18 Burst results for "Yatta Yati Yatta"

Interview With David Martins, Executive Chef

The Radio Show

02:03 min | 9 months ago

Interview With David Martins, Executive Chef

"Got a big star like you. Poor cujo to come on aftermath was going. Oh man man. You caught me between spanks between are going goings on. I had a feeling that this one was gonna get. Because we're talking to an executive chef david martin's you to snap king so you couldn't miss an executive chef. Could you yeah food. I like i like food and yeah we own. I like like talking food. Well let's bring in david. Let's talk about food there and more stuff. He's probably just. I'm sure he has other things as interested in about i. So we're just going to dive right in. You know get to know you your store your journey and everything so with euless let's start at the beginning with you so you're gonna raise enforceable what started you'll love culinary art and how did that leads you come into the. Us always say since my mom. She's a horrible cook. Someone had to save the family because he was just a day after day after day. I didn't have that romantic story. That a lot of chefs do or people that the hospitality world they do. You know the grandma to coke and the grandfather used to cook. i never had. That's really growing up was very simple food. you know. we're pretty humble family so there was not a lot of money so my mom did all the cooking and i remember i used to watch. I always like to eat but not necessarily to cook. But i saw watching two shows. He's called a two fat ladies on bbc in the ninety s and it was very hands on the body wash hands. You know. it's perfect cova time but yet yata one was called ready steady cook which was like normal people not chefs. They'll go there and they'll spend like you mentioned ten dollars and they can bring just four or five ingredients in the chefs there in twenty minutes on the spot. They'll make like five dishes out of it. So there was something about aspect that i thought was cool and i just starting to read a little bit more and everything just then what happened. Everything just happened very fast.

David Martin David Coke BBC
How I Built Resilience: Shan-Lyn Ma of Zola

How I Built This

05:47 min | 11 months ago

How I Built Resilience: Shan-Lyn Ma of Zola

"Everyone and welcome to how. I built this resilience edition from npr. I'm guy is each week. On thursdays we invite entrepreneurs and other business leaders to come onto the show. Live to talk about how they've been building resilience into their businesses this year. And today my conversationalist jianlin mop. Ceo and co founder of zola. Zola is a one stop shop for couples. Planning a wedding from creating a wedding website. Finding local vendors making registry even creating a photo album of the big day with the wedding industry completely hammered by the pandemic last year solely focused on releasing new products and features for couples like a homegoods marketplace and even hosting virtual weddings on its platform. We aimed couples from that first aid. Get engaged through their entire wedding planning journey into their festivals of newlywed life with the tools and technology that we build to help them plan dream and bring to life bear fantasy wedding so basically you go on the website and you can do everything like from finding the person to do your flowers to a you to the caterer to the registry to the invitations. Everything yes wedding website. you'll save the dates and then you'll album of you're beautiful photos with photographer that you found on seoul ios chicken out the website earlier today. It's super cool. How did it. How did it start had it. I know it's you start in twenty thirteen And i think at the time you were working at guilt which is a the gilt groupe g. I l t nut gui. Tell me how how this idea came about well. I always dreamed about starting my own company. One day but i had never felt ready until really working for many years in product management which is really working alongside designers and engineers to build digital websites and mobile apps and so had gone that experience and in twenty thirteen That just happened to be all. My friends got married at exactly the same time. Everyone has that year where you're going to a wedding. Every weekend spending a lot of money. I was buying gifts from my friends. Women registries and found that the experience that i was going through their registered was just one of the worst shopping experiences i had ever seen. I was talking to nobu. Who is my co-founder zola. About how painful was and he's married and he was complaining about it from the couple's perspective. It's just terrible and we looked at each other and we said you know we've been working together to build great products when it we attacked this assets. We think we can do a much better job. And and that was how zola was born. I'm wondering you know. I mean this is twenty thirteen so this is still you know. The the ancient early days of of of web two point zero which is unbelievable Did you have initially when you went to people. I know a little bit your backstory. You grew up in australia. And then you came to the us business school and you had a bunch of Jobs in sort of adjacent kind of industries right. You worked at guilt and another an and also worked at another who. You're actually growing up in australia. It's a very remote country in that is literally on the the side of the world. And i had always can read about what what is happening in the world. And what is happening in the tech revolution that we all living through right now and i felt very removed from the action. So i moved to the us to really be a part of this Tech revolution underway and my dream was always to be like an entrepreneur. Like jerry yang. Who found yata. I had a picture of him on my wall. And because i'd never known really anyone else who worked in tech apart from the people that i read about in magazines you may dream actually came true in that i moved to the us. After business school. I was able to get a job at yahoo. Which jerry founded. And i think one of the best days there was when i walked past him in the hallway. Wow that as a result of working that. I got to learn from great product leaders. Who with some of the best in silicon valley. Who really told me. How do you think about creating a product that customers love and that they want to share with all their friends when you came up with the idea for for what is now zola and you started to talk to people about it. I have to imagine that some people said oh this industry saturated they're already. There's you know the not. There's a bunch of other sites that you know. There's a bunch of other people doing this. You don't want get into that business. That is exactly. I think there was a lot of from many places and for many investors. Who said like what you said. It's not possible to build a big business in weddings. Because there hasn't been one yet all. Do people really spend that much on weddings. All it's it's highly fragmented as an industry so then must be a reason for that and that sounded crazy to me. Because i knew how much my friends were spending tons of time and money i think weddings is one of the only times in your life where you spend on average in this country thirty thousand dollars on one day because we want to create a special memory inexperienced for yourself and your friends and so i knew it was a lot of business opportunity. It was an undeserved need. That was a passionate customer base and just because investors didn't feel personally connected to the pain point did it mean it to thin exist

Zola NPR Australia Jerry Yang United States Silicon Valley Jerry Yahoo
Year of Second Chances

The Daily Boost

05:39 min | 1 year ago

Year of Second Chances

"I want to talk about a year of second chances. I know I took off running really fast. I hope some people get up and listen to the show the first thing in the morning like the get out of bed and listen to me, God bless you today. I can I can. Can I come? Home a little bit Kinda crazy right now but here's the thing. I could bored. I get mad. I got up said, I. Didn't like was going on around this place I don't like what's happening in the world. I don't like people being being sequestered or quarantined I don't like people even doing that themselves. I don't like that because what happens it rubs of me and I don't like that and so eventually I know Scott Eventually, I say to hell with it and I do the right thing I I eat better to care myself I sleep. Better I start getting the positive attitude I start reading a little bit more exercise a little bit more in just a little bit. I do more of that and I say, let's go. Let's get this thing done and I've been feeling that way lately, and I'm really kind of this point like hang on for the ride because I'm going to put myself up and who knows what will happen when I do that don't talk about your second chances. This year Because that's what we have. We're getting close to the end of two, thousand twenty and like I said the beginning of the program. There are two very distinct kinds of people that I'm seeing these days. and. They're my personal life and I, see some of them on Facebook I've got a pretty good group of facebook friends. Why? Because a toss oil the other ones? Yata here if you're allowed mouth if you're if you're hypocritical if you're if you're one political bob type of person and you don't like anybody else that you're gone I, don't even to hear from you. Anymore I don't care I like regular people I like cool people to rules of my life be nice and be cool. That's it. Just be nice and be cool and if you're that way, I'd get along with anybody if not I, don't need you. For this to people I'm seeing my world right now number one people who were sitting around. Quote somebody knocked on my door. Oh, somebody's checking in on the I saw his data click they're responding to my data, Click Shit a turn that off I'm sorry but there from Dallas to them if you minutes here so to counsel people sitting around waiting to see what was going to happen that's it. They're living everyday life. It's mostly normal rights go the grocery stores to kind of working on that zoom machines. Some people going to work the whole thing but pretty much just kinda paused. Is Paused and see them all the time. I think it's okay to be paused a little bit and we are essentially a little bit pas anyway right now. Right. But there are other kinds of people. I've seen as well. And I hope I'm one of them I'm going to if not going to be at this afternoon I promise that they've decided life is too short to wait for things to happen. Don't care what's going on. The starting businesses, they're buying homes, the traveling more all kinds of we are looking at open houses as we can look at it some real estate it's amazing. How many people out there shopping for homes this flitting in and out buying stuff it's cool. Two kinds of people sitting around waiting to happen on pause or kicking butt making things happen which one are you? So my question to you today. Is Have you taken advantage of the opportunity to reevaluate your path. And Deliver Your Passion here in twenty. Twenty. I know not listen. This is kind of hard right now it's not easy for anybody to literally look around you watch the news talk to people see what's happening whatever whatever situation you're in. It is not easy to just decide to do it. You have got to pick yourself up and say, let's go. As a skillset that you've learned over time, you have the ability if you're eighteen or nineteen years old or twenty years old or twenty five, you might not have learned the skill set of dusting yourself off and and doing it again right what if you're older than that? You probably already know you know what it takes to get you pumped up and get you move him. Have you recognize the opportunities that are here liberty reset reevaluate do whatever you want to do in this life twenty twenty s provided that for some people it's forced that. You got to look at the positive way. Have you done that? So I'm a fan of STOIC philosophy, it just fits. Me Really truly does because the one I say explore the possibilities, things like that I love that thing because there's another side of that. So let me ask a couple questions here that are kind of STOIC and maybe might get your juices flowing if I have already done that today in my. Whatever they call his thing today. Don't even know what is. Are you willing to explore those possibilities of life right now. Maybe take direction. If you're willing to explore the possibility that means commitment, which is usually say, but here's the thing. Are you going to reserve the right to do nothing at all? That's very STOIC. The right to reverse to be able to contemplate just about anything and say, Hey, maybe so but now okay and don't have any prejudice toward it. It is what it is. A lot of people go exports darned. It didn't work out and get upset now who cares go explore the possibility re-evalue re evaluate reset figure out what you WanNa do but always reserve the right to not do a thing and if anybody says anything, I reserve the right not to change. Its, okay. Have you done that I know that a lot of folks right now listening to be say that reserving the right not to change reserving the right to explore and see what's possible to cognitively think of because maybe I can do this and then realize heck I don't want to. I get yelled all the time sky. Why'd you stop doing that? It's while got into it all I would like it determined they didn't like it I quit your a no not I reserve the right not to do it if I don't want to. Very STOIC by the way. Are Things in your life right now. Causing you desire. Because you don't have them. Because you want something. Right. or or something not in your life right now that is causing you fear. Something maybe anticipated. Not. In your life in other words are things you don't have and things you're not gonNa have better than causing you some fear. Right now

Twenty Twenty Facebook Scott Dallas
Scientists Discover A New Material For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Environment: NPR

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Discover A New Material For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

"Soil spills are often sopped up with synthetic spongy materials, but researchers are looking to nature for more sustainable alternatives. NPR's Christopher Intel Yada has more. There's a good reason hair gets oily. It's because your hair follicles have little fat glance that use oil onto your hair and so hair oil kinda like peanut, butter and Jelly. Sandwich but they go together all the time. David, who is a biologist and engineer at Georgia Tech? He says that oil is a good thing because it coats and protects your hair, and it helps animals waterproof there for well now scientists Australia have taken a cue from nature to see how well hair and for can absorb a different kind of oil crude oil I keep looking at my cats in wondering if they can be more useful. Megan Murray and environmental scientist at the University of Technology Sydney. She says she's joking about the cats, but there is a whole lot of hair out there. As long as we get, had cats and dogs that need to be groomed. We're going to continue to generate this waste stream. Murray's team put dabs of crude oil in petri dishes, either straight on the glass on top of terra cotta tile, or on sand, then they took Matt's of human hair and dog fur, and pitted them against synthetic polypropylene fabric, which is commonly used to sop up oil spills. It was justice good We've done the science. We run the numbers and it performed just as well as polypropylene which is. Is Allocating Saban at the moment that we use in disaster management. The details are in the journal. Environments few county yachts, Hair, and I soaked up the oil well on glass and terra cotta, but not on sand, which suggests that Matt's of hair might work on factory, floors or roads, but not so much on a beach and previous work by Murray's team shows that Harris sinks in the water, so it's not ideal for cleanup at sea. Then there's the issue of reliability, says chemist Chris Ready in the middle of a battle like normal spill. You're GONNA have a very predictable material that is easily deployed increase. No uncertainty and these natural products carry just a lot more uncertainty. At, woods hole oceanographic, institution, and full disclosure the owner of a yellow lab. Despite this uncertainty, he says maybe hair can teach us how to make better materials and Georgia techs. David, who says the study made him look at hair differently as soon as I read this. The first thing I thought is hey. I've been throwing away these little hairy rings that appear in the bottom of my shower, but maybe I should just collect them in a jar and use it to clean my dishes, or maybe you'll just have a little more patients when Fido and fluffy shed their potentially valuable hair Christopher Intel Yata NPR news.

Megan Murray Georgia Tech NPR David Matt Christopher Intel Woods Hole Oceanographic Sandwich University Of Technology Sydne Saban Chris Ready Engineer Scientist Australia Fido Harris
How some doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills

60-Second Science

02:03 min | 2 years ago

How some doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata used to be when doctors prescribe a drug. They'd open up a a book summarizing drugs and dosages or go by memory for the common stuff but nowadays now you can type in whatever it is and then placing an order via computer. See you type in an order of the name of the drug. And it will pre populate everything one Carlos Monte as an emergency medicine physician at San Francisco General Hospital. He also studies decision making in healthcare. He says for an antibiotic default dose programmed into a doctor's computer might be pretty standard but for pain. The the number of opioids prescribed might vary a lot depending on the patient and their type of pain. Well we wanted to look at is whether and to what extent the precepts the default upsetting that we had in the electric medical record influence provider prescribing specifically would lower defaults resulting fewer opioids being prescribed. Soman toys team systematically changed the recommended opioid pill number defaults in the computer systems of two hospitals in the San Francisco Bay area during an eight month period rid. Each hospital's pre existing defaults were twelve and twenty pills respectively. The researchers dialed in new defaults of five ten fifteen or an unspecified number of pills compared to doctors prior prescribing habits. The new default settings resulted in fewer opioid pills prescribed overall and fewer prescriptions shins exceeding the maximum recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So this is suggestive that hospitals other departments clinics can change the setting England impact opioid prescribing. Pretty much immediately as the really low constantly prevention and can be done really quickly. The results are in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Russian internal medicine. Definitely not a silver bullet. The epidemic has a lot of different issues that need to be addressed in this one small tool so that we can use to address. There still could be a useful prescription for physicians.

Carlos Monte Centers For Disease Control An Christopher Dodd San Francisco General Hospital San Francisco Bay Yata Soman England Journal Of The American Medica
New York City targets carbon pollution from buildings

Climate Connections

01:06 min | 2 years ago

New York City targets carbon pollution from buildings

"The many large apartment buildings in new park city. have old windows outdated heating systems and lack insulation in exterior walls. A vast majority of them were built in the years immediately post floor when energy was cheap and we certainly didn't understand the climate change implications of energy use. That's Yata Frank. The nonprofit building energy exchange change. He says the city aims to eliminate eighty percent of its carbon pollution by twenty fifty so making these buildings. More efficient is a priority retrofits such as new windows in each fax systems. Typically pay off over time because of the energy. But Frank says building owners have been slow to make changes because of the upfront cost so the city is putting the pressure on earlier this year at passed a law that sets emission limits for buildings larger than twenty five thousand square feet and essentially says if you go over this limit of carbon emissions per square foot you will be assessed a fine. It's going to

Yata Frank Eighty Percent
Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

60-Second Science

02:31 min | 2 years ago

Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata the Arctic because warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet meaning more and more sea ice is melting every year concerning the rapid loss of see I sat there for a lot of reasons. Tracy Z Goldstein. A researcher and conservationist at UC Davis she says one of those reasons is animals like ice seals. Need the ice to haul out on and give birth and other reason. As the Arctic warms the fish the seals eat maybe moving to deeper and colder waters so the seals have to travel further to hunt them for the combination of all of that over time is probably going to affect their health and their body condition and that will make them not just underweight but also more susceptible to diseases diseases may also be encroaching the upon Arctic marine mammals because spotting a trend here Arctic sea ice is melting coli unintended consequence of all of that but yes You know when they I used to be an ice bridge certain populations would remain separate from each other and so they couldn't come in contact and give each other they bacteria viruses etc but once those channels thought it to open animals were able to move further and came into contact with new species that they had not come in. Contact with in the Post Goldstein. In her colleagues documented the spread of a disease called called fo seen distemper virus from two thousand one through two thousand sixteen. It's related to the measles and causes skin lesions coughing pneumonia seizures and sometimes death in in marine mammals Goldstein's team scanned historical and Contemporary Marine Mammal blood samples for antibodies against the virus. They also hunted for evidence of live infections nasal swabs taken of mammals and they found that flare ups of the virus were linked to years with extreme losses. NCI's suggesting that open waters. Aided the spread of the pathogen perhaps along the melted coastline north of Siberia. Their analysis is in the journal scientific reports mammals that depend on ice to survive may already be slated for extinction and as the Arctic melts. Goldstein says in more frequent epidemics like this viral one could hastened the blow but humans may also be affected up in the Arctic. People subsist subsist on these species so they really rely on these animals for their livelihood and wellbeing and as those animals disappear as their habitat disappears. That's is also going to heavily affect humans in that area so overall I think overall health of the environment and the animals and the people up in the Arctic over time it's just going to continue to deteriorate

Tracy Z Goldstein Arctic Researcher Christopher Dodd Underweight Uc Davis NCI Sixty Seconds
Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

60-Second Science

02:47 min | 2 years ago

Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

"At Toyota we believe that American veterans have the strongest credentials on earth especially when you consider that they spend years gaining valuable experience by putting their lives on the line to protect the country they love and the people that live here but that doesn't always mean finding a career path is easy. That's why Toyota has partnered with hiring our as Europe's to help over one hundred fifty thousand veterans and military spouses connect with employment opportunities. We are Toyota. USA. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata in the science. It's fiction story June. The Desert Planet Iraq is inhabited by enormous fearsome sandwich shops they blast out of the dunes to swallow vehicles the whole they also look familiar to Caltech geneticists Paul Sternberg. We look like nats anything in pop culture has relationship doors. We follow nematodes toads of course are much smaller than sand worms most never told you can just barely see and there are a lot slower these worms are probably take one hundred years to get across the US if they could could do it and they went continuously day and night even so they're pretty scary when you look at them up close. Sternberg and his colleagues had a hunch they might find nematodes lurking in one of California's most extreme extreme habitats Mono Lake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada it super salty alkaline and loaded with arsenic and previously known to harbor only two animal species easies brine shrimp and Alkali flies so the researchers took soil samples at beaches around the lake and indeed they found eight species of nematodes living there so we just I went from two animals to at least ten species so that's Kinda striking so are they going to be others the lake yeah people should go look photos and details are in the journal current Biology Sternberg. His colleagues were able to culture one of the worm species in the lab and they discovered it could survive five hundred times the dose of arsenic they would kill a human but they also found that even nemo toads that weren't from Mona Lake seemed to have the genetic ability to resist the lethal element meaning. The worms may be Natural Boron extrema files us from the worms perspective invading a host. That's a harsh environment so I think there's some general ability than Emma toads to adapt to harsh environments like Doc. Maybe Mars I have a fantasy that we should send Amadou's. We really interesting. He could get the codes to photosynthesis or carry photosynthetic organisms and then worth talking about of course that's scenarios in the realm of science fiction for now. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dunya.

Toyota Paul Sternberg Mono Lake Christopher Dodd Yata Mona Lake Journal Current Biology Sternb Christopher Dunya Europe United States Amadou Usa. Emma Sierra Nevada California Sixty Seconds One Hundred Years
Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 2 years ago

Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

"Komo Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America join me as I talked to Ken Burns about the moments that inspired his work as a documentary dementri filmmaker. You can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts. This is scientific civic. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Marine Heatwave in two thousand sixteen killed off a full third of Australia's Great Barrier Reef the largest coral reef system in the world and it's terrible watching your favorite ecosystems slowly. Di Carli can't go is a marine biologist at the University of Southern California Nia who's studied that coral bleaching event bleaching occurs when the waters around corals become too cold or too salty or too hot but mostly too hot and then the symbiotic algae that live inside corals which are photosynthetic food factories abandoned the coral which causes them to die because they're losing their nutritional source so they're essentially starving to death but coral can house multiple species of algae some more heat tolerant than others so sometimes in the face of stress the heartier algae proliferate delivery and that change offsets the damage caused by the exodus of the more sensitive species have processes called shuffling chemical in her colleagues studied shuffling in corals roles affected by the two thousand sixteen bleaching bet on the Great Barrier Reef and they found that adult corals can actually pass those reshuffled. Al Go residents along to their offspring in in their eggs pointing to a possible way. Successive generations of coral could adapt to warmer waters. If your mom can kind of crime you for the environment that you might be experiencing presumably would improve your fitness. The details are in the journal scientific reports so can this help corals beat back bleaching the pace of climate change and the frequency and intensity of the stress events is such that I don't think this is enough in face of so many threats. Even this trick may fail to provide relief for the reef. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Great Barrier Reef Christopher Dodd Alicia Burke Ken Burns Christopher Indonesia Di Carli Bank Of America University Of Southern Califor Australia Sixty Seconds
Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 2 years ago

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Documentaries are known for their sweeping natural vistas. This does their amazing footage seriously. How did they get that shot in often soothing baritone of Sir David attenborough strain incontinent what those documentaries don't do though is show the realities of environmental destruction historically particularly BBC documentaries have shied away from that Nikki Rust is an environmental social scientist at Newcastle University in the UK Russ studied work by the BBC in the World Wildlife Fund which had teamed up with Netflix to make what they said would be a whole new kind of production. They wanted it to reach. I think a billion people and that it was going to revolutionize nature documentaries except for the fact it may be that attenborough would be the narrator the Netflix series our planet aim to be different because it promised to reveal the threats facing wildlife in the natural world so did it deliver liver rust and her colleagues analyzed scripts of our planet along with three recent. BBC Series Planet Earth to Pimple Dynasties Twenty into hyenas and Blue Planet to spider cramps and logged everything they saw on the screen turns out planet only talks about threats and successes successes a bit more than Blue Planet to fifteen percent of the script did focus on the woes of the natural world but very little devastation was actually shown on screen. The spite being filmed the analysis is in the Journal people in nature. The lead author of the Study Julia Jones was in Madagascar at the time where net that flicks were there filming and she knows that they were there filming the destruction of Habitat and burning and lots of mental devastation so they've got fatigue is just unfortunately it wasn't chosen to be included. It's not clear if that's really a bad thing. Though we still don't really know whether showing environmental tragedies on screen green motivates people to support conservation but what climate change communication has taught us. Ross says is that the ideal way to motivate audiences is with optimism tinged with trepidation. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata BBC David Attenborough Netflix World Wildlife Fund Nikki Rust Julia Jones Attenborough Cramps Newcastle University Ross Scientist Russ UK Madagascar Sixty Seconds Fifteen Percent
Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

60-Second Science

02:21 min | 2 years ago

Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata seems like anytime you see a squirrel. It's busy doing something pink headed somewhere scrounging for food and being out in about all the time also means era tasty morsels for a lot of different predators. Keith target a behavioral ecologist at at Overland College. He says squirrels scan their surroundings for hawks and owls cats and foxes but they also have another surveillance system. They eavesdrop on nearby. Birds BIRT's eavesdropping on alarm calls or eavesdropping on chatter is a cheap and easy way to supplement the information that they have access to because it's free it's produced by other individuals in the environment. It's publicly available to any organism that has the cognitive ability to recognize interpret that information tarvisio colleague Marie Lillie tested that ability by riding around town on her bicycle stopping when she found a squirrel then she'd set up her equipment play the fearsome fearsome scream of a red tailed hawk and then either play the casual unworried chatter of songbirds chiefs or ambient noise as a control all the while she observed the squirrels behavior and she noticed that when squirrels heard the reassuring chatter of songbirds following the Hawks doc scream they relaxed more readily. Imagine this if you're walking in a crowd and everyone seems pretty happy and content and they're chit chatting with beach other. You might even subconsciously take that as information that all of those eyes and ears apparently seem to perceive the environment as being safe and we think the squirrels might be listening in on bird chatter in the same way the details are in the journal plus one and squirrels give back to the community to with their own alarm calls which might help other eavesdropping animals but in busy urban environments Tara and says that rich fabric brick of animal communication risks being drowned out by the loudest animals around us. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher.

Hawks Christopher Dodd Yata Marie Lillie Overland College Keith Tara Sixty Seconds
Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yata food and drug administration has to recall hundreds of foods is every year like cookie snack packs with chunks of blue plastic hiding inside or salmonella tainted taco seasoning or curry powder laced with lead he can take months before a recall is issued but now researchers have come up with a method that might fast track process leading to early detection and ultimately faster recalls the system relies on the fact that people increasingly by foods and spices online and people tend to write reviews of products they buy online which are like breadcrumbs to food safety officials sniffing out dangerous products. The researchers linked f._d._a. Food recalls from twenty twelve to twenty fourteen to amazon reviews of those same products they then train machine. Learning algorithms comes to differentiate between reviews for recalled items and reviews for items that had not been flagged and the trained algorithms rebel to predict f._d._a. Recalls three quarters of the time name the also identified another twenty thousand reviews for possibly unsafe foods most of which had never been recalled. The results are in the journal of the american medical informatics informatics association. The world health organization estimates that six hundred million people worldwide get sick annually from contaminated food and more than four hundred thousand people die from it so having tools that can enable us to detect. There's a lot of actor and hopefully investigated and <hes> do recalls faster would be useful not just in the u._s. Other countries around the wall show study author elaine and soya see of boston university. She did add one caveat. Even recalled hauled products can still get five star reviews so stars alone. Don't tell the whole sickening story. The proof and fortunately may still be in the pudding. Thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher indonesia.

Christopher Dodd Elaine Christopher Indonesia Salmonella Journal Of The American Medica Amazon Boston University Sixty Seconds Three Quarters
Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 2 years ago

Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds sites. I'm christopher dodd yata. No trip to the beach would be complete without a swarm of hungry goals but don't get distracted because one of those goals may soon go after your food. There's a very small proportion russian of extremely bold individuals that seem to ruin the reputation of the whole species notre bogert animal behavior researcher at the university of exeter. She studied the food snatching habits of goals in seaside towns in the southern u._k. And she found that very few only the boldest would actually take the bait or make that the the bite the experiment went like this a researcher crouch near goal and then sat out a plastic bag of french fries for those brave goals that then started to approach. The researcher either stared straight at the goal as in i._c._u. Thief or the researchers simply looked away and it turns out staring down the gulls made them hesitate twenty one seconds on average bridge before approaching the fries. The results are in the journal biology. Letters and goals aren't the only ones who behave better when being watched a two thousand six study found that people paid three times as much for their drinks at an unintended honor system coffee bar when just an image of staring eyes was displayed nearby as for the gulls gobert points out that we need to learn to live with them because the particular species she studied the herring gull is on the u._k.'s red list of birds of conservation concern. The thing is people. Don't want to have a seaside holiday without goals there so it's just finding ways to harmoniously live with one of the only wildlife species we still have around in these coastal areas so don't turn back on the goals she says both figuratively for conserving the species and of course literally for conserving. Thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yada.

Researcher Christopher Dodd University Of Exeter U._K Crouch I._C._U Sixty Seconds Twenty One Seconds
London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

60-Second Science

01:34 min | 2 years ago

London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you're a Germaphobe navigating the city there are certain certain mandatory rules of engagement use a paper towel to shield your hand as you touch the bathroom door handle lift toilet seat covers with your shoe touch buttons at A._T._M.'s and crosswalks awesome walks in elevators with a knuckle. The back of your hand never a fingertip. I know this because I am that person and a new study in the journal scientific reports somewhat justifies is my behavior because when researchers in London sampled all those kinds of surfaces in public shopping centers and train stations and common areas in hospitals what they found was a whole a lot of antibiotic resistant bacteria lurking there scientists swab sites all over London and ended up with six hundred samples of staphylococcus bacteria of those nearly half were resistant to two or more commonly used antibiotics like penicillin and Erythromycin and the hospital samples had significantly more drug doug resistant microbes which makes sense because hospitals are a place where they use a lot of antibiotics but if there is a silver lining here it might be how few staph bacteria were multi-drug-resistant drug-resistant in public places a mere forty seven percent because a few years back one in the same scientists swabbed London hotel rooms in found that eighty six percent percent of the staph bacteria. There were multi-drug-resistant which may not help you sleep easy. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Staph London Germaphobe Penicillin Erythromycin A._T._M. Sixty Seconds Forty Seven Percent Eighty Six Percent
Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 2 years ago

Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata for male black widow spiders. Finding a mate is risky risky business. They have to go on an epic journey. Catherine Scott in Iraq knowledge EST at the University of Toronto. If the population she studies on Canada's Vancouver Hoover Island she says the spiders only twelve percent chance of surviving their scramble over sand dunes implants and they have very poor eyesight and their traveling at night so one way males find females is by sniffing from afar the fair Ramon perfume on their webs but Scott has now discovered an alternative way males find mates by subjecting the spiders to a race for each male before he started. We weighed him in on a tiny scale and we painted him with racing stripes and measured the length of his his legs. We had a finish line of fairmount omitting females and we released males at various distances from those females to see whether they arrived out of females. Weber not and how fast they got their what suppressor was at the males that started farthest nearly two hundred feet away actually traveled fastest towards females else and the reason they poached the pads of their rivals. WHO's been continuous. Soak drag lines as they move. These spiders are much more adept at walking and running on silk than they are on the ground so we realized that maybe the males that we released far away from the females were encountering. These silk highways left by rival males else and running along them. The details are in the proceedings of the Royal Society. B and follow up experiments in the lab confirmed that male black widows are indeed willing to risk a run in with a rival to win a chance to pass on their genes a chance that makes it worth traveling along the Silk Road. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Catherine Scott Christopher Dodd Yata Silk Road Christopher Indonesia Vancouver Hoover Island Iraq University Of Toronto Royal Society Weber Ramon Canada Sixty Seconds Two Hundred Feet Twelve Percent
Tourist Photos Help African Wildlife Census

60-Second Science

02:14 min | 2 years ago

Tourist Photos Help African Wildlife Census

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Tracking wildlife is a tough job. Take the case of a one eared leopard named Pavarotti for this guy. A very very big beautiful mail and you had a very very deep deep roar and so the end after Roy Kassim Rafique a wildlife biologist at Liverpool John Moores University so you see the crack of dawn and I would find his tracks. You know it's always tracks and try and find him. One day I went out and I was looking for and it tracks to offer ordered through this like woodland area and before you knew it the wheel of his Land Rover was stuck in a warthog burrow. He wasted several. Several hours getting it out and then on the way back to camp he bumped into some local tour guides in their safari guests who'd had way better luck spotting Pavarotti and basically they laughed and they told me that morning Rafique then realized that tourist wildlife sightings might be. UNTAPPED source of information about wild animals so he and his team worked with a Safari Lodge in Botswana to analyze twenty five thousand tourists photographs of wildlife. They use those as sightings of lions spotted Hyenas Leopards Cheetahs and wild dogs. Dogs they then compared those data to the estimates they made with traditional wildlife biology tactics stuff like camera traps and track surveys and Colin stations where they play sounds of distrust animals in the middle of the night and see who pops by it turned turned out that the estimates from tourist photos were just as good as those gleaned from traditional methods and the tourists were actually the only ones to see elusive cheetahs. The researchers would have missed the cats without the citizen science data. The results are in the journal current biology.

Roy Kassim Rafique Pavarotti Christopher Dodd Yata Liverpool John Moores Universi Land Rover Colin Botswana Sixty Seconds One Day
One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

60-Second Science

04:19 min | 2 years ago

One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

"Have you ever wanted to speak another language. Whether you want to speak Spanish French or German Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons can get you speaking confidently and your new language within weeks babble spaced repetition method gradually build your language skills so so you intuitively remember what you've learned. No wonder battle is the number one selling language learning APP in the world. Try BABBLE FOR FREE GO TO BABBLE DOT com or download the APP. That's Babbel B. A. B. L. DOT com or download the BABBLE APP to try for free. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. The Apollo missions brought back eight hundred forty two pounds of Rock and soil from the Moon nearly early twenty two hundred different samples but there's one sample that planetary scientists monoxide Wadhwa says is the most interesting of all Apollo one zero zero eight five Neil Armstrong collected it on Apollo Eleven. He was about to step back into the lunar module and. He turned around and just he had this rocks and he saw little spaces and there and he knew that these geologists on earth would be just so excited to study these materials just scooped up. I think nine scoops of soil that he put into the box six and it became one of the most well-studied samples of the Apollo mission she says geologist named John would at the Smithsonian noticed white flex of rock in the soil which he identified as Iraq type called a north of site and include him into the Moon's ancient past and this casinos quite a leap of imagination but he proposed that the whole of the moon had at one time in the past somewhere close to four and a half billion years ago been almost covered with a global magma ocean ocean of lava and so this was a revolutionary idea at the time because people had thought that the moon had formed cold and so it completely changed their idea about how the moon farmed how the terrestrial planets form like the Earth is well. You know really changed a lot about our. Our understanding of planetary science but WADHWA has a second and more personal reason to appreciate this sample. I met my husband because of this rock. My husband is Scott Parazynski. He was with NASA as an astronaut for seventeen seventeen years from nine hundred ninety two two thousand nine and after his retirement from NASA he actually he's a mountaineer as well and he had always aspired to climb Mount Everest Scott's boyhood heroes were Neil Armstrong and the climber Edmund Hillary who made the first confirmed affirmed incentive Everest with his partner tenzing norgay in honor of them he wanted to take a moon rock from Apollo eleven to the top of Everest and to bring back and never some rock at the time Wadhwa was the chair of the NASA committee that grants access to the samples for scientific purposes but this request she says was definitely out of the ordinary and I just remember it because it was a really funny discussion the committee hey what happens if that moon rockfalls Donna Crevasse you know and and not that race Scott would be. Going Down with them with that moon rock of but Scott made it to the top Wadhwa never met him and moved on from the lunar sample committee but then a year or two later she saw a friend suggestion pop up on facebook. You might know Scott Parazynski and I respect took said hey how did your expedition go and did you return the moon rock to NASA and he sent me this note back saying well. Actually I didn't send the Moon Rock back to NASA. I actually sent it to the International Space Station along with an ever summit rock and if you ever happened to be in Houston I would love to meet you and thank you for making that possible and so I happened to meet him and that was that I was that that's how we met and so Neil Armstrong's last minute scoop of moon-dust brought to people together here on earth and upturned our understanding of how the moon and the earth itself got here. There's something in there about one small scoop for A.

Neil Armstrong Moon Rock Scott Parazynski Wadhwa Nasa Apollo Eleven Babbel B. A. B. Christopher Dodd Yata Geologist Mount Everest Everest Tenzing Norgay Facebook John Edmund Hillary International Space Station Houston Iraq Donna Crevasse Partner
Attractive Young Females May Have Justice Edge

60-Second Science

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Attractive Young Females May Have Justice Edge

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata eight years ago. The jury in the trial of Casey Anthony announced their verdict as to the charge of first degree murder verdict as to count one. We the jury find the defendant not guilty so say we all anthony had been charged with murdering her two year old daughter but like the murder charge the jury's decision for additional charges of aggravated child abuse and aggravated manslaughter. We're again guilty and that created this huge outcry Christopher Ferguson clinical psychologist at Stetson University in Central Florida not far from where the trial occurred. It was kind of like this narrative that you know she got preferential treatment maybe not on. Purpose but yeah so the jury was more sympathetic to her because she was this pretty young female and that kind of conflicted with people's impression of who a murderer as mock trial studies have. Suggested that attractive people have an edge in the criminal justice system so ferguson and his colleagues looked into that stereotype using data from the National Longitudinal Study of adolescent to adult health. The largest long-term study of people who began participating in the study as is teens the interviewers asked the youths a multitude of questions and also raided the respondents degree of attractiveness a measure. That's been used to examine links to health and wealth in this case Ferguson and his team looked at a subset of nearly eight hundred respondents. And examined the correlation between attractiveness and arrest conviction and sentencing after controlling for things like gender race and socioeconomic status they found that attractiveness did have a protective effect but only for females girls or women who are. are more attractive or less likely to be arrested if they had committed a crime and less likely to be convicted if they were arrested for that crime however it did not have any impact on their sentencing so once they were convicted. Attractiveness conveyed no further benefits the results are in the journal Psychiatry Psychology and law. It's just a correlation of course and there are limitations. The attractiveness ratings were an average of four different interviewers assessments made over a dozen years but beauty as they say is in the eyes of the beholder.

Christopher Ferguson Casey Anthony Aggravated Manslaughter Christopher Dodd Journal Psychiatry Psychology First Degree Murder Stetson University Murder Central Florida Sixty Seconds Eight Years Two Year