreading very far and most importantly there was a way to this. -rupt transmission of the disease in this case a

Smallpox Smallpox Areola Fever Americas FLU Yellow Fever
"yellow fever" Discussed on We Need To Talk About Ghosts

We Need To Talk About Ghosts

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on We Need To Talk About Ghosts

"The i mean of course layers upon layers of death because the spanish influenza yellow fever and it was or own and all of that good go st We were walking through know. Of course my sister. You're obsessed with doing ghost tours. So we're we're constantly over there looking for something and we were just walking through with this person because we know they're sensitive. Yes so we were. We were having our own private doss tour and we went to the well. Which is an old historical. Well it's one of the original ones in the area and while we were stood around the well to go touch touch here. Do you feel anything. Do you feel anything. And of course. I'm walking around the well. Like an idiot like touching here and there and i did actually feel something at fell somewhere in between like when a limb falls asleep instead 'electricity but not quite so strong just like a little bit of tangle and i was like oh yeah i i feel something. There's something here like maybe a kid. Something like oh it's neat and of course we keep walking on her way. 'cause we're we're killing time until we go to a dinner at a restaurant and i'm shaking my hand and we're walking and they keep kinda side eyeing me and like do you feel something like yeah. My hand like still feels tinguely from from over the welna go. Yeah it followed you blank. It's holding your hand right now. And i was like no thank you very much of course had to walk past the well so we kindly escorted this this young child. Or what. whoever it was they said that it felt like maybe child who had died in the vicinity which isn't hard to believe and very graciously took it back and said goodbye and immediately all of this dissipated. I put my hand back on the wall and it was gone. I mean diane. Do you think. I mean you know this. I know we're talking about your friend here..

influenza yellow fever diane
"yellow fever" Discussed on Our Different Take

Our Different Take

07:40 min | 5 months ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Our Different Take

"In just wondering. Yeah i don't know. I don't know but I definitely am no longer interested in donating my body to science. Oh this just. In each whole-body cadaver can cause between two to three thousand dollars to purchase and the price average. Just gone through the roof. Amit flation inflation is is bad. It's hitler cadaver market pretty good. I mean i remember when cadavers like five hundred bucks back a good day good old days you can get a cadaver for dime well. you know. there's a here's some more facts for you. Okay ahead can cost five hundred dollars in processing fees only but a torso good condition can fetch five grand a spine can go for as much as thirty five hundred a knee six fifty and in two thousand and two. A pharmaceutical company paid four thousand dollars box of fingernails. and toenails. You i mean. I can just clip those often. Maybe that's that's what i need to do to start clipping nails off. Just start selling those bad boys. Two pharmaceutical companies seen dummy. You've gotta get out the the grinder ads nasty. Well there's a lot of money in that. Yeah well it's so expensive that it's really hard to get ahead these days. Nice one so in one thousand nine hundred. Sixty five martin. Seligman conducted unethical experiment using dogs. And we've probably all heard of this or something akin to it again. The psych one on one type stuff. The purpose of the experiment was to see how control could be perceived and if helplessness could be taught you may have seen the meme on the facebook or the internet somewhere where it shows a donkey or a horse. That's like tied to a chair but the chair is like this little. You know one pound plastic chair. Ooh but the horse has not moving because he thinks he's tied to a chair thinks he can't move. Well that's kinda. What what this experiment was trying to prove so seligman place to dog in a box and this box was divided down the middle by a low barrier. He then administered at painful shock that the dog could escape simply by jumping over the barrier. Not surprisingly every dog quickly figured out that if he jumped to the other side of the box he could avoid the pain of the shock. Then the psychologist took experiment A little bit further. He harnessed a group of dogs gather so that they were unable to escape when he shocked them and the next day he plays those same dogs individually in the original box by this time though each dog even though he could've simply jumped the barrier to safety none of them did because they had been taught to be helpless. And again you know here. I am from from my viewpoint. Seeing this very thing happening in society where they're telling people you don't have control over anything you can't change anything it's all it's all hereditary. You can't do anything on your own. It's the way that the system is stacked against you. And you're a victim and blah blah blah blah blah blah and. So they teach people. They train people to be helpless not to say that everybody can get out of every situation. I'm you know. Certainly there are exceptions to that but But clearly there are things where whoever they is the powers that be are are teaching society to be helpless and doing a damn good job of it right his last one. I've got this was in the nineteenth century. There's a doctor in phil in philadelphia. Steuben's firth was this guy's name back in the early nineteenth century. He saw that During the summer yellow fever was crazy. Couldn't stop it. Killing people left and right and then disappeared in the winter so he thought well this looks to me like yellow. Fever is not a contagious disease. But it could be caused by excess of stimulants may be heat food noise. He wasn't sure didn't have proof. It was just a theory that he came up with so he designed a self experiment and this was him on himself. He didn't experiment on any people. Anything like that but his goal was to demonstrate that no matter how much he exposed himself to yellow fever that he would not catch it so he started out by making small incisions on his arm. And by the way kids do do this at home disclaimer. He made small on his arm and he poured his some fresh black vomit obtained from a yellow fever patient. Right into the cuts proce right. Well he didn't get sick sick. He's like okay. Well let's take it to the next level. well anyway. He went back to to joe and he's like. Hey i need some more vomit. He got some more and then he dribbled it right into his is. Oh yeah 'cause. That's what i would want to do okay. Well i didn't get sick He's like all right well among get some more so he got some more vomit fried in a skillet. He inhaled the fumes. This time still not sick did not get sick. I don't know use olive oil or butter. What he used. I mean that could of help determine you know what it was maybe a little rosemary in there. Well next already made some. I'm gonna swallow it so he put he made some into a pill and swallowed. It didn't get sick. He got an entire glass of pure undiluted. Vomit in drink did not get sick. He didn't get sick so he grabbed a ton of this stuff huge bucket and smeared himself all over with it but he also mixed it with Again this is from yellow fever patients. He mixed blood saliva perspiration urine in vomit together any smeared it all over his body. Oh man dude married. Maybe he was what time maybe the time this experiment was done. He wasn't no probably not you know that that would stink. Oh man seriously. But he's still didn't get sick at all that he did not get sick. He was healthy as ever and he. He thought well he has declared that. His theory was proved proven. True.

Amit flation Seligman seligman martin fever patient Steuben facebook firth phil fever philadelphia Fever joe yellow fever
The Fight Over Vaccine Passports

Slate's If Then

01:43 min | 8 months ago

The Fight Over Vaccine Passports

"Okay. I think that this term vaccine passport gets thrown around lake. We all understand what it means. Is there a- definition like one what does vaccine passport mean. I think it depends you ask the biden administration would say this would be documentation of people who have been vaccinated and they can present it as needed to travel authorities to businesses. That are requiring some proof of the shot. They actually try and avoid the word passport lizzy. The they've talked about credentialing of this information vaccine. Verification republicans would say that passports are it infringement This is an increasing argument from from the right. That passports are an attempt By the government to collect data in an appropriate way to but into people's personal health decisions and even the use of the word passport is creating some complaint that this is an elitist term that only people who travel internationally have passports. So why why are we even cutting on to that terminal. I mean it's not all that different from the like little yellow cards that you get if you've gotten a a yellow fever shot or something like that when you travel or if you traveled in the past i've i've had inoculations and had to show that cross borders. I remember doing the same. When i went to south america. I think in college but the idea is a little different. Only that we're in the middle of a global pandemic right like there's more import able to demonstrate that you're protected against covid nineteen as we're trying to ramp down cove nineteen.

Biden Administration South America
"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

Past Episodes

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

"Package says <Speech_Female> and i'm gonna go around <Speech_Female> the room. And i want <Speech_Female> you to tell try to <Speech_Female> sell us <Speech_Female> the condom that you <Speech_Female> housing your hand. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Who can <Speech_Male> i start with <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> dan. <Silence> Jimmy plus size <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> chosen people. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Male> what's your condom. <Speech_Male> Open line says latex <Silence> video camera <Speech_Male> on it <Speech_Male> in quotes <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> should ask your doctor <Speech_Music_Female> if you have any hard issues <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> do you have. <Speech_Male> I have <Speech_Male> the iron <Speech_Male> grip and <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> iron grip <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> catchphrase for this <Speech_Male> tighter size <Speech_Male> for iron men <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to suspect about as <Speech_Male> a really good euphemism <Speech_Male> for <SpeakerChange> individuals <Speech_Male> who do not <Laughter> fit magnum. <Laughter> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Let's go to kate. <Speech_Female> It's is one <Speech_Female> and ten <Speech_Female> on the front. Which <Speech_Female> i <Speech_Female> immediately finished <Speech_Female> said they wanted <Speech_Female> fails so <Speech_Music_Female> that can't be right <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> then. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> have your a <Speech_Male> brand natural <Speech_Male> luxury <Speech_Male> on them. Oh <Speech_Male> received <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> real <Speech_Music_Male> must super <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Silence> luxury economy. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think it's expensive. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's expensive <Speech_Female> because it's made <Speech_Music_Female> lamb. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Salt <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> said <Speech_Female> make. It <Speech_Female> may get technology <Speech_Female> relaxed. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You're <SpeakerChange> protected <Speech_Female> but you're not feeling <Speech_Female> it okay. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I've done <Speech_Female> the turquoise <Speech_Female> blue. It says sheer <Speech_Female> glide. <Speech_Female> I wanna say <Speech_Female> feel <Speech_Female> better than <SpeakerChange> very made <Laughter> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> last but not <Speech_Female> least got mine <Speech_Female> as a skin. It's <Speech_Female> a black rapper. <Speech_Female> In the front <Speech_Female> skin with the why <Speech_Female> which <Speech_Female> i'm guessing it's <Speech_Female> feels like skin <Speech_Female> but it's not <Speech_Female> because they're protected <Speech_Female> mean <Speech_Female> luxury and latex <Silence> free. <Speech_Female> Latex <Speech_Female> free yes. <Speech_Female> It's just <SpeakerChange> human skin <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Laughter> off <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> this <Laughter> overland <Speech_Female> crush short. <Speech_Female> Thanks for <Speech_Female> playing you guys under <Speech_Female> wrap this up. Thanks so <Speech_Female> much for telling us <Speech_Female> your yellow fever and white <Speech_Female> fever <SpeakerChange> stories <Speech_Female> respectively <Speech_Music_Female> lizards <Speech_Female> at home. We <Speech_Female> want to hear your stories. <Speech_Female> We love talking about <Speech_Female> race <Speech_Female> dating. I think we need <Speech_Female> to talk more about <Speech_Female> this because this is something. <Speech_Female> We don't really talk about in san <Speech_Female> francisco. <Speech_Female> San francisco's one of those <Speech_Female> places that so liberal <Speech_Female> that you don't talk <Speech_Female> about race. Oh <Speech_Female> it's not a thing. <Speech_Female> Do you know what it's a <Speech_Female> thing it's a thing <Speech_Female> here. <SpeakerChange> We should open <Speech_Female> up that conversation. <Speech_Female> We want to hear <Speech_Female> from you. Tell <SpeakerChange> us your stories. <Speech_Female> We can protect your <Speech_Female> identity and the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> identity of people <Speech_Music_Female> that are involved <Speech_Music_Female> in your story <Speech_Music_Female> and with <Speech_Music_Female> said <Music> save. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Your action item <Speech_Music_Female> for this week is <Speech_Music_Female> to expand your search <Speech_Music_Female> filter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> whether it's age <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ethnicity <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or height. <Speech_Music_Female> How do you know what <Speech_Music_Female> you want if you haven't had <Speech_Music_Female> it yet. Right <Speech_Music_Female> and from all <Speech_Female> of us here dateable. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

kate fever francisco San francisco san
"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

Past Episodes

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

"Me very today's let's just try it as a surprise the shit out of them. It didn't see one coming on board with every you want to. I hear what you're saying. I in being half jewish. My mom converted so she did the whole ocean dunking thing that we're supposed to do and and i've had to. You know in thinking about my early thirties and thinking about the long-term situation it's like it's like if i if i marry outside the jewish culture that that's going to die with me right so i think that that is something that may apply to a number of different people. You know like if you if you date someone outside your culture and you and you abandon whatever your parents culture was that then ends with you. So that's i think that's something to consider a lot of inclusionary dating and ending up with somebody within your own race has got to do with cultural and religious factors so in that case when i say that inclusionary dating can be considered racist in some regards perhaps prejudice. It's justified to that extent. Like it's okay. Because we want you to be able to continue this type of lineage. Right but but then again you know as we all begin to mix and turn a nice shade of tope. It will probably be a believing in the the flying spaghetti monster. Eventually i went to this beautiful leading a few months ago. They said something in their thousand said. I can't wait to start new traditions with you. And i thought that was very insightful and also just opened up the whole new perspective about marriage. We've been spending the last couple of generations trying to maintain our roots and tried to pass on the traditions. And now we're at a point where we can create new ones and i find that very very exciting for all of us. I'm going to wrap this up. I have really fun game for all of us in just a sec but any last minute comments we started this pretty light hearted talking about yellow fever. But we're really talking about is dating outside of her own race and culture any advice you can give to people who are dating outside their own race. I guess coming from me. I guess. I'd probably have to quote hans solo. Don't ever tell me the odds. Just just do it just to try it out. Do your research us in favour. It's it's really the only thing you can do. And if you've got village and use it sneaking privileged dan thanks. I dunno. Follow your heart. Follow your gut do what feels right. That's all i can say. Okay and i will say own it if you fucking of yellow fever just fucking have yellow fever. Long yellow fever stage four. I would say just to stay sensitive fetig. I think the best situation is for you to stay at pathetic towards someone that you may not have much in common with and just try to get to know them as best as possible and be as understanding as best as possible. Okay so here's a fun little game for us. I have our friends. at kanda. mania gave us a little care. Package sent his seven condoms which is perfect answers. Seven people in the room they all have different packaging. It's like their newest condoms. I want everyone give everyone a condom condom..

hans solo dan thanks yellow fever fetig sec fever
"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

Past Episodes

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

"Mean skin tone wise. Yes you are correct in that regard. How do you feel now that you know that there are sort of like a superficial stereotype. I mean there is a bit of self interest. I think itself applies a bit. Yeah yeah at least four or five of the traits described. That's kind of neat that you're dating profile really advertising. Here's a good question for you when you go on dates with girls. Do you tell them that. You prefer asian because think that. I'm finishing them which is a off. Do you not think you're fetishizes them. Why isn't perfectly willing to date. Not asians how do you have any rebuttal to that. I think that asian women fetishizes him interesting. That is can we speak to that for a moment. Are you familiar with the okay. Cupid racial dating data. I haven't read it recently but please divulge so check this out so and this is not exactly accurate numbers. I read it months ago. But that being said white guys show about a seven percent preference for asian women versus neutral asian women show about a twenty to twenty five percent preference for white guys versus neutral. So really it's not so much. That white guys have fever yellow fever towards asian winning but rather that asian women have like white fever towards. Does that impact you eric. In your dating preferences knowing that asia women fetishizes life men. I have no problem with asia. Women federalizing white men because quite frankly that leaves more caucasian women for me so again again. It's all about swinging the numbers in favor As best as i can anyway. they're taking. It is an eel. A numbers game taken off the market. That's fine by bam dope problem with that have done. This is in other parts of the country as much as i see it in new york. See nah big cities for sure. I've lived in boston which is very conservative. And i don't i mean i've lived. There appears but it was not as prevalent as san francisco. Maybe this is a supply and demand issue to right so when i looked in beijing we have this term for these men called. Lbh losers back home. We charge these white guys who can't get much action in the states or in north america and they go to china and they're able to date any locally want because it's very very prevalent. I'm going to there. You go but you don't like fobs were bogus or were they actually are locals. So it's like these guys who go to china because they become celebrities in a way and it's not so much nowadays used to be this way like ten years ago because there is this thought that white people can help us excel move forward in society. It's what we've been taught in the media and used to play with white dolls as a kid even in china because there were no asian dolls to play with even as love interests in movies. It's always a white male who of interest so ever. Since i was little is kind of like oh if you're a with a white male he'll help propel you do a higher status in society. Can i ask you a question. Sure every year open to white males only need egypt guys. And i know a lot of asian girls who only jake nation is..

fever yellow fever asia fever eric china boston beijing san francisco new york north america egypt jake
"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

Past Episodes

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

"Francisco. We can experiment. Oh my god phenomenal wig at this point. So you're fully aware of this idea of what you're able to get. Oh i know for a fact that i can't score girls. In the marina i go there out of sheer amusement and to entertain my friend because he just for some reason only stays in the marina to go out and drink. I have i know what i look like. I know what. I can conceivably score. I get what i get that. I don't have i don't have mentioned often delta pretty difficult. I do not complain k. And dan why do you think you have better luck with hot. Asian women versus hot caucasian. I think i get more mileage with asian women. What's more mileage. Define what. I mean i can get a hotter asian gal then i can get a waco but why. Why do you think that well. I think that white people are more in demand. Generally speaking so me being white gives me some kind of like bonus points or something. Which i'm certainly happy to apply you know within the context of dating asia. One can you tell when asia woman is into wakeman how some kind of sixty cents symptoms of sucrose loves wait. No i wish if there is such a thing like let me know. Because i'm just going case by case trying my luck because you know we have a sense of white man you know. There's a stereotype of a yellow fever. White man looks. Are you able to pick up on tinder profile. I shouldn't make it up. Pull out of ten. I can we. Can we drill into this. A little bit of one of the giveaways. So here's some physical give lace all right. This should be totally candidate. Usually pale not two hands. A tall lanky slightly.

Francisco waco asia dan wakeman fever
"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

Past Episodes

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

"Asia's serious thing that you just said about the immigrants i mean. I'm jewish. I can say this but it's like i'm not just white identify with english culture. It's like the same thing as being. Asian americans similarity. They're going back to what you said earlier. Being white in america is kind of weird because it's almost like the absence of missing. We're we're like an empty glass with nothing. Template right so i find myself like overcompensating on the jewish aspect can have some kind of identity. I hear this from a lot of my white male friends. Who asian because they're like well the asian cultures so rich and his so rich in history that i feel like i can latch onto. Something of rehab is white people like nascar like what the hell is there. I'm not saying that. It's only jewish people that have asian or yellow fever. But there's a lot. Judaism and those of jewish would typically considered collective for the most part a lot of emphasis on the family. So why a so. You dated jewish girls in the past. I have those relationships ended when when the relationship would become more serious than long-term logistics would become an issue right such as would you convert to my like well. I am circumcised so yes. That shouldn't be a problem brace. Elite challenge accepted and finished. What are some of the differences between dating a white woman. Asian woman in your experience. Is that a lot of the asian girls that i have held out with or dated most of the time we'll primarily associate with strictly asians for the most part or a large majority of them. We'll be right. I didn't see much ever stayed in much growth in terms of learning from somebody who is outside of your group. I believe in a lot of self improvement and that has to stem from being able to hang out with and learning from people outside of your normal group of folks that you hang up. I think you and i can relate to this. Because i'm not first..

Asia america fever
"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

Past Episodes

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Past Episodes

"Everyone welcome to another episode of dateable a show that opens up a candid conversation about dating in san francisco. We're talking about yellow fever my favorite Topic and we're not talking about the disease you could get from mosquitoes. I have dan and eric in the studio with me. Dan what let let me. Just go back to pull on. We're gonna drink i. Do you want him poor. I already did poor. I just know that. I'm gonna need more later. Okay gotcha okay. Because we got dan. And eric and eric just ask for refill on a drink that he hasn't finished so you know this is gonna be good episode. How this started was. I put out. Something on. Facebook and dan was recommended by a mutual friend and he decided to come on the show at the same time. Eric responded to my post. And said i have the opposite. I and asia night only like white women so we're like perfect we'll get both sides of the story for what is yellow fever. Meteo well to me. It means that. I primarily digit. And why so i throughout high school. I mostly dated white chicks. Just because that's what i am. Where their asian women there. A few there were handful in california. It was in california. i'm a californian. And so i always dated girls in high school and then when i got to college i met the beautiful brilliant asian girl who i dated for two years and it was a really great relationship. We were very close and it kind of like a recent my thermostat such when we broke up. I started noticing asian women everywhere previously. Hadn't and so but i still didn't officially have yellow fever yet. I was so kind of a mix of different at this show. Symptoms early symptoms early onset. Something's and and recently. I just got out of a long relationship and so i started really kind of diving into the dating apps and you know how when you when they show you a new picture of a new person you kind of have this gut check like do i like or do i not like and empirically speaking. I was saying yes to like. Vast majority asian women and the apps are really responsive so they pick up on what you like eventually. Just.

eric dan san francisco fever Dan california Eric Symptoms early symptoms early asia Facebook
Why make a vaccine mandatory?

Coronacast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Why make a vaccine mandatory?

"Sino men were hearing that the Australian government is is trying to secure US supply of vaccine for strands. Once a vaccine is successful, which is great to hear, but we're also hearing from the peon that he wants to make it. As mandatory as possible that people would have to get it at, which is sort of interesting wording I thought given that the vast majority of Austrians have indicated this research showing that they've indicated that they would get it if they could and only a really small proportion say that they wouldn't. So what's the purpose of making a vaccine mandatory if people wanted anyway well, it is a risky strategy. Even, people that might be in favor of having the vaccine might say, well, you're going to force me to have it stuff you. I'M NOT GONNA have it and rebel against the idea just because you're forcing people to have it. So it is a is a difficult situation and you'd have to be pretty sure that the vaccine that you're offering is very, very safe. So that's that's the ethical side of it. There is there are two good scientific reasons for doing it although I'm not promoting the mandatory view I'm just giving you the argument here. So. There is one which is to do with the virus one reasons to do with the virus. So, the virus mutates all the time and by the play of Chen, some of the mutations will give that particular version of the virus an advantage. So we've got this virus that's one four G. that's dominant in Australia, and that's almost certainly dominant because two mutation on the spike protein that allows the virus to enter the body that six one, four g mutation almost certainly. Allows the virus to be transmitted more easily, and therefore that version of the virus will preferentially survive. There'll be more of it is doesn't seem to be a naseer form of the viruses just has more survival advantage. Now, the only selective pressure on the virus at the moment is social distancing. So by social distancing, we're making the harder for the virus to spread in the community. and. Therefore, the viruses that will tend to survive when your social distancing locking down will be those that transmit more easily. But as soon as you go to vaccine and vaccine is blocking a whole lot of mutants of the virus but there might be mutants of the virus which are resistant to the version of the viruses, the vaccine, and therefore those mutants might escape round and therefore it's a bit like antibiotic resistance and you've got a sense viruses that are resistant to antibiotics resistant to that particular form of the vaccine. Now if you mandate a vaccine and you try and get very quickly one hundred percent of the community or near it. Immunized there's almost no virus left in the community to mutate and spin around and get around the corner. That's a strong scientific reason for mandating it or trying to get almost one hundred percent coverage. The other reason is that you don't know yet how effective the new vaccines are going to be. It may be that the first versions are only fifty or sixty percent effective. So therefore, do the maths if only say seventy percent of the community gets immunized and it's only fifty percent effective. Then you've only got thirty thirty, five percent coverage that's not enough to give you large enough haired immunity to. Get the virus down to very low levels. I mean the other incentive is that you know if you WANNA go to Port Douglas for your holidays, you're GonNa need something like the old yellow fever vaccination certificate to show that you've had it before they'll let you in and that'll be a strong incentive to people to do that or if you want to go to the movies, you gotTa Show Your certificate but you've had it done robin mandating it you got to be immunized to get into certain environments right then that's what we have at the moment in the sense with child vaccinations. And being able to access childcare but there are problems with mandating a vaccine that on one hand is the individual side of it where you balancing someone's ability to have an individual choice against the greater. Good. But even on the greater good. If they were problems of the vaccine, because anything that we have is going to be brought out quite quickly if there were any sort of problems with it, then that really arrives that public trust and might make it even harder to get the sort of number of vaccinated people that we would need to get to get the reduction in transmissibility that is. What we need a vaccine full yeah and those are really good reasons. The reason that you can really push it hard particularly, which preschool children is that the vaccines we have given to hundreds of millions of kids, hundreds of millions of adults. We know the really safe. We know the site apart profile, really really rare and you can insist on it with a lot with a high degree of safety. In other words, you know what the risks of getting measles are, and you know what the risks getting polio are and the risks of the vaccine or infinitesimal highly almost non measurable comp-. In comparison. covid nineteen it's a little bit different because point six percent of people die from this although ten or fifteen percent maybe even more get quite unwell with it. So that's quite a large proportion of the community but you the you're right. That is the equation of the government is going to be very confident about. Okay. So let's say we do have a vaccine and one hundred percent of Australians get vaccinated what we still living on a planet with other people we can't. We can't guarantee vaccination for the whole globe. So there is there is an answer to that question and Garvey the global. Immunization Initiative not for profit initiative argues exactly that point is that there is no point and just having your own nation immunized because if you want International Border Open Up, you need the world to be immunised, which is why they've got this system through Sepe and Garvey of of funding vaccine so that low income countries get access to the to the

Garvey Australian Government United States Port Douglas Polio Immunization Initiative Chen Australia Sepe
Leaving the World Health Organization

Second Opinion

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Leaving the World Health Organization

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with. The pinion over the past few years. Our President has made some incredibly ill informed policy decisions even in the face of clear evidence to the contrary, these decisions have negatively impacted people's lives through policies around covid climate change, immigration health care women's rights, lgbt rights education, and of course, our relationship with foreign countries, but the president's recent decision to leave the sixty year. Old World Health Organization is among the very most irresponsible decision will. Will hurt the US every bit as much as it will hurt the rest of the world the W. H.. O. Is not a perfect organization. It is plagued by politics and infighting and a low budget, but it's still serves a super important function. The whol plays a key role in many decisions that directly or indirectly affect our lives more than ever before our global interconnected world create great risks particularly with regard to the spreading. Spreading of diseases, it is the WHO that is. Our First Line of defense the WHO. I alerted the world to the infection that came to be called covid in early January, and it advised healthcare workers how to protect themselves from the spread. Perhaps it could have been more aggressive with its policies, but if there is a problem, conduct an audit help improve the organization. Don't be a baby and take your toys and walk away. Away and it's not just covid were who plays a vital role. It coordinates the global response to diseases like polio Ebola Malaria HIV TB and yellow fever. The near nation of diseases like polio has saved the US tens of billions of dollars in treatment costs, and the WHO isn't the only Health Organization the US refuses to work with as the US decided to focus inwardly. We have already stopped funding the pan. American Health Organization. Pan. America is the area that is currently home to half of the top ten countries with co Vid. Now aside from helping ourselves, we also have a social responsibility to help resource poor countries by helping to provide education laboratory training tools like p. p. e. and clinical trials drugs to treat emerging and reemerging diseases. When we step back from these responsibilities, China steps in, and they're now in our backyard, working with countries that will old them a big favor. The WHO also directly benefits the US for example each year influenza virus mutates resulting in new variants around the world. It is the W. H. O. that leads the. The flu vaccine development process each year which includes several American researchers and organizations like our FDA and CDC. The US depends on data from the WHO to predict which strain of the flu will spread to the US so that we can make ineffective vaccination in the end the total US funding for the WHO is equivalent to the overhead of about one ass hospital about three hundred seventy million dollars. It would be very hard to get better value for that

United States World Health Organization WHO Covid Dr Michael Wilks President Trump American Health Organization Flu Vaccine Polio Health Organization Malaria FDA W. H. O. America CDC China TB
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 1 year ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
EPA Grants First Permit to Test Genetically Modified Mosquitoes in Houston, Florida Keys

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

EPA Grants First Permit to Test Genetically Modified Mosquitoes in Houston, Florida Keys

"The U. S. environmental protection agency has granted permission for genetically engineered mosquitoes to be released in the Florida Keys and around Houston to see if they can help limit the spread of mosquito borne illnesses the British biotech company Oxitec limited was granted an experimental use permit to release of genetically engineered type of the skill species known to be associated with the Sikh of virus and viruses that cause yellow fever besides the EPA's office of chemical safety and pollution Oxitec must get state and local approval before it can start field testing but if granted testing will take place over a two year period in Monroe County Florida starting this summer and in Harris County Texas beginning in twenty twenty one when genetically engineered males are released into the field they mate with wild female mosquitoes with only male mosquitoes able to survive the population decrease suse as the gene spreads

Florida Keys Houston EPA Monroe County Florida British Biotech Oxitec Limited Harris County Texas
"yellow fever" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on WJR 760

"By yellow fever was more than four thousand modern scholars estimate the number to be close to five thousand a tenth of the city's fifty thousand residents ten percent Thomas however twenty thousand people including Thomas Jefferson George Washington and much of the federal government it fled the city to escape the fever thereby making proportion of deaths among those who remain quite high what could cause a devastating epidemic to occur on Pennsylvania soil yellow fever is an acute infectious hemorrhagic that is bleeding viral disease transmitted by the bite of the female mosquito native to tropical and subtropical regions of South America and Africa but it wasn't discovered but that yellow fever was transmitted by mosquitoes until eighteen eighty one at the time yellow fever was a well known illness that affected sailors who travel to the Caribbean and Africa characterized by disquieting color changes including yellow eyes and skin purple blotches under the skin from internal bleeding and hemorrhages and black stools and vomit all of which were accompanied by a high fever in seventeen ninety three people in the French Caribbean colony of St Dominique now Haiti whistling a revolution from France and thousands of infected individuals landed at the Philadelphia docks this combined with the city hot summer and low water tables of seventeen ninety three created the perfect breeding grounds for mosquitoes and the spread of yellow fever on August nineteen seventeen ninety three the first fatality of yellow fever Peter Aston became a topic of general conversation according to Matthew carry Irish born American publisher and first hand with just at the beginning of the plague when how many hospital beds they had missed petition how many ventilators at first many residents believed it was simply a common autumn donis prominent doctor the time Benjamin rush you may have heard of him he was a founder quietly identified the onus is yellow fever and crap hold on the damn thing changed on me hold on I'm reading the best I can what happened here reading this off my iPhone stick with me all right I'll find it I'll find it hello okay let's see I'm finding it everybody sing along dammit the prominent doctor the time Benjamin rush quickly identify the illnesses yellow fever by August twenty five universal terrace described by Carrie began spreading like wildfire through Philadelphia many fled the city is so great to tear the carts wagons chairs and coaches could be constantly seen leaving the city over the next few weeks those left behind sought refuge indoors Congress was adjourned and moved to the then remote village of Germantown streets became empty is business Holt nineteen hundred Lillian Rhodes author of the story of Philadelphia commented that the hearse and the doctors carriage with the sole vehicles on the street she also stated the hospitals run a horrible condition nurses could nurses could not be had at any price to go into a house which nearly every bed contained a dead body in the floors reek with filth was courting death in its most read full form quote unquote in the history of Philadelphia no city has ever faced at some mortality to the extent the Philadelphia suffered under the yellow fever flexion the spreading yellow fever to Philadelphia resulted in panic and fear of death and the number of deaths change from ten victims a day in August to one hundred a day in October and sudden exit was of common occurrence is depicted by Samuel Breck he also noticed that people were in health one day were buried the next the city was also almost completely unprepared for such a catastrophe no hospitals or hospitals stores were in readiness to alleviate the sufferings of the poor is mentioned by Breck hope became dismal roads also commented on the atmosphere Philadelphia's deserted and desolate it during such a tragedy there was also an intense struggle for curing containment Dr Benjamin rush one of the signers of the declaration of independence became the leader of the fight against yellow fever storage to flee the city like others rush said I have resolved to stick to my principles my practice and my patients to the last extremity doctor rush gave the people of Philadelphia courage and hope fearing golf the city of Philadelphia while many resorted to prayer and appeal to the divine doctor rush believe that yellow fever was caused by unsanitary conditions especially those of the docks sewage system and rotting vegetables such as riding coffee from the arch street wharf boy was he right he concluded that the onus was not transmitted from human to human but by putrid exultation in the atmosphere exhalations in the atmosphere he also recognize that weather played a part in the epidemic that the infection did not spread from human to human contact though many people the time wanted to point blame at the newly arrive St Dominique Rev revolution refugees rush was adamant to not point the blame to outsiders but instead accused the sanitary conditions of the city of poor residents to clean up the city so as not to in trail the disease upon future generations Russia believe the epidemic could be prevented by cleaning the docks pumping out the bilge water of the ship water that collects and stagnates in the build of a ship cleaning sewers sewers more often washing the streets and warm water removing filth from home better employing toilets more often stopping building so close and alleys eating less meat in the summer in regards to disease Russian said to every natural evil heaven is provided an antidote.

fever
Ida B Wells: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil Rights Movement

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Ida B Wells: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil Rights Movement

"Born into slavery. Today's warrior became a journalist. Educator civil workers rights activists in suffer. Just she is best known as the leader of the Anti Lynching Movement her reporting on the violent injustices faced by African Americans and the work to make United States or more equitable place significantly impacted American society. Let's talk about ib well IDA. Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs Mississippi on July Sixteenth. Eighteen sixty two six months. Before the emancipation proclamation. She was the eldest of six children. When I was sixteen. Her parents died in a yellow fever. Outbreak Ida was determined that she and her siblings would not be split up so she got jobs a teacher at a rural country school in eighteen. Eighty two item move with her family to Memphis Tennessee. Two years later I was riding on a train from work when she was asked to move. She was instructed to move to the colored car which also served as a smoking area. Furious either refuse when the conductor forcibly removed from the train ida bit how she sued the Railroad Company and ultimately lost the case according to a story in me obey the injustice inspired beginning of her activism in journalism career while working as a journalist Ida wrote about ride subjects she was an outspoken reporter and weighed in on issues such as disenfranchisement and segregation rapidly. Ida became one of the most prominent black journalists have her time and was called the princess of the press in eighteen ninety two. I disclose friend and two other African Americans were murdered by Lynch mob. The killings motivated IDA to expose the reality of becoming one the first reporter city so I don't wrote articles condemning the attack and the wrongful deaths of African Americans and one article titled Lynch Law. In America I wrote the nineteenth century lynching mob cut off. Ears toes and fingers strips of flesh and distributes sugars person at the body as souvenirs among the crowd. Her Writing Ida documented the dangers that black southerner face after one particularly controversial article. That either wrote a mob stormed the office of her newspaper and destroyed the press. Fortunately I wasn't in the office when the incident occurred still the attack understandably Friday nighter and she left town. She moved to New York where she worked at the New York Age and African American newspaper. There she continued her work exposing lynching and wrote a report on the subject for the publication. Ooh In eighteen. Ninety eight IDA brought her campaign to the White House. She discuss lynchings with President. Mckinley Alami Congress for a National Anti Lynching Law in one thousand nine hundred five item to Chicago and married for an Ed Barnett with whom she had four children in Chicago. Idaho for many prominent civil rights organizations including the National Association of Color Women That Alpha suffrage club and the end ablaze c. p. she actively fought for the women's suffrage movement during one suffers parade organizers told IDA and the other black women incidents to march in the back the organizers feared that women of color would offend southern delegates but either refused standing her ground despite the enormous backlash she received. Ida's fight for. Social Justice was relentless. She continued her activism and to her death in one thousand nine hundred eighty one at the age of Sixteen Ida is best remembered for her invaluable role as a social pioneer Ida a risks her life repeatedly to fight against the score of lynching and to protect African Americans all over the country.

IDA Reporter Sixteen Ida Lynch Law New York Age United States Memphis Ed Barnett Mckinley Alami Congress Bell Wells National Association Of Color Tennessee Idaho African American Newspaper New York Chicago America
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

05:20 min | 2 years ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"Safai here with none other than NPR east. Africa correspondent eight Peralta to. Hey there ater. Hey mattie thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled but I want to open with a quick question who discovered Ebola and Google. It first of all. How dare you asked me a a question? I should definitely know the answer to and don't and yeah I already. Google bet came up was a Belgian. Microbiologist I but I think you're about to tell me there's more to the story there absolutely there always is right so I mean you cheated. Yeah what you probably saw is a bunch of White Westerners like Dr John Jack. Mugambi does not. Yeah he was not one of the people that came up yes so he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo. But back in nineteen seventy six. We we emberg he was the first doctor to collect any bola sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote. A lot of history has been written without your name. Yes but you on this Yes it is it not correct did not quite so today on the show correcting the record on a bola the story of Dr John Jock Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing its future to some in the medical community. It's a controversial move. Okay ater so we're talking talking about a Congolese Dr Jacques in his role in discovering Abullah. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa south he said we should start in nineteen seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD in microbiology at the Institute in Belgium and and he could have stayed in Europe but he decided to come back to Congo. But when I arrive here The condition of work were not I. I had no lab. I have no mice for experimentation so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah it's tough to do lab work without a lab you now. He said without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen nineteen seventy six we sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak It's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola. But no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever and he goes to this local hospital but he says he finds it completely empty was nobody there. Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and and people had died there but in the morning when they heard was sent from capitol. They thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital and we started seeing patients. So so what's he seeing. When the patients come in he was seeing people who were very weak with fever they had headaches? I started it to him to make the physical time but at that time. have no gloves you know gloves. And of course he had to draw blood but when I removed they're the city which Blood continued to spread out. It was the first time from two CDs momentum and also my fingers so with a bow. Wow Yeah so he says he he would wash his hands a lot but really really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on and he was able to not get it and at this point we MP. He was startled but then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village also got sick with a fever all the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point I was like. Oh it's probably not those things. Thanks yeah I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different. So he convinced one none to go back to Kinshasa with him so what happens next. She died at a hospital a couple of days later but he took blood samples and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end. That was Peter. Piot who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium. Aw The guy who turned up from Google Search. Yeah that's right. And so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit the CDC in the US US gets involved and they realize this is a new virus that caused hemorragic

Fever Kinshasa Dr John Jack Congo Google Blood Peralta Typhoid Dr Jacques NPR Belgium Kenya Mattie Dr John Jock Mugabe Africa Ebola Mugambi Bolla Institute For Tropical Medicin United States
Vaccine group announces creation of Ebola vaccine stockpile

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Vaccine group announces creation of Ebola vaccine stockpile

"The vaccine alliance Gabby was announced he would invest one hundred and seventy eight billion dollars to create a global stockpile of about half a million Ebola vaccines a decision health officials say could help prevent future outbreaks from spiraling out of control they're similar stockpiles the vaccines against yellow fever meningitis and cholera limited shots all of the above the vaccine would be available to developing countries by W. H. show UNICEF the red cross and doctors without borders after receiving technical advice from others chose to live this month London

Gabby W. H. London Ebola Unicef Seventy Eight Billion Dollars
Mosquitoes On The Scent

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Mosquitoes On The Scent

"What's let's smell. Do you like it. It's my new citronella perfume. Miss Submit role strong good. I'm ready to do anything to keep those nasty mosquitoes at bay. Did you know that some mosquitoes carry diseases like encephalitis. West Nile Dangi and yellow fever and malaria. Maybe having snow isn't all you need to be doing. Site is known for over half century that mosquito species are attracted to carbon dioxide heat and moisture any warm-blooded species produces those three things since that time researchers have been trying to figure out what specific odors in humans attract disease-carrying species. She's so you're saying I need to get rid of a spell yes take. West Nile virus for example according to the CDC West Nile virus is is the leading cause of mosquito borne disease in the continental United States scientists studying mosquito culex quinquefasciatus did research to figure out why it feeds on humans as well as other host species downtown me. It's the smell you guessed it. Mosquitoes smell whether antennas and this two legs mosquito has a special sensitivity to a chemical called mono produced by both birds and humans when scientists bathing mosquito traps for the the combination of nominal and carbon dioxide. They were capturing over two thousand mosquitoes a night that was fifty percent more than with carbon dioxide alone. That's great. Where can I get. Some traps are selling any traps yet but you might wanna cut back on the perfume Yale. I think you're keeping more award mosquitoes. Had this moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Ya Cassandra and armed don glass.

West Nile Dangi Ya Cassandra Fever CDC Indiana University United States Yale Don Glass Fifty Percent
News in Brief 28 August 2019

UN News

02:14 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 28 August 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations. Janine hannes plaid shirt special representative and head of the u._n._c. since mission for iraq or briefed briefed the security council on wednesday via video conference spotlighting funding shortfalls his hut most concern after saluting enormous sacrifices made that led to rex freedom and sovereignty the special representative lamented that both defining facility for stabilization and humanitarian response plan are facing enormous thomas financial gaps of three hundred and five hundred million dollars respectively. The united chief recalled that iraq's daunting challenges did not arise overnight it in will not be resolved tomorrow but as iraq is press ahead. They need an engaged international community at their side misinformation on vaccines. He's he's as contagious in dangerous as diseases. It helps to spread. That's according to the head of the u. N. health agency and it is being disseminated far and fast on social media throughout many countries including during critical vaccination campaigns like those underway for polio in pakistan or yellow fever in south america with these in mind tetras gabrielle's director general of the world health organization or w._t._o. Expressed his appreciation to the internet photo sharing service pinterest dressed for its commitment to provide only evidence based vaccine information to its users in this way protecting public health. We hope to see other social media platforms around the world following interests lead. He said turning to canada the u._n. Special repertoire and violence against women welcomed a bill removing sexual discrimination from federal law dealing with indigenous peoples before the bill entered into force on fifteen august provisions within the indian act act meant women lost their status when they married non-indigenous men while men who married non-indigenous women kept theirs for decades first nations women in their descendants have faced sex-based discrimination that has been perpetuated by these provisions constituting violation of international and national gender equality standards said the u._n. Expert an academy u._n. News.

Iraq United Nations Representative Polio Pinterest Pakistan Fever U. N. Director General America Five Hundred Million Dollars
News in Brief 20 August 2019

UN News

03:30 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 20 August 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations. The recent outbreak of fighting in southern yemen between former allies that are still locked in combat with hootie opposition forces forces in the north of the country is a clear sign that the current conflict must be brought to an end you an envoy martin griffiths said on tuesday updating the security council so in new york on his efforts to secure a peaceful end to more than four years of war. Mr griffiths insisted that the u._n. Remains committed to inclusive dialogue that resolves differences am to addressing the concerns of all yemenis including something groups that the range of us to be taken into account in any dialogue on the future of yemen and we i need all of its citizens to assist us in making sure that future is stable and secure. This is a vital importance the efforts to end the conflict perfect and to ensure the resumption of the political transition that has been interrupted by these recent years. I hope all yemeni stakeholders from all parts of the country take events in arden as a clear sign that the current the conflict must be brought and swiftly and peacefully and in a manner which addresses the needs of yemenis across the country his comments come amid clashes between southern separatists and government forces in aden. Mr griffiths welcomed the fact that a ceasefire deal in hodeida governor it had maintained the flow. If desperately needed humanitarian supplies and lead to a sustained reduction in violence intensifying clashes in the southern libyan town of merck involving air and drone strikes strikes in recent days have left at least ninety people dead and displaced thousands of terrified civilians the u._n. Said on tuesday the warning over these small oasis town follows follows local media reports that the clashes involved tribal opponents of these self-styled libyan national army of commander khalifa after which in april began on offensive on libya's capital it'll tripoli jens locker from the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs or arch condemned the ongoing clashes casualties on all sides of the fighting have continued canoed as a result of air strikes by planes and drowns indiscriminate rocket attacks shelling and direct fighting on the ground. We know for a fact that at least six children into of them were killed. Four of them were injured in a strike that hit a house hosting internally displaced people on the eighth of august according adding to the u._n. Nine thousand four hundred and fifty people have now been displaced by the violence in and around music since the beginning of august the u._n. And humanitarian partners are responding with emergency healthcare food distribution shelter and non-food items but access remains extremely limited in music itself and finally venezuela where the u._n. Children's fund unicef has appealed for help to provide lifesaving assistance to nine hundred thousand youngsters as the country continues to face aid <hes> economic crisis more than three million children need help amid food shortages and limited access to healthcare and save water unicef said in a statement in its appeal hill for more than seventy million dollars. The agency said that vaccine preventable diseases including measles and diptheria have emerged while yellow fever and malaria are on the arise around one point three million children and adolescence need protection services while over a million are now out of school daniel johnson u._n. News.

Yemen Martin Griffiths Mr Griffiths United Nations Unicef Libyan National Army Merck Hodeida New York Fever Arden Libya Aden Daniel Johnson Malaria Commander
"yellow fever" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And all of us have battled it we're talking about the mosquito last year mosquitoes were blamed for the deaths of eight hundred thirty thousand people twerking any other assassin including other humans snakes and Amiri out of other celebrated killers more from doctor Timothy wind guard author of a book called the mosquito a human history of our deadliest predator Tim what's your research say well there's been lots of research done on miss he does in the cedar bar disease in various avenues of the academic world and I kept coming across these figures in estimates obviously they're estimates of the the mosquito is killed roughly half of all human beings who have ever lived in this was from numerous sources and generally and the estimate is that there's been roughly about a hundred and eighty billion homo sapiens who lived across our two hundred thousand or more a year to year existence and so they've done some statistical extrapolation that situates you know roughly half fifty billion fifty to fifty four billion people that have been unfortunately killed as a result of them if you don't if you don't want to diss goodness so it is this taking place in third world countries are are we at on a similar pace from years ago are we better at preventing deaths or mosquito bites the minute you put that on the perspective yeah I certainly the statistics in the habit she only females by but she is is is bestowed upon humans is definitely decreasing but what we have to remember is that our ancestor birth places in Africa which is also the ancestor birthplace of yellow fever and certainly malaria which has been with us throughout our human journey and malaria predominately kills children under five so if if you account for her longevity in Africa and the slow human migration out of Africa which included in some cases of malaria itself so there's a lot of things that went into those estimates according to the statisticians in statistical extrapolation but definitely when we finally on masking the mosquito generally around nineteen hundred to then realize what is causing these diseases speak with doctor Timothy one guard author of a book called the mosquito a human history of our deadliest predator malaria today versus years ago where are we in terms of writing it the statistics are America is me see since the early nineteen fifties is similar in the United States anymore or in Canada because even seat up as far north as Canada which is quite amazing the military at the death rates from malaria are definitely decreasing now those overall numbers there's a wide range of estimates as to how many currently or still people are still succumbing to malaria but when we look at a general pattern of statistics using those broad ranges malaria deaths are definitely decreasing in the last in twenty years thanks in part to the bill bill and Melinda gates foundation but what we're seeing at the same time it is an emergency reemergence of other mosquito borne diseases so for example west Nile Zeca and being he is making a huge comeback well they're not prolific killers like military is which is by comparison a relatively speaking a good thing which is why we're seeing overall death rate decrease because we're combating malaria and the ones that are emerging and re emerging as I mentioned are not as prolific killers as as malaria is not that's the guy I know you had some points in your two about triggers an common misconceptions explain a couple those well I think people action I glass again I'm a historian not an entomologist there about just but they obviously have done quite a bit of research people want to know why some people get a bit more or less than other people and unfortunately about eighty five percent of what makes you charming to miss he does or not charming is pre wired in in an individual's genetic circuit board which includes blood type type blood is generally is the preference of the female mosquito order vintage of choice over eighteen be ordered bland the back on our feet and futile aphrodisiac it depends on how much in individuals units carbon dioxide or the bacterium chemicals in and on our skin including lactic acid so some of the myths that you know the darker your hair the less you get bitten or that's not true or the darker more leathery your skin the less you get bitten also not true so some of those minutes or if you need to tell me you can ward off the vampire mosquitoes in that in the bond is well so it's basically unfortunately pre wired in our in our circuit board missed him doctor Timothy wind guard the book is called the mosquito a human history of our deadliest predator it's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this morning America's first news you're a small business owner and there's nothing small about.

eighty five percent twenty minutes twenty years
"yellow fever" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Numerous sources in generally and the estimate is that there's been roughly about a hundred and eighty billion homo sapiens who lived across our two hundred thousand or more a year to year existence and so they've done some statistical extrapolation that situates you know roughly half fifty billion fifty to fifty four billion people that have been unfortunately killed as a result of the machine on the future one diseases so it is this taking place in third world countries are are we at on a similar pace from years ago are we better at preventing deaths or mosquito bites the minute you put that on the perspective yeah I certainly the statistics in the habit she only females by but she is is is bestowed upon humans is definitely decreasing but what we have to remember is that our ancestor birth places in Africa which is also the ancestor of birth place of yellow fever and certainly malaria which has been with us throughout our human journey and malaria predominantly kills children under five so if if you account for how long jeopardy in Africa and the slow human migration out of Africa which included in some cases of malaria itself so there's a lot of things that went into those estimates according to the statisticians in statistical extrapolation but definitely when we finally on mass given the ski though generally around nineteen hundred to then realize what is causing these diseases speak with doctor Timothy one guard author of a book called the mosquito a human history of our deadliest predator malaria today versus years ago or are we in terms of writing it this statistic so America is me see since the early nineteen fifties are similar in the United States anymore four in Canada because even seat up as far north as Canada which is quite amazing the malaria the death rate from malaria are definitely decreasing now those overall numbers there's a wide range of estimates as to how many currently or still people are still succumbing to malaria but when we look at a general pattern of statistics using those broad ranges malaria deaths are definitely decreasing in the last in twenty years thanks in part to the bill bill and Melinda gates foundation but what we're seeing at the same time it is an emergency reemergence of other mosquito borne diseases so for example west Nile Zeca and being he is making a huge comeback well they're not prolific killers like military is which is by comparison a relatively speaking a good thing which is why we're seeing overall death rate decrease because we're combating malaria and the ones that are emerging and re emerging as I mentioned are not as prolific killers as as malaria is not that's the guy I know you had some points in your two about triggers an common misconceptions explain a couple those well I think people question I get asked again on his story not an entomologist there about this but they obviously have been quite a bit of research people.

twenty years
"yellow fever" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on KTRH

"Numerous sources in generally and the estimate is that there's been roughly about a hundred and eighty billion homo sapiens who lived across our two hundred thousand or more a year a year existence and so they've done some statistical extrapolation that situates you know roughly half fifty billion fifty to fifty four billion people that have been unfortunately killed as a result of the machine on the feet of one diseases goodness so it is this taking place in third world countries are are we at on a similar pace from years ago are we better at preventing deaths or mosquito bites someone had to put it all into perspective yeah I certainly the statistics in the the habits she only females by but she is this is bestowed upon humans is definitely decreasing but what we have to remember is that our ancestors both places in Africa which is also the ancestor of birth place of yellow fever and certainly malaria which has been with us throughout our human journey and malaria predominantly kills children under five so if if you would help for her longevity in Africa and the swell human migration out of Africa which included in some cases of malaria itself so there's a lot of things that went into those estimates according to the statisticians in statistical extrapolation but definitely when we finally on masculine the ski though generally around nineteen hundred to then realize what is causing these diseases speak with doctor Timothy one guard author of a book called the mosquito a human history of our deadliest predator malaria today versus years ago where are we in terms of writing it the statistics are America is on the C. since the early nineteen fifties is similar in the United States anymore or in Canada because even seat up as far north as Canada which is quite amazing the malaria.

Africa malaria America United States Canada doctor Timothy
Mosquitoes will probably kill us all one day

The Big Story

13:11 min | 2 years ago

Mosquitoes will probably kill us all one day

"Right now if handled properly mosquitoes in Canada aren't annoyance a buzzkill even yes they are capable of spreading West Nile virus but it's not terribly likely at least not right now but if the role of this little critter throughout um the entire scope of human history tells us anything. This is not likely to stay that way a new book on the history of the mosquito reports that the best estimates are that about one hundred eight billion humans have ever lived on this planet and fifty two billion of them die due to mosquito borne diseases and no those diseases are not present in the suckers that are ruining your evening outside this weekend. They are not as far away as they used to be either. If there's one thing we should know although mosquitoes by now it's that they will survive and they will spread and they will find a way to make our lives miserable so it's probably only a matter of time <music>. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the bug story Dr David Fiszman is an epidemiologist at Delana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto is seen his fair share mosquito borne and diseases hi David. Thanks for joining us. Thank you very much driving when people like me ask you questions about Mosquitos. What is the most common thing we get wrong? The common assumption most of the people who who asked me about Mosquitos are my family members really <hes> and they they they usually just want to know. How is it okay to put debate on small children which I think is still risk-benefit kind of stuff so in terms of my professional opinion as an epidemiologist infectious diseases people seldom seldom seek out my opinion and <hes> I sort of tend to foisted on them? I think I think the most important thing about mosquitos is that you know as you've said they've had tremendous impact on human history human civilization and I mean the whole way the Vatican's laid out with the pope having a summer residence up on a hillside outside room. That's all about malaria. I mean you know really the word. Malaria is Italian. Were just like influences. The air is bad. GotTa get the pope out from so he doesn't die of malaria so these diseases have really shaped you know civilization <hes> how we've been governed <hes> how the globe was colonized by Europeans rate and I think to me as someone who does infectious disease stuff enough for a living the most common misconception is that it's about the mosquitoes being there or not being there because mosquitoes are kind of everywhere you know you can go to northern Canada obviously and the mosquitoes aren't around the winter in the winter is long but come that come that thaw the mosquitoes are back so there there there there are many many agenda of mosquitoes within each of those many species some conspiracies some can't but the spread of disease doesn't tend to be about there being particular killer mosquitoes somewhere or not. I think that's misconception. I I agree with your premise or your your question is sh. Should we be concerned about global environmental change that we think driven by largely by humans all of those things you know abundance of water drought temperature all of those things have to do with mosquito abundance mosquito biting rates and you know where Mosquitos are GonNa find habitat and that's extremely important in terms of how infectious purchase disease this move when I say and when I hear from <hes> friends and relatives that when they're up at their cottage this year and last year it seems like the mosquitoes last longer into the year are in more abundance and are just the way way worse than they've ever been. Nobody's exaggerating or we right in terms of the absolute abundance. I can't comment on that. I know so far this year. We don't have West Nile but it's not August yet. Is that the peak period yeah so so so the the two mechanisms for human disease that comes from mosquitoes broadly speaking to mechanisms one is you can have <hes> what's called an amplification cycle that involves humans and mosquitoes and the example of that would be something like malaria where you know someone I am a mosquito actually may come off an airplane from an area with a lot of malaria in New Jersey. Let's say which doesn't have endemic malaria anymore and someone opens that case in the mosquito has malaria bites that person now if you're in an environment end where there are some number of other mosquitoes can spread that disease they may also bite that person and they then become infected if they then go off and feed on other people get blood meals from other people they infect them and that's what's called an amplification cycle so let's say the Mosquitos from that one person or sufficient to infect five other people via intermediate mosquitoes that that's what we would call a reproduction number of five so you need to have the right mosquitoes there <hes> the right types of mosquitoes and you also have to have mosquitoes the types of mosquitoes that are biting enough to get those five other people infected but they'll then be fed on mosquitoes and if each of them produces another five case of malaria now you've gone from one case to five case it's twenty five cases and what's what's called an epidemic <hes>. It's an it's an exponential growth process that perpetuates itself an epidemic so really scary. How fast can that happen over very I do remember the Bola outbreak in two thousand fifteen in west Africa that had everybody kind of freaked out? I mean that was over a period of a couple of months that you went from you know basically a handful of cases too. I think by the end of it there was some thirty thousand cases because you're dealing with exponential growth. How fast it happens depends on what people talk about as the generation time? Time which is the interval between a case being infected and they're basically on offspring cases being infected so the shorter that is the faster at happens with things like West Nile or there's a disease he's called Ross River that they ha- Ross reverse that they have in Australia for example what you have there is you have a human animal amplification cycle and were collateral damage so for example with West Nile the reason the mosquito fool start turning positive usually late July August and maybe later this year because we had the cool spring is <hes> that it goes mosquito bird mosquito bird mosquito bird and you have that same amplification cycle that results in increasing disease prevalence in the birds which makes mosquitoes more and more likely to get infected and somewhere through that summer when you have a high enough prevalence of infection mosquitoes reach a point where mosquitos that will feed both on birds and humans which are minority of mosquitoes they start to be infected to and then those are called bridge factors so they'll bridge those two population so you get the disease moving from an animal population to us and we're dead end hosts so we can get sick with West Nile but we'RE NOT GONNA give it to mosquito. Give it back to a bird so we're dead end. How efficient are mosquitoes compared to other creatures at spreading these kind of diseases? The big vulnerability for mosquitoes as vectors is GONNA hold my arm up to the microphone. Is that try eh noise. They don't live long rate their their lives. Are I can't remember who said it nasty brutish short right and so you have that built into the math when people look at how do these epidemics grow one of the most important factors is that mosquitoes that get infected very likely to die soon. They're very likely to die before they feed on someone again and that keeps this reproduction down reproduction number down it turns out the what's most important in driving diseases that well so it would be in driving all of these diseases because whether it's a it's a mosquito to animal to mosquito disease mosquito to human to mosquito disease. What's going to drive that is the biting rate because the biting rate both impacts the rate which mosquitoes in fact and at the rate which mosquitoes are infected expression for this reproduction number which is number new cases you get from an old case in totally susceptible population and some of the things that are in there are mosquito density? How many mosquitoes are there per human pra creature <hes>? How long does the mosquitoes lives? You know <hes> isn't that expression. The biting rate is one squared term and that expression so the more mosquito bite the more they get infected but also the more they infect us with more in the case of west smile infect birds so to bring this back to climate change. Guess what mosquito behavior turns out to be really temperatures are no that's good. That's not good. Isn't it so what happens exactly so years argument that I've made this is published. I've I've I've suggested this and lectures okay. I think this is probably probably true. You know I think in Canada we think about the U._S.. And the slave trade Brazil was really the great slaving nation in the Western a hemisphere for very long time it was it was the epicenter of the slave trade and they're you know just millions and millions and millions of human beings in mosquitoes were trafficked from sub Saharan Africa to South America and people and died a lot and a lot of them died of disease right and there's this really interesting genetic work. That's gone on on a disease called yellow fever which is present in South America but which is thought to have originated in Africa and what you see. Is that disease disease if you look at the lineage of the viruses that disease was clearly introduced into South America by the slave trade and <hes> it's spread by what are called eighties mosquitoes which are the baddies for a lot of the stuff eighties. Mosquitoes seem to be really good at spreading a lot of different viruses and off lease <hes> <hes> Anopheles mosquitoes tend to spread malaria eighties ten spent most of the viral diseases. We worry about case so you've got this this disease imported in the late fourteen fifteen hundreds from Brazil with this massive traffic of human beings and it becomes established established it becomes a probably there must have had epidemics becomes endemic exactly the same parts of the world have chicken gun ooh virus and Zico virus but we've never had chicken Gunja or Zeka established in South America until like ten years ago right and all of a sudden these endemic diseases and South America notwithstanding the fact that there has been massive amounts of movement of humans goods and presumably insect right between those fears over a period of about five hundred years so how is it that you never had these diseases move and then all of a sudden they did the right if you look at the reproduction number for <hes> yellow fever. It's just hire at baseline in eighties mosquitoes. It is in these other diseases but the most important part of that reproduction number is biting rate. which is I say temperature sensitive the other thing that's temperature sensitive is how fast the virus develops and becomes infectious in the mosquito before bites again so you have these two really important things that are temperature sensitive sensitive with reproduction numbers? It's like a tipping point thing right. If the reproduction number is below one you know I show up sort of thing I might do show up at a party and I'm ill with some unusual infectious disease Mr Fund and I infect on average zero point nine or zero point eight new cases right. I can't in fact part of human but if the average ratio of an old case to new cases less than one what happens is you can get a chain of transmission and you can freak people the hell out with something like bird flu that is very likely to kill people it infects but it's going to be <hes> self-limited right once once you have a reproduction number that is greater than one even a little bit like a Bolo is probably one point three or one point five once you're into the realm of <hes> exponential growth which you will have if you reproduction numbers greater than one things can explode in my my personal read of what's been happening in the world over the last decade or two is that you have diseases that. That were near that threshold like Zico like chicken Gunja. We've always had lots of movement of people and lots of goods and you know and and creatures between these these different places but if you push on this parameter like biting rate and also on on time to become transmissible you push on that a little bit by increasing nighttime temperatures which they've had in Brazil I mean we think of Brazil's hot place but there are actually data Brazil's warming to and it's warming at night and that seems to be really important and if you can push that above above that threshold then you go from something that when it's introduced which must have been introduced last five hundred years it just flames out to something that can set up epidemics. You know it's a whole new ballgame and I think that's that's just such a great kind of exemplar of what climate change yeah and do because you know you don't know you've crossed these thresholds till you cross them <hes> and and we we don't really know what other thresholds their heart across that you know as things get warmer and warmer we we may cross he sort of recognized this crossing the thresholds Post Hawk which is part of why this is such a problem will what would that look like <hes> given our current mosquito

Malaria Canada West Nile Brazil South America Fever Dr David Fiszman Jordan Heath Rawlings West Africa New Jersey Delana School Of Public Health Africa University Of Toronto Saharan Africa Ross River Ross Zeka Australia
Mosquitoes Don't Like Skrillex, But Listening To His Music Isn't Enough To Keep Them Away

Ben Maller

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Mosquitoes Don't Like Skrillex, But Listening To His Music Isn't Enough To Keep Them Away

"Electronic music on female, mosquitoes and female mosquitoes are the only ones that bite, and so they tested this on the yellow fever mosquito which is kind of known as one of the most notorious because it spreads yellow fever and. A lot of other diseases. And so they were testing the effects of music on these yellow fever female mosquitoes. And when screw lex was playing the females bit less than when the music was off. And so they said the observation that this type of music can delay a mosquito attack and reduce blood feeding is actually something they're going to continue to study now because they say sound is crucial for the reproduction and survival of many animals, including

Fever LEX
"yellow fever" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:16 min | 2 years ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on KGO 810

"The the infectious disease problems homelessness? We have another problem probably our way in southern California. Which is a is a new mosquito showed up what? Yeah, I'm from the midwest. I hate mosquitoes. Well, we already have West Nile and Ecuadorian encephalitis. And now with all the rain we're gonna have standing water and now with this new mosquito that showed up the carries sort of tropical diseases like like. What's the word that much shoot? What am I thinking of which one? Are we talking like yellow fever Donut? Well, perhaps I haven't looked into that yet. But I'm thinking more dingy dinghy that Johnny Fiat malaria. Nick, danny. Well, no, that's a different studio. So so, yeah, I mean, the point is we've in my thing, I'm exercised by is that we've decided as a political unit in California that we're not biological anymore. We don't need to attend to those things anymore. We don't need to tend to the basic rights of civilizations. Don't bother don't bother and the same thing. You crazy which is kind of the basic needs of living in a certain area. Right. Right. It's so it's so frustrating to me. I just I really get. I get very very upset. But you're eating a chocolate chip cookie right now. Yes. One of your magical devices. I it's you like that. Just a touch crisper though. So that one, but that's like one gram net carbon that chocolate chip cookie. So you can you're you're you're happy you're into that stuff too. You it's been the greatest thing ever for me. What's that? No cardinals. Starch you've cut it out completely having as best. I can. And so again, every body does a little bit. There are gonna be there very soon. We're going to be having genetic testing, the tell us what we should be what kinds of things tweaking that ratio gross. This is one of the reasons diet generally is so frustrating for people are like, you know, is the one size fits all. Right. You're all very different, and we're going to be able to test for that. And then recommend particular dietary programs that are the best for that give given biology. I can't really for me. The no star snowshoe variables as soon as I eat some bread immediately bloat, and and it goes to it goes my middle. And that's the inflammatory part of the problem. And this part has gone way down with me. And I feel great. Yeah. I mean, you look great. So that's so. Yeah. So I just keep going so hard. Yeah. You. No. I mean, it's it's that initial her. So hang on say, I want to focus on something that you just said it's not hard that initial week when you cut out carbs is hard. It wasn't. Well, it has historically. It has been for me. I actually go through like a heroin Trump. Yes. I'll get irritable. Discontent on them, by the way. Yeah. But in this case, I had adequate fat, I really paying attention. And I found hard to maintain. But I had adequate fat and lots of protein. And there was nothing. I just noticed. I was sleeping better and have more energy. Yep. I love avocado. If there is a connection between distillery, not real acidosis and hyperthyroidism. So I am saying take care of that. Okay. Got it. I'll take a look into send text me that direction. So. We have too many things going on all over the place right now. So he you were off on the east coast. I was so do you have any new shows you're announcing no, I was just sort of running around just making having a good time. I love New York City. So we have the weirdest experience. I six eight months ago. I was I was picked up very in the more. I was doing good Morning America, something, and I was driving down the street. And I was looking around. I was enjoying it. And I thought what is this feeling? What what what what? Oh my God. I am in love with this city in love with it. Yeah. It's the weirdest thing. I'm like a romantic feeling of love for that. AM city came up with the oh I love, but I'd never expected to feel it quite that vividly. So so because of that I like spending much time there. I can't. So there you go. Okay. I'm here planning. Don't worry. I know. I know I know the California is still home calmed you down from all the PG. I just I can't get over that. So what are the? I'm always worried about things like pollution. Tell me what you know because listen, but our school of we have a Laguna school of dolphins in southern California. And they just died because the what came through the Santa Ana river because of all the infectious disease material from the homeless encampments you've tied directly back to the homeless encampments doing the autopsies now, but we we knew stuff would wash that Santa river would not be good for sea mammals. And now we have a whole. What did what kind of we'll find out all kinds of stuff? I just heard somebody sent me a note on that saying, hey, did you see this news about what happened the dolphin? And that's because of what washed out into the theory is they tops. He's looking. What is the sense to me? I kept saying that was going to happen. That's that's sad. And fascinating at the same time. They ran into the syringes, which there were many tens of thousands of all infected. But largely infected so what do we do about that? So you have a combination problem right now. So that's the piece I keep saying is like if you do not humanely take care of people that are languishing in our streets and you allow their illnesses to keep them in the street and the symptoms of their illnesses. Prevent you from intervening. If you don't do something like expand gravely disabled expand conservative ships. So these poor families at once their loved ones back and get them back and get free didn't keep them in their homes, and and by the way when they get treated and look back. They're pissed at people for leaving them on the streets. You're literally laying the symptoms of their illness lack of insight paranoia, unwillingness drugs and alcohol, use whatever it might be. You're letting those symptoms be the reason you don't help people from dangerous illness and for a heart attack. And you didn't help them would be considered cruel because it's a brain disease. Somehow, we have entirely different yardstick we use and now because we decided that civilization doesn't need it's basic functional needs like rodent control vector control with fleas. Sanitation. We don't need that anymore. There will be major major. She's really funny that you brought up the fleas thing. Because I I actually thought it went to the vet with my little dog who's really is mostly an indoor dog by detailer for walks outside. And that was like, oh, do you want the flea medication? Yeah. Just keep hearing talk about fleas all the time. Type of thing is unbelievable. Had it, and my my son had norovirus norovirus twice which he got from volatile is feces off the streets of Hollywood. Yeah. Yeah. Yes. You can't just ignore the basic needs of biological ecosystem and expect they're not to be consequences. What's the matter with us, which which I met one of your sons, he he had typhus when he was a kid what talk to him about it. Does he get typhus when he was a kid because typhus is endemic in Southern Cal. That's right. That's right. The foothills. And so when I saw the flea and rat thing explode, I thought oh my God. We're gonna have a typist problem. I knew it. I knew it. Yeah. And then it's I I was in city hall, Los Angeles. And they're like, oh, no. It's a big deal. It's a horrible illness. It is devastating and now because some politicians got it and are saying oh my God. I thought I was going to die. Yeah. You could've thank you for now. Caring about the people L. There you go. But remember again part of our problem at dates back. It is more than fifty years old of we kept people in psychiatric institutions in absolutely inhumane. No, no, no. No. No. Yes. We did. Here's what happened. In nineteen th mids early sixties. Yes, my profession stepped up and said we have a new drug. It's called Thorazine. It's gonna take care of everything. President Kennedy please sign the community mental health act said start getting people out of these hospitals, which were excellent at the time. Let's get the people out of them. They don't need to be house. We can get them back to work and get them to flourish in their life. Great idea wrong. The Thorazine is gonna make people somehow flourish. No. So they started pulling people out sending their community health, which wasn't a bad idea. But they didn't fund the community health mental health services sufficiently now the conditions of the state hospital started deteriorating physicians did not want to work there because it was desperate populations. It was poorly paid it was deteriorating environments, and it started a spiral then where nobody wanted to work there. Then a couple of public kinds of things happen like one flew over the cuckoo's nest and people ran away from them, then so it was a whole series of decays, and then they were finally closed and that was that. It was not one thing. But there are a series of things that happened to an president Carter actually tried funding the community health and really closing down. The he accelerated the closing down of the state of the large right by funded it, and it was President Reagan and the Republican administration who immediately de funded what president Carter had finding because it wasn't working. It wasn't working just to remove the money with nothing to replace it. Right. And then, but they're they're playing at least is my profession as usual. It's sort of messed it up. All right us that really advocated strongly for getting these things dismantle in the first place. And I don't think we advocate a strong enough for the community mental health stuff when it was time to and now here we are. So let's make the Enron. Margaret Seneca is going out of Senator Weiner up in northern California. London breed gets it. She understands it. And she's actually getting housing addressed as well right now. Well, what they found out. There was eighty percent of the people. They offered housing to did not want to. I know that's because of the illnesses if you don't treat the illnesses, of course, they're not going to watch the movie the soloist I saw was on the net. Flicks roster recently, please watch that movie please point. Okay. I know you are literally like, it's a great exploration. It's JD Robert Downey junior. It's a great. It's a guy a Juilliard trained cellist. Oh, I remember this schizophrenia in a few years ago. Yes. But it's a great exploration of this problem. See how challenging it is particularly given the current laws. Interesting. All right. So Dr drew Dr drew today like a million things go on Dr drew dot com is the best seventies there. Yeah. Exactly. Always great to catch up with. You will hear you at one o'clock. Well, awesome. Dr your thank you on McCarthy's cookies. Let me deal coming up in just a moment. We're going to talk to Sarah Ferguson's. She's a South African Open water endurance swimmer on a new global campaign called swim against plastic. That's next four one five eight hundred eighty eight ten Ethan Bearman on K G O eight ten..

California typhus Johnny Fiat West Nile cardinals New York City hyperthyroidism Dr drew Dr president Robert Downey Santa Ana river Sarah Ferguson Nick President Kennedy city hall heroin Enron norovirus America
Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 3 years ago

Human Diet Drugs Kill Mosquitoes' Appetite Too

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin all believe it or not mosquitoes don't bite out of spite female mosquitoes of the species agent tie. Need the nutrients present in your plasma to ensure the proper development of their eggs? Then though there I may seem on quench people. The ladies actually, take time to savor your blood once they've sip their fill after female bites she'll double her body weight. And then she'll actually completely lose interest in biting people for several days. Laura Duval postdoctoral researcher at the Rockefeller University in New York City, the insects post-prandial recovery phase may divall in her colleagues wonder, whether they could essentially trick mosquitoes into thinking already eaten divall works in the lab of Leslie Voss hall who studies genetics neuro science and behavior. Here's fossil our idea with that maybe the same drugs that would turn off human appetite might actually. Work to turn off mosquito. Appetite turns out that when the Rockefeller researchers fed mosquitoes a drug that's used to treat people for obesity. The insects were indeed less interested in hunting for their next human meal ticket. But the problem was that we needed to figure out how the human diet drugs were actually working in the mosquito. So the isolated the receptor protein with which these diet drugs interact, the receptor, which they dubbed NPR L are seven looks a lot like the receptors that regulate hunger and people the researchers knew they had the right receptor. Because when they knocked it out in some mosquitoes, the drugs, no longer dampen, the insects appetite a finding they describe in the journal cell. In fact, the mutant mosquitoes were all around insatiable said the are seven mutants behaviorally strangely. Even after they take a huge blood meal. They remained thirsty for human blood next divall says they'd like to explore exactly how these drugs act to curb. Females bloodlust does she become less sensitive to the clues teller that humanist nearby? Or is this more like smelling a hamburger app you've already eaten three either way the approach could provide a novel method to limit the spread of diseases that are transmitted by mosquito bite like Dunga and yellow fever and give us a new way to tell mosquitoes to buzz off. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans, sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

Karen Hopkin Rockefeller University Leslie Voss Hall Obesity Postdoctoral Researcher Laura Duval New York City NPR Fever Sixty Seconds
Diet drugs could halt mosquitoes' blood-sucking behavior, study says

Science Friday

11:33 min | 3 years ago

Diet drugs could halt mosquitoes' blood-sucking behavior, study says

"But one lab at the university Rockefeller had another idea. What have we just could convince female mosquitoes, the problematic ones that they're just not hungry enough to bite us in the first place? What if we can put them on a diet here to talk about this more is Dr Leslie Vassall, professor of neurobiology at the Rockefeller University. And a Howard Hughes Medical institute investigator in New York, New York, also welcome to science Friday. Thanks for being here. Thanks. I'm so excited. So why don't you start by telling us how often female mosquitoes actually bite because it feels like the same? Mosquito comes back. Bites me all the time. So first of all they love us. They have to fill up on your blood and as soon as they failed up and doubled their body weight. They actually will go into seclusion for four days. So the female that's just fitting you you won't see her again for the next four days. Okay. So they bite and they go away for a while. Why are they so attracted us in the first place, you you, you say they they like feasting on our blood y. They just love how we smell. So that the the mosquitoes that spread these diseases are they have specialized on human. So they're super sensitive to our body odor. Every time we exhale we excite them with our carbon dioxide in our brass they loved it were warm-blooded, but basically animals specialize on humans, and that's why they're so dangerous in spreading these diseases among humans, so you decided to see how they would react to human diet drugs. Explain why. Well, we were really struck by this. Phenomenon that they will lose her appetite for four days after taking a blood meal. So our idea was how can we get them to do that without feeding on blood? And so we know a little bit about how appetite works across the tree of life. And so one day we thought why don't we just got some diet drugs and see if we can disrupt the appetite of mosquitoes and that worked immediately this was five years ago and just over the course of the week we were able to turn off mosquito attraction to humans just with a little dose of this drug. Well, so it really worked very quickly. It did. And then it took a five years to figure out how how it was working. And then how how to get drugs that were specific just to insects and not and not people. So why drugs that are specific to insects and not people if if it works to give them human die drugs wanna just feed them human diet drugs. Well, I mean, I think people always worry if you have a bunch of mosquitoes flying around with with drugs that are nonspecific it would it would just be more elegant strategy to get to get drugs that really are just working really effectively on things like let's say ticks and malaria, mosquitoes and mosquito so just want we wanted to to make it the most selective possible drug in. So how did you make the selection? How did you find something that works specifically the mosquito brain? So this was a huge looking for a needle in a haystack exercise. So my whole stuck lower divall looked individually at two hundred sixty five thousand compounds and of though she found six that actually works on a ski. Oh, and those drums do not work on the human version of of the same targets so five years later, we we finally made it to the end of the journey. Do what do we know about how mosquitoes feel hunger? You say that when they have a blood meal they go away for a couple of days. Do we know anything about how they actually experience hunger? So it's it's this interplay between their need for protein. So they need blood to be able to get protein to produce eggs. And so we don't exactly know what's happening in their brains. But there's something about taking in this huge protein meal that leashes a huge series of physiological events that are really understood where the the the basically, the gut communicates to the brain. I am full. And so we think that our drugs hijack that conversation between what God and the brain. And and that's why are drugs are turning off appetite. So you got these drugs, they work they're turning off the appetite is the idea that this would eventually kill the mosquito that they would die of hunger or you just trying to deprive them of that one house the supposed to work. So our jobs are not forever. So we don't kill appetite forever. So they lasts for two or three days. And then when the drugs wear off they will go back and either come back to our traps and drink more. Of our drug or they will find you invite you. But where we think this is an innovative way to control disease vectors is that anytime you have a mosquito take two or three days from biting. That's some number of people who are not going to be bitten by infected mosquitoes. So we don't these drugs are not gonna kill mosquitoes. They're not gonna radical mosquitoes. They will just take a population that will take a break from biting people. You mentioned having them come back to to get more of this stuff. How are you dispersing this? How would this work is a practical solution getting this diet drug to mosquitoes? That's the really key question. So we need them to drink. It just like when you take pills you need to take it into your mouth. We need the mosquitoes to drink it. And so the plan is working off of existing technology to lure mosquitoes to traps us every day to to figure out what the epidemiology of infected mosquitoes as and we lured them in and then waiting for them. There is a Cup of our drug mixed into. This elixir that they love to drink which is basically salty water with ATP. And so that the land on the trap. They love the taste of that stuff. And they'll take the drug, and then they will go away for two or three days and things that they're full of blood. We're talking about mosquito science here. And I know Dr Voss all the others have been looking at ways to just eradicate mosquitoes altogether. To edit them out of existence or find ways to just get rid of the species do wanna just try that why don't you try to get rid of mosquitos altogether? What do you see is the consequence there? So the whole community the whole mosquito communities working really hard on lots of ideas to deal with this very old and very complicated problem, and the ratification team is doing amazing work. I think that it will be difficult to eradicate all of the different species that are spreading diseases. Those approaches will have an impact what I'm a believer in integrating multiple different approaches. So vaccines team affair? Ps and repellents and then our strategy of behavioral appetite control. So I always get a little bit worried about a radical getting species on earth because we do have a web of life. And and I don't know what will happen if we did succeed in killing all mosquitos. I'd rather not do the experiments. Have you have you thought a lot about the unintended consequences of the work that you're doing now putting them on a diet and having the not feed the same way, what are the potential consequences there? So we don't know what it's a good point. We don't know about the potential consequences are, but again, we're not killing them. It's a temporary effect. So it may have some small local effects on populations. But the main benefit is that there will be fewer female mosquitoes flying around and biting people. What are the things we need to be thinking about to really solve the mosquito disease problem, not just mosquitoes, but all the diseases they carry mean, what are the what are the public health needs here in the United States and elsewhere around the world that we might need to we need to avail ourselves. To help to solve this. Big problem. And it is a huge huge problem as long as there's been humans. There's there's been mosquitoes spreading diseases to them. And so, you know, there's a lot of areas the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the national institutes of health are putting huge amounts of money into making vaccines improving repellents bednets, the GMO approach our behavioral control, all of these different technologies. Need to be brought to bear. Because we have not the mosquito wins every time the mosquito keeps winning and so I don't think that there's any one approach that will put humans into a win earlier. I talked about deep turning seventy five this year. This is thought of as a repellent. What do we know about how these repellents actually work a mosquitoes? What's remarkable is that scientists cannot agree on how repellents work? So you have in your day to day experience. You know, that deep would off works really, well, so insect repellents work incredibly, well, there's still a lot of discussion in scientific circles about how they work and the work from my lab, and many others is trying to figure out how does it work. And then once we know how it works. We could perhaps improve on it and come up with repellents that are longer lasting and not as nasty to put on the skin. But believe it or not it's still a huge scientific controversy seventy five years later while so seventy five years, we know that it works. But we don't know exactly why works. I can only imagine that if you rebel to crack that code. You might be able to come up with a repellent that really really works. That is the dream exactly. That is the dream. And it's been, you know, science sometimes it's tricky this has been a long it's been a long relative figure out how it works and many labs. They're still working on it. So there's repelling mosquitoes were still trying to solve a seventy five year long. Mystery about that, there's you know, trying to a radical them something that obviously has its own unintended consequences, potentially. Are there? Other ideas about manipulating mosquito behavior other than what we've been talking about, you know, trying to put them on a diet. How else might we manipulate the way they just they live in go feed? You know, the the GMO approach can be used to to kill mosquitoes. There's also people thinking about GMO purchased just to change the behavior of the mosquitoes like a science fiction cool idea could remake mosquitoes that lose interest in people and really specialize on on animals that that would be another way of using modern crisper technology to to change mosquito behavior. But again, these are these are such incredibly complicated public health problems that that anybody that has an idea that would be willing to try it out. I think we would be all ears. Some of the mosquito borne illnesses. We're talking about the cause these gigantic public health problems like malaria, are they more difficult to prevent it manage than things like the flu. Such a complicated question. I mean because all of these diseases are so different all of these different areas. People are trying to raise vaccines and effective vaccine exists for yellow fever and yellow fever is very rarely seen. So I think it depends on on which critter you're talking about malaria. It's been extremely difficult in every way to to conquer because it's been very difficult to get a vaccine. But but each of these diseases has its own unique problems and flew the problem and all of the mosquito diseases are a big problem, but we've we've gotten rid of malaria in the United States. It can be done. It can be done, and that was a huge coordinated public health effort that only succeeded in nineteen sixty a lot of people think that malaria is not relevant to the US but through most of the twentieth century people in the southern US were being sick and by malaria. So it can't be done you need to have a you need to invest heavily in in in public health infrastructure. And and many other infrastructure issues. But we are a high resource country. So it's it's much easier to pull off in a hurry source country. Well, thank you for keeping on this. Mosquito beat for us, Dr Leslie Vassall, professor of neurobiology at the Rockefeller University here in New York City. Thank you so much.

Malaria United States New York City Rockefeller University Dr Leslie Vassall Professor Howard Hughes Medical Institut Fever Investigator Dr Voss Bill Melinda Gates Foundation Five Years Three Days Four Days Seventy Five Years Seventy Five Year One Day
"yellow fever" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:10 min | 3 years ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Condition. Deteriorated blood tests showed my liver was being affected, and I was admitted to hospital under the care of the leading infectious diseases specialist despite all the tests and all the medication. The doctors discovered not kill his fever. But then it got worse. He said I'm gonna fly with angel style. My husband's room was on the fifteenth floor of the building that was a big window. So I grabbed my mobile phone. I came on the house phone, and I started texting this friend allows begging her to call the warden Asmus check. They ran into his found him on the windowsill. It's nice seven years since he left hospital and Malcolm joins me now. Hello, Malcolm, clique's, just just to set the scene. Why did you get the yellow fever job in the first place? I was supposed to go to west Africa to Ivory Coast to do film serious films for UNICEF about child soldiers and get into the country. I needed to have yellow fever vaccine and a certificate to prove it as things unraveled appoints. You thought you were Jesus then you thought you were the devil and the messiah you're really tormented by your condition of what point did you realize that something is not just wrong, but something's very wrong. It wasn't clear to me personally immediately. The things were wrong because I was diluted. I was going crazy. And I started going mad fairly she'll be off. I had the vaccine I started to hallucinate my kindle e-readers at Flint across the room. And then. I don't know how I came across this. But I thought I started to have supernatural powers. And then I thought my dead friends. We're getting in touch with me. It wasn't until I was. Receive anti psychotic medication when I was in a psychiatric hospital that I gradually came to recognize that that was not the truth. But the problem was what happened was in. My view the yellow fever vaccine unhinged. The anchors that kept my sanity in touch, and once those anchors had gone, my brain took off on a journey of its own which is just extraordinary and I flipped from mania to depression. And it was the most awful experience the for. Almost almost fifteen months. What's what's the latest with the yellow fever vaccination? What what are the manufacturers? What are they saying about about this? They have completely denied any ability whatsoever. Insists that I went model one myself. I say that this is purely incidence, but the doctors have treated me always through. It's really absolutely spot on the were sent crazy by this yellow fever vaccine during your journey. What was the lowest point that you reached the worst point was when I go to Denmark. We I lost my job. I lost absolutely everything in Athens because I couldn't work, and I was a freelance journalist and so my wife took his country Denmark to try to get the kid. I mean, fortunately, the psychiatrists in Denmark were able to get me. So after about eight months of the most intense efforts, and after civil relapses indeed thinking that I was the devil thinking, I was going to burn. I was going to be the most appalling person. In the universe for eternity was just devastating to me. And it took quite a lot of persuasion to convince me ultimately that I was not believing that I was the devil led me to try to commit suicide on New Year's Eve. In two thousand eleven because I was hearing voices say that the world was going to end of the stroke of midnight. And I had it within my power to be able to save the world, and therefore my family if I if I would commit suicide. So I went about it. But some stuff came in just in time. I mean, I saw that on the movie I watched the the entire thing yesterday on its parts of it are difficult to watch last time you come out of hospital was seven years ago in two thousand ten. Is that or do you fear? Another relapse. No. I managed to wean myself all of the end of all of the anti psychotic medication. I was given a clean Bill of health bonsai contras in two thousand fourteen I have not had any twinges at all since for example. I've been back to the grade side of one of my friends who I thought was instructing me how to become the summer, and I didn't get any of the sort of the impulses that I was getting when I was insane. I don't believe that. There is anything that's of Samuel. Edge. All that. I have to say that I am very cautious about where I go. For example. I don't. Promise to my wife that I wouldn't get him Africa because I would have to take anti malarial treatment and some of the anti malarial treatments do sometimes of the side effects of of psychosis. And so I can't really whisk that which is a source of great distress to be that. I can't go there. But I'm grateful that I fully recovered, and I'm not gonna do anything that's going to jeopardize my health. The most seriously upset my family because the thing about mental illnesses that it's bad for the person who suffering it, but there's a double trauma for the family, you have to witness it, and you have to endure all the consequences of that. And that is a living legacy for my wife. My son how has this affected your wife and son because you were convinced that your son was the messiah chosen because he has three passports British Danish and American, and I thought this was interesting because you said that Britain Denmark and America have the values that God wants to see an earth. I'm that's the reason he put your son on the planet to save. Save the world. So when I see that it makes me laugh because these days because you have to have a sense of humor about six because if. To deeply would really upset me. But the the problem for my wife is she's always looking to make sure that there is news changing my behavior. She says in the film. She's changed completely. She's donating to have the joy of looking food anymore. She used to be this extraordinarily feisty woman who never worried about anything. But she does get more concerned that life is going to fall off a cliff nester. My son go into the kind of personal problems that he has as a result because he's nineteen years old, and it's up to him to be able to work that out. But if you listen to the song ends our film elegantly talks about the kind of problems that he's got he talks about nightmares that hold him all the time. And so what I'm really angry about what happened to me is the legacy of my son in particular because his childhood was truly snatched away from him. When he saw what happened to me. And he's got a bit of a struggle to rebuild his life. I'm sure I'm sure he'll get through that. I mean, let's let's have a quick listen to a clip of the song. Lucas province nightmares. It's very dark lyrics. How's life? Obviously has changed. Have your priorities changed since? Then. Well, I'll be.

fever Malcolm Denmark UNICEF Asmus west Africa Ivory Coast Flint Lucas relapse Athens Africa America Britain seven years fifteen months
"yellow fever" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

06:50 min | 3 years ago

"yellow fever" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"With Dr Melissa bourgeoisie. Must tell me what dogs are more likely to get dog flu and just like humans. I'm based in Minnesota. We see tons of flu in humans during the winter. Is there a seasonal affect where I should worry about taking my dog to the dog park during the winter versus the spring, or when are we actually seeing this dog flu is a little bit different than people people flew tends to have a very seasonal distribution based on a number of environmental factors as well. As when the viruses recombine in come out of southeast Asia in dogs the flu virus that circulating here h three into we're tending to see it year round. Now that being said dogs that are at risk for it or those dogs that are going to interact with each other. So you know, if you are doing any boarding or you're going to dog park possibly. More common in the summer months based on people's travel and the nicer weather outside, especially if you live in north you may see more cases in in the summer season in those situations. Just because the dogs are being more social. All right. So how do we actually prevent this? Yes. So the best way to prevent dog. Flu is one vaccinate. It is extremely important to get any dogs that might have social interactions vaccinated. So if you bring your dog to the groomer, if you bring your dog, the dog part if you ever board your dog or go to a doggy daycare, or even if you go for a walk in the neighborhood, or let's say you live in a city and you use the elevator. Where other dogs might also use the elevator. Basically if your dog is exposed to other dogs or areas where other dogs are it should be vaccinated. Now, the vaccine it's what we call the killed virus vaccine. So what that means is. Is the dog actually needs to dose is two to four weeks apart in order for immunity to form. So if you bring your dog into the clinic, and it gets vaccinated for dog, flu even mind their tat. I does. And then you need to go back to two four weeks later, richer veterinarian will tell you to get that booster ghosts. Now. The thing about vaccines is that they are not a treatment measure, right? So once an animal or a human has a disease giving them a vaccine isn't gonna help that current infection. So you really need to start vaccinating dogs before you see flu in your area. So that your dog has time to build its immune system. So that when flu does come to your area, it can respond accordingly. So that is such an important point. I'm going to reiterate at one more time prior dog owners out there even my own dog who I bring to the hospital whenever I'm working is back. Needed for the dog flu vaccine, and the main reason why is because if all of a sudden, you have an outbreak in your area, and you decide to go to your Canarian because you want to protect your dog, especially if they go to doggy daycare or dog parks or they had any nose to nose contact exposure to other pets, even if you get vaccinated with the first vaccine remember your dog doesn't actually mount a protective response. In other words, are Munis needs time to respond to the second back scene. And that's why I always say you don't want to wait until the outbreak happens in your area. You want to make sure your dog is protected before that even happens because it can take several weeks to mount that response. And again, really important that your dog get the two vaccines at needs at second booster two to four weeks later in order to protect it. So make sure to talk to your veterinarian about this now. Most in terms of dog flu we always hear about humans when they get the flu some people actually dying from it. What do we have to know about when it comes to dog flu you already said? It's really infectious. But is my dog going to die from this? What do I need to know? Yes. So the majority of cases of dog flu will be designs that we talked about before the coughing the nose with I discharge lather g anorexia things like that. And with supportive care. They can usually recover. Pretty. Wow. Now, there are certain dogs a subset of dogs. And we don't have the exact numbers, but especially in the unvaccinated dog population that when they're exposed to flu we'll get more severe disease, and what does that consist of that consists of things like pneumonia? So you might notice that your dog is having difficulty breathing. It's ribcage is sort of moving in and out either more quickly or with more effort in sometimes it can even progress to more severe systemic signs as well as death. So Luke can actually cause death in dogs, which is why it is really important. I want to vaccinate dogs before they encounter the flu virus our great information to other question. I had is if my dog dog flu CHAI actually get it from my dog or vice versa. What if I get sick? And I get the flu what are the risks that it's actually going to spread to my dog or my cat. Right. So there is a good amount of confusion as far as that goes because dog flew flew that we are seeing circulating throughout the United States is called h three n two and there are h three n two flu viruses in people as well. But at this point there have been no documented cases of dog to human transmission of dog Flynn. So in other words, people do not get the dog version of three and two. Now that being said there are actual cases of cats getting the h three and two virus from dogs. So you are not at risk or h. Three and two from dogs by your cats. Maybe that's so scary. Because every day we hear more and more about different types of influenza, whether or not it's in birds or in pigs, and I always tell people if they haven't seen the movie contagion, you realize how infectious influenza can be. Well, Dr bourgeois. Thank you so much for educating our pet owners today on dog flu. And again, we really appreciate you giving us the signs to look for. So again, if your dog showing signs of sneezing green or yellow discharge from the eyes are knows they're coughing. They feel warm to the touch because they a fever though, lethargic. They don't want to eat, please, get your vetinarian right away. We do want to do some blood work. We do wanna test to make sure it's not dog flu or some other type of infectious disease. We may even want to do chest x rays. These me no up to twenty percent of dogs can get a pneumonia in their lungs from this. And thankfully, there's.

Flu flu vaccine southeast Asia Dr Melissa bourgeoisie pneumonia Minnesota fever United States Dr bourgeois Luke Flynn four weeks twenty percent two four weeks
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"Has arrived in Israel as NPR's. Daniel estrin reports from Jerusalem Day is being criticized for his human rights record and the comment he made about the holocaust Detaille in Israel on a four day visit with senior government ministers, he's meeting as Rayleigh. Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu visiting to holocaust memorials and reportedly viewing and Isreaeli weapons display Israeli human rights activists are protesting his visit in two thousand sixteen compared himself to Hitler in describing his war on drugs and later apologized. Human Rights Watch says, do taste forces have killed thousands in his drug crackdown. Israel's foreign ministry declined comment on the criticism. Overdue taste, visit. Israel says the two countries have robust cooperation on security and combating terrorism. Daniel estrin NPR news Jerusalem,

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