35 Burst results for "Years Years Ago"

Canadians re-elect Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 4 hrs ago

Canadians re-elect Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Canadians re elect Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party prime minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party won Monday's parliamentary elections in Canada according to projections by the Canadian press and Canada's television networks but while the liberals were projected to win the most seats of any party it was initially unclear whether Trudeau succeeded in his gamble to win a majority of seats Trudeau called for an early vote two years ahead of the deadline betting Canadians would support his policies for battling Corbett nineteen under Trudeau Canada is among the most fully vaccinated countries in the world hi Mike Rossio

Justin Trudeau Mike Rossi Liberal Party Canada Trudeau Canadian Press Corbett Mike Rossio
George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 hrs ago

George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

"A Los Angeles plumber who made history by capturing the beating of Rodney king on a video camera has died of covert nineteen complications a longtime friend says George Holliday was sixty one years old not vaccinated against covert nineteen and have been on a ventilator for days it was in nineteen ninety one that holiday who'd gotten a new video camera shot grainy images of four white police officers beating Rodney king during a traffic stop he captured Los Angeles officers punching kicking and using a stun gun on the black motorist even after he was on the ground a year later holidays footage was key evidence in the officer's trial that ended with four acquittals that triggered rioting king was so upset by the burning and looting he issued this famous statement in nineteen ninety two can we can we all get along hi Jackie Quinn

George Holliday Los Angeles Jackie Quinn
Emmy ratings up to 7.4 million viewers this year

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 hrs ago

Emmy ratings up to 7.4 million viewers this year

"The ratings for the Emmy awards are in this year's Emmy awards provided something that all television award shows desperately need a sign that viewers have not completely lost interest in watching the Sunday broadcasts increased its viewing audience something that is rare for a televised award show these days Nielsen reports seven point four million people watch that is a significant uptick from the six point one million who watched last year's socially distanced affair where some winners had their trophies delivered to them by people in hazmat suits the other good news Sunday's total also surpassed the twenty nineteen audience of six point nine million I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Emmy Awards Nielsen Oscar Wells Gabriel
Ruth Wisse and Eric Discuss Liberals' Perceived Victimhood and Apathy

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:25 min | 8 hrs ago

Ruth Wisse and Eric Discuss Liberals' Perceived Victimhood and Apathy

"Strikes me that the left in america has fallen in love with with with victimhood. And that they they don't like celebrating sometimes because it almost implies within we haven't suffered enough we want you to focus on are suffering as though something's gained by that you're saying that's not how people learn. It's not a good thing but you see that narrative surely in in american life in the latter part of the the twentieth century just kind of took over and people they wanna wallow they wanna be victims. They wanna remind you of how much they've suffered because it gives them some kind of perverse status. Well that may be true of some people. But you know what i saw. When i was teaching at harvard actually was something quite different. knowle's troubling but very different people didn't wanna fight and what surprised me most about harvard and all the twenty one years that i taught there i became involved in faculty meetings as i had never been before when i was at mcgill and And i saw that there was. They refused to let. Rotc the reserve officer training corps. That had always been at the basis of higher education. There was always training of the best and the brightest young people during precisely the age when you have to go into the arm right. That's the hr so with their. The there was for for forty years forty years right. The faculty of harvard kept rossi off the campus. They did everything. They kept changing the rationale for keeping it on campus so as not to allowed on campus. What is that about what they were actually saying to. These kids is forgive me but this is the way i understood it. America is not worth defending. Of course that's exactly what they're saying. It's worse than that. They were saying that. America is bad. And they're saying that. Any kind of militarism or i should say any kind of self-defence is militarism is a step away from the quagmire of vietnam and chest thumping Jingoism i mean. That's where the left has been for a long time. It breaks my heart but this is all through the culture. Obviously just places like harvard.

Harvard Reserve Officer Training Corps Knowle America Rotc Mcgill Rossi Vietnam
Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas Promised Open Borders

Mark Levin

01:23 min | 9 hrs ago

Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas Promised Open Borders

"What he said A while back, right? This is the same secretary Andrew Mayorkas. That said, Listen. We're not telling you not to come to the United States. We're just saying Don't come right now. And this was at a time when the pandemic was really like, out of control. And it was for like, five minutes when he was saying Don't come right now. Right. It was it wasn't as forceful as came alive as the vice president, who when she said, she said, I'm telling you don't come right should have got that one. That's a funny audio, but She was more forceful in it, and she took heat for it. Mayorga says What he wants to say he doesn't take heat for anything. But so that's what he said today. Now he went on today and I think we have the clip from earlier this year in March when he said, I'm not saying that the countries don't come right. We are not saying Don't come. We are saying don't come now because we will be able to deliver, uh safe and orderly process to them as quickly as possible. Oh, safe and orderly. Yeah. Do you really think somebody saying I'm just saying Don't come. Just don't come right now, because we want to make this safe and orderly. Do you think anybody's going to listen to somebody that talks that way? I know I'm not. I'm just okay. Excuse me, sir. Step aside. I've got some border crossing to do, And that's exactly what they did, because he's literally opening the door. He's opening the border, and he's doing it at the command of the commander in chief, Joe L. Barbosa.

Andrew Mayorkas Mayorga United States Joe L. Barbosa
Buyers' Remorse Runs Rampant Among Biden's Former Cheerleaders

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:39 min | 9 hrs ago

Buyers' Remorse Runs Rampant Among Biden's Former Cheerleaders

"It's pretty clear we have a bigger problem now than we've had in years and this is a these policies have turned it into becoming a magnet. So he's got a lot of work to do incredible chunk taught who is a reliable cheerleader for the democrats for the bite administration just rattling off a number of crises lang them at the feet of the current encampment. Let's are somebody who believes in unbiased reporting the creator of just the us dot com john. Solomon we played a cut in the first hour from cnn. Talking about might have multiple crisis. Then you have chunk. Todd you have a stephanie ruling others is something happening in the mainstream media. John i wrote a star the other day that said that buyer's remorse starting to set in even among people who embraced by nearly the media is currently wanted them and chuck. Todd was a great apologised for joe biden. All astier into the beginning of this administration as was cnn and msnbc we also see an enormous amount of buyers remorse from our foreign allies france. Great britain grave concerns about the way joe biden conduct. Things and i know he just said in the clip there that it's key issue of of credibility. I think the american voter see something. Different isn't just credibility its competence. We don't blow up people who are innocent with a predator drone and call it a right to strike. We don't open the border and bring cove into our country. That's just the competence question. I think the bigger issue that joe biden's presence he's going to with long-term is is he. Competent president did we vote for someone who sounded good but can't

Joe Biden CNN Todd Solomon Stephanie Msnbc Chuck John Great Britain United States France
Marxist History Is Repeating Itself

Mark Levin

01:46 min | 9 hrs ago

Marxist History Is Repeating Itself

"All of this is just indicative of how Marxism is playing out. If you've read American Marxism by Mark Levin, you know exactly what I'm talking about. Chapter six, Chapter one. It really describes how these institutions in America have just been hijacked. Write everything. I mean, everything has been hijacked. Nothing is the way it looks. Everything is some sort of, uh, to reference the Soviet Union like politburo and these and these ministers of propaganda, and they're in line force mint, federal law enforcement and I support law enforcement. You know, I actually was a volunteer cop in Jersey and for for like, two years, and my brothers served both of them. 20 years, NYPD have nothing but respect for law enforcement, But it's Sad to say. At the federal level. We've seen it time and again. There are some bad apples that are Trying to spoil the bunch. And that's just not there. I mean, we see the same thing in the media. We see the same thing in in the schools. You've got teachers that come in with very altruistic, altruistic. Excuse me, Um Rationale of why they want to become a teacher, and then they get there. And that is all kind of, um, usurped by the unions and them saying No, no, you've got to do this and you've got to teach this and we're going to do this and parents. I don't want to put this on the parents, but the parents have a role. Have been taken a back seat, some of them because they don't know better and some of them because they're too busy because they're trying to make a way for their family. So when we look at all of that stuff It's like, man. We're looking at the same thing that we saw. In our own history. A 20 years ago. And it's happening right before our very eyes the violence in the streets of last summer, we've seen that play out.

Mark Levin Politburo Soviet Union Nypd America Jersey
Abraham Lincoln Said the Only Thing That Could Destroy Us Is Us

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 9 hrs ago

Abraham Lincoln Said the Only Thing That Could Destroy Us Is Us

"Shall we expect some transatlantic military giant to step the ocean and crush us with one blow? Never All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined. With all the treasure of the earth except our own. In their military chests. With Bonaparte for a commander could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio or make a track on the Blue Ridge. In a trial of 1000 years. At what point then. Is the approach of danger to be expected. I answer. If it is ever to reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot. We must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of free men. We live Through all time. Or die by suicide. And he wraps up With The rest of the admonition and you can read that for yourselves. But To sum this up. Abraham Lincoln gave us this morning and he said, this country comes down because we'll take it down ourselves. Mark Levin wrote the book, American Marxism. Because he clearly articulates But that's happened where here doesn't mean the country is Over. It means they've gotten a footing and we can't play games anymore. It is no longer a spectator sport. This is critically important. I think it's it's important that we realize these things again. What Lincoln said. And he said it in 18 38 is so apt

Bonaparte Blue Ridge Asia Africa Europe Ohio Abraham Lincoln Mark Levin Lincoln
The Left Are Threatening the Livelihood of Free Thinkers

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 9 hrs ago

The Left Are Threatening the Livelihood of Free Thinkers

"But the left is threatening the livelihood of free thinkers. Here in America, and they're doing it to keep them in line. So, for example, when I give props to Nicki Minaj the wrapper for standing up for herself. That's not me, saying that she's the champion for the conservative cause. But I will celebrate liberty and action nonetheless. You know, a couple of years ago, right here on this program might have been 2019. I mentioned that the left hasn't fired a single shot literally. But figuratively. And quite literally, where under an ideological attack a very intense one. When activists that embrace Soviet principles. The principles that gave rise to communist countries and socialist governments. And they're succeeding. In teaching those same principles to students in their classrooms. Our Children. To readers of their journalism. Our neighbors. And to their constituents through various levels of government, the whole country. The choice is clear. That we have to choose Liberty Libertad. For the survival of this great nation.

Nicki Minaj America Liberty Libertad
The Biden Administration Has NO Idea What They're Doing

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:33 min | 9 hrs ago

The Biden Administration Has NO Idea What They're Doing

"China is on the rise again intimidating. Our friends and partners in south asia north korea is again launching ballistic missiles over the sea of japan. Russia is flexing. Its muscles with putin. Having just won reelection well reelection. Just reinstalling himself. And iran drawn is very happy. We've left afghanistan in cannot believe their luck the senile decrepit old hoskins politician in the white house is seriously thinking of reinstating. The obama era. Jcp away run deal all this all this in the space of less than a year nine months in the fall of kabul with the teen americans and the response what's the response a drone strike that kills an afghan aid worker and children america's back. Oh i didn't mention the sub deal. I i'm in american history. The french of recalled their ambassador because this administration snubbed them in their diesel and nuclear sub. Deal with the australia. What did they tell us. The adults are back. Yeah i'll tell you one thing. They may be add outs. They don't love this country and they have no idea what they're

South Asia North Korea Putin Hoskins Russia China Japan Iran Afghanistan White House Kabul Barack Obama America Australia
According to the Taliban, They Defeated the United States

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:39 min | 9 hrs ago

According to the Taliban, They Defeated the United States

"Talk about afghanistan. God fa- sekine piece of real estate. it's never functioned. As a modern westphalian nation ever even under the monarchy the nation. That was home to bin laden and his al-qaeda training camps now twenty years after september eleventh is again under the control of our friends let of corrupt politicians that want to play nice with the west like qatar cy but under the control of people who want to kill you yes. The taliban quote unquote the students. The tally ban the students of islam fundamentalists. They don't hate isis. The same breed is. I says isis may want to be in control but they're all fundamentalists jihadis along with al qaeda. Now they have eighty three billion dollars worth of equipment and training that you pay for. And how are they sending that across the muslim world arab and non-arab. We defeated america. We didn't just defeat the ruthless murderous soviet union with its helicopter gunships and landmines shaped like toys to main children. We defeated the greatest station. I'm seth that's how they're selling it than jihadis are flooding back into this

Qaeda Bin Laden Afghanistan Taliban Al Qaeda America Seth
Oklahoma's 1st executions set since '15 include Julius Jones

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 10 hrs ago

Oklahoma's 1st executions set since '15 include Julius Jones

"Oklahoma scheduled its first executions since the state put lethal injections on hold six years ago at one point the Oklahoma death chamber it was one of the busiest in the nation but executions were put on hold after a botched lethal injection in twenty fourteen that left an inmate writhing on the Gurney and drug mix ups in twenty fifteen the wrong lethal drugs were delivered seven executions are scheduled including Julius Jones he is supposed to die November eighteenth for killing a local businessman who was shot in front of his family during a carjacking the date was set despite a recommendation by the Oklahoma pardon and parole board that Jones's death sentence be commuted to life imprisonment without parole Jones's case was featured in twenty eighteen on the ABC television documentary the last defense I'm at Donahue

Oklahoma Julius Jones Jones ABC Donahue
FBI searches Florida home of Gabby Petito's boyfriend

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 10 hrs ago

FBI searches Florida home of Gabby Petito's boyfriend

"The FBI executed a search warrant in total weight a Mustang at the family home of Brian Landry wanted for questioning after a body was found the thought to be that of his girlfriend van life blogger Gabby potato out side the family home of Brian Landry a person of interest in the disappearance of Gabby potato a crowd of reporters huddled under umbrellas on a neighbor's lawn exactly I agents came in and out of his parents home with boxes of evidence at least a dozen agents and police officers converged on the home a day after authorities discovered a body believed to be hers on the edge of Grand Teton National Park Landry's whereabouts are still unknown in an interview broadcast Monday on the Dr Phil show Gabby's father Joseph potato said Landry and his daughter had dated for two and a half years and there were no problems during a previous road trip to California Patino said Landry's family was complicit by protecting him he says he wants later to be held accountable for whatever part he played in Gabby's disappearance I'm Jennifer king

Brian Landry Gabby Potato Van Life Landry FBI Joseph Potato Grand Teton National Park Dr Phil Gabby Patino California Jennifer King
Democrats Aim to Suspend Debt Limit with Bill to Avoid Government Shutdown

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 11 hrs ago

Democrats Aim to Suspend Debt Limit with Bill to Avoid Government Shutdown

"Democrats are introducing legislation that would fund the government through the end of the year while suspending the debt limit through december of twenty twenty two. Npr's windsor johnston reports move sets up a showdown with republicans. Were threatening to oppose the measure. House speaker nancy. Pelosi and senate majority leader chuck. Schumer say they're planning to attach a suspension of the debt limit to a spending bill to keep the government funded through the end of the year. The move puts the pressure on congressional republicans who have repeatedly threatened to vote against an increase in the debt ceiling. This latest legislative maneuver follows weeks of intense debate over the best way to increase the government's borrowing limit and prevent a government shutdown at the end of the month in an op-ed over the weekend treasury secretary janet yellen warned that a government default would prove to be a devastating and irreparable blow to the nation's economy. Windsor

Windsor Johnston House Speaker Nancy NPR Schumer Pelosi Chuck Senate Janet Yellen Government Treasury Windsor
Biden looks to turn page on 20 years of war at UN

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 11 hrs ago

Biden looks to turn page on 20 years of war at UN

"President Biden will make his first address to the U. N. General Assembly tomorrow and may face some skepticism over his pledge to work with allies and adversaries alike less than a month after replacing Donald Trump the president said he had a clear message for the world America is back exciting friendly nations who expected better cooperation but now eight months in the president's been out of sync with allies over ending the Afghan war virus travel restrictions and now a fresh bad with America's oldest ally France over a submarine deal spokeswoman Jen Psaki says it happens nations disagree the larger point here and we'll hear the president talk about tomorrow is that we are committed to those alliances and that always requires work from every president from every global leader in a big emphasis will be on shared challenges like the pandemic and the climate change Sager make ani Washington

President Biden U. N. General Assembly Donald Trump Jen Psaki America France Sager Ani Washington
United Airlines CEO Wants to Ban the Unvaccinated From Flying

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:38 min | 12 hrs ago

United Airlines CEO Wants to Ban the Unvaccinated From Flying

"Status on united airlines very high status for many years near the very top. I'm trying to avoid united whenever i can. Their ceo is a leftist low-life. He's announced that he would like to ban the unvaccinated from his airplanes because as we know the unvaccinated are killing people left and right on his airplanes man sick. A bad bad man runs the united airlines. And of course the people put up with it the board and everybody else. United airlines is the one that announced it will no longer be placing people in their air air flight school based on competence split based on race and gender half the places that the united airlines pilot schools will be reserved for people of color and women gives you great faith that only the best will make it correct. They have announced they are not doing it. Based on quality but based on race and gender is gonna fly united. And if you don't let them know why i had a. You would've asked me who'd be the first volunteer to ban americans from his airline. This is all political by the way leftists know that most unvaccinated people not all but most are conservative. It's all a power trip and it's a way of taking revenge on the people. They most hate people me

United Airlines United
Chamberlin Rock Removed From University of Wisconsin Campus

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:11 min | 12 hrs ago

Chamberlin Rock Removed From University of Wisconsin Campus

"What is it about the university of wisconsin and race. He begins versus. Wisconsin is a crackpot university. My friends most universities are university of wisconsin stands out as particularly stupid. It's been a long time. It's not this is not new. But it's reached new lows the administration's recent decision. Do you remember this one. My friends i don't know if i covered it. Do i cover. I don't think so to move a rock because journalists referred to it with the n. word almost a hundred years ago was goofy enough. This is what he writes. it's beyond goofy. of course. is that really. That's what happened. I didn't remember the a somebody used the n. Word almost a hundred years ago to describe the rock. How did they know. Couldn't iraq be offensive. It's yours you wisconsin.

University Of Wisconsin Wisconsin Iraq
UW Medicine Looking for Volunteers for COVID-19 Booster Trial

KUOW Newsroom

00:37 sec | 14 hrs ago

UW Medicine Looking for Volunteers for COVID-19 Booster Trial

"U. dub school of medicine is looking for volunteers to participate in a covert booster trial. Kyw's ruby to luna. Has the details in scenes. Made by pfizer madonna and johnson and johnson target the viruses spike protein. The new trial vaccines are designed to trigger immune response to multiple proteins. Researchers went to test their safety and help people tolerate them. They hope the experimental vaccines will provide protection against a variety of strains and variants as a way to get ahead of the virus. The study is recruiting volunteers. Eighteen years and older who are already vaccinated

Dub School Of Medicine KYW Pfizer Madonna Johnson Luna
"years  ago" Discussed on Distorted View Daily

Distorted View Daily

02:21 min | 1 d ago

"years ago" Discussed on Distorted View Daily

"You called me right so eventually. She had enough courage to leave him. she found herself in a shelter kind of pick up her life with her little girl. Unfortunately the only thing she picked up was a nasty drinking habit all right so now she's drunk in a shelter with her daughter puking a bucket collapses on the bed. The little girl has no little toys to play with so she decides. Oh the bucket. I'll put it on my head. I'm going to be an astronaut But instead she actually falls in to the bucket full of vomit and promptly drowns and seen thank you. Oh this little girls only three months old. She didn't know what the hell's going on probably thought. The vomit was gerber baby. Food or something like bananas in mommy's breath So yeah the eighteen year old mom said she left ni- with another resident. She left the baby with another woman stuck in this shelter. Well she looked friendly enough. That susan smith schumer is kind. I don't know why she wanted to borrow my car though. Dun dun dun. She returned to the baby back to her room in threw up in a bucket before falling asleep. She found nyah in the container at around two forty pm. The baby was rushed to mount sinai medical center where she was pronounced dead at four ten. Her body bore no signs of trauma. A woman who answered the phone at the shelter last night declined to comment cops. Were questioning the mother at the twenty fifth precinct but she had not been charged last night. The medical examiner will perform an autopsy to determine the cause of death. Now there was an update to the story. And i believe this woman is not going to be charged with the death of her daughter. There you go baby falls into a vat of vomit second-story we have for you. Today comes out of china. That's right. Chinese surgeons have performed the world's first penis transplant hoping to get a little echo. There let's try it again. Lose the transplant. A little better short.

susan smith schumer Dun dun dun mount sinai medical center trauma china
"years  ago" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

08:51 min | 3 d ago

"years ago" Discussed on The Science Show

"Both the sun show on aren And here's richard. Ad although most experts believe we're decades away from genuine artificial intelligence with feelings of its own. The computer has come a very long way in a very short time. Not that long ago. We were impressed by this sort of thing. The leo ads. do grady. All all your view it will be star larry individual. It will be fifty years since australia's first computer ran. Its first program. That machine was invented by trevor. Pse and was cooled sidetrack professor. Peter thorne from the university of melbourne says it was the product of an extraordinary mind and it was. But now i coming up to the seventieth anniversary that's when in one thousand nine hundred fifty one. A special conference set up to launch computer science in australia. He is called smith with barbara with from the monash university museum of computing history on the significance of that event. So barbara in nineteen fifty one. What did computing look like. They were very few computers as way would regard a computer. Most computers at that time were actually people women who would do calculations with desktop equipment. They were human. Computers were was repetitive table calculations but the first digital computer industry was built and tested successfully in nineteen forty nine so computing was on the way as we would recognize it now so in nineteen fifty one if i went up to someone. And said hey. I'm a computer scientist. They wouldn't have any idea what i meant. Absolutely no idea. They were people who were mathematicians. Physicists and i would be using calculating equipment but they had no idea what a computer was general purpose electronic digital computer with stored programming and in nineteen fifty one seventy years ago when this first conference half it and there were some very early computers that were in use. Give me a sense of what these computers look like. They're big clunky things. Aren't they in the twentieth century during world war two. They were huge machines. They had valves. They took up huge amounts of space and generate a lot of heat and noise. And i were very few of them infecting existence at that time but in nine forty nine the australian. Csiro had built their own computer and it was probably the fossil fifth in the world. What were the big topics. What would proto computer scientists talking about it. This first conference prato computer scientists. This is interesting because they were. Mathematicians are engineers and i had the need to create calculating machines. There was a lot of work in science progress in that town. And the stimulated development of digital computing mathematicians. Were a little bit hesitant. They're were worried about the accuracy of this new machine and would work. And how could you check this. There was definitely a generational change in understanding how to use machines for calculating people at the conference probably had a little bit of an idea. There was sort of sensational articles in the paper of what was happening in the us with embiid cold. Any ac and certainly that we're aware of british developments but in fact when they came to the conference that sydney university in nineteen fifty one hour that to see their own real digital computer inaction sira which was at that time nine cirmac won the big new machine that trip and messed bid had built at the ira and even played music. It was just a stunning display of new technology. And that was the hot topic. What is digital computer. I think the importance of the first conference is really really introduced the concept of digital computing to a much wider audience. And this was a way of telling everyone in australia. Look what we have. We have a computer. This is what it can do and this is the future. I think the conference itself also has started the idea of computer signs as a separate body of sort and work and this was acknowledged the time that they realized that they were starting something really new and they needed to spread the word and so my understanding is at this time. There was still some debate as to whether analogue or digital computers. We're going to be the future. What's the distinction. Between those two different types. The analog computers stores data in a continuous form of physical quantities and performs calculations with the help of measures. So that early just use jesus that would move and then one step would be recorded at a time. It's quite different from the digital computer uses symbolic numbers to represent results. So you get data transferred become binary and then it can work with that. The analog computers during the nineteen forties very useful in working out calculations for wartime efforts and in the digital computers appear and gradually they took over so the digital computers are essentially a bit more easily programmable he could pick different things and faded and i think at the time using paper tapes or punched holes in paper. That's right initially sira the computer that the sro build it use paper tape or punch cards during its life. One of the terms in computing is to say that a digital computer is a general purpose machine and that is that you can put a programming. At this time they used to sequence of halls. that machine could read and turn those into numbers and then it would process and then it would print out that paper tape result and could be transferred into a printout on a piece of paper so the cards were an integral part of entering the data and programming. And so what. Were the other big topics at this conference with computer scientists was sort of staking out the territory and australia. One of the things is that you get to tell them what the words meant. What is an instruction. What is the program what he's store in memory. In a computer the whole terminology of computing was still in its infancy and i had to learn the definitions behold of new words and then they had to explain how programming work and people would in questioning. How did this machine complete a mathematical calculation and it was quite a technical conference in the people. There understood maths and they there to learn how these machines will go to help them. Some were representatives from different departments and governments who needed statistical information processing systems. They were engineers that came from the snowy mountains. Hydro electric authority. And i knew that the work required for the engineering calculations was massive and computing. Was going to be the answer but they were very very few women at the conference probably sixteen women with their manly from the sro and probably worked as female computers already. There were mathematically trained women who were working in the field and what about the scientists who were there at that conference. Did they have any sense of where computers might take us. They had an idea that this was going to be different in nineteen forty eight trevor. Pse even suggested we could have an encyclopedia on the computer sent through the phone system to you at home so you can get an answer rather than having to look in a big book. You could ask the computer and really not in forty. That was pretty good. Idea of what might happen lighter on the idea that we could store information and share it to such an extent with a really big idea. And what about the general public or journalists watching from the sidelines. What did they think of this. Conference and computing well. Competing at the time was a mystery to the general public and journalists. Used great phrases like the conference was advertised as wonder radio brain in show and that was what the emphasis of the conference in the newspaper was. They had a wonder. Brian and people didn't really quite understand. I mean the fact that. I put radio in the middle. You know..

larry individual Peter thorne monash university museum of co australia barbara sydney university university of melbourne grady trevor Csiro richard smith Hydro electric authority us Brian
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

05:21 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"The mind this out from the party in some ways because they can do things with abode without have the breath. So that's how i think and so it's have been confirmed so much that was talking about here it is true it is. I am not of who to make another different belief system. I'm here for to heal the churches that risk. They can heal the mormon church. Have many people around the world that have should make you very big differs. If it could happen. I don't know s i have no control over what's going on and the paper should not judge me to go into the mormon church and be a member of the mormon church. It's i do. What god he's telling me to do a nigga. It's if it's a way to he the world by going into the mormon church and talk to those leaders that i don i talk to the leaders over the malone show ch- when i was in salt lake city and but i don't know if they understood what was going on because they the they are more though the beast by not seeing women as coming from god is so many that say that a woman can't hear from god and that's not true with that's live from the devil and I don't believe in double. But i know he exists as i have seen him being confronted with him manned almost speaking of him. I don't believe in him. But i know his exist but i believe in god and he exist. So thank you for i. I the spirits coming through. I can't ended it nal because would going to take with me. My my surf played them. Place me to a better place for for the spirit to cover was sitting on my computer. My laptop read about the facebook. Thanks so now. I am back to mostly are recording. Where i'm recording my focused. So i was say what's going on and you know it's always say in the most of the time in the end of my recording of the poll the cast of varies spirits coming through. But you i told you that From the beginning it was spirit here and the it so it of course i should understand date that it's warsaw woman. That should come to. Because i'm talking about way. So she was from. This thought she and they you know what's going on on our from now They know they know that order our life the whole life so that's was easy for her to know that dan should talk about women in the church associates coming forward in the..

facebook salt lake city double god malone show
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:43 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"That's what they say in the show which i don't say it don't say it but it can have happened so that they didn't like that he also smith started to make women be equal with the men in the church that women have more power. That's was on. Its way when he was killed and now and then when another man took over the show which he stop women to come forward and that's what god won't them to see in me that i have. I have the healing power. An i have done healing inside the church without. They know that. I have done it but there have been people that asked me for. He and i have the heat them with that. Nha of healing that. I got when i was two to three years old. When i died and god he let me when i was dead and that energy that healing and the that i got when i was the shine that i can use for healing people so i have dumb healing menomonie types and in on there is healing in the many more than only healing for diseases. The body healing. It's stereotypes other sorts healing. That i have done and the it's many things that comfort comfort people and and the that's when i don't touch mentor People about when they are coming to me and ask for healing for the mental sick children for example than is. Tell them that. I don't lay hamdan mental sick people. But i can lay hand on the hugh and make a healing for you to understand your child better to hear what the child is say and to come up to you and that my lay hand on them and hold on mental sick so there is so much other healings ways but people think that this that healing is only about the body that decent and of course the mind is a part of the body but a talk like.

two three years old hamdan
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:18 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"That other church doesn't have so they are the the most right but they are not right and they going into into the wrong direction. And that's why god wants me to work on them. But it's so very hard. As i am a woman and a special mormon church doesn't won't have any and the women be involved in in their belief system in believing and they don't want women to talk like hearing from god. And when i say something diehard from those leaders in the church they say you should not talk about it because that's your personal testimony for yourself and not for other people to here so they stop the though stinks if a woman ten. Am that they hear from god. Tell them to. That's on before you and not for other people to now as so they They stopped women to go forward in that church. They have some symbolic power. A women have symbolic power in mormon church so they say that Those women women are equal in the in the mormon church but they are not the his far from it and the in the in the usa smith stays. I will seem the pioneers museum and read what it was saying in those things they had to show. And i saw that the the mormon church in joseph smith's time they lay ham and healing people in the church that women and today it's only it's only man that can lay hand the he'll people so that women have been taken away from what you say smith say and did and he was on his way to make more power to women when he was killed. Some mormons save layouts was killed if from the inside but they use they pay people to to Kill you'll smith but it was other people that have paid for it..

joseph smith today smith ten usa god
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"And they just say that yes will help you say and i didn't know what it was but when i come up to the center of a family search there was a man that coming that should help me on the computer and his name was the f. and eight have not been south things special if it walsum that jeff will sit with me and we look kim into i. Have names of mike graham mothering. Those of forest on sisters related to me in in the short time period and the his. So that my grandfather And i don't know i. He must have had someone with him from have a that that make him do what he did because he he look at my graham father and his so he pointed out on on the computer and he showed me that my grandfather he was coming with his mother to a to a man that his mother married and Everyone was thinking that was his father. And if you say that the he was adopted of this man he that's not his real father he said to me and then And then he saw only say to me that. I'm going into the arcade and give you some books. He said and then they go in into the arcade and he come out with too big books and when i open the books that was the short name most everyone that i have got in my dna test that they have some to me. Those names the i was had the d. a. night together with and the it was royal and noble other. Addy them through really knew what i was looking at. Because i have not had more than i am. I have seen those names. But i am not done. The research on those names. But when i come back to sweden i am research on my brand new father if i could find his real father and it's a i could do it because able will get many shorten names that.

sweden mike graham jeff graham kim eight
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:17 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"Time and it doesn't matter as long as we still are here on this planet that God can take his time and he he use the time and he but in heaven there is no time but here on earth god is time to for a long time. I had like bush is flying around in front of my eyes. They was in all direction flying around in my bedroom. When i was away as say that with a big let us i was awake. People own the whole time telling me that. I'm dreaming but i get bisham and i am awake when i get. I was awake in my bed before i was so awake. So as set me up in the bed when the be real awake they was gone. It is when i am in total relaxed mood. I get these messages. I get it very much. Because i never get in the night mars and more so when i wake up i often are singing and laughing and that was for savages ago. No i don't need to be in this tutor relaxing mode. Because i am in relaxing mood. Most of the time and three now for some days ago did i wake up and trees to steal. So i could see was like knots on them so it was on a way to growing out tweaks from the branches. Maybe we grow out something from the notes and they pab down that and a four these night waking up at night so this picture the three with a map behind it and so very clear for me today what what the definition was about because the then when was in jerusalem. Hoda voice telling me that that should mighty name will not did my diem a i. The voice say at the should enter into the mormon church because they have the best researcher on out on sisters..

today jerusalem three savages earth days four God
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:10 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"That tree and the and i wrote this thanks. I go to read guy wrote. I thought it was over with a tree but they come back again. These night as it started with i so one branch and i thought it was a sign of jesus with his Or the had owner on a dove had the torn over the crown of tone. But it wasn't. But i i. I didn't know what i so so it started with one branch in the night showing me and then it started with more branches together so i wrote this. I thought this it was over with a tree but it come to me again this night this time did. I had a piece of map behind it. The map covered the whole backside. What does it means. I could not read where i was from. No city nothing to take from. The map had no big cities or much or much. Sure odes but it had a frame in it like it means a special place and not whatever plays hope by will be showed where these places are from god and it will mo and i will move there if it is a sick so really psyche called psychic call place that exists for real or anisette a symbol for something. I didn't know this is how god are many types. He gave me like rebus some times. Everything is wants but also like this piece by piece. How many pieces have these ripples. This piece these pieces have got so far. One is started that a so a branch of a tree coming out from my more wall at the side of my bed. i thought it was a part of jesus crown. this was for eighteen months ago. That what right for seven yes ago so it started about nine years ago so he doesn't come very quick everything.

eighteen months ago one branch this night jesus about nine years ago seven yes ago These night One
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"Stop and not a no king and search for god they accept jesus as god and then they don't go forward that's means that they be killed in the spirit because the church doesn't want them to move forward. They only stop in the gate where jesus standing but there is another fold there is another folded is two fold like they said the book of life and the book of death is to books in heaven and it's two folds in heaven and the first fold is jesus fold and the other door to nixed. Fold is closed for those people that them at the preachers in the church. That these from the devil and the devil have work since day one to go into to be the flock leader and he of course does doesn't want to be a leader of the the biggest the most important fold he won't or people to in fold one. Stop it to go forward to fold to where they come to know. God the real god that created everything held he had created. Jesus also here created the darrell. Also for to test test before or llc. Have not been and that thing that he can. God can see if There is people that follow him. That do what god wants us to do. A if it was not the devil he is a tool for god because the that will make the test and if they don't if they follow him them they are out for to be in the city. They can some people our nice even if they are full of the devil and they can be out in the meadow around a city but the those people in the folder the little flock that follow god that to god they they are in the city in have they are in the new euro salem in the city but those other people that have working good work but they have not called they have no going into that gate for the second fold. They never be in the city they they can play around like small shield run like the by beliefs saying they the dad they know. Don't know anything and those that these in the meadow they don't know anything they are like. Oh she had run they. They don't need to know when they only know how to play jumping around them. Playing in kidding leo. Make jokes to each other and like this light thinks but those in the seat the thus the people that have search for god have over the being truly in their heart mccain for god so today it come up these memories and it was for seven years ago and it's a seven is holy number. I feel the spirit of someone here with me now because what. I'm talking about what i will talking about And i had. There is a picture and it's a like a tree with many branches. It was a so it. In addition that The tree was in the special area on the map..

jesus Jesus today seven years ago seven first fold day one second fold two folds two fold euro salem one
"years  ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:34 min | 4 months ago

"years ago" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"I have taken rest for some days from recording my podcast. The yesterday its hep is something that i wanted to talk about with you. And the the risks Confirming about that those sisters that we have our level on some those is connected with us in some way at they they leave behind the the way land the try to take contact with us but the often is it a lot. The church people a church leader. Stoltze that take care of the beliefs and tell us what they want us to believe or they what they want us to not believe and what is deemed months. And what is good and you know. We live in the last days and those things that have been talking about. Being good is start to be bad and the bad things started to be good so it has changed two thousand fifteen. Was it when it started to change much in in the world. We can see and i get people that say i have contact with delmonico's. Thanks because they don't know and they talk from the devil because they they are. She'll run from the devil and the devil is not scare the ballot the church the he can stand in the pool pit and the teaching in the church. In that way he want us to believe. So that's what. I am not in in and the religion. I only know that god exists them. I'm i'm gonna work lena. When i started the in this stu place in noblest she inside me but the the sad thing is that. I don't get so much people believe in what i say. Because there is so much whispering in years that these demonic that.

yesterday Stoltze lena two thousand fifteen delmonico last
"years  ago" Discussed on The HT Guys

The HT Guys

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"years ago" Discussed on The HT Guys

"P LCD. That's P stands for progressive scan will explain that in a little bit if you don't know and Samsung promises to have ten eighty P D lp which is digital projection later this spring. And I saw these things. Cas they're unbelievable. I mean it's it's actually. It almost feels like you're watching things that have looked better than than live like it's better than real time. It's it's unbelievable this this so why go to the baseball game just watching on TV? It's better I mean. It looks better than looking out your window. And also if you if you just bought your hd set don't worry it's far from obsolete there are currently no programs that are broadcast in ten eighty. P and don't expect any in the near future so then you ask. Why should I spend the money on the higher resolution while the manufacturers they say the ten eighty p set will still produce a better picture on a large screen with the current HD HD programming They make the analogy that blowing up a two megapixel picture Versus a six megapixel picture. won't look as good so obviously the more Pixels in or scan lines in this case you have the better. The picture will look will look when it's blown up and the other thing is you can expect ten. Eighty p DVDs at some point in the future probably well before the broadcast or switch over to that format and there's gotta be some news about some direct TV or somebody's got to be doing something right. Exactly also I'm sure you've seen the ADS that Directtv claims they'll have fifteen hundred high definition channels. Well don't hold your breath waiting for these channels anytime soon direct. Tv still needs to launch a satellite over the next few years make room for these channels and most of the satellite space will be used to transmit local high definition channels They expect up two thousand and four as far as the national channels. They only expect to have one hundred and fifty of those And so basically to make matters worst direct. Tv to make room for this. In addition to the extra satellites that helped now use impact for compression which requires the H. E. Subscribers to get a new dish and a new receiver. Right now. There's no announced date for one new dish and receiver will be available to use my limited abilities.

Samsung Directtv
"years  ago" Discussed on The HT Guys

The HT Guys

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"years ago" Discussed on The HT Guys

"Hdtv Home Theater. Podcast first one. It's our inaugural one. We're getting to know how to do this and getting to know you. So we'll introduce ourselves in the show. My name is Brian Russell with me as always my partner are during. How's IT GOING TODAY? And so let's start off. I guess just kind of introducing who we are doing what we're going to do with the podcast and and I know that you just met us but we're ready to take relationship to the next level you know. Get to know you a little bit more or I guess you get to know us. We don't know who you are so How about a little bit about yourself are what? What do you know about Home Theater high definition? Well I worked for Advanced Digital Systems Group at Sony pictures for five years there and we basically built equipment to for the movie and Television Industry. And that's where I got involved with high-definition TV and actually Kinda took over from there. So what was the first time we saw high def say it was about nine hundred ninety six nine hundred ninety seven at a trade show and once. I saw it I said this is. This is the way it's gotta be and ever since then my wife's Kinda been sorry that I worked for Sony. Yeah I hear you. I don't think I started with. Adhd and. Tell them if you're on ninety eight that was my first introduction. Hdtv and it's changed my life. I am now a believer and there's a lot more complicated than regular TV. I remember as a kid. Gosh all my father did was connect to wires to the TV and turn it on and we only had like what seven channels in Los Angeles. Back in the sixties. Now you have to have all kinds of Stereo Equipment. High-definition tuners Do you get it over the air versus cable satellite. So we're going to try and demystify that. Yeah my dad connected me to the back of the TV. Move a little bit that way. We have a little bit that way so the show format. I guess we're GONNA do basically we'll do what we call on it news reviews and how to's right so we're going to sounds good. We'll start off with the news and see what's going on in high definition. We'll do some reviews of different. Maybe shows maybe products TV's stuff. I'm a big audio guy. So you'RE GONNA get a lot of audio stuff out of me. My opinion high definition without the surround sound is. I don't know why bother why bother and we'll we'll be answering questions from you the email or sending us an MP three our email address is HDTV podcasts. At MAC DOT COM. And we'll probably depending on how the show goes get her own domain and change that but for the now we're hosting it on my dot. Mac Account all right so let's see backgrounds. We worked for Sony Pictures. Did you mention the Academy Award? No I didn't. That's a good point and we'll just throw that out there. There's there's some buzzwords Academy Award Academy Award. We see one. We actually got an academy award for technical achievement for our digital audio dubber that we created for for Sony Pictures. And we're both avid home theater. High-definition nuts we've done custom home theater installation in the southern California area more. We really like to talk about it more than we actually like to people's houses and do it for them but yeah it was a great idea till we had the first customer who complained about every tiny little aspect and we said we want to be architects. More than we want to be installers. Yeah the whole tech support thing in hand holding us just not but we will take our time this show. Actually we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA go pretty slow after we get through the news. We're going to kind of just define what high definition is given. Hdtv primer so a few are an HDTV Guru. Maybe a little bit review or kind of slow for you but just hang out with this. We're going to get into the more advanced stuff as we move along and through the next few podcasts. If you don't know anything about it then we'll give you a bunch to talk about with your friends and Family. And you'll know all the buzzwords and all this stuff but with without any further ado list the news what do you got all right so. I on on tap today. We have a research firm called in-stat. They're reporting that. Hdtv'S HDTV service within. The United States is in four million homes and ten million worldwide. They're predicting that by the year..

Sony Pictures Hdtv Home Theater Brian Russell Academy Award Home Theater Sony Adhd Los Angeles United States partner in-stat California Advanced Digital Systems Group Mac Television Industry
"years  ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"years ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"This character and they had done a lot of writing dyrlund as well Ms username terminator and that was really striking to me. Just that something like that. People were doing these major things like publishing books books and doing a cool hoax but also you know they went to their also sort of adding an online element to it and it wasn't just your average sort of diary of a a twenty year old in Utah or whatever a lot of the other things were so it really connected into into what was happening in popular culture. That's interesting because I think at least for a little while you and I worked together on live journal for a couple of years and that was the first place I ever heard of an author named George R R Martin right and he's still on live journal Right But he's never updated right but I mean he hasn't finished any of the books so he's probably not updating us live on that much achieve better not be and yeah. I'm curious for you about like as these moments and you get to work both across live journal and twitter and many other sides. Wh what what was something that jumped out to you of you realizing okay. This is going to connect into the world at large. And it's not just our little. You know bunch of Goth kids writing journals. How'd you know he regards? Everybody was gone right for me. It's again it's another personal note I I had been working for a while for live. Journal is the only system men. They're only a couple of US really keeping it going and I was burned out okay. Just physically mentally emotionally exhausted working long hours and I got to go home for a visit and my sister-in-law was there and I was telling her you know how tired I was. And why am I even doing this. What does this even worth? Does it even matter to people. I mean it's just a website you know it's just tack doesn't have meaning in the real world because at that point it wasn't totally you know a given that the Internet would become as ubiquitous as it is still see him like Pr- Frivolous and it was having real impact on my on my body. I was telling my sister in law. You know the sites used by more than in a million people and that doesn't mean anything to me it's you can't visualize can't really feel a million people and how they interact with site and she said to me through tears Lisa. Do you realize what this site is for me. I have a new mom. I moved into a new community. She Herself Office Bhai and Liberal. She moved onto conservative community and she didn't have any friends around her and she had postpartum depression and she made a community. It community back then called hip Mama's which was a community of MOMS online? who found each other no matter where they lived and could talk with each other around the things that were harder to do in their community where they lived and she said without them she? She didn't know where she would turn. She would just be depressed. You know and She had a were fulfilling life just because the site was available to her and that actually kept me going for years after that and being open to those stories about the individual people and what the Internet did for them is what kept me motivated you know and then moving onto twitter a lot of similar stories like that now is it for me was sort of when I could feel on an individual level. How how a person's life was made better or more full from this site that that was actually bigger to me than some of the news stories? That happened later on. Sounds like that's still part of your motivation. Still today definitely a huge part of my motivation. Shen later on twitter. I've heard stories directly from from women that were in the Meana region during our spring. And what twitter allowed them to do and how they communicate with each other around things like whether or not the street they were on was safe for them to go outside and hearing those stories directly Klay from these women was so powerful can going longer there So as long as people are sharing those stories with me it it continues to motivate me to participate in this. And this thing that I still believe to be Overall a positive influence on an individual level bruce curious for you you were may be one of the very first people to build a platform that gave million other people voice What was that that early moment? That comes to your mind. Yeah I can I. I can define the moment easily because We had a user. His name was bladder He was living in San Francisco and he was He was a gay man older. Gay Man I think Middle aged at the time and again this is twenty years ago and He was somebody who felt disenfranchised by society. And by the culture he lived in The AIDS crisis had been You know huge in the late eighties season he had lost. You know a lot of his friends who were his real family He was somebody who had been separated from his from his family. Because of of WHO and what he was And and was alone and he found open diary and started posting very soon after we launched like take a about a month or two months in he started posting and he started with very tentative things. Just kind of saying you know what life was like for him and not not introducing all the problems that he had had and The places where you know culture society had had treated him poorly poorly And he met a lot of people and a lot of people fell in love with him because of his style of writing and the honesty that they could feel coming through and it really was an amazing thing to watch people who You know in real life maybe would have ignored that person discounted that person or minimalized him because of who they were which you know today I like to think culturally. We're in a much better place than that. But in nineteen ninety eight. There was a lot of stigma and he He was one of the people who sent an email into us More than once and said you know I was having a really difficult time In my life I had lost a lot of people. I didn't have a community and I found that here here and the site saved my life And I had more than one email conversation with him where I said you know. I really appreciate that. Like like what. Lisa said. Those are the things that still motivate of eight me. I think I think it's easy to forget the personal impact that the online world has on people today good and bad and that it can N. B.. Good it's easy to look at twitter and look at facebook and look at the things that are happening and how awful people are to each other and say the world will be better off without the Internet and I don't believe that I think I think there's still space for there to be a place where people can be good to each other and understand each other And Not Judge People by what they know of them in real life. I think that's that's the real power of what we do. And that's what keeps me going is knowing that you you know. It's there are still people out there who are disaffected for whatever reason and what we do can give them a voice. I think that it's a beautiful sentiment to wrap things up with Bruce Andrew Lisa. Thank you all for joining us on function. I appreciate you taking time. Thank you thank you. Thank you thank these days. It feels like we all live in a world that social media created for us and so it's easy to forget that somebody had to build these tools in the first place all of us check facebook instagram and twitter every single day but those apps that we use were shaped by the work that was done twenty years ago people people make decisions about how we were GonNa comment respond to each other. How we were going to share ideas and it really affects the way that we see the world and so I'm glad to give voice nice to the people that made those choices invented those tools one because we should give credit to creators who should get credit to inventors also people can realize there were some really thoughtful choices that maybe we should revisit and start to think about again? If we're going to start to fix some of the problems that have happened in the social media created world that we have now functions produced by bridget. Armstrong are associate producers Maurice Cherry. The shocker was the executive producer of audio for the Vox media podcast network. Our engineers are soon invest. Rama Murthy at Floyd. Our theme music was composed by Brandon McFarland and pick. Thanks to the entire team glitch. You can follow me on twitter at the DASH and of course you can always check out function at glitch dot com slash function. Please remember to subscribe to the show wherever you listen and we'll be back next week week with a brand new episode.

twitter Bruce Andrew Lisa Journal Utah US George R R Martin depression Vox media San Francisco Brandon McFarland Meana Shen Rama Murthy Klay bridget Armstrong facebook Maurice Cherry
"years  ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

10:21 min | 2 years ago

"years ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"Machines And it was sitting there mostly unused and so we thought well we've got all this memory all over the the data center That we're not really using we've got we've got to get everything we can out of everything we're paying for right now because anything that's sitting there unused CPU CPU memory. Storage is waste is a waste for us that we can't afford right to membership. At least we're talking about is is open source technology you brad and others created together. That was letting you grow a big social networking grow it's big database of users and be able to do it on you know really cheap hardware and pretty much free software and and that's still something that underpins a lot of the social networks today right. That's my understanding. Yes you don't want to take any blame for history you. Here's for you if you eat at your at that point where it's starting to grow and starting to boom. You don't have millions of dollars in your pockets like what were you duct taping together to make this thing still keep working one of the lucky things for me was that Because I did ORIG- I worked at dream hosts and they're running their dream book Guest Books I knew from that and being really close contact with the people making that running it that the database was sort of the pain point so when I wrote Oh my sites I went to my way. Well you know coating them so that there is as little databases possible and you know. Ninety percent of the traffic may be. He was hitting static pages when people are actually loading the web logs and diaries and stuff so it didn't. That didn't eliminate any pro. Your you know all the problems looms but it made it so I could run it pretty reasonably with the money that was coming in from paid memberships and it was never a huge problem. There was a little silly that I was Leasing all these co located servers. Just I'm just a guy who lives in a basement apartment and You know all this money's coming in and out and doing all this up but it was never a real hassle for me Other thing I'd say on the topic of you've of not having a lot of money is we didn't get funding from outside and we weren't sort of building consumer services assuming the money would come later. which which I think is a really different experience than Some of the sites leader. Aung which is we knew everything we built. Somebody had is sort of agree to donate us. You know that's that's how we started with just donations An later on be willing to pay for the account because we weren't really getting supplemental income from anywhere also every feature. We built everything we invested in had to have some value to a person that was a dollar that they would give us anything. That was a very different experience than what you saw. Leader her with other sites there. You couldn't just put Google ads on it and there wasn't You know some sort of easy you know apple pay or something like that and And also at that time people weren't doing startups that were these things either. Because you couldn't nobody would invest in a bunch of people publishing their diaries online right. That was a different world. That was crazy and there were ad networks. I mean but they were not easy and they didn't work well and they mailed you a check once once a month and So it was a whole different thing. I mean we ran. We ran on AD revenue For a couple of years before we added a subscription model and it was crazy because CPM's went up up up until the measure of how many how much you get per every thousand ads viewed and Those numbers went up for about a year and a half and then two thousand two thousand and one came and it suddenly went to about three or or four percent of what it was before the bubble burst see lasts like ninety seventy percent of your revenue. Well it was funny because I mean we had like literally about a month and a half where we had signed a contract with the company that used to be a dot com and they were paying a fixed rate for advertising across sites that would sign up for their network work and it was this number that was exponentially larger than what we had been earning but this was the way that was then people were signing for crazy easy amounts and literally the next month their lawyers called and they were like. We're avoiding this contract because there's no you know the Internet economies collapsing. There's no way So so interesting. Because there's this sort of like it's such a different environment economically You have these networks that you how are at that point largest things anybody had seen but by today's standards are you know Almost A small small site right so it's sort of AH different different scale to it But one of the things that's interesting is The evolution the concepts think of as a social network to being able to follow somebody or friends. Somebody even find somebody Andrew Maybe I'll start with you. What what kind of social features did you include in your sights in? which ones did you? You deliberately not build included Buddy list feature so you keep track of what people were you know. Essentially it's following people and it would tell you when they updated dated. I had features where you could sort of mark off. Oh these were my favorite diary posts. The people added Whatnot Whatnot I did steer somewhat clear of sort of location and stuff like that which a lot of people were asking for. I did wind up adding a location search search but it was there sort of like a lot of warnings before you would be listed in it so that nobody would sort of accidentally get listed or or not understand what was involved in. It also wasn't the most granular. You couldn't actually search that small smaller area to find somebody Because there's a lot more worries about sort of stalkers in some stuff like that in those days. Yeah that was the concern. Then what about privacy could you could you make your Diary private we had a couple of levels of privacy with one being. You could just lock the entire diary so if it had been public you could just you know at any moment just set it to be locked and then there is always an for each post you added. There's a little check box if if you wanted that one just to be private and if you did you could set up different passwords for your friends and let them view it or you could just have it for yourself. which was what a lot of people people did when we started Those things all evolved very quickly at the beginning of the site because when we started you posted and everything was public blick and It took me one day from the first poll. I post going live to where I read something and I said I really want to talk to that person. I want to say they something and the only thing that you could do then was post email addresses which nobody wanted to do on the private diary so the second night the site was live. I wrote the code for for what we call notes then which were comments and I. It was the first time comments had been put the bottom of a page of content. And I'm sorry about that. Thanks that worked out. Great you're welcome but At the time it was like that was what made the site social because now suddenly you could talk talk back and forth we each other and Conversations would evolve in the comment threat or the note thread that we were calling it down and Privacy evolved quickly after that we Eventually got to Where we have Private semiprivate friends only or public content members only content or public content and those were all things that users want and we were very similar with location to to what Andrew was saying like. We would let you do location by state and country in the US the region and country in Canada or just country outside but nothing nothing close in that because it scary and there were you know stockers like that was the concern people showing up at your door. Yeah that's interesting. So what were the. The controls like social controls in funding and following on online journal the controls on live journal. Were you could create for any post that you made on a per post basis you could choose public available to anyone but but what I loved about it is. You could also choose a specific group. You could also be entirely private. You're the only person you could read it But you could also You Know Live Journal had the concept. That's you know sort of similar to facebook now where you have a group of friends who allow in your friends with them. You're part part of the social community together and on a per post basis. You could decide who share that with an individual a group of people so really similar to what you see on on facebook today Unless they change it next week and that was I think that was huge for community building and sharing because you could still Grellet community that way it wasn't totally walled off. One of the most remarkable things is all these platforms as early as they were not only grew to have millions of users. There were these stories that became part of culture became part of the world. I'm sure each of you had experiences like that. Andrew I start with you. I'm curious about what's the time when you found this connection between your work work in realizing it was going to connect to you know what was happening in society overall. I guess the most interesting one that sort of made me realize that Dairyland wasn't just sort of a closed bubble but also reached out to the world was there is a literary hoax an author name. Jt Leroy JT. Roy Oy is a twenty one year old writer with two books of fiction based on his experiences as the son of a truck stop prostitute have on. Jt Jeremiah. Terminator Data Roy. He doesn't like to show his face to the press. JC stay you from the bottom of my heart. So people think that Jay Tiller Roy might not really exists. I names Laura Albert and I am the writer J t published. I think three books and then it turned out it. was somebody just pretending to.

Andrew Live Journal facebook Jt Leroy JT brad Jt Jeremiah Jay Tiller Roy Google Aung Roy Oy Laura Albert apple US
"years  ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

10:14 min | 2 years ago

"years ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"Oh Oh yeah that's correct. Yes and what did scaling look like on open diary. How fast growing when it was first started to boom? Yeah when it first started. It actually started booming really fast like things and we didn't have a marketing budget. Either I mean I put the site online and I think two or three days in the second or third day it was featured shirt as a netscape dot COM 'cause netscape portal. Then who was a cool site of the day and graduation. Oh yeah that was a very I wish honors uh-huh but that one you know suddenly there was much traffic from that and then We got picked up as a yahoo cool site of the week like six weeks later. That's like the Oscars like exponential from Netscape DOT COM. Cool side of the day so We very quickly by ninety nine. We were registering like between ten and twenty thousand thousand people a day. Wow And that that era that was unbelievable. Yeah and I on on high days when there was a lot of publicity And then you know over. By the time we got to about two thousand four. We had registered about two and a half million accounts now. That's not to say they were all you know. Unique users don't know but they were all individual accounts So we had all the same problems like scaling Was relearning is. We went there. Weren't you know there weren't things that were that outside. I launched the site funny story originally on a shared Microsoft access database. Because I was like doing. This is basically a proof of concept. See at work I put it online. We're all physically cringing. I know the worst. It's the worst story ever and I think I was about thirty six hours in when I was like okay. There's enough off. And there were a few dozen people and it was like okay. We're moving to sequel server. Because obviously this is never going to last and then so that you know just became a constant sort of how do you add more capacity. How do you add how do you you know bill better technology? Whatever but a lot of it was and I think we all had the same thing it was like it was things that hadn't happened nothing before scaling before scale offending? We're GONNA take a quick break and we'll come back with more of our conversation with Lisa Bruce Andrew. This podcast is supported by so fi. If you're like most millennials you know you should be investing but you're not sure where to start getting your money right doesn't have to be hard heart so fine. Best makes it easy. It's the first investing platform offers stocks. Automated investing in Crypto all in one and would suffice stock bits. You could buy a piece piece of your favorite brands dock. With as little as a dollar see how easy it is at S-o-f-i dot com slash box listeners. Who Fund their account with Promo Link Box will receive twenty five dollars mystery stock Yup free stock just for signing up? Here's how it works. I go to s-o-f-i dot com slash box and create an account. Then you choose to either do it yourself or let. Soap is automated investing build your portfolio you stock bits by fractional shares of your favorite stocks get started with as little as one dollar again again listeners who fund their account from Lincoln B o x will receive twenty five dollars mystery stock just for signing up that's S. O. F. I dot com slash Fox so so fight lending CORP CFL number six zero five four six twenty. Here's a question. What is technology how you're listening to me right now on your phone your smart speaker or laptop we know that's tech but tech is also the way we develop new medicines? It's how we compose music. It's our connection to friends and strangers and it's changing every day. I'm Arial Jim Ross and when I see those changes I see worlds. I can't can't wait to dive into question because none of us are immune to those changes and we need to understand their impact right now. That's why I'm hosting a new tech. podcast called reset from recode by Fox will examine how artificial intelligence is changing the way we write. I had a bizarre thought. Enter my head. which was I wonder if at some point this is going to be able to write my novel ideas better than I stood algorithms augment flaws in our thinking over and over again? We're seeing these algorithms display by and it can have there is serious real world consequences for people we'll talk to the bio hackers who are challenging regulators and scientific standards. So would would I sell crisper that somebody could inject it make bigger. Who knows and we'll look at the tools we have to save our rapid warming World Jones? I think you need fixed-wing detection radar the public everybody. It's we're all in this together. Every story is a story. And we're GONNA break that down. Subscribe right now on Apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP. Uh from stitcher and the VOX media podcast network. Hello Listener. I'm Sean Ramos. Firm host of today explained. Vox Daily. News podcast every day Monday through Friday. My team and I look at what's happening in the world. We pick one essential news story that defines our moment and ask smart people to help us understand it in about twenty minutes or less. It's the perfect way to start or end your day subscribed today explained for free on apple podcasts or in your favorite podcast APP. It's from stitcher and the VOX media. PODCAST network what. If all you're breaking news alerts had a voice voice. What would that sound like? It would sound like today. Explain Daily News podcast from Vox. I'm Sean Ramos Grim. Everyday my team take one essential new story politics metoo movies sports science. And we break it down into twenty minute episodes perfect for your ride. Home subscribed got to today explained on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen from stitcher and the VOX media podcast network welcome back to function. I'm in L. Dash. We are in the midst of an amazing roundtable with some of the folks folks who created the earliest forms social media back in one thousand nine hundred nine. We're GONNA jump right back into it now so this wild west where you're all building these large sites and thousands of people are signing up every day which is extraordinary? And there's no marketing infrastructure back. Then there's no google ad words he can't to slap ads on it You didn't have enough people to be selling as on your own and also everything was much more expensive. You couldn't just go to Amazon and say give me some web services. I'd like to run a big site. Okay so what do you do when that bill comes due for this server that you're suddenly paying for this database that you're suddenly paying for it. It's scary I mean. It is scary and And it was way more expensive than we were lucky. WE ENDED UP CO locating in Atlanta and there was a bunch of Bandwidth available and server space face available in Atlanta that had been built for the Olympics was leftover because Atlanta had assumed they were going to have this tech Mecca. And all these companies. We're GONNA come. And they were going to be the hub of the Internet after the Olympics and and suddenly there was all this empty capacity for a couple years. We got pretty good discounts on. But that didn't last night it's like you know the aws bills today WCM's on sorry Amazon Web Services Bills Today are are fractions of what we were paying for then for way less capacity. So it's it's a lot easier. I think to do this kind of thing now. A lot of reasons. But that's a big and Lisa. What about you did was there a moment where you all were looking on the live your team looking around and saying oh my gosh? How are we going to pay for all this now? I was every day I mean I I was the cloud personally. I twenty four hours a day and I thought the data center constantly Bentley. And you know we tried to to utilize different things like you know. CDN Akimoto was started back there then. you know load balancers and stuff like that but the cost of equipment the cost of hardware and always came with these big support. Contracts that you didn't really want to use and you didn't really want to talk to the sales people totally different time With this assumption that you had money and we only had the money that you know our users would pay us and so that's where you know for us. That's where some of the open source technologies like cash deal came out of. I mean that was literally men cassidy was. We cannot afford to scale scale database performance with the money that we have in front of us so we have to figure out another way to do it So a little bit about that. which is which is that? You needed a database to be able to handle all the users that you had The solutions that were out there but like millions of dollars they were so yeah. Millions of dollars I mean and it was only with the big big vendors and then so you say we're going to cobble together our own system to run a really big database basic or or something something that doesn't require us to scale keep throwing money at storage because it's way too expensive. The hardware is too expensive even just the whole infrastructure around it was too expensive. We definitely went through some trials of of weird stuff Using like The I don't remember what they're calling out there was like the apple apple external storage devices back then we were like what if we changed a bunch of those together in the data center. They're not even rack mounted or anything Probably very stylish look beautiful together though totally and yeah we just we just knew again going back to that. We knew that the community grew if we were fast and so anytime we were slow. People Bullet go away. You know or or people would be very mad to be honest and So yeah that's that's Kinda where men cash grew as we thought we've got to be able to figure out a way to utilize what we do pay for and we knew that we paid for memory that goes in.

Apple VOX media netscape Lisa Bruce Andrew yahoo Atlanta Vox Daily Olympics Sean Ramos Grim Sean Ramos Amazon google Fox Jim Ross cassidy Jones
"years  ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

11:54 min | 2 years ago

"years ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"Brad Pitt and it was sort of a satirical pretending to be Brad Pitt and very over the top way very odd and then it became the The top Google result for if you search for Brad Pitt hit. That seemed like a big thing. That was getting a lot of people and then Brad Pitt's lawyer Jennifer Aniston at the Times lawyers made them shut it down but it was just stuff like that. There'd be the odd thing where suddenly some page was getting. You know five thousand people a day or something as all the coverage of blogs grew you know and maybe I guess two thousand two thousand and one something like that you know. There is a very obvious traffic boost. I had to get more powerful servers stuff like that and these days somebody like that would probably just make like fake Brad Pitt twitter account absolutely. Yeah absolutely I think at that time. That was something people weren't used to that kind of parody and now it's commonplace because wikipedia hadn't even really become a thing yet. I mean I think it existed hadn't taken off so the idea of like you're editing it yourself or there could be information putting out there and you don't know if it's reliable or not was was pretty new yeah and there was a big period in two thousand and two thousand and one and two were. There was a lot of press coverage where people were like logging. Is this new thing. Hey they are these people crazy like. Why are they writing about themselves online? We've got a lot of really a lot of great press from that and a lot of Technology writers saying you know. Here's something really interesting. That's happening with technology being done with it. That's giving people a voice so that was cool. We got a lot of traffic off of that was Lisa. was that some of the some of that attention why you decided decided to start working on a platform like live journal or like when when was this which over for you where you thought this is interesting enough that I want to be part of it. Well I I knew Brad Fitzpatrick. It's Patrick who started live journal When I met him which I think was in ninety nine or two thousand He needed some server space because live journal was growing bigger than the his closet or wherever he had it at the time in his dorm room. So I said hey this is really cool Yeah go ahead had put you can put it in our in our Colo space For this ISP. So that's kind of how we started talking with each other and you know we all used it at this company so we thought well you should we'll just host it for free. It'll be fine so it's kind of how we I started getting involved with it and He couldn't keep but with growth. Just like you guys are saying. All of a sudden things started growing exponentially more people were getting online and feeling comfortable sharing Live Journal actually had quite quite a few impersonation kind of you know accounts kind of what you're talking about but there'd be whole communities of it where you would just be online a character interacting with each other right and the phantom community as well so what was going to be huge like what was the thing where it just blew up. And you're like oh my gosh. This is going to be everywhere. He told me I said. How much bandwidth do you need? And he gave me the numbers in terms of like the total amount of traffic transferred in a month and didn't really know much about throughput. At the time. The idea of bandwidth where you know if you exceed a certain amount in your pipe any given second you're going to be over capacity and the second. Can he moved in and we gave him what he thought he needed. He was over it and I think that watching that sounds silly. But even he wasn't able to sort of comprehend how large it was at the time in terms of the the sort of the machine power and the bandwidth needs. I feel like that was a story for a little while which we just. Couldn't we had a really hard time keeping up with the growth And so oh you know watching that with broad. Eventually I said you know I do this for this other company. It's not that interesting anymore. I come into this for you. Can I come in. Scale Live Journal all Because I think it is I think it is big. I think for me when I knew that it mattered was when I started talking with people that weren't in my day to day life telling me how important the service was how it was their lifeline. How something that Kept them going. You know if they were dealing with depression or they were dealing with having a hard time developing community wherever they were. When I started to get a sense that this matters more than as a play thing as like a pastime this matters in in your day to day life this is you know it's connecting you on a on a deeper level and so therefore my job which was to make sure the stings available? All the time online online Started to matter on a I guess a deeper level for me and I think that's that's sort of my realization of it being really powerful and important to people. Aw Bruce what were the stories of people don't do. Yeah well. I think we've probably all of us had similar experiences to that right where you found out that people were Using the site as a community because they couldn't find support elsewhere and that we would get e mails every day. We have emails from people who were saying you know. Thank you so much because I've been looking for a place where people would listen to me. We would get emails from people who had been you know considering suicide or considering You know other terrible things and saying you. I've found people to interact with here that I could talk to. And they understood me and We built a community there. And that really you know out of all of it. That was the one thing thing that looking back. You can say feel like we made a difference. We did something that people hadn't seen before and we built a place where are people could interact and get support. We had a lot of people who you know. We're dealing with any number of challenges in their lives and you know it's twenty years ago. It's hard to think about how long ago twenty years ago is but people who were in communities that were You know minimalized by society so the people who were Lgbtq then people who were Living you know below the poverty line or you know there were any number of kinds kinds of communities that didn't have a voice them and they found places like this and found that they could have voice and that people would interact with them. I think one of the main powers of sites sites like this was that you would come on and you would interact and read these people stories without knowing anything about them. I don't know what your races or your religion is or what your beliefs are and I start reading your journal your diary and realized that your person your person just like me And that's like that's one of the things I think is missing in today's social and that's why I think there's space still for things like open diary because people don't have that experience elsewhere Andrew. What was the first time somebody thank you for making diarrhea lander making pizzas? Oh Gosh I don't know I've got a terrible memory for stuff like that. What about blame? Somebody blamed you and said you know your your. Your site made my road my day. People were not email me but every once in a while somebody would ask me to say they They lost their password to their site. Or something they change your email and so I'd go to their site. A you know check it was them or whatever and then their last entry it'd be from six months earlier and they'd be like Andrew Sucks. I hope he dies. This guy's terrible and so I have to reply to apply them like okay. Since you a password reset email go ahead go ahead go ahead. Yeah so not not to really horrible. 'cause you know for for you percents sort of thing. What what what? What were the things or somebody is like you know you did this to me? By giving me this great greats. I utter free. Yeah there were a lot of challenges. I mean we. We were facing a lot of things that hadn't really been like You know litigated in in the online world before there were free speech questions and there was you know we dealt with. Is it okay for somebody to post a picture of them breastfeeding their baby. What's the line? Where do you draw that? And so we were you know I was just navigating that without any there was no previous experience. Anywhere that anybody had with that and The free speech one was huge. Just like we have very specific rules that you can't attack other members you can't call them names. You can't say you know you can't say they're stupid because of their political or religious beliefs whatever ever So there was a lot especially back then of. Oh you're infringing on my free speech. You're taking you know and people posting about the First Amendment and shouting shouting and shouting outing in saying and then saying no. You're in my space right. Not My space our speaking. You're in in my space now so you got follow my rules and we did. There was a lot of that. Like people are. Oh you gave me the retool and you connect with all these people and now you've taken my free speech away. I mean there's always this moment where I have to remember. You know we were so young so some of these issues which now we look back and think well of course we had a hard time with that. Of course we made mistakes. What are you gonNA expect? You're twenty years old But at the time just seems so big and daunting But you know we you know. We experimented with ADS That was the people. Were pretty vocal about that experience. Vocally supportive right. The great you know and again it's I have a different perspective just because I was so involved with the performance and availability side of the service. But you know we you know when I think going back to the question of knowing how big it was and the Aha moment the faster we can make the site. The larger the community grew not just in terms of traffic for the number of users. So we figured out pretty early on if we can keep keep this thing clicky fast. That's what we would say You Click you get the thing which back then was not necessarily guaranteed all for sites online. It wasn't is an easy but we figured we were like. Wow this is insane I mean it. was you know visceral lake. I made this piece of the site faster and it grew to fill that space immediately mmediately and then the community grew so there. You know figuring out that there's this connection that people wanted this so much that as much as we can make available they would take and they would grow and Dan so anything that we did decisions. The ads were one of them You know if we ever made you know had regressions after deploy if we made decisions decisions around our network or machine changes that caused the site to get slower for any reason caused this great just horde of complainers. Because you know they're like you showed me that. This site was awesome and fast and you just took that away from me so that that was the that's one that I will never ever forget which is as fast as I could. Were people. Were still probably complaining that it wasn't fast enough so we've talked a little bit out all these challenges of growing going in scaling and success problems really Andrew. I'll start with you. I'm curious about like people may not understand what was considered big back. Then so ascites started to grow How many people are you talking about? How many diaries or you know different sites we were you hosting the that was considered a big scale back then I mean at the probably at the peak I remember getting about And this was all due to sort of media attention like you'd get a few more but probably at the peak. I I was getting maybe two thousand twenty five hundred new users a day and you know these days that's not really considered too much For a start up with a bunch of funding or whatever but that was Yeah really exciting back then. I think that probably had a few hundred thousand active active users really posting all the time. Well and nobody had been growing at that level of signing up two thousand people and you were doing. I assume zero advertising of any kind..

Brad Pitt Andrew Sucks Live Journal Brad Fitzpatrick Times Google ascites Scale Live Journal Jennifer Aniston Patrick Lisa. Bruce Dan
"years  ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

Function with Anil Dash

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"years ago" Discussed on Function with Anil Dash

"Only your small community of friends. It wasn't all public which I think a lot of the things before then were pretty public. Let's talk a little bit about timeline. When did open? Diarrhea launched to the Public October Twentieth Nineteen ninety-eight roughing was. Yeah that's when it went online about seven pm eastern right and then Andrew. Diary Landon landed Pitas. While Peterson was I was was not too much later. In Ninety nine right yeah Pitas was first. DYRLUND was probably five months later or something like that. Yeah to my recollection election. I think I think pitas was in the springtime a ninety nine and was like August September October right. Yeah I think it was August or so and then blogger Dot Com launched in September of ninety. Nine so what we have. Is You know in the span of a year The three four five sites come online and there. We're maybe one or two others but these were certainly the dominant ones across. You know. I guess I don't know what we'd later may be because the blogosphere whatever it was but part of it was blogs and diaries hirees internals were all seems very different things. What was your perception of a block? Initially called a weblog. Yeah exactly so. In Ninety eight when we first launched a weblog was kind of very similar to what Andrew was describing like. It would be somebody who was maybe posting links posting Information about like. What were they doing their job? Or things like that You know the the idea of like actual journalists blogs was still a long ways vice off them so you can't really compare them to blogs today to whereas we thought about a diary or journal that was a regular person talking about their our regular life and what are their everyday experiences And then when you add in the interaction with the you know what Lisa was pointing out we saw the same thing As people started interact with each other became this whole huger more amazing thing than just people posting their personal journals and like one of the key differences we we saw between live journal and open diary was with Lisa describe with live journal where groups of people who knew each other would use it sort of like how facebook is now was much more prevalent avalon on there then open diary opened Ari tend to be more people were posting their You know personal things that they didn't WanNa put somewhere else and didn't necessarily invite their friends friends and family to come in back then. Your friends and family weren't necessarily online. Have Modems right and at least I'm curious for you whether that sort of beers you're expressed i. Yeah I was actually just thinking as I was remembering my diary land account I maintained that account even as I started using journal and create you know became part of that whole community because my diary land account was actually sort of more like a diary like literally talking about my inner feelings and desires and sort of how I interacted with the world in a certain way that was not how I projected or what I talked about on live journal because I still was talking in my community and my friends in so diary land. I actually kept as a sort of private diary now. If somebody happened to read it or was totally anonymous on there. That would be fine fine but I maintain that for quite a while. I had both Because I did see the distinction there. Repeaters was almost pointedly. Not about about weblogs. It was about Peterson about diaries. Right I would say the main thing it with Pitas that differentiated it from dyrlund was just the pitas. It is was multiple posts on one page that I would say it was more like the weblog format whereas diarrhea land was just To begin with anyway was just one post per page which I mean. At the time there were a lot of people doing you know online. Diaries and I was sort of aware of those people people like doing you know with html and everything but Pitas was something. I just sort of throw up in the meantime while I was working on Ireland just to do that. Weblog LOG FORMAT SO YEAH I would say it was more actually of the weblog format. It's interesting because it feels like well. Maybe this is more of a diary land thing. There was almost a tension between these communities like diaries or one thing and blogs or another and you sort of picked one camp that you're in or or a different side your persona were expressed through different tools right. Oh absolutely There is quite a division back. Then I mean that was the whole reason that I started to different sites and then I guess when blogger started getting in big vase to me always. It seemed like they kind of made the conscious decision of. Let's call it a blog and kind of get everybody onto our thing you know and kind of Meld it. Maybe I mean I don't know if they actually were the ones that caused everything to kind of Meld or whether it was going that way anyway but I felt like people who used blogger and blog spot were more There wasn't that division for me when I think about that and how I I use those platforms and then I saw blogger and what I saw as a distinction with weblogs was that because of the sort of private nature of diarrhea Korea or journals. A lot of people didn't use their real identities. They didn't use their real names and their user names general and the Internet back. Then you weren't necessarily early coming forward with your real name. You weren't Presenting as the person that you were in real life you're presenting the persona that you had in your diary or journal and I you know that's that was true for blogs as well but that is in my mind that's when I think of starting to see blogs associated more with real writers real journalist has three people who are representing themselves online as the way that they that they've moved through the real world and to me that was a big change from the sort of diarrhea dowry and journals to blogs. And what we see today so the standard might have been You're either anonymous or you used used your your online hacker hindle or your AOL screen name or whatever it was you were you were neo from the Matrix. You had a very different persona. Yeah was that was. Is that the conventional an open diarrhea. We actually required users to be anonymous in the beginning like our rules. Were very specific. You could not post your personal information information And we considered that important for safety because of what people were writing about so that lasted for a few years. Obviously it's not like that anymore are posted him to be real name if you want to But Lisa makes a really good distinction like distinction to me between blogs then and today hey are blogs are usually people who are writing for an audience or to get their opinion out about something You know it's what happens on medium. It's what happens on a lot of different tools now versus somebody who's writing for themselves being interaction with the community that they don't necessarily want to share you know their absolute identity so if you're reading that piece that we have today and you're gonNA put your name on it and I want to be the leader on this idea and you were to do that on one of these platforms back around the turn of the century. What would the reaction be the response be? That's a good question I don't there wasn't it wasn't a distribution mechanism for think pieces. That was the thing could make a name for yourself off. No you couldn't make a name for yourself because you weren't using it real name and I posted things and I still do. I will write things that I think of as think pieces but I'm doing it more to say here's here's what I actually believe in and here's my manifesto but I'm putting out and You know if somebody figures out that it's my writing. That's fine but I'm I'm not doing it to promote myself. If I wanted to promote myself I'd go on medium or on twitter You know somewhere else other channels to my real name Andrew. When you had people that that had diaries stories started to get popular ARPITA starting to popular? What did that look like? How do people respond to it? How did you know something was catching on? You would just see the interaction between people on the site and you know you go to one diary. They'd be talking other people mentioning them. There are few cases early on that. Were really big One of the biggest or most popular users on the site he started a second account called.

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