17 Burst results for "Yele Shen"

"yele shen" Discussed on Fight Boyz: A Pro-Wrestling Podcast

Fight Boyz: A Pro-Wrestling Podcast

02:59 min | Last month

"yele shen" Discussed on Fight Boyz: A Pro-Wrestling Podcast

"Also, pointed this out. All the day had nickelodeon inspired gear tonight. It was fucking round of so good in fact, the back of biggies. Insurance vest said all that. So now we get a promo with Jay. Who's basically like Roman what is the what the stakes of our match? What are the? What's the stipulation of this hell in a cell match which I knew that they were talking about increased consequences increased stakes no one said anything about there being some new weird stipulation. Yeah. This kind of. Hit Weird place because you pointed out, it is already Helena sell. More. Hold on, we'll get into it because I Paul Heyman interrupts and Paul Heyman's basically like I know Romans your family but he will murder you like I always trying to be nice but you will die you're going to die. We did get into Paul. Heyman Asmar territory real quick. The then got a recap of the beatdown clash of champions. We come back and Roman is just tempt back wearing a polo shirt with two naked baby statues behind him and fuck Roman reigns is the best Roman reigns. fucking rules Noah could tell me otherwise he killed that Promo because it was it was vicious and it was also natural, which is something that face Roman reigns could never do. Yes. So he reveals that it's not just going to be a hell sell. It's going to be an I quit match inside hell in a cell, which you and I both were like. Okay That's a cool thing. But you you did I will give you price. You brought up why this is a good idea yeah, exactly. Because this is. As you mentioned last episode of Fight Boys. Jay Never said that Roman was the tribal chief he never gave ended that that was what Roman wanted before. He beaded he beats him. Roman wanted before he. I'm the. Out Ahead of the fuck. makes. It makes sense that Roman wants this at least because that is if Jay says, he quits the night is his acknowledgement that Roman is the head of the table in the yard that he owns now and then he did say if you do quit, there will be consequences. So who knows what that is? Then Dismissed from the family then we come back from the fucking probably right. He's like you're no longer someone because of this, you're now you're now paying. He Forces Jay to get all of his tribal tattoos removed the ZIP Yele Shen. Up. Next. We get our second round of draft picks..

Roman Jay Paul Heyman Heyman Asmar nickelodeon murder Noah
"yele shen" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"yele shen" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"You'll tell me joining us on the line from her offices in Toronto Canada is Kim Addis, welcome to the program. Hello. And thank you for having me on. I'm excited about this call. Absolutely. So can you and I work together? We, we do some podcasting. You are widely podcast did as a life and business coach. But you created something that really stands apart in the marketplace changing our frame of mind. I know that from no, you can press a button and ask you what's it all about Alfie? And you can really give us a good top level view of what frame of mind coaching is how it works and why it works, please. Coaching first of all sign for the highly driven talk. Yele Shen, really, we work with those people who are very serious about accomplishing eagles, and really wanna live the life of extraordinary passion, enlightenment and engagement. So we're looking for that client person, someone who has a lot to achieve, so that's for starters, second of all friendly, coaching based on the premise that you're thinking is really the single most important driver of your success. And so, whatever you feel frustrated unhappy, impatient. Whenever you feel like you're unable to reach your goals for one reason, or another typically it relates to the way, you're thinking about that particular subject. So family coaching attempts to really understand how you're thinking is leading to the outcomes. You're getting those causative -ly negatively what we do is always begin with a very simple ten week program. There's a call winter week every close your courted. Record the call so that our clients can really hear themselves talk. They can hear the words they use the stories they have and start to understand the patterns of their thinking, and how they're thinking is affecting them. And then every single day for the duration of the coaching periods. The actor coins to journal in an online journal so that our, our coach can really pick up the patterns of people thinking and, and show our clients how they're thinking is leading the outcomes are getting Kim the power or the engine behind a lot of this technology that you co create a do I have that, right? Tell us a little bit about the journal engine and how that works. Journal engine is a pizza software, where our clients ternal. So every single day for the duration of their coaching, they get to journal, and that how it works is that's beginning of every week. They get a journaling question or front. And they journal about that question. The journal their coach agrees response to the question on a daily basis that she's a sauce wears a white label product that we license out to other coaches beakers trainers membership groups corporations, etcetera for their own development journaling platform etcetera. So really there's two businesses in one one is coaching division and what is software division visiting with Kim Atta. She's the founder of frame of mind coaching up Toronto, and their triple W dot frame of mind, coaching dot com for more information. So we've covered the technology side of, of sort of the world that you're working, you also have a team of coaches that work with you. Tell us a little bit about how, how. How they come to work with you. And what qualifications they need? And you know, kind of what that ecosystem looks like. So are is not ordinary coaching where we hold people accountable, and we watch what they do and help and incremental steps in order to reach their goals. That's not what we do really, really focused on. Way that people think and their thought processes and how their thoughts please them to their goals in the there come. And so when we coach people it becomes a very intimate, and intense experience and are poised experienced dramatic transformation as a result. So to answer your question every single one of our toge is has been coached in the frame mind, coaching methods and after they've been coached. They come back. They say man that was incredible. How do I become a coach and that's one training begins? And through a rigorous training process usually takes about a year. It's, it's also pretty intense, but our standards are extremely high. And here's what I'm looking for. I'm looking for my coaches to deliver as powerful coaching as I do. And that's what we create. Kim from working with you. The power of journaling, and what is what is possible to impact from observing. Our own thoughts is absolutely profound. I mean, I don't necessarily have a question here, but just sharing with our audience that we rarely. Observe our own thought processes. And we rarely observe how our thought processes inform our belief system. And what we believe leads to how we feel and so I've learned tremendous amount working with Kim. We have a podcast product that we generate and of course, you're doing your own podcasting as well. Can tell us about where you're podcasting today and we're folks can find you? Yeah, that's place. I is failing my coaching dot com. There's a product. They've David liar building together called on the central's where you can journal every day, and then listen to podcasts on a one month basis and actually send in your journal to coach for review. But I'll tell you something, you know, you asked about the power of journaling and I'm gonna give your listeners that quickest sinement if that's okay with you. Brilliant. So whoever's listening, grab a piece of paper and a pen and write these three questions down question. Number one, what do you really, really want and not what somebody else wants for you? But what you really, really want question. Number two, is why do you want it, why it's important to you in which kids, you never had it and question number three is what's stopping leaf? And having what I really, really want right now. That's a really phenomenal starting point. Getting at your thinking process and understanding how you're thinking is getting in the way of your success? Now for those of you who actually do this exercise, I'm gonna make you an incredible author, which is to send me those journal, that's journaling exercise send it to me. And I will connect you with one of our coaches who will review with you in.

Kim Toronto Kim Addis Kim Atta Yele Shen Canada Alfie founder David one month ten week
"yele shen" Discussed on iMore

iMore

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"yele shen" Discussed on iMore

"Dot org a win. Here. We go. Hearing. So from the verge of will put this link to Senator linked this, please entreat now, I must have. We have a rink in the meanwhile, you can use you can read the internet archive's version of fix it. Simpson's galaxy full tear down right here. So they linked to just web archive version of it. Okay. I just popped it into our chat. And I'll make sure to include it in our show notes that others Rita too. Still. Yeah. At your leisure, re re the tear down because it actually is very fascinating. Again, to me what I from it knowing that there was of Asli a issue with the screen. I just was just just so intrigued by how well the rest of the phone was made. So. You know, when you're talking about spending two thousand dollars a phone you want that to be solid as a rock. And I think that a lot for the most part, it's solid rock except for the screen issue. So you're pretty good. I gave it a two of ten for repairability. I have to say, I think the iphone get something like that too. And the the the the Samsung phone is like they want that to be like unrepaired will. And it's a two thousand dollar phone. You know, they won it wanna protect that thing as much as they can an iphone still have just a terrible repair rating. So. If we had to all bet on when we get to see the foldable phone is it never is going to be in like, six months. Are we talking a year? What would everyone put their money on do? You mean a photo phone or demean Samsung's full Samsung because while we still coming McVay still have released their phone. It's still on the same. Dateline? So they have not changed anything they feel I guess relatively after this cautionary tale, they feel relatively safe that because now everyone's going to be looking at this phone, or you know, every little bit of what could happen to it. So yeah. For some some when do you think it will be a released? I'm gonna say. I'm going to save first quarter two thousand twenty. First quarter, so January February March earning like that I'm gonna I'm gonna stay March like our locate March twenty twenty Megan I'm gonna say. I'm gonna say March twenty twenty one. Fhu. And and I'm going to go all in here. I think that we're gonna see it being released in six months, you think before the end of twenty nineteen we're gonna see it on. I think that I think that that is because that they will spend a lot of resources because they have to save face end who always going to be coming out with their phone. And I think it's just the on your face is gonna make you really driven to wanna see if you can fix it. And I think that like the problems are solvable. But I think that you're right. They might need to redesign having the hinge on where the plastic actually is folding might create too much. They might who always doing it the opposite way. Right. So they're inside out. So anyway, I'm gonna you know, different in I say, six months. All right. So we're gonna have to come back to this win. It does come out rises the hundred number. Numbers. So that they can what was our predictions. Right. Our our is about I've had a wonderful time. Chatting with you ladies. It was really great. I think we should do. This more often kick the boys out everyone just to really talk about tech instead of just talking about boy STA. So mega marooning Estepona. Find you on the internet where can they find you? I'm Meghan Rooney on Twitter macaroni on Instagram Annan twits. I I hope I always today on Tuesdays. So you can find me there, and I host newsweekly on Thursdays. And then do an interview show that Leo and Jason Powell, and that's on Fridays. I do that about once a month. That's Coltrane Yele Shen. Very much George ago, where do you? So I'm still on Twitter though. I don't tweet anymore. Kind of getting a yeah. Not trying not to be a part of the social problem with that. But you can still kind of check me out a met Georgia underscored DAL if you're dealing with anxiety or depression or sleep issues or conflict resolution, you checkout, anxiety, dash dot com. Excellence..

Samsung Twitter internet archive Meghan Rooney Senator George Coltrane Yele Shen Simpson Rita Megan McVay Georgia Leo Jason Powell six months two thousand dollars two thousand dollar
"yele shen" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"yele shen" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Says she hopes it doesn't come to that. As of right now. We don't have anybody. That's not adhering to the quarantine orders in regards to the number of actual. Easels cases. She says five LA county residents are infected four of those are linked to one another and an additional five people with the virus have traveled through LAX Cooper, Rummell KNX, ten seventy NewsRadio environmentalist raising concerns about the Trump administration's plan to open up more than one million acres of land in California to oil drilling and fracking, the Trump administration. Just doesn't seem to the fracking is a big deal at all clearly quit is senior attorney at the center for biological diversity. It doesn't seem to be paying attention to the no-one healthy pets air quality impacts climate change impacts as well as the risks to grab what a race horses and the risk of earthquakes the center is among the groups that sued the interior department halt leasing efforts under the Obama administration this resulted in a five year moratorium on leasing federal lands in California to Galveston oil, developers the western energy alliance which represents oil and gas companies is applauding the plan. That would end the moratorium alliance president Kathleen gamma points out the Lance identified in the plan were affirmed under the OBE. Obama administration as appropriate for carefully controlled development. Guess development on land. It's regulated comes with that Yele Shen representatives protected mild life in the area. Other sounds protective wealth if the Trump administration moves ahead with the plan. Lakewood says litigation is always an option. Kloof skew KNX ten seventy NewsRadio one day after entering the presidential race. Joe Biden sparred with Donald Trump over who has the energy to be president could be a factor in the twenty twenty presidential race. After President Trump suggested former vice president Joe Biden was past his prime Biden responded on the view I can demonstrate not only with ages come wisdom and experience that can make things a lot better. Right. And so, but look that's for you all decide not for me to decide before heading to Indiana. Mr. Trump said he is a young vibrant, man. And he doesn't know about Joe. I would never.

President Trump Trump administration Joe Biden president Obama California vice president Yele Shen LA county senior attorney Kathleen gamma Indiana KNX Lakewood Cooper one million acres
"yele shen" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"yele shen" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Festival. It's going to be screened on Saturday at the Garfield park conservatory in in Garfield park and met Wexler, one of the directors of the film will be there for a and he's in studio tonight. We're talking about this film that really looks at the local food movement. But also explores the history of industrial agriculture, and there's a point where there's talk in in the middle of the middle of the twentieth century where there was a need for efficiency and farming. And that's what that really was the push this officiency, we're going to mass produce everything from grain to meet to dairy, whatever it might be. But we need more and more to feed their talked about food, insecurity and really the by product was rural America. And if anyone is living in listening in the suburbs. Or maybe in the city, you may have the start of the the red barn and what rule. Erica is today. And the film looks at industrial agriculture and paints entirely different pitcher. Yeah. I mean, you know, what's going on in Berle America right now is economic colonization. That's really what's going on Wall Street Journal article pointed out a five-year decline in the rope Yele Shen and that role America's leading poverty statistics. So it's not it's it's not a pleasant place to live anymore, and you go to farm like the mardi Travis farm, Spence farm, and it's beautiful, but outside of that it's a really hostile place, and it it's it's difficult for someone who's young like myself who would love to move out to the country one day to find a place where I would feel that I'm safe where I can grow food for myself where I wouldn't feel like my rights may be taken away from me from my industrial farming. Neighbors polluting my water polluting my air or making it a hostile environment for me to live. There was so much made of of bailouts with the tariffs. And we saw with the with some of the things that just happened with the Trump administration the continuing fight with China. But now, I think about after watching your film and better understanding agriculture that the bail out may not have been for mom and pop on their local farm, but really we're talking about a bail out for these industrial agriculture providers who really are working in mass production. Yeah. I mean, they are technically family farms. They are, but they are very large companies. They're people who are farming thousands and thousands of acres. It's very different from small farms like mardi Travis. And the thing is that when you have a global food Connie, and you will have massive massive collapses of your food system where you need to bail out in tire industry, and the government is basically build out the dairy industry to they're buying up all the cheese because the dairy industry can't sell it the dairy industries in twenty five year decline, something like that. So and they're counting on the government to help them get out of it. So if you think about how we transition to better food system, you could talk about spreading people out on the land rebuilding role America at one point in time in the nineteen thirties. Twenty five percent of the population in the US lived on over six million farms. We have less than two million five now less than two percent of our population lives on them. And some studies show that less than two hundred thousand people actually contribute to our food system. Today. There's there's something about it too. When we talk about climate change. And we talk about how farming and agriculture plays a role in this that there needs to be a system change, you kind of mentioned before the break that everyone needs to kind of embrace the idea that they're still money that could be made. But the way we do farming now in the systems now, and the waste that that obviously is going down river. Just to general that has to change. And are we seeing the farm farming community the the agriculture communities step up to the plate on this kind of stuff? Are they are they saying we recognized that the impact having on the planet or like many other industries are they saying, you know, what we're just going to keep doing this still someone says we can't and then we'll fight to the dickens still. We can't right now. We're seeing deregulation. That's what we're seeing slipped into the two thousand eighteen or two thousand seventeen US budget was was a Bill that said that you cannot complain about from large concentrated animal feeding operations anymore. So that's what they do. They realize agriculture is not on the radar of people. There has not been a US presidential debate about agriculture since nineteen sixties. That's a huge problem right now, we have twenty candidates who are all in the state of Iowa and many of them have participated in conversations about changing our food system. But if that conversation dies in Iowa, and it doesn't move on to other states. Then nothing is accomplished. And we're back to where we were. And we need to really talk about. How do we rebuild a rural America? How do we make it possible for young people to go out there? I talked to one farmer who contributes a lot to the Chicago community is Greg gun Thorpe. And he has the second largest pastor chicken farm in the tire country. And he was telling me that in his area they had a referendum on whether or not to continue funding the school there or not because they don't have enough people to pay taxes to fund that school and the referendum did not pass. And they no longer. We'll be having school for kids in that neighborhood. They will have to go to the the nearest school the next county. That's that's really sad. There are a lot of things. I mean, obviously, we're we're drawing out some of the controversial parts about the film. But but is I just I really enjoyed watching. And. Trying to understand how farming has changed and one of the areas and some of the chefs were talking about wheat that we really is the is the founder of this country, and we have used to settle and to and to thrive and prosper, but somewhere along the line once again things changed, and we went in a different direction. Yeah. But just you saying we made the hair on my arms stand because I'm just I'm in love with the flavors that come from some of these small farms some of these varieties that have been brought back by these champions like Greg Wade and Ellen king out in Evanston where I live. The flavors that are coming. Here are amazing. They're working with farmers. Some who have converted actually from being traditional different varietals right row cry. I mean, you're talking about more than sixty thousand varieties. I believe just in the US seed Bank alone. And they're thankfully, there are people at university of Illinois. Now who are doing studies trials to to test? These this is important because in the film, you talk about how the wheat industry or just the idea of harvesting wheat. They went a different direction where they said varietals are are the enemy. Yeah. They I mean, well Norman Borlaug won the Nobel prize for for creating the dwarf weight, which they said at the time was going to the world and what they did in breeding that is bred out all the protein. They bred out everything that was fundamentally good about wheat was bred out. And now, we have this gluten thing going on which is kind of a byproduct actually of the fact that we changed from something that was incredibly healthy to something that is incredibly not healthy and ninety nine percent of the week. That's grown in this country is one or two varieties of this door fleet. But that's that's changing. And we we there especially here in the midwest and people on the coast even talked about you have a great Brett culture going on in the midwest. And I think the the core of that storyline is about once again, local farmers and local producers deciding to do something different to almost disrupt. If you will the food the cycle in which we make food, and that's really what this film is about sustainable is the film. He could find it on Netflix, watch it the other night. It was great. It's also a part of the many film festival as part of the earth week and the one earth film festival, and it's gonna be at the Garfield park conservatory coming up this Saturday met Wexler will be there doing a Q and A. You can join what time is that start. I believe it's at eleven quote me sometime to check your local listings met, a pleasure to meet you. Thanks for coming in and looking forward to our next conversation. Set.

America Garfield park conservatory Wexler Iowa mardi Travis farm Garfield park Wall Street Journal Erica Berle America mardi Travis Spence farm Netflix Norman Borlaug Chicago China Nobel prize Yele Shen
"yele shen" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

09:27 min | 1 year ago

"yele shen" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Right. Still ahead. David clark's. Join me, you know, as I'm thinking about the why why won't the Democrats give it up? Why won't they just do a quick may call a move onto something else? And pretend this never happened. Why won't they because they can't they're they're incapable of doing this this martis thing? There's an explanation as to why the smartest thing to Democrats in Wisconsin did with stop obsessing over Scott Walker. It's the smartest thing they did stop ever obsessing over Scott Walker Scott Walker was elected governor immediately. They flipped out the occupied the capital they dragged everything into court sound familiar. They ran a recall election, which is essentially with the Democrats were hoping to be able to do via impeachment with President Trump. They failed in their attempts to take Scott walkout in a recall election. They launched a legal on constitutional investigation. That was legally leaking out information that was going to finally be the bombshell that took Scott Walker out through the John Doe investigation when they stopped doing that when everything calmed down when the Democrats had a month on end of not looking absolutely bat. Crazy. The short attention span of voters kicked in and people forgot about it. Now have they continue to obsess, then when the Republicans and Scott Walker had made that referenced back to the occupation referenced back to the recall referenced back to the to the knock down drag out over at ten it probably would have had some impact, but because people had essentially permitted themselves to move on from all of that. And put it in the past the Democrats got to take advantage of that in in this lull. The Republicans kinda lost a. A little bit of ood to fight. They were bland. And the Democrats were not misbehaving openly. Like, they were before smart thing they did. And maybe it was just got worn out about it. Maybe it all just got boring to them. And that's why they did it. I don't know if they did it as a specific political calculation, or they just got bored. But at the end, the short attention span voters kicked in and Tony Iverson is now governor of Wisconsin breathing a little bit of life in fight back into the Republicans. It's a good thing. The Democrats are not going to give up and say, they're sorry. Just like the Democrats in Wisconsin didn't give up and say, they're sorry until they were brute they were roundly beaten into submission by loss after loss after loss with John Doe, and the recall, the Democrats aren't going to give it up now because they don't see that. There is an advantage. To saying there. Sorry, saying they were wrong or saying nothing and moving on. They don't want just like the Democrats in Wisconsin didn't want to accept Scott Walker's a legitimate governor. The Democrats are still at that place where they will not accept Donald Trump. It's legitimate president. They thought they'd find something in the mail report. Something anything they got nothing. Just like they got nothing out of John Doe in Wisconsin one line in a four hundred seventy eight report is what they're hanging their hopes on right now where President Trump said something like I'm done. I'm eft this could be the end of my presidency. They're hanging their hopes on one line in four hundred seventy eight pages taken out of context this. This is so familiar this is so perfectly in parallel with how the Democrats behaved when one line or one story would leak out about the John Doe that they would hang all of their hopes on it. Remember the night of the recall election. The election was done in under ninety minutes. We got the returns back in under ninety minutes. And there were people who simply didn't accept that the that the election could be legitimate could be valid. They had so totally convinced themselves that they were gonna take out Scott Walker because they knew he was guilty. They didn't care what it took. They didn't care if they violate the law and the constitution. They did not care how many abuses they enabled they emboldened because he was an illegitimate governor. And they were going to take him out. That's where the Democrats are nationally right now. The downside to them of admitting. They're wrong. They would lose supporters. They would lose voters. They would lose elections. They would have to understand that everything that has come because of their obsession with their belief that the mean, orange man was elected legitimately would every single. Piece of twisted, bent logic that they have used to justify obstruction to justify leaking to justify lives to justify slander would go away. All of their heroes would disappear Adam Schiff, Maxine Waters, Jerry Naylor. Hillary Clinton, James Komi, Robert Muller, all of them. Just go away. They would have to recognize that they're heroes are embarrassments. That's a big ask to say. You were wrong in your sorry is to say that everything that came because of the obsession that Trump was a traitor and was illegitimate illegitimately elected. The trashing of middle America as deplorables the new obsession with taking away middle middle America's voice by eliminating the electoral college, that's all based on the idea that middle America was too stupid, not to be duped by Russians into voting for President Trump all of that goes away. If they say hoops, we were wrong about that. They've gotta figure out a way to either continue their obsession. Find a way to justify their smears their slander in their lies. Or they have to admit they're wrong and everything that has come out of that. It's okay to abuse the process, it's okay to destroy democracy. It is okay to destroy the constitution. It's okay to liberate due process. It's okay. To smearing slander people. It's okay to justify attacking kids and maga- hats or little old men sitting at coffee shops and maga- hats. It's okay to shutdown conservative, free speech on social media. It's okay to do all of this. It's all justified by the Democrats based on their are tick Yele Shen that President Trump is a Russian puppet. All of it comes from that. It's gone. So they're not going to do it. They should they might actually be able to resurrect some of their reputation if they do it, but they can't because they can't abide showing themselves and everything they have been for the last handful of years as a complete lie. There eagles won't let them do it there too worried that if they admit this they'll lose power. Not an option for the media either. They're even more invested in the myth, not an option for the rabble rouse mobs who are completely invested in the myth. They bought it. They're not even part of the of the communication team. They just got spoon fed a pile of BS that they action an actualized on the streets in the form of street violence. And the Democrats have been running interference for them. The media has been justifying that essentially tacitly endorsing that behavior. Well, my gosh, if Trump isn't a Russian puppet, then, you know, maybe tacking the kids in the maga- ahead to the little old man in the maga- hats or the little old lady who's driving around with her Trump bumper sticker on her car. He's yeah. That might have to call that out because that's some pretty bad behavior. They're not gonna do it. It's now it's it's it's going to make things miserable. Because they're not gonna do it for the Democrats admitting. They were wrong and the media admitting they lied. This would be good for America would allow them to say. Those those really difficult words I was wrong in the two other difficult words, I'm sorry, and it would allow them to sort of liberate themselves from their past and actually do something in the future like proper news and investigative reporting with Democrats actually freed to actually recognize the crisis at the border and understand that they have a part in doing what's necessary to secure America would free them from their commitment to obstruction and dishonesty. But they won't do it. In their minds there too. They have invested too much to let it go. I'm gonna take a.

Democrats Scott Walker Scott Walker President Trump Wisconsin America president Trump David clark Tony Iverson Adam Schiff Hillary Clinton Jerry Naylor Robert Muller Maxine Waters Yele Shen James Komi ninety minutes
"yele shen" Discussed on PTI

PTI

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on PTI

"He looks good kyri. Right. The lack of experience is what's holding back the Celtics what in God's name is he talking about. Okay. Kyrie Irving has been to three finals and made the game winning in a game seven. Yeah. All right. Al Horford how loud only played onto NCA championship teams bitterly for twelve years and a lot of playoff. Gordon? Hayward been in two different playoffs. And by the way, let me point out every single person on the Celtics said matters went to game seven of these finals last year played nineteen playoffs take to get there. So to me, Kyrie Irving is right there with Kevin Durant way just says stuff that sounds dopey. I'm no longer listening to him. Well, you sound like me with the golden. I'm not listening. There's no need to listen. Then Kyrie's case, there is a need elicit because I'm actually there and Kyrenia is great impact fourth. And he has reasons for things. I don't know what this game. I wasn't as well. Just say this. I'm okay with whatever Kyrie's said, the only. Like was just tick Yele Shen in the open. Visit Grady, right, Geno. So Boston thing just talked to the guys in the locker room. I'm okay with what he's saying. I'm not I am in uh theme. That's crazy. Let's take one last breaks become Duke. I resolve schools. Right. Kevin games. I think barely survives left Florida state's upset did. And then Tonio ground gives yet another clue these players final game for the Steelers. Can we get out of him till we stop with him. Antonio brown's. I mean, come home until he signed somewhere. Can we stop going to be San Francisco? He'll be on the other posts, you won't be any attention. He's. Heo? Shoutout. Having time people have thirty ninth birthday Byron left which left which has been named offensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay bucks. A man Bruce Arians offensive coach himself will let left which call plays and maybe between them they can get James Winston on track. We'll buy left, which is a favorite of our. Yes, does he grew up in DC? And we remember that play it Marshall if two left which broke his leg when his teammates carried him to the line of scrimmage. I go years before that fourteen years old how about this prediction it. What's highschool, Mr. wilpon, you're going to be writing about me one day? How about that from a fourteen year old? He's still calls you real happy anniversary of the Minnesota. Vikings on this day last year trailing the saints by point with ten seconds remaining in the divisional playoff game. Case keenum hits bondage from Iraq. You a sixty one yard touchdown. And it was miraculous 'cause it's the worst defensive play. Anyone has ever seen the following week? Vikings lost in the eagles who made no such stupid play that. Gots defined digs that commercial. Does he ever commercial without yet? No, no, no, no, no the earned got him. Personally. Some having trails to Florida state's upset bid of Duke, Florida state was poised to be the number one Duke team for the time in Tallahassee. How calls the Seminoles were up by one point with two point eight seconds to go when somehow they left Cham, reddish alone on the right side of the art and ready. She was already eight of fourteen from the field and scored twenty points took an inbounds pass. And Conley switched to game win who only think by tout can screaming we watching this. You see what dick right? He said there's going to be a screen that's gonna come around and get the pass and take the shot and he did. No. That was that was a VM off the couch moment. One me they really was running out of show. We go to the big Jillette. James harden, scored journey plus for the sixteenth straight line. But also went Awo one for seven team from three in a loss to the magic impressed. And not really that ain't the big news out of Houston..

Kyrie Irving Steelers Mr. wilpon Celtics Kevin Durant Antonio brown Florida Vikings Al Horford Hayward James harden Kyrenia NCA Bruce Arians James Winston Yele Shen Iraq Gordon Tampa Bay
"yele shen" Discussed on She Who Persisted

She Who Persisted

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on She Who Persisted

"It takes your your pubic area back to how it was before you went through puberty. And then the question is like why are we encouraging erotica that is encouraging like the the eroticism nation of of the body as a child spot. Yeah. Which I mean, I think we can all get on board with the fact that may be like child porn is bad. Maybe. So now, we're trying to I mean, maybe. But so now what we're doing is. We are trying to make adults look like children and one issue that is also in this cost in the context of the removal of UK is Genesis plastic surgery because it's Augie that you to the fact that by removing pubic cat, the pubic area, again becomes more visible in most crucial. Sized. According to bullshit is that criteria. And yes, let's let's call it. What it yes? And this is she too is considered to be related to pornography because pornography is often thought to create these unrealistic ideals of genitals should be looking like now that also is connected to what you just said to these two aspect of infantilism mission because the ideal seems to be childlike vulva that only pre pupa goes have 'cause only previous ghosts in PK and the removal. Yeah. The removal of what he hit infantilized women and subjugates women is something that a lot of people say, and there is an obstacle. That's cold a close shave to boot on female body had by Nick, smell it Konica smell. Thank you. And she writes, one of the one of the imbalances of the modern hairless body. Then is that the adult female genitals sumultaneously erotic sauce infantilized post between the pleasure of too much to see and the horror of. Nothing to see wavering between presence and absence, and again that links shaving genital plastic surgery because most surgery that is done also tries to make Volvos look young in childlike, or you know, the other thing that there's like vaginal reconstruction to make your body to make your vaginal canal tighter. So that you can be as though you were still a virgin which like, yeah. No, what he actually wants to have sex with a virgin, let me just like it's not. I mean. No. I mean, I think there are people. Maybe you do. And that's I I'm not judge. I don't. But like, so I think the problem is that the ideal no matter if it's hairless nece all the way that you've oh by supposed to look like the way supposed to be shaped like all of that seems to be a child's Volvo. Which is we hid? Yes. It is related to to. To making women seem more like children. And what is that telling us about patriarchy patriarchy is telling women that they should be more like children. They should be silent. They should be compliant. They should be like not have. They should you know, all of those thing. Yeah. And smell actually writes, quote, the removal of body hair, especially genital dip Yele Shen puts the female body family on the side of Prieta lessens, the removal of pubic points to a major league you itty as it makes adult female, genitals fool visible uncovering them from a long history of nothing to see. But does so on the sign of infantilism healthiness makes a buddy look smooth and innocent in taking together with the practice of digital or surgical cutting away of excess flesh a female external genitals helplessness may betray a deep seated fee of adult sick show that I think would be interesting is like women in..

Volvo UK Yele Shen Nick
"yele shen" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on The Working Experience

"There were no Asian African American Indian nothing not. I mean, I'm sure if like, you know, the DNA testing was around someone could have had like point one percent of African them. But it was all white male. It was like a fraternity house. It was complete do Bochum. So you would have to you brought fifty thousand dollars capital in. That's what she traded on zoo. Juice to to give people perspective. This was right before the dot com bust. So this was the first wave of internet companies where it was pets dot com. Where vin? I can't remember these horrific companies that would literally come up like you delivering dog food, and they would be worth like two hundred million dollars. So all day, we would buy dump by dump bind up in just kind of play with this this upmarket cycle, and we would suit when the market was opened it was somewhat of a professional place someone in then Mara closed. Were out whole drugs. There were Stricker's. There were there was one party where the can't remember the movie might have been wolf Wall Street where they did the midget tossing. Yeah. That was awful wall straight yet. So we did that they hired a almost barest to to tell the story that, but I was an idiot. Right. So I was like twenty two years old, and it was just complete departure, and I made money doing it just because it was it up market. So it was of bull runs you'd be complete idiot. Not to make money in this. Right. I got out maybe a year of where the market crashed in that entire firm. Went up in flames. John just sure it was. It was a complete disaster. But it is it was almost laughable that in the firm made a lot of money. So the firm was in New York City, but it also had offices in London Singapore, Singapore LA, there was one other that can't remember it was won by a complete idiot. Anyway, that that's my that's my day trading experience. I was there for seven months think six seven months. Yeah. About the same time period. I was at mine, but your son's like more legit in terms of having several offices. And I don't know. But in the same sense, it was it was similar to my experience in the sense that it was primarily male dominated. There was some diversity where I was there were some Asians. There were naive commerical. Nhs. There were some Indians. There were is. But you know, only me and one other girl at the time and everybody sat in their clique. So like the Russian set in the bag lakes, mafia all dress all plaque on the other side like everybody sat in like their clicks. And the person running also Liz, shady, I don't even know if anyone knows of his whereabouts these days. And it was definitely like key. Lot of inappropriateness. I mean, a smoking room people putting their fists the wall. It wasn't a bull market after the dot com. So, you know, a lot of playing off of economic indicators or technical trading, the Naci levels and things like it wasn't our on capitol as their cattle say they wanted you to churn allowed, you know, churn and burn as they say so like getting in and out of stocks, LA. But then you also manipulating the market at times where someone would get stuck in like, oh, let's all get in stock. Like, let's see if we can move it up and things like that. And so it was just ridiculous again parties like we all went to Puerto Rico at one point. And. Yeah, again, like getting the alcohol shrugs, the, you know, lack of any diversity real diversity of Email presence. Like it was when I saw that. Movie will all I was just like this is flown out of proportion a little bit. But really not too much especially because throughout my career. I mean later on worked at hedge funds where it was the same. I mean in this years later, it was like again like a fraternity, you know. So it was crazy just like the wild wild west or something like, no HR, obviously. There's no HR in VERA points where I would be working. And I was like I can't believe this is legal. He. I can't believe that you know, this. I would think someone would come crashing into the doors. There is like market nip Yele Shen. Yeah. There was there was all of that stuff. In. It was just it was complete vanturi. Yeah. Pleading utter debauchery. Yep..

Bochum Stricker Yele Shen Singapore LA Mara vin Nhs London Singapore New York City Puerto Rico LA Liz John two hundred million dollars fifty thousand dollars six seven months twenty two years seven months one percent
"yele shen" Discussed on Hostage

Hostage

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on Hostage

"How could an individual make the most money in the shortest amount of time and get away without being identified by the cops. In September nineteen fifty two while Carl hall lay daydreaming in his cell about the perfect crime. Bonnie Emily Hettie of Saint Joseph Missouri was finally divorcing her abusive husband. Her husband Vernon Ellis Hetty was alive stock salesman. They had lived well for twenty years participating in square dances and dog shows. But Vernon's dislike of children led him to force Bonnie into eleven abortions over the course of their marriage. These were illegal at the time and even more dangerous in potentially psychologically, damaging for Bonnie as the years progressed, friends and acquaintances of Bonnie's began to notice she was frequently intoxicated even showing up drunk to some of the affirmation dog shows. It would seem that she had begun to cope with life's hardships by turning to alcohol soon. She like hall. Couldn't make it an hour without a drink. It said she drank as much as a fifth of whiskey a day. Fairly quickly after the divorce in September nineteen fifty two friends of Bonnie heady began to notice strange music coming from her home men called at all hours, and it became clear that she had turned to sex work to support herself and well sex work in of itself is not indicative of any kind of illness or malfeasance most of Bonnie's prophets were going toward fueling her alcohol addiction, and this is perhaps the best indication of how serious her alcohol abuse had become not only was she dependent on the substance, but she now had to mold her life around the pursuit of it. She had long since crossed the threshold from drinking problem to full blown alcoholic the National Institute on alcohol abuse and alcoholism known as an I a reports that there are five types of alcoholics both Bonnie. Carl fit into the rarest and most dangerous category chronic severe people in this subtype begin drinking at a young age, though, they may not become truly addicted until middle age. They have a high rate of divorce and in all likelihood use other drugs beyond alcohol. We know for certain Caro began drinking at Kemper military school Fonteyn Caro were both coming off of bad. Marriages in Carl at least was also known to have a drug habit. Another characteristic of this subtype is that the alcoholic also potentially suffers from depression, bipolar disorder or other personality disorders, and in some cases, they are more prone to acts of criminality. Well, we don't know for certain that either Bonnie heady or Carl hall suffered from mental illness. They were absolutely both drawn to a life of crime there in the ferris partnership began. Almost as soon as they met. Bonnie regularly picked up sex work clients at the pony express bar in the ruby del hotel in Saint Joseph one night in April nineteen fifty three Bonnie met a potential client who for a change was charming and kind almost immediately. She fell for him. He introduced himself as Carl hall of Kansas City, Missouri. He was recently paroled from jail having served time for insurance fraud. He claimed he thought she was beautiful, of course, whether he was actually attracted to Bonnie or not Carl had seen potential in Bonney potential from the nip Yele Shen, they moved into gather almost immediately after meeting in April nineteen fifty three and by June nineteen Fifty-three Carl began to speak about the green lease family. How wealthy they were their fleet of Cadillacs. How they had their names on various Catholic institutions throughout the city when Bonnie was halfway sober. She would try to steer the conversation towards something more normal who cared about some rich family. It wasn't until he began to drive them by the green Lisa state in Mission Hills that she started to worry, but she ignored her doubts car loved her and he put up with her addiction. They were to societal misfits living in a world skewed by constant intoxication. What Bonnie didn't know was that Carl had been planning to abduct one of the young Greenlees children for some time. He remembered Paul Greenlees from Kemper military school in when he read in prison that Paul's father Robert now had two young children from a second marriage Carl's perfect crime suddenly came into focus, and he would use the lonely and pliable Bonnie Hetty to help him pull it.

Bonnie Carl hall Bonnie heady Bonnie Emily Hettie Bonnie Hetty Vernon Ellis Hetty Kemper military school Fonteyn Saint Joseph Missouri Kansas City salesman Kemper military school Paul Greenlees Caro depression Missouri green Lisa Saint Joseph National Institute Mission Hills
"yele shen" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on EconTalk

"'cause unusual though, yet some might may story about this was that I was getting undergraduate. I double majored in economics and in let or biophysics by atmosphere. Perfect. And I grown up a Chicago on the south side. I was incredibly interested in economics, social science policy, and I also really liked science. My Gad's biological psychiatrist sense. So I started medical school, I felt sorry. I started college thinking nine by interested in catastophe by g, but also social studies like economic second really loved economics. I took science what I what I learned was that I loved the rigor of science of basic science, but I actually hear how stairmaster turned out. In contrast, I found economics just hostage simulated. But at the time in particular economics, credibly, radical, and it felt like a reality conomic was going to be all about your nodded out applying to albums. So I knew about an EP h. programs and at a time I thought about sort of using the science might my dad lead the advice that yet here your interest. And in science, biomedical science doctor rather than a PHD because PHD's to work for doctors and doctors, terrible for itself. So he recommended, you know, about the PHD try. He suspect also new Lau that and VP's programs for pretty well subsidized by government. But I wonder to myself, you am VP each in economics and. Or standard one is one of the of the base science. So anyway, wrote letters all around US I, you know my job, but kind of a third of the place says, that's really stupid idea. Third place says, she ain't got good grades wanted to real sciences, please by where program. And the third wrote back and said, note, strange idea, but reasonable, please ply and university of Chicago back and said, you know, we have a program. And so I, you know, I only later discovered knowing that actually have been in it. But anyway, I wonderful teacher at yell on halt shows who was the son of tat assaults another Kogyo outta missed and hall, taunt amazing courses, economic Margaret fee. And from that I learned all about serves Chicago economists studying talk Yele Shen, how and Gary back her stuff and a whole crew. And so coming back to Chicago was really sort of great thing because there were so many wonderful communists in by connects labor, economics, adjustable organization, and I got into medical school and program, it's coming home. So I ended up coming to Chicago and Erie ended up being my DC share. Along with other members. Many Bob Willis showing Rosen gray folks and an amazing group of people around Chicago and not your air. I know how many know Laureus Tobby Alex. It was some wonderful exposure, and it's interesting when I look at the comprehensive care physician where it is literally the tools that I learned Yuri backers, microeconomics class that I used when I sat down and tried to sort of figure out timeout, Haitian doctors, and then that evening, literally looking at those questions, the idea for the comprehensive care physician program. So I give an immense amount of credit to them and their way of thinking for inspiring the the work that done, of course very practical hands on Ponant to too. But I think that the sort of now get out. Insight really has come from my I chain. It's economists that we have an MVP each program in the social sciences go now, and we have had some amazing graduates. I'm done the teaching like I have and gone on to do incredible work. And so there's quite a few more and he's an economics from the country around the world. I think they're making a lot a lot of break hundred agents, but in the day to day practice as a clinician, further things like kind of pricing structure senators that you see that drive you crazy because you understand their impact. You know, I mean, there are lots of things in on that old practice in academic outta send that you can recognize is irrational. And at, I guess you could allow those driving crazy, you know, but then they're also on the better days yearly interesting ways of thinking about problems that economic reasoning teaches you like trading off, heating values. Organ function as a as a door. Good as an asset in the us and transferred to other forms of assets. When you have a patient in intensive care unit with molten system wargin failure, they can have a lot of Lena capital, but not very much cardiac, right?.

Chicago Ponant Lau university of Chicago VP Laureus Tobby Alex Margaret fee Bob Willis Lena capital Yuri MVP Yele Shen Erie Rosen Gary
"yele shen" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on EconTalk

"Costs. And for patient experience, the kind airy measured we've looked at, it's how the the patients rape the quality of care that that yet from their doctor and the bottom line is the people in the troll people. In both groups, they started were pretty unhappy with their doctors like twentieth percentile nationally. The people in the. Troll revenge went to about the eightieth percentile. And we think that's as we get them, you know, Dr they light or at least you know, didn't dislike. And then the intervention group went up to the ninth supply'll, impatient, SOPs faction. So we thought that was a really big, a really big success. And that's that's important to patients. That's one of the issues there I'm sure worried about is that when I'm writing my doctor who I've known for a while and it's the same doctor all the time, I might feel that about saying something negative about them or so you're asking them on a scale of one to five, what's. Once ten and the vast majority of people give their doctors, nine or ten, you know, even even with they're not all that. So there's a lot of top coating on, but nevertheless found that are CC doctors did. We didn't pay stands for the copying secure position. The The new. new. And then in terms of health status measures, we didn't find differences in general on self rated health status on, but we did find statistically significant improvements solve rated mental outs. Yup. And lots of reasons to believe that that's related to the stronger relationships and Annette's of thing. And then finally, we looked at I'm hospitalization, which is the biggest driver of costs in the top Yele Shen and we found looks like about a twenty percent reduction in hostels ation rates out tweet year when she's huge and probably translates to savings of several thousand dollars per patient per year, which is just an immensely large amount to save it, twenty percent of any medical cost is going to be a lot of it's it's, it's a of end, you know. I think what makes it really notable is that whereas a lot of the here coordination interventions that have been used in many instances require hiring a lot of people on in order to ridge that care are mile really doesn't apply that. In fact, all we're doing reorganized care. So they don't have as many of these hand offs. And so call this, a lean of Hordley has got rid of potentially avoidable unnecessary costs of who occasion. And so the fact that it looks like it's reducing hospitalizations a lot. Therefore, presumably saving a fair bit of money while it costs very, very little to run this program. And no, it's really just three. Organizing care, getting patients insure it. It Neely suggests the promise of this sort of approach not exclusion about her forms of care ordanation, but I would argue as a strategy to lessen the need for them on add, perhaps allow those people doing here ordination to focus on the areas where they really required quick question on the better mental health. How is that measured so important? I assume. Yeah, he just has an results describing to you just sort of self reported health status. How would you rate your mental health? Excellent, very good. Good, fair. Poor of thirty crude measure about one that's been shown to car late without her measures of mental health, and we have a lot of other as IRS mental health in our data, but we have yet reported on them publicly. So something to look forward to let me just a general question continent. Do care and how it actually works practice. So my father in last year was was hospitalized for some surgery and cancer surgery and happy doing fine on his fourth cancer is just is so far is beaten all of them, which is glorious wonderful, and I'm grateful for.

rape Yele Shen IRS cancer Annette Neely Hordley twenty percent thousand dollars
"yele shen" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Prefrontal cortex and how it's different and in someone who has violent tendencies or someone who's antisocial as opposed to a person with a calmer more empathetic demeanor what we've continuously found in many different studies whether it's from near a psychological studies or near logical studies or brain imaging studies is that antisocial individuals show deficits in the prefrontal cortex you see these deficit in structure so they show reduce structure in this part of the brain and also reduced functioning as well and so what we wanted to do in the study was build off those fines and extend them by seeing whether enhancing that part of the brain would produce the opposite effect in reduced levels of aggression and aggressive intent and how does those jolt of electricity chain the function of the this area of the brain yeah that's a good question what we did in the study with something called an oto stimulation and that means that with this really weak electrical current that's passing through the scalp that increases or excites new onell activity in that part of the brain oso connections within the brain they kind of get a kick start exactly does this affect how the prefrontal cortex interacts with the rest of the brain as well so we believe that enhancing uctivities in this part of the brain may very well increase connectivity to other parts of the brain but that's something that goes beyond our study and that would involve really brain imaging techniques to really assess you know what happens in the brain with jim yele shen though these were healthy adult individuals who you tested with this also work on criminals with stronger violent tendencies that's a really good question and i think that if these findings can be replicated and extended in very well maybe i think one of the key things that has come out of this shoddy is that the findings really justify further research efforts to use tdc's as a tool to better understand anti social behaviour and in might inform future approaches to reducing aggressive intense and aggressive behavior using this noninvasive relatively benign intervention that targets a biological risk factor for crime which is not really approach that the current interventions we have have been taking so in might not be out of the question but i do think that this is an early stab and if these findings can be replicated in extended that might be a useful avenue to take in the future so if you do find this as a way to reduce violent tendencies violent people i mean what could this mean for society while i think the big thing that comes out of it broadly is that there other approaches we can take to tackle this major global public health problem which is violence as i mentioned it's an early step but here were changing intentions which is really i have to changing behavior while i guess you know it's it's a lot more difficult to change society and maybe even psychology so if we can give biology a boasts than maybe weaken affect those other two exactly and that's not to say that you know social interventions psychological interventions cognitive behavioral therapy for example that's not to say that those aren't helpful and invaluable they are and lead to know that social factors psychological factors certainly play a role in antisocial and aggressive behavior but i think what we're missing is another piece of the puzzle so if we can target by logical factors as well in may be that a tool like tea ccs in conjunction with other therapies might lead us to see better results in terms of reducing levels of antisocial aggressive behavior will i can't wait to hear where your research takes thank you very much for your time thank you dr lidia toys and associate professor in the department of psychology at nanyan technological university in singapore.

"yele shen" Discussed on I Do Podcast

I Do Podcast

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on I Do Podcast

"In the physiology of it probably lends itself a lot more to this being a male problem well you know it's interesting what you say what are sort of male common male problems for during sex and common female problems and for both however mindfulness can really work in that vise that you're talking about of like think of something else it's for premature what's called premature ejaculation it's not really what's recommended so to to backup basically a few things about just to address premature ejaculation in general men think it's premature ejaculation is not and because of unrealistic porn images that we have right now and i'm not anti porn i'm just it shouldn't be used as sex ed that's for sure is that many people many men think they should last long really long unrealistically long for female pleasure and that's the that's inaccurate first of all the average man or gives them about anywhere between three and six minutes between if your time intercourse putting his penis in jonah and jack yele shen and most women you know will say it's really not intercourse that's going to bring them organism most women need clitoral stimulation so that's just some background but in terms of thinking something else and or you know i've heard many even tell me that they were told to think like negative terrible thoughts and it's like oh no don't do that don't ruin your sexual encounter with thinking bad thoughts to make yourself not orgasm what actually is most helpful for premature ejaculation is exercises where you're very mindful of your body you're very tuned into your body's responses and most men have this point of jack hewlett tori inevitability the i'm gonna come phenomenon i'm gonna come right now in focusing in learning your own body enough to know when that is and then the able to back off and before that point back off on the stimulation so actually you know well maybe thinking counting cards or whatever backwards may help the actual most proven techniques don't do don't recommend that at all they recommend more body.

six minutes
"yele shen" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on WGTK

"The world the onscreen looks like the world around us well if that's being advocated in hollywood what them let them do what i guess i mean look at no say he whether they do with them the widow they won't do it the this is a new notion however that everything must reflect the way society looks is it the dumb and sports should be done in sports the via proverbial ice hockey team verses nba theme they don't look like they're a community to the those the through the members of the detroit red wings hockey team will look like the citizens of detroit for that matter but the through the players on the utah jazz look like the citizens of utah that's a basketball team i thought the the task of all societies is to seek the best by definition this is not seeking the best this is seeking employment by looks if the does somebody who was half black half white count as fully black men if so why would that be we want this in politics they want this in hollywood and what it does is it undermines the notion in sports or anywhere else it would it undermines the notion of we want the best the best may end up disproportionately black in the case of basketball disproportionately white in the case of hockey that's just the way it is the people don't go to games to see ethnic diversity people don't root for themes based on weather it looks like them the vast majority of the fans at an nba game or white they're rooting for a team with either all with starters are black or four of the five starters were black the you don't seem to care and they shouldn't care why why must something look like the top yele shen as a whole why why is that a value the only value should be excellence and if there were communities disproportionately pursuing excellence then what you do is you have the community pursue excellence more you don't dropped the standards to make it look like a mirror i don't want to see mirrors i want to see excellence the left wants to see mirrors all right we'll see what.

hollywood detroit utah basketball hockey nba
"yele shen" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Power is that i fire were intel i'd be freaking out right now this is not this is not entails year i'll hours they lose mobile right qualcom in the arm family just destroy them on mobile apple does apple uses a arm architecture license but they make their own chips essentially like arm chips call comes and everything else but at least until still had the desktop and they still have the network center armies in the networks center now because it allows power its power curve is good in the new eu made at you don't use a lot of energy and they seem to do a decent job you're right until probably still owns the printing of but yes this this this fundamentally attacks the winds will announce which has gone on with we'd has pretty much since since the style the big question here is can they make it work because all guy was trying these knee laptops out in maui and he was saying you look at double alike tournamnent oh i said i'm good if he was typing forced the woods were pairing already type them can't keep up that's because asked use on malaysian onset nonstop they're going to pull office in much loot office to to um so you hopefully get rid of them yele shen leg that but you know it's really effect the fate the the new devices were to come from the novo and acer and others start with with us ten s which is the version of windows that is low power and only runs apps uw piazza melinda store and those probably where i would guess run at full speed their designed to run on in a compa for arm but if you get if you said i i want to upgrade to win as i chrome audit chrome would not run well i know you gotta run.

apple maui windows uw piazza melinda store acer
"yele shen" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"yele shen" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"From that side i've always shook my head but be in a detroit street fighter i've never condone violence i've never participated in violence i never suggested by let's just the opposite i was in detroit during the sixty several riots and i was the voice of calm in reason into downtown area especially since all my heroes were the black motown artis and i was really torn as a teenager that i do not understand why people would become violent like that so i've always been on the side of peace of love through straight and and the statistics to support what i believe in right so here air 2017 we certainly have reached critical mass i do not blame any of the outrageous hate from the left is responsible for the shooter at the republican ballgame regret was solely the responsibility and accountability of the man pulling the trigger he was he was just demonic to be able to do that how wherever you are absolutely correct and euroarctic yele shen that we reach critical mass and when liberal democrat could media late kathy kathy griffin holds up a severed head in it time frame where the isis and taliban our decapitating innocent people it it resonates much more true that a random comedy routine ryan here's the horror i think i don't think cathy griffins believes in killing the president but that was an unambiguous imagery he said i am supporting the separate the head of the president the united states it wasn't funny isn't comedy i hang around with in the seventies with richard prior and sam kinna scindia and rodney dangerfield i know humor and that in it and i'll get to the chase today where i realized that even though oh by my rhetoric staged during these sunam e ever travel and when a time when hillary clinton and barack obama at all were trying to ban the second amendment whereas awad stage with my props as age as it up an honor rain of the military was called the tour was about paying tribute to the military ads sandbags and i had a lot of weaponry on stage even though california at the time they were air salk god's they were legal and i we hold it up and i say so you want a bad guns.

street fighter detroit ryan cathy griffins president united states rodney dangerfield barack obama second amendment california kathy kathy griffin taliban richard sam kinna scindia hillary clinton awad