24 Burst results for "Yannick"

Raiders Concerned Marcus Mariota, Yannick Ngakoue May Have Suffered Long-Term Injuries

The Trendzone

00:16 sec | 4 d ago

Raiders Concerned Marcus Mariota, Yannick Ngakoue May Have Suffered Long-Term Injuries

"Yeah then the raiders. On monday night had a huge win but they lose denzel good. Acl he's out for the air. And then john gruden in gakugei. Marcus mariota and jerry mccoy may have long-term injuries. We haven't heard the extent of it yet. I'll just brutal. For the raiders but man. What an epa

John Gruden Gakugei Marcus Mariota Raiders Jerry Mccoy Denzel EPA
Pittsburgh Penguins GM Jim Rutherford Resigns for Personal Reasons

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

03:37 min | 8 months ago

Pittsburgh Penguins GM Jim Rutherford Resigns for Personal Reasons

"Question today is who's going to be the next fulltime general manager of the pittsburgh penguins wednesday jer mother furred suddenly and abruptly. We understand resigned as gm of the pittsburgh penguins. Your wide brush thoughts when you first heard it shock. I think everybody was shocked. Someone told me that. An email came from rutherford a company wide. Email came from rutherford to everyone about an hour it was announced and people were just slack jawed. They couldn't believe it. And i think the other thing too is that the penguins signed yannick weber on wednesday morning. 'cause their defense just so battered and rutherford was involved in it he did the signing and then one hour and a half later. It was announced that he was out. So i think it caught a lot of people by surprise. You know. there's a couple of things here. Initially there was a concern that it was health related. If you've been familiar. Jim rutherford's in his seventies and he's been very careful during the time of corona virus. He's mainly stayed out of the public which is perfectly fine. There's nothing wrong with being safe. It's the smart and responsible thing to do for yourself and your family so there were concerns about health. But david morehouse the president and the ceo made sure to point out at the beginning of his. Call that you know. It was not health related. You know something happened monday night. Where rutherford are tuesday. Night where rutherford told the team and they check with them again on wednesday and he decided to do it. I do think there was some kind of philosophical difference about where the penguins were going or how they were like everybody wants the penguins in the organization to continue being in that win now mentality. I don't think anyone disagreed with that. But i think there might have been a professional disagreement on how to get there. The thing that is kind of interesting to me about it is that david. Morehouse his media availabilities. Said it wasn't anything there wasn't anything that you wouldn't normally think was unusual or different like a. Basically disagreements happen all the time and you don't necessarily think they're going to lead to that. And i just wonder if the organization saw one way and rutherford saad another way and he's been quoted as saying it was time and i just think that happened. I think he got to a point where he said. We don't see this the same way and times were challenging. I don't need to tell anybody that and it's just time. And i think that's kind of what happened now. His contract was up. I don't think the penguins and said to him. We're not bringing you back. I don't think there'd been any conversation really about. The contract is a lot of teams right now. And we see it with travis green and vancouver who are kind of saying like during this these financial times. We gotta be careful. So i don't think the penguins had said were not bringing you back. I just think they really kind of punted towards the end of the year and said they talk about dan. So that's kind of where i think it was. I think that there was a philosophical disagreement and about just where they were going. The penguins didn't think it was necessarily a big deal because these kinds of conversations happen all the time. And rutherford just said okay. We just disagree on the vision. It's time for me

Rutherford Pittsburgh Penguins Penguins Yannick Weber Jim Rutherford David Morehouse JER GM Morehouse Travis Green David Vancouver DAN
Washington, DC - Minnesota Vikings send Yannick Ngakoue to Baltimore Ravens for a third-round pick

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

00:18 sec | 11 months ago

Washington, DC - Minnesota Vikings send Yannick Ngakoue to Baltimore Ravens for a third-round pick

"And Ravens are finalizing a trade to send Janek and God way to Baltimore for a 2021 3rd round draft pick in a conditional fifth rounder in 2022. He'll fly to Baltimore in the next 24 hours to go through Kobe 19 testing so he can join the Ravens after the buyer and get ready for week eight against the Steelers.

Ravens Baltimore Janek Steelers
"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That was the first part of as era from Verdi's requiem conducted by our guest uniqueness. Again, with the Philadelphia Orchestra in two thousand twelve, we'll be back after a break. This is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor Western. Governors University one equality college education but worried about the cost at WGC you, you can earn a respected Bachelor's or master's degree for under eighty seven hundred dollars per year fees included WG use low flat rate tuition covers as many courses as you can complete each term that means the faster you learn the more you'll save listeners of this podcast can have the sixty five dollar application fee waived learn more at Wvu, dot edu slash fresh air. Our guest is uniqueness again, the music director and conductor of the Metropolitan Opera in New York and the Philadelphia Orchestra this July, his inaugural performance as music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra in two, thousand, twelve streamed by Whyy TV they performed very requiem and Terry had the chance to speak with him about it. Well, am I right in saying that when you were a child that you sang in the choir doing Verdi's requiem. How old were you? I think the first time I sang that requiem I must have been fifteen or sixteen. So I sang a couple of times as a member of the choir. What did it mean to you when you were fifteen compared to what it means to you now? I mean. This is a piece about the dread of eternal damnation versus the possibility of eternal life. So you have the two biggest extremes and you have really soft and really just assuming passages and it's it's such an a an emotional work. So when you were fifteen and still not very experienced in the world, what did this music and the power mean to you? I think when I was as far as I remember when I was a teenager was I was very interested was from the viewpoint of a music student or scholar wife surely will I was trying to analyze more the elements of what rings true in terms of theater or in terms of religion because as you've been I have have talked about a few times already my own relationship to religion when I was growing was very, very very. And Of course coming from that. Of viewpoints but trying also to make my opinion, make up my mind about. This internal question about that piece specifically, is it an opera? Is it a mass and I think that over the years I developed more my view about it wishes. That every composer who tries to tackle these incredibly. Powerful in challenging and eternal questions That's the brings. You know the day of judgement and the fear of the the tears. The joy in the sanctum, but also the internal blessing and internal rest. Every composer wants to deal with this has to do it with the most sincere way, and the only way for composer to be really sincere is to do with the kind of language and vocabulary that they usually use. Since vanity is one of the greatest opera composers of all time the language he knew was through theater. So I think for immediately someone who is not accustomed to barely will think, oh, that's an opera. It's a bit too theatrical and I disagree I think that's just the kind of language there was was knowing and therefore became sincere and more personal to him. Very himself was agnostic. And it's amazing to me that he'd write such a powerful deeply felt requiem. When he wasn't he wasn't Catholic he he was agnostic. And wondering you need getting back to the fact that you sang this when you were fifteen at what point in your own relationship to Catholicism were you. First about the fact of the composer's Nas I think that's Mozart. In. Many ways can be considered an agnostic to. Maybe, not so much bonds, but I'm thinking of the another composer like this or at least at the very least they all had a. Troubled or At least questioning relation ship to religion all of these great composers. and. Maybe that's indeed actually gave them the necessary distance to be able to really understand what it means that the text instead of having maybe a. Formalized or to accepted vision of what it is. that. This text means as a prayer or as a believer of one faith and probably this is just an it's hypothetic for me but it's it might be the reason why these species speak to us so much today and too many generations regardless of if you're a Catholic or Jewish or Muslim or a Lutheran, it doesn't matter at some point. You know it's all about the relationship of humankind's to these eternal themes which religion is one way of explaining in at my age especially in the teenage years I was still very believing very intensely in the Catholic religion however. It. was really the time where I I started to understand my transfer of my own vision from believing in. Gods into believing in music, which was a way to God's or God's way of talking to us, and so that peace had a special importance to me because it's Basically maybe income passed. All of my beliefs takes wish I knew well, but with the vision of an opera composer who had a lot more to say about life but put. All of his best word arguably.

Philadelphia Orchestra Verdi director Wvu NPR Governors University New York Whyy Terry
Yannick Ngakoue has traded from the Jaguars to the Vikings

Best Week Ever

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Yannick Ngakoue has traded from the Jaguars to the Vikings

"And Janek and Ga Quay is traded from the Jaguars to the Vikings. That report from ESPN is Adam Schefter. Minnesota gets an elite pass rusher to pair with the deal Hunter to give the Vikings one of the top defense is in the lead. And the JAG Wars get more ammunition in the 2021 draft, in which they now will have picks in the first five rounds. Adam Schefter on best week ever in that deal, Jacksonville gets a second round pick next year and a conditional fifth rounder in 2022 got away had said earlier he would not sign a long term deal. With the Jaguars, where he's piled up 37 a half sacks in his first four seasons

Vikings Adam Schefter Jaguars Janek Espn Jacksonville Minnesota Hunter
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"It's really. Moment that where you know all of a sudden you you just you. Just fall. Just fall it. Can you do is joy? You can die at this moment. Doesn't you won't make different? You won't make a difference, so that was special. Such such wonderful memories. You best friend, you know you cry and hug you best friend. You know that that's what Davis Cup gave us. That was ten. Hug, my dad. I cried of happiness and cried for happiness, hugging my best friend because. You know, we won the Davis Cup together so that's something that. that. We have a forget of course. The wonderful wonderful stories. Thank you so much for your time. It's been worth. Davis will welcome in really was great to talk to you and. After, all these years, that's a long time. I've probably heard one or two of these stories over the years when we were traveling on. Always wanted to do this and and it's just lovely. Thank you so much. My pleasure David. Yannick Noah mortar man, what a guy! He is I just love talking to him and. I hope you've enjoyed listening to that as much as I did because he's the best interview around and and it's just the thrill really to had him as guest here on the tennis podcast. If you've enjoyed it, do tell you friends. You'll family your social media groups. She. What's that groups? Our linked to share this interview is in the show notes to this podcast and yeah. Thanks very much for your company as always we will love in producing the podcast and we'll be back with many more over the coming weeks. We're going to have a meeting this week to discuss. Our plans will have daily shows during the US Open fortnight, whether there is a tournament or not, where we know it still up in the air. At the moment, there is still hope that will be live tennis from the US Open. If not, it'll be US Open relived all away. And then the French Open as well. We look like we're going to have that, so we'll have loads of shows for you. Thanks for listening to this one and we'll see you next..

Davis Cup US Yannick Noah tennis David
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"Bad And she goes. Is You bad Yannick? Because he knew that he was listening, I said well. My bet is really hard. You know. The mattress is really it's really hard. It's a hard mud. Oh, he's a hard metrics. Can we come into your room any change room so he? We are exchanging rooms at three in the morning because. Of course the metric exactly the same that you needed to know that was around I. Guess. So he goes. and He. We aren't a bit of changing rules changing beds. That take bets the bed where the same anyway, so by not what's going on? What's going on, but? Some growing. I know I have an idea, so we were staying in the middle in the middle of the town, and it was all these restaurants, and we could sometimes he people chanting all the crowds where supporters defense the so by three in the morning, just took my jeans on. Get dressed and going to the street and go to the I've got. Walking place where you have no cars, we've all the restaurants are very popular place, yonkers. We miss you so I knew that like hundreds of fans. Thousands of fans way there you know. I decided to go so I went to all the restaurants. All the restaurants standard in one table a freshman stand on tables. Oh, yeah, because they know guys i. have to Tell You I count on you tomorrow. You really have to help. You need you. Gain it. You okay. Yeah, yeah, I so I went to about twelve restaurants to do that like. Fire the whole might defense. Oh, the next day you know it was crazy. G told me that even though it can sleep a lot, but he slept very well the bed. The crowd with crazy. It was crazy. It was just fantastic. Twelve like I. Don't think we've had we've never. We've never had that after. Never never had the amount of energy coming from the crowd never. and. and He. Took that help help them you know and. And that was fantastic and wins this game. Crazy, you know after, tell you. Last week. I told you that also came to Arthur came to Cameroon right. Any with Tom Walker. Some augert. Charlie, Pasarell and Marty recent Tomoko my first. Time, I was playing singles in Davis Cup was against Holland. Tomoko I'm playing Tomoko. Like to seven years after. Actually yes seven years after we met in Cameroon. I'm playing him. So he was part of all the whole. My whole stories from my first Davis Cup player. He's to play Tom. I'm trying to make the story short. The fifth set we playing on carpet, playing the fifth. I'm serving for the match at. I think eight seven or Tena of ten nine I'm sorry for the match. Forty thirty matchpoint I serve you returns I make volumes backhand. It's a winner. I throw my Reckitt, up. Okay I want. Dives. You have to look at it slow motion. I throw them, Iraq. It's he's beaten. It dives. The bullies behind him, and for some reason with his wrist. He hits the ball back. The problem is when the ball little mini love that comes. I finished the volleys underground, but the promise that I through Iraq. So I, don't have a racket. So. The ball comes slow motion in front of me and I take it with my hand my racket. He's over there. You imagine yen the crowd in Holland screening. Screaming screaming were almost lost. Dispatch because of this mistake. I'm nineteen. At this point. You know when you're young, you don't you don't think too much. Don't don't panic. You know this the energy of being young. So end up winning this match, but I will never forget this. Listen to this. Look at look at the finals complete. Sampras looked at the match point because I told them to story I told the. So many times. It part of the story was all did that was a joke, Bob? We laughing about it for years? Even before it was captain, look at what happened was. Look at the final. Is I took it back end? Pete returns to his down the line. and G makes like a perfect volley. Cross court volley. The winner. If you look at the image. Look at it. Pete Dives. Dives this is a winner Ev, nine, hundred, nine, four ninety, so we the the. Pete Dives. And hit the ball. And Give a slow ball back. That actually hit a little bit of the net and come. But look at. Almost Swiss racket. Almost always record away. Almost did the same thing goes crazy, but he kept the racket crown already cheering that I shall. Always Movement is going to throw his racket. And then the ball comes, doesn't the racket is really and then and then you said he was going to cry and stuff. I don't think I've ever seen. A player collapsed to the ground quite like the way he did it was. He completely lost control of his body. He just let's I mean it was the ultimate matched was the ultimatum and winning Davis Cup for us, you know we have tradition for Davis Cup you know deep shot three used to be the president at this dream of winning the Davis Cup. either. So, it's like it. It met in meant a lot. It was like. Shambo tie was like the one of the Moose Curtail was the reason why we slackers. And Crochet. where the reason why to hold on gallows was built, was built, was in the state in this at the stadium. You was there it was. It was filled with history. D. Is is very special. Guy Loves the tradition he loves loves scope, I. Think loved more that actually winning a grand slam as a teammate easer. So tools to win this last point for him was. The universe. and. And it's it's.

Davis Cup Pete Dives Cameroon Tomoko Tom Walker Holland Iraq Yannick yonkers Reckitt Davis Bob Arthur Sampras president Charlie Pasarell Marty
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"Don't remember it was a semi final fifty eight was a semi final. And feed us one. Win The game, so there's an interview on the court. And and the speaker says feed as you say. Hey, there's something that after say, nobody in the history of Tennis Nobody Beats Vitas Gerulaitis more than sixteen times in a row. fillers Vitas bar just. slashing. And yes, so yes I think we played in a time where tennis was popular because it was like Jahn the game he was beyond the game. I have so much respect for the generation today. Play some unbelievable tennis, but they don't have these. Luxury to really express themselves with people. Don't see it. People don't see I, don't they? Don't feel it. People don't know them. Really you know not dial. You. Know is a strong player united. She's one of the best. Ever. But you don't know him. You don't read or read on, know him. Within. The code of Conduct Yelich wins. Therefore when you were down the other end of the court from John. When when he would lose. What was it like I? Mean we were you able to rationalize that viewpoint then and think what actually this is good for the game. He can do it. That's fine or Or was it. Was it tough? No it was. It was part of the big of the Game John Always. Beat me always. He had me because me. The energy that I loved was like a happy energy. Excitement. A showtime kind of energy you know. And and John. Liked the drama elected you coming with John on the court? Okay, we like same size. We starting to play. I'm doing a couple of jokes trying to pass as me I dive. I make a good show and I'm taking the energy and taking the I'm taking all the energy. I remember playing him once in Dallas that used to have the W. C. T. in Dallas Tournament of champions I'm playing him. We both from New York, so we add spend some time together. At my place that he plays, you know. So! We friends, so we go to play and okay. We get on the CO together and I'm starting for the first time I'm playing well the energy good people are rooting for me I was always Democrat crowd favorite some taking all the energy of the stadium. A much bigger than him now. At that tiny for no reason he created like problem. He twenty, nine thousand to scream. Then the Energy Tori change my film. You know my script scenario that I wrote was comedy phone. Happy feeling it was people enjoyed, and all of a sudden like brings like trauma. And as I I is, it goes I see my my energy going down down. We didn't even play yet again. And this is what happened anyone. And at one point, we have an argument on the court. He comes to the net and I'm like. Me At the time, I'm talking to my friend. I said John Come Man, and you know what he said Fuck you. For Real and like I, was like I I was I was hurt. So, that any got me then you got me, so you know we're playing in Dallas where the mavericks playing, so we have these big locker rooms. You know where you have one. You know. We all stay in these big locker rooms. Tournament of Champions, eight players, so we like taking the shower and we ended showers with together naked. We together naked I know in the shower stays like five minutes. He's going Takao Rochon I'm going to showers so these nobody just us in the shower naked. And as communist turned his back show Muzak. Like you know, I'm not talking to some John. John I mean that means enough I lost I. Reach out to John so that means like what we're not friends anymore. And he goes I'm sorry man is part of the game, so I'm sorry man and he got me and you know I if I understood. At that moment you know the which John Never had a problem when he was winning, it was always when he was very close or when he was losing and when he started to do this. Wherever you wear in the other side of the net, you didn't even exist. And this is when he was getting energy. So that was that was, his game was the mind game he was playing I realized late. You know when. I started to work on late in my career and when I was coaching, so the part of the mind game things that you thought about getting four forehands, a back ends. I used to play beyond one day. I'm playing in stow calm. And you know it's very. I don't think it happens that you remember the best rally a your life. The best rally, so we're playing Stockholm I think in the semifinals. And at one point, we have a rally that you know from the. From the back. Left right left right left. Right left right at one point I'm like tired. I'm getting tired during the rally in our because he's been coal most a minute hitting so of course I okay I'm going for the last shot. I'm trying to hear okay. I need a win or not, because I can't breathe so I hit it. Come to the net. Eh passes me I dive. Comes allows me, I run I. Don't have anymore guess. I run I hit. A shot is back. We going on a rally? I know he's. Finally come to the net you know and I in a great approach. You passes me. The whole stadium stands up screening. Screaming I look at him. And I've like I feel proud him. United Smile, you know. Look at me. He doesn't even. Doesn't. He barely looks at me. Go back and take the next book from the WAL boy. This point counted for one set. It got me. Got Me because I wanted to connect with him. You know just have a little break. Connect you. Let me. And I was gone ice cold note, but bork now is like one of my best friends you know. We talk all the time you know. We see each other. We spend vacation together like the best and then. No that was his thing. Back End forehands strong, Best Best Physical Athletics Athlete. I've seen on the court ever. Remember. He won these thing that call the superstars you remember. It was his thing with all different athletes from. Different disciplines, and he wanted easi easily, but yeah gone, that was beyond that was his energy. Gamma was the point you know you can gain. Was a pilot. Was Yours right? He was actually writing books..

John Dallas Vitas Gerulaitis Tennis John Always Vitas Jahn John Never New York mavericks bork W. C. T.
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"So. We've had a week off and. Has Gone to get his haircuts. Catherine's been hanging out with Magnus. The dog I've been stressing about my football team west from job in as they try to throw promotion away. That may or may not mean something to you, and we will be back with tennis podcasts over the coming weeks and months altogether chat in as we normally do, but today we have a very very special interview with the French Open champion of nineteen eighty-three, the world's number three as his highest ranking, but that really doesn't tell the story of Yannick who is unquestionably the coolest man I have ever met Davis Cup winning captain. Three Times Fed Cup winning captain as well and had a hugely successful music career. Once his tennis stays had come to an end I had the chance to meet him just over twenty years ago when he joined the champions tour. Tour retired players who just traveled to will played matches against one another him and John McEnroe and beyond bog, and all these greats of the game, and just got to know him a little bit at that time. He was always suggest to me. I haven't seen him for about ten years, but I managed to get in contact with him through a couple of other people when we were researching and trying to set up interviews full at tennis, relived series, particularly the French Open, so that we could tell that story, and you'll have heard an excerpt perhaps of this interview when we covered his run to that nineteen, eighty three French Open title, but the entire interview. It's just joy, and it will improve your mood, and if you do enjoy the into you tell your friends family, let your social media, and what's that group's now about it because it will just leave them happier than when they started listening to. It has Yannick Noah. I'd like to go right back to the beginning of your of your career, and even before your career and the reason for your career and. I believe a meeting with Arthur Ashe. Yep Absolutely. Our used to leave the group in Cameroon, Africa and We were I was playing detail club tennis was. Not, very, big in Cameroon in the whole country, back nine court, so to play tennis was very privilege radio privilege so. so we used to go to the club at night, but at that time my parents couldn't afford a racket in one day. When I heard that? Some Americans were coming to the club saw. Americans you know so. So Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell, Tom, ochre, and Arthur Ashe where doing tour in Africa. And they happen to play one day my club. During the clinic they decide. They played with the kids. And I played with Sir and Liked what he saw. I was slim press. You know he was my heroes. At the end of the clinic gave me a racket is racket. Head competition that worth like. Probably Probably what my parents would making every month. and it was you know it was like a dream for me to meeting. Dr Racket Sonya poster. Saying To Yannick I hope I'll see one that. So that was very funny. But the next thing that happened is after this story went to the French Open and he talked to shut. It was the president of the Federation. I told him that he was a little kid was playing. Or was in French. Speaking. Country and And I I. The scholarship came to friends because of author I played in niece for few years. And? The first time I played in Wimbledon That was nine years after we met was in Wimbledon because as for wild card. That was accepted and we play doubles on center court. So that was a beautiful story, so yes, the so mean Africa. And he was a big part of my story. Because and after that you know. For some reason, he was always like you know. Not Too far helping me when I was younger growing up, and then you know played with him at Wimbledon, the first tournament. Back in the days. It was called Super Seris. I was playing Richmond Virginia where he was born. And that was the first tournament I one. Super Series and As I was you know going through the tournament semifinal quarterfinals? Semifinals Playing Roscoe Tanner and these gentlemen comes into locker room sold demand. It comes. It goes Yanic if you win. Arthur is coming tomorrow SEO really worrisome. Is Dad. So that was that was something I beat Roscoe and An author flew to Richmond I played Yvonne in the finals. Won The won. It and Arthur gave me the cup in his hometown, so that was really special. So yeah, we have a very connected. Yeah couldn't extent and did he keep in touch throughout your career? Did you see him around? There was a long period of you being a player and and many many years before he passed. It was he? Was You know he was here? Always here for me for advice, you know I went through a phase. You know when I was like eighteen nineteen and I felt like. I wanted to be by my own self. You know so. It was like you know you WanNa, be away from your father for who? This Seo I'm I'm Yani camera author and. It went on for a couple of years and then. But he was always there like he. Invited me played my first Orange Bowl in Miami. Miami Beach I was fourteen invited me. played Wimbledon with within. You know we play doubles at US Open together. We play doubles set. We will done. and he was always there for me was inspiring, obviously twice a mentor of status. And do you know today? I'm like? Oh. I was really impressed by what the work that the social work that he was doing. Decide the the you know one of the greats. Y- was always active so. The social worker working. And and most of all he was yet is these foundation was like helping kids in inner city to play tennis? And that was really inspiring, so one day I went to the. To the Bronx? New, York, and I saw what he was doing and I say all. I dream of doing that and Amid Foundation now score meal in France and we working all over France in eighty CDs. and. That was inspired by him. I just wanted to. Be Useful. You know besides playing. Winning losing, money. Whatever it was, it gave me. A different dimension it was something that makes sense, and and that's shows because of. Inspiration he says is advice. What was he like Yannick? What was he like as a person? Well, he was very was very quiet. Actually, it was very quite yet. Very. Little. Little sense of humor, but it was very was more introverted. And compared to be and I always remember like one day when we played with the first match replayed, was in on the court, and of course the press talked about this story. The fact that you know years before that he he saw me as a child. In Cameroon's. The central was packed and we playing in them. I remember we playing Bernie. Meet and Andy Pattison. From Rhodesia and South Africa, which led to the symbolic was really strong. and we playing them and I- posters of them in my bedroom full of them. So before we getting to the court, you know you have the always morning while you like staying in this room before everybody get. Installed good knowing the VIP's everything and I I read about an as we are about to go to court like saw nervous, my knees trembling. So we sitting in front of each other. and asked Arthur excuse me. Author Leash was terrible and I quit accusing yeah. It's possible, not Before in front of the other guys echoes why I I'm I'm too nervous too now to pay. And he starts laughing and the other guy. And he's the first. Time! TELLING THEM I don't want to play. It was like I was making a dream. I was like I. Didn't know what was going on. I couldn't put my. My mind together and and he says No. It's GonNa. Be Ok son so I actually don't remember anything about the first set. I was like on automatic pilot. I don't remember anything. And we ended up winning up I. Don't know if it was not eight..

Yannick Noah Arthur Ashe tennis Cameroon Africa John McEnroe Roscoe Tanner Dr Racket Sonya Catherine football Davis Miami Beach Miami Richmond Virginia president France Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell York Richmond
Yannick Noah Interview

The Tennis Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Yannick Noah Interview

"We've had a week off and. Has Gone to get his haircuts. Catherine's been hanging out with Magnus. The dog I've been stressing about my football team west from job in as they try to throw promotion away. That may or may not mean something to you, and we will be back with tennis podcasts over the coming weeks and months altogether chat in as we normally do, but today we have a very very special interview with the French Open champion of nineteen eighty-three, the world's number three as his highest ranking, but that really doesn't tell the story of Yannick who is unquestionably the coolest man I have ever met Davis Cup winning captain. Three Times Fed Cup winning captain as well and had a hugely successful music career. Once his tennis stays had come to an end I had the chance to meet him just over twenty years ago when he joined the champions tour. Tour retired players who just traveled to will played matches against one another him and John McEnroe and beyond bog, and all these greats of the game, and just got to know him a little bit at that time. He was always suggest to me. I haven't seen him for about ten years, but I managed to get in contact with him through a couple of other people when we were researching and trying to set up interviews full at tennis, relived series, particularly the French Open, so that we could tell that story, and you'll have heard an excerpt perhaps of this interview when we covered his run to that nineteen, eighty three French Open title, but the entire interview. It's just joy, and it will improve your mood, and if you do enjoy the into you tell your friends family, let your social media, and what's that group's now about it because it will just leave them happier than when they started listening to. It has Yannick Noah. I'd like to go right back to the beginning of your of your career, and even before your career and the reason for your career and. I believe a meeting with Arthur Ashe. Yep Absolutely. Our used to leave the group in Cameroon, Africa and We were I was playing detail club tennis was. Not, very, big in Cameroon in the whole country, back nine court, so to play tennis was very privilege radio privilege so. so we used to go to the club at night, but at that time my parents couldn't afford a racket in one day. When I heard that? Some Americans were coming to the club saw. Americans you know so. So Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell, Tom, ochre, and Arthur Ashe where doing tour in Africa. And they happen to play one day my club. During the clinic they decide. They played with the kids. And I played with Sir and Liked what he saw. I was slim press. You know he was my heroes. At the end of the clinic gave me a racket is racket. Head competition that worth like. Probably Probably what my parents would making every month. and it was you know it was like a dream for me to meeting. Dr Racket Sonya poster. Saying To Yannick I hope I'll see one that. So that was very funny. But the next thing that happened is after this story went to the French Open and he talked to shut. It was the president of the Federation. I told him that he was a little kid was playing. Or was in French. Speaking. Country and And I I. The scholarship came to friends because of author I played in niece for few years. And? The first time I played in Wimbledon That was nine years after we met was in Wimbledon because as for wild card. That was accepted and we play doubles on center court. So that was a beautiful story, so yes, the so mean Africa. And he was a big part of my story. Because and after that you know. For some reason, he was always like you know. Not Too far helping me when I was younger growing up, and then you know played with him at Wimbledon, the first tournament. Back in the days. It was called Super Seris. I was playing Richmond Virginia where he was born. And that was the first tournament I one. Super Series and As I was you know going through the tournament semifinal quarterfinals? Semifinals Playing Roscoe Tanner and these gentlemen comes into locker room sold demand. It comes. It goes Yanic if you win. Arthur is coming tomorrow SEO really worrisome. Is Dad. So that was that was something I beat Roscoe and An author flew to Richmond I played Yvonne in the finals. Won The won. It and Arthur gave me the cup in his hometown, so that was really special.

Arthur Ashe Yannick Noah Tennis Africa Dr Racket Sonya John Mcenroe Cameroon Roscoe Tanner Catherine Football Richmond Davis Marty Riessen Charlie Pasarell Richmond Virginia President Trump Yvonne TOM
"yannick" Discussed on The Voice Tech Podcast

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Voice Tech Podcast

"Had a chance to really talk about voice dot at funding before. and familiar nego very interesting. Take on it as well one of the ambassadors for the voice I movement in the funding world. Maybe kick off by just telling us a little bit more about Mangrove I gave the intro that but tell us. What kind of things did you get involved in the the clients in the deals? He'd be doing recently mortgage from that. So. We Peeing Stage Venture Fund. A. Little bit specialists that we have always two hundred million funds, but we have very concentrated portfolio, so we do around. Thirty investments, meaning sixty seventy dozens purpose. And we always believed meaning. We get in very early and we on active cheerleader if Pronounce. And we have data handled so <unk> review, so we're going down with the doper -tunities. Investment checks the. Half a million up to five ISH Huffman up to five million, so this is seed funding on it as a stage code precede as well, do you do both of those you say early stage you could clarify the difference between those and you guys lie on that. Yeah, we don't really kissel much work. At the moment being put on the rounds. TAME <unk>! Long thirty percent. Meaning as a product out there, people. We don't cast much rather is the <unk> and do that? It descend bit more. Odious. Companies has revenues and the stage where. You. Go Raisin. Yeah right right excellent, and what part of your portfolio is comprised by voice technology companies in particular. You guys focus exclusively on that a new interest for you, so it's getting your interest I think we actually stop it looking at the space, the ALF. Ago. Since then we've done one investment in staged company called. See Better in Paris. Essentially pump needed to reinvent entertainment by beating rebate access to high-end. Brilliant way we can dig into that a little bit and a second in general. What's the feeling in the investment community? You guys one of the earliest thing you really leading the charge on this or the other firms that are now dipping their toe in the water, and and showing interest in voice so us both bedrooms looking at the space in year but say. If, it of all investments that have been done net probably. Three to four venture funds that are looking at the space, but we definitely say. Would I one getting excited about it? Nice there any particular characteristics that you look for then in voice tech companies. A wide range of different types of products that are being launched. People are trying different things. I've some patterns just from interviewing people on the PODCAST, so I'm sure you've noticed some some trends as well as the types of companies will the type of use cases that voices being applied to the tend to do better from attraction, point of view, or from evaluation, point of view while other <unk> typical kind of the cases, all the areas potentially industries that are most interesting to you right now. Footed that into that? It's <unk>. <unk> space so initially why we got interested in it is because it's so consume ass, using voice, technology and data, so basically used, but engagement conversion rates were extremely. Good. Instead of this, tell me us. They're ready. Use this new in. An extra enjoying it and they communicate engages. More than if they have to use the keyboard to put in data, so that will finish. Starting point where we realized, is this <unk> voice? From that what we having at we have the platforms via the voicing visit lodge and the platforms notables assistance. Everybody's involved home the next size this. Specific Arab just for us. But we are more than at all. Kinds of flux is use voice to enhance US experience into his. Business that at the end of the day eighty percent of the directions be has. Can Be done by boys, so we take him to do that. It's vision. We share absolutely the keyboard. It feels so antiquated. The fact that lasted so long crying out for. Crying on the alternative and one that's love it more human as well.

Twenty Twenty skype Nashville vanderbilt Tennessee
Investing in Voice - Yannick Oswald, Mangrove Capital

The Voice Tech Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

Investing in Voice - Yannick Oswald, Mangrove Capital

"Had a chance to really talk about voice dot at funding before. and familiar nego very interesting. Take on it as well one of the ambassadors for the voice I movement in the funding world. Maybe kick off by just telling us a little bit more about Mangrove I gave the intro that but tell us. What kind of things did you get involved in the the clients in the deals? He'd be doing recently mortgage from that. So. We Peeing Stage Venture Fund. A. Little bit specialists that we have always two hundred million funds, but we have very concentrated portfolio, so we do around. Thirty investments, meaning sixty seventy dozens purpose. And we always believed meaning. We get in very early and we on active cheerleader if Pronounce. And we have data handled so review, so we're going down with the doper -tunities. Investment checks the. Half a million up to five ISH Huffman up to five million, so this is seed funding on it as a stage code precede as well, do you do both of those you say early stage you could clarify the difference between those and you guys lie on that. Yeah, we don't really kissel much work. At the moment being put on the rounds. TAME Long thirty percent. Meaning as a product out there, people. We don't cast much rather is the and do that? It descend bit more. Odious. Companies has revenues and the stage where. You. Go Raisin. Yeah right right excellent, and what part of your portfolio is comprised by voice technology companies in particular. You guys focus exclusively on that a new interest for you, so it's getting your interest I think we actually stop it looking at the space, the ALF. Ago. Since then we've done one investment in staged company called. See Better in Paris. Essentially pump needed to reinvent entertainment by beating rebate access to high-end. Brilliant way we can dig into that a little bit and a second in general. What's the feeling in the investment community? You guys one of the earliest thing you really leading the charge on this or the other firms that are now dipping their toe in the water, and and showing interest in voice so us both bedrooms looking at the space in year but say. If, it of all investments that have been done net probably. Three to four venture funds that are looking at the space, but we definitely say. Would I one getting excited about it? Nice there any particular characteristics that you look for then in voice tech companies. A wide range of different types of products that are being launched. People are trying different things. I've some patterns just from interviewing people on the PODCAST, so I'm sure you've noticed some some trends as well as the types of companies will the type of use cases that voices being applied to the tend to do better from attraction, point of view, or from evaluation, point of view while other typical kind of the cases, all the areas potentially industries that are most interesting to you right now. Footed that into that? It's space so initially why we got interested in it is because it's so consume ass, using voice, technology and data, so basically used, but engagement conversion rates were extremely. Good. Instead of this, tell me us. They're ready. Use this new in. An extra enjoying it and they communicate engages. More than if they have to use the keyboard to put in data, so that will finish. Starting point where we realized, is this voice? From that what we having at we have the platforms via the voicing visit lodge and the platforms notables assistance. Everybody's involved home the next size this. Specific Arab just for us. But we are more than at all. Kinds of flux is use voice to enhance US experience into his. Business that at the end of the day eighty percent of the directions be has. Can Be done by boys, so we take him to do that. It's vision. We share absolutely the keyboard. It feels so antiquated. The fact that lasted so long crying out for. Crying on the alternative and one that's love it more human as well.

United States Venture Fund Kissel Paris ALF
"yannick" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

Unofficial Partner Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

"While I expect. But at this voluntary, that mafia correction a at C. knows supremacy, and by implication I also think that all the domestic revenue among the big five few. Foot BUNDY'S V temblor converge in the differentiate shade of vdb liked international an broadcasting revenue and I think. The, primitive expect pasta the. Most global brand and therefore most attractive rented overseas market and Dominate the meteorites revenue a month, the European foot by going forward, but more due to the reason. The. Higher intonation revenue as to the highest domestic revenue, I think only leak that come somewhat close to the perimeter in terms of overseas for tension is. But still a significant get be between those two Quite difficult to know whether you know coming to market with a rights tender, this moment is is great or terrible. BENDA's isn't because it's just you can see a covert impact, but actually it might be the. The the broadcasters are. Looking to make big bets, because of the you know the. Proof point of football. In in terms of commercial value and one of the very few things that they're certain, always the the the audience will come back to football in a way that they probably less sure about other things. Yes agreed Angie and standpoint of the Bundesliga has also evolved over time at the beginning. Of March it's the ball dead stick to our initial scheduling, and then the auction was actually scheduled for March then voss and slightly delayed to a few months back, which is the reason why we have no the tender, but I think both you wipe decision by the witness you've got to and. Postpone and the auction like the Italian city audit I think they postponed it onto the NBA. But who says that ten beyond a better position and I think it would just brought even more uncertainty to the marketplace and to the broadcast. Bundesliga foot, not test gone ahead of white now and I think gruden decision, and at least as I said I expected will be rewarded with this slight increase, but not coming close to the increase. They have experience with the current second I, think probably. The last thing to say Yanni is first of all thanks very much for two diary enjoyed. That is good fun and I. Think There's a there's a lot there, and we will carry on the size of thread that will keep pulling and his a compensation will keep going via this strand of podcasts. To our people listening, we'd love to you to get involved if you've got questions in areas that you think we should be focusing on covering, and this is an international conversation, so we will be looking at various markets. We've looked at the UK and Sorry. We looked at the English premier league and we've looked at Bundesliga. Primarily today, but we're going to be sort of looking at leagues and properties, and the media picture elsewhere as well so any thoughts on that any questions, just getting touched by unofficial partners, dot, com, or on twitter, and linked in which is where we spend a great deal of our time in the meantime Yanic. Thanks very much as ever for your contributions and you'll. Insight and see you next time tons good I enjoyed it and Yeah, it's keeps a serious running..

football Bundesliga twitter Yanni BENDA NBA BUNDY voss Angie UK gruden
"yannick" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

Unofficial Partner Podcast

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

"Vicious, and often in competition with the extra single game, single knife game but I expect sky going aggressive feel. Potentially being able to show all the games. The. Game All as part of the conference, and the second hatred White Hoda booby, either zone or Amazon because. Guys quite traditional and do not expect to split the life packages across three patriarchy. Bit US given that Yop. The German the German willingness to pay for media I would call on. It is somewhat limited and spending. The climbed bought property in Germany and. Three pay-tv operators would be fight challenging at to accept from the consumer's point of view. And in terms of that loss of the Champions League for for sky, does that impact? Their sort of position of you know primacy in in that in football. Is that is that you say that? They're going to respond aggressively with around Bundesliga but there's also a question of sort of the premium -ness of the offer, and if you don't have Champions League that impacts on on that, you think that's a fair. View. It's an absolutely fairview view. Sky Does Not Go aggressively after the Boondi and retains the majority of the Games of the Bundesliga mockery position. Envisaged Not Christian. What's whatsoever and Looking at this vague, she health guy has reacted to those new auditees lenders here in in Germany. It has been like I. Think like also other telecommunication companies have done. They really have. been more focused and their white acquisition strategy and more trim spinach, each of focus on. An hoped your properties and cutting costs on the fringes, really focusing on those subscription, driving difference making leaks in competitions and potholes that difference making and properties so. It's not a little dying, but it's certainly a really really important moment for sky to just remain relevant into remain among democratise year in in Germany one of the. Questions and one of the one of the things, the premier league gets enormous amounts of credit four, and and is creating a competitive market for their rights. Every time they come round, so there is a you know it was. It was Setanta going back and it was bt, and it was TV digital there. All sorts in there was always. Skyways had competition, and so that kept the price up and that, so that happened in Germany to the same extent, or is that something? A sky had much more of a sort of a monopoly in that way. Does that affect the way in which the price is impacted? I think there are two things to consider I think. The, Patriot landscape and scope of potential potential bidders is much more competitive compared to the last white tigers, which was brought to market for years ago back then, Bundesliga introduce you to the national docks in no single virus would bitch didn't make anything tends back then because there was only one pay to business, skied so everybody. Is Taking to get into the business with the Bundesliga which false. Over.

Germany Champions League Amazon football Skyways Setanta bt
"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

"So that was my guest. Uniqueness again conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra last Thursday before an empty hall because audiences were already band. I listen to a lot of jazz and a lot of it dates back to the nineteen twenties that I listened to and I think about how that music has endured for decades when I go to the Opera. I think of how some of the operas that I'm seeing have endured for centuries they've endured through wars and world wars they've endured through epidemics and through the nineteen eighteen. Flu Pandemic Do you think about that a lot. About how the music that you can duct you conduct a lot of Newark too but the earlier work that you conduct that this is music that has endured and giving people like joy and comfort and connection for for so long ties us to Two centuries of people who lived before us and who have endured they're suffering to this is so well said Terry I I think you know what you just said is exactly why we do what we do. This music is not called classical for You know for nothing is because it becomes a classic because we actually Connect through our being and our history and our aspirations Collectively as a society but also individually through these masterpieces because they have an endless power of a regenerating our philosophy or our hope in life. And yes I do think about this a lot especially not only that they have endured these terrible moments in life but I think this is where precisely that art has been able to give a comfort to give hope to give guidance to give a moment to breathe Something to think and now is no exception. I think this is where And feels strange because we can't give it live but it's not the first time in history that also like performances are not possible so we have this advantage to actually be able to share differently. And now what I see What I'm seeing all over the world happening and definitely this is what we are doing in Philadelphia and Montreal and New York is Several initiatives about what can we do even from our living room to bring it to the people What the musicians can do as chamber music just a very small group in the living room or some QNA's some lessons online some Gatherings that are that keep the connection and the communication because that is the key Leonie. Thank you so much for taking some time to talk with us. I wish you well please stay well And your family. I hope your family stays well Your friends the orchestra members the members of the met your musical family. Thank you so much for your time and free music. Thank you Terry. It's always an honor and a pleasure to talk to you and I also wish you Health and also your family's enough ones but very appreciative that you also take the time to bring this content to the people uniqueness as again is the conductor and music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Music Director of the Metropolitan Opera. Fresh air weakened is produced by Teresa Madden. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham our interviews and reviews of produced and edited by Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers Roberta shorrock. Sam Berger Lauren Crandall Heidi Soman Moods. Eighty Fair challenor. And Seth Kelly Molly Seavy. Nesper is our associate producer of digital media. I'm Terry Gross..

Terry Gross Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Opera Seth Kelly Molly Seavy Flu Phyllis Myers Roberta shorrock producer Sam Berger Lauren Crandall Philadelphia Fresh Air Teresa Madden Newark Danny Miller Metropolitan Opera Technical Director Audrey Bentham executive producer Leonie
"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Something that brings together so they told friends most famous passage. Probably from Beethoven's fifth is bump bump bump palm so like when you play Thursday night passage that so many people have heard so many times. What did it mean to you my own vision of this famous motives about no famous songs? Payments it's You know those four notes is that it's something that's relentless and breathless and it's actually Beethoven struggling and his Beethoven Not Knowing where this is all going until he finds the solution some thirty minutes later with the last movement which is a major and this is normally my interpretation of it of course with the circumstances it became even more relentless even more breathless and I have to congratulate. Of course all the musicians of the orchestra for being so focused in chairing there. emotions that moments even though there was no audience. And I believe that that's at that point. It was quite clear for all of us that we it's might be the last knows we play together for some weeks or months and This definitely helped inform the performance or charge with I wouldn't say even so fresh vision but more an emotional content. That's just different than any normal but by the way there should never be a normal. There should never be in music any sense of routine or something. That's just the way it has always been for the sake of IT and But this is why we play. Music is to to get these emotions which are hard to put in words We can actually express them in have Hopefully some people inspired the in a kind of Cathartic way by listening to it. So let's hear that passage from Beethoven's fifth that we were just talking about and this is my guest uniqueness again conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra last Thursday night with no audience in front of an empty hall..

Beethoven Philadelphia Orchestra
"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

11:02 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Just use this fear that's intruding into other people's privacy. What do you do when you can see part of the future support for? Npr comes from whyy presenting the podcast. Eleanor amplified an adventure series. Kids love here reporter. Eleanor Atwood crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts. Or at WHYY DOT Org. We can't go to concerts for now. And my guest uniqueness again can't do his job which is conducting two of the world's Great Music Institutions The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera. But I'm pleased to say he's going to spend some time with US last week. After the orchestra learned that it would have to counsel performances until at least April eleventh. The Orchestra decided to go ahead with a final performance. Livestream in front of an Empty Concert Hall unique conducted the orchestra in a performance of Beethoven's fifth and sixth symphonies. If you WANNA watch that performance it streaming on the Philadelphia Orchestra website and on Youtube and thanks to the generosity of the orchestra and in collaboration with whyy the full concert will be available to watch on the PBS VIDEO APP and on W. H. Y. Y. Dot Org and now that the metropolitan opera has cancelled performances. They're streaming an encore performance of an opera every day on their website. Free for everyone like most of us unique can't do what he typically does but one of the things he can do is talk with us about music he things resonates in this moment uniqueness again welcome back to fresh air. Thank you for taking the time to do this. How are well? I consider myself lucky because I'm healthy. Everyone around me is healthy I am with my family here in Montreal and I came back here right after my last performance in Philadelphia on last Thursday and Yes I think you know. Of course we have We are living unprecedented times but Relatively speaking I think we have to count our blessings and I'm definitely you know fit to try and phase these new challenges ahead of us. So I love what the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera and probably a lot of other places are doing to. Which has since you can't perform in front of live audiences you're making performances available to the public through broadcast or streaming. So let's start talking about the Philadelphia Orchestra the last time you conduct to do And what you did. Was You conducted the orchestra in front of basically an empty hall so that it could be broadcast on the classical music station in Philadelphia and then also televised on channel twelve the TV Sister Station. Whyy radio where fresh air is produced And and so. What was it like for you to conduct in front of an Empty Hall knowing this. This wasn't a rehearsal. This was the real thing even though there was nobody there. Yeah this is Of course this was one of the most memorable For good and not so good reasons of course Because it's sad circumstances but yet it's it became a memorable event and experience for all of us on the stage to perform in front of an empty hall now We're coming into caters musicians. That's why we do this Some of what we do is very lonely because when we study scores when we practice our instruments It's it's one on one you know. Not even it's one the instrument Or or the score but all of this is ultimately to share and to have all of a sudden component of having an audience so someone who can react immediately physically in the same space as we are to what we do is really unsettling and Immediately I think for musicians and myself. We realized that we were missing. This very important part of what we do. And if there's something that even just a few days without being able to perform for audiences and also when I talked to audience members You know by phone or communicates by a with them through social media. I think that The live experience already. We miss it and we hopefully when this is all over we can resume our Life offering with renewed sense of how important it is for us all to feel like a community. Was It acoustically different for you to record in an empty hall? We know are empty hall by rehearsing in there so it was interesting to see that even though we were wearing concert dress and in concert mode we felt the same acoustics The kimmel center there is an hall than what we normally hear when it's a rehearsal so that was not unsettling what was unsettling was to finish these species and have complete silence. Oh of course. Yeah very very unsettling and and actually quite moving for musicians. It's was even you know. Dad there is because that there was a feeling of of emptiness data was You know also challenging. You know in a way but that's all made us realize how much we need the audience to bounce our energy back and that's a that's something essential for the live experience of music but music and also live otherwise than just live so that is a me. Yeah I think there's a lot to reflect and think it's GonNa take us a few months to also understand exactly All those differences between the the being live with an audience and knowing that there's an audience of course but just not having them as part of the experience immediately physically was last Thursday night. The first time you used wipes on your on your baton definitely the first time I used why he s and I mean We also had to think of the entire they car of the concert. You know all the ritual things that we normally do which is for example when I come in A before and after the performance when I go on stage I have to shake the hand of the concert master but now we had to reflect you know. Of course we can shake hands so We decided to opt for a kind of salute which is very respectful which is more Japanese greeting And so there's no physical contact but yet there's an acknowledgement and You know all these little things that we take for granted that change our and daily life for the moment. So you conducted Beethoven's fifth and sixth year last performance with the Philadelphia Orchestra before having to shut down. Did the music have different meaning for you in the moment? And did you invest a different meaning in it? We always planned these concerts to be the start of a Beethoven Cycle. So this is the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of Beethoven. And so it's the is. Music is celebrated all over the world. And we've been planning this great cycle full cycle into the delta. That was supposed to go to Carnegie Hall which on this of course is now and cancelled. I was personally to also go to Europe next month to perform record those symphonies by Beethoven With Different Orchestra Chamber Construct Europe now. This of course is still uncertain so Then when this situation happened we did not change program. This is what we were rehearsing planning on playing. And it's I don't know I don't want to read signs of of any kind but the opportunity to connect to our audience in such a moment of shock in the world where all of this is happening and we can't access the concert hall but having it would Beethoven whose you know whose. Music is probably the most popular or best known in the symphonic world And the Fifth Symphony is the representation of destiny and The humankind overcoming in its own destiny and the pastoral symphony which is all about nature and how to reconnect with nature and nature as they provide either in the source of inspiration and hope and we honestly could not have chosen a better program for this. But this is what we add to play. And every musician of the Orchestra I've played the symphonies countless times and in myself included is of course conducted the symphony so often but there was indeed a sense of reconnecting to the purpose of what. Beethoven wanted to tell us through this symphonies and Beethoven was very socially engaged. Composer in his time was very great. Opinions Politically opinions about Also how human nature should Take charge of their own destiny responsibility and their own place in the world and he also because he was having you suffering from hearing loss as a composer as we all know he had To reflect on the struggle and how to live with the disease. So there's a lot in his music that is still so relevant as a society and that meaningful than rich when we have to celebrate.

Philadelphia Orchestra Beethoven Empty Hall Metropolitan Opera Philadelphia whyy Empty Concert Hall Beethoven Cycle Eleanor Atwood Carnegie Hall Different Orchestra Chamber Co reporter Npr Montreal Youtube W. H. Y. Y. Dot Org kimmel center TV Sister Station
"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The two thousand seventeen novel little fires everywhere by selecting tells the story of the relationship between a black family and a white family in Nineteen Ninety. S suburbia. The book has been adapted into a new Hulu series are critic at large John. Power says it's carried by its stars Reese Witherspoon and Carrie. Washington American television spent decades tiptoeing around race a topic the mid advertisers nervous. I can't say exactly when this change. Maybe somewhere between Obama's reelection the trump presidency but these days we're seeing an explosion of shows on this subject including blackish watchmen Atlanta shots fired and the people vs Oj Simpson. Now comes in little fires everywhere. A new eight part. Hulu series adapted from the two thousand seventeen bestseller by Celeste ing set during the late nineties and prosperous Shaker Heights Ohio. This drama uses the fraud encounter between two families. One will often white one bohemian black to raise tricky questions about race. Social class at how much we can shape life to our ends. The story begins with Taipei mother. Elena Richardson that's Reese Witherspoon. Watching her family's large home burned down. And everyone say that. Your disaffected daughter. Izzy set the fire to see this happened. We flashback several months. That's when Elena Rinse out. Her family owned apartment to meet a warrant. A nomadic single mom artist played by Kerry Washington and her teenage daughter Pearl. That's Lexi underwood bursting with new blessed. Leauge ELENA is proud to be helping MIA and Pearl. Make a home in Shaker heights a liberal bastion of good schools and seeming racial equality. She wants me and Pearl to have a good life like the one she shares. The third lawyer husband played by a genial Joshua Jackson and therefore teenage kids but life isn't so neat even as Pearl begins spending time with the Richardson House drawn. It's unfamiliar air of stability. The rebellious izzy gravitates to the SPIKY MIA whose art strive to show people as they really are not as they want to be. Seen the WARY MIA neither likes nor trusts Elena whom she finds complacent she's unhappy. That Pearl is being pulled into the Richardson. Family orbit believing they're both spoiling and using her daughter to keep an eye on this. She accepts Lena's cringe-worthy offer to do domestic work around their house. Naturally their relationship is strained as you can hear when Elena Burston unannounced with the problem. Something Bernie sorry I knocked. Can I help you yes? I forgot to give you the keys to the House and Money Gracious I. The place looks great..

Leauge ELENA Elena Richardson Pearl Reese Witherspoon Hulu Elena Burston Nineteen Ninety Shaker heights Shaker Heights Ohio Richardson House Oj Simpson Kerry Washington Taipei Obama Lexi underwood izzy Celeste ing fraud Washington Joshua Jackson
"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:42 min | 1 year ago

"yannick" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Most of our staff is working at home now and I've started broadcasting from home so if I sound slightly different that's the acoustics of my living room and if you hear a loud meow. That's our cat rowdy. My first guest is Octavia Spencer. She won an Oscar for her first film role in the help playing a made in Mississippi in nineteen sixty three. She was nominated for an Oscar for her role in hidden figures. As the head of a unit of African American Female Mathematicians doing calculations for NASA to help launch the first Americans into orbit. She also received an Oscar nomination for her performance in the shape of water. That film won an Oscar for best picture now. She starring in the net flicks limited series self-made which is inspired by the life of Madame. Cj Walker who was born in eighteen sixty seven on a plantation in Louisiana after first eking out a living washing clothes for other families. She became a successful businesswoman selling hair products for black women. Eventually she became the first self made female millionaire. In the Netflix series Octavia Spencer plays Madame. Cj Walker in the first episode when she's still working as a laundromat. She's feeling ugly because her hair's falling out her husband has told her she looks like a mangy dog. She tries a hair product that claims to restore lost hair and it works sooner. Start selling her own version of the product to poor working. Women like her here. She is an open market trying to sell her product to a crowd of women. It's not about half pack and be Freedom Bondage Joys Yours WanNA battle station in life. She needs to make more money. Come on let me show you how she talked. I had a cane verses April relationship with my half but somebody all due to see. I was born free two years. After masturbation was often by seven meredith fourteen breaded fifteen widow by twenty had. Been for myself and my baby girl. All the work I could find was in the field was Washington. Didn't have time to take care of my head. I know you know what I mean. Hard work on the bombing wanted to work at the new hotel but they say ain't got the right luke. How many y'all know what she's talking about Cindy Down? Don't give nothing. Tell us make us feel. Luckily I tell you what you come by my salon do you. Have you got himself a deal that y'all a wondering why would you something for nothing? I know how hard it is to kept our head. I know what it's like to not have running water or products maypole. But most important I know if she looked good. We all look. If you look respectable we all look respectable era everything we do as Israel's next back on us so can help one person. I'm lifting us. All want world gives me the confidence every day to be in slay. The demon like the good fight as color woman in a mirror leads to wonderful opportunities him activities Spencer. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you for having me. Can you talk a little bit about Madame? Cj Walker importance in American history. I can I can tell you that. Madame CJ was a a standard bearer in our household that my mother used to inspire my siblings and Myself to strive to be the best that we could be and so I've always known her story but was interesting is her legacy is known in African American culture but not Really by the masses and she built an empire For Hair care for women of color. Black women actually and she was the first self made female Millionaire in this country and the fact that her story is known by the masses I I think it's time that that we we tell it. Did your mother used Madame. Cj Walker hair product. No I I don't even know if they were still around then she basically we. We had nothing and Madame. Cj was born You know Humbly as well and she was a woman of of of purpose. And that's what my mother used to motivate us to to be the best that we can be to reach our potential And so I've always known about her and I've always Felt that her story was Germane to WHO I am As a black woman so I if it she not only did hear growth product. She did other hair products. I think she made hair. Straighten IRS Cosmetics for African American women and so like when you got to Hollywood. Did you feel like that was still an issue? Having good hair products for black women getting good makeup on sets getting good lighting from in in the movies. If you have dark skin absolutely I remember one of the first jobs. I had I you go to set and expect to be made up and there was no makeup for me and From then on I always carry my own makeup. But I don't have to now but I definitely carry my own makeup two sets and yes it is still Pervasive that Women of Color Have to have someone who knows how to to light them. it's something that we struggle with within the profession Madame CJ Walker as we heard describes her as having had a Cain versus Abel relationship with her hair. Did you ever Like struggle with your hair and did that affect your feelings about your chances of becoming an actress. No my mother. I grew up in a household with their six girls in in one boy. So my mom. I used to love to watch her Wash in style my sister's hair and so she taught me how to do that I I didn't have. Kate enable relationship with my hair. I do now because I'm so used to other people doing it but I I didn't back then so you are in the amazing position of having like your first big role when you an Oscar for best supporting in in the help which I haven't seen it is from the point of view of a white journalist writing a book about a couple of African American women in the south working as maids for wealthy white women it was based on a novel by a friend of Yours Catherine docket Who told you you played one of the maids and she told you that this character was based in part on you not on your work but on what on what aspects of you did she draw? Well I didn't know Catherine. She was actually very good friends. With tyrod Taylor The director And writer of the help and I had met her Once and it was while we were in In New Orleans and it was summer and I was on a diet which those two things really really Didn't BODE WELL FOR TATE. Because we were doing a some sort of tour and it was hot in August and so I was actually very haughty and I think as she was re basically writing help she really didn't have a grasp of of who many was physicality and I think she saw this Part of my personality That was you know I'm the type of person am a straight shooter. And that's kind of I think what she drew from. But we didn't really know each other I think it was just a A surface Part of what she drew from. So at. What point did you find out that she drew from you to create the role that you ended up playing I? She asked me to read the manuscript and Let me tell you when you moved to Hollywood. Everybody has a manuscript and it's usually terrible And the manager for the novel for the novel and I she asked me to read it night just kept putting it off and one night. I sat down and read it. And what what how the way she got me to read it. Actually she said well. I wrote this. And I'd love for your opinion and I loosely based many on you and of course. My curiosity was Peaked but I just. It was such a thick manuscript. And I'm thinking if this terrible I do not want to waste my time and of course it wasn't terrible I found it very interesting and I literally read the book in One sitting. And at what point did it get offered to you as a role in the movie adaptation I think tate had always Earmarked that part for me we were. We had been friends for a long time.

Madame CJ Walker Oscar Madame CJ Octavia Spencer African American Female Mathem Hollywood Netflix Mississippi NASA Louisiana Israel meredith tate luke Washington Catherine IRS Kate New Orleans Cain
"yannick" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Entire arc and also in helmick helmet can was kind of an Easter egg sort of performance to just popped in there along the clue trail and then gun never seen again so that's a lot of fun doing that and a bill marks who worked on both of those films actually does that on purpose purpose with me because he knows that's what I WanNa do and I enjoy doing but also you know it's it works for him to just Sorta sprinkle me in here and there I think it helps to bolster the cast of the film and and you know the solidity of of the viability of the project well. You definitely left me wanting wanting more good Mr Jones. Thank you so much for your time. This was wonderful talking with you. Well thank you and Mr Bacillum is my dad. It is an birthday today so you could just call me all right well. Thank you Yannick. I really appreciate this and it was a real pleasure talking with you same same here. Thanks very much. Take it easy Yeah.

Mr Jones Mr Bacillum Yannick
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"He said, it's politics, and and it is politics. And I think that's what frustrates the tennis fan and the likes of of Yannick Noah for whom the Davis Cup has nothing at all to do with politics. None of tennis has anything to do with politics. It's just about four hundred backhands and passion and emotion and enjoy and yet, you know, you actually behind the scenes that the decisions the that. We're unable to be involved in actually a lot of the time necessarily come down to a whole lot of boring politics. And that's where a sort of disconnect comes in. That's why you know, you have Yannick Noah talking about his sort of distaste for the the money in vote because for him those things are so alien to everything that he knows the Davis Cup to be. And I get that. I get it. But, you know, politics, pretty ghostly, but they're also, unfortunately, a necessary evil, only, you could also say that Catherine. And his team the not exactly struggling for few quit other. So he can kinda Ford to tighten that view. You could argue, but but I get the point. I I mean when I got an out I was right behind it to be honest and probably overly hastily. So because a lot of the response we got really took me aback from analysts knows about how many people which is devastated at what they would lose, and they will lose. Yes there thankfully that. There is at least kind of some home in a way earlier early in the year. But there's no question for particular all the British fans that we we have listening to us the there's a lot of upset there because that's their chance to watch tennis locally. And they just love it a love the Davis Cup. I do get all of all of that. Now, I still feel that on balance. This is this is the way to go. I just hope they get it right in the end. So it's going to be. Fascinating evolves. That wasn't the end of the press. I we'll say because there was quite amount of Yana talking in French, which you in Catherine understand, which I I so what went on. Yeah. Well, that was good question where he was asked. Basically, you know, the roller captain is kind of to get the to get the most at if you apply. Do you think you did that this weekend that he he wasn't well, Catherine? What would you say it wasn't? It wasn't very happy that question. He did it in his sort of soothing seething Yannick Noah tones, but he was pussy confrontational with the journalists that question combative, and he sort of straight back saying well have you been watching the matches? The my players have been playing in the past three months, and there was a bit of back and forth and. Journalist kinda set while. No, I've not seen them all. But yes, I've been watching and Janet now set what I've seen them all and I've analyzed the mole. And I honestly think that this weekend my players performed better than they have been for the past three months and kind of to their maximum by stone, therefore moments Geel, Simone's six one record against Merrill, Lynch, the which he tweeted without comment relentless this morning. Yes. Yeah. Well, that has been the biggest of elephant in the room, hasn't it? The fact that you know, this is now the second time that unit now is French team of loss to Croatia. His only is only two defeats in this. Third caps. Say paired form has both been against Croatia twenty sixteen and now the final, and you know, France have had the Maron Chile disruptor in Iran seven she'll Sema six one head to head record. And. Yet. He's not played. And now it went into a bit of detail about about why that is and basically as far as I understood it. Does seem all would would want to kind of work different later Yannick Noah Yannick, Noah kind of chooses his team kind of a last minute was she'll seem on would want to know quite a lot and advance..

Yannick Noah Yannick Noah Yannick Davis Cup tennis Catherine Noah kind Croatia Lynch Yana Maron Chile Ford Janet Iran France Geel Simone three months
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"And that's kind of what are the French plasma signs that, you know, something something is going to be lost that they won't be able to replicate through, you know, through not having the home and away ties throughout the whole year and having a neutral venue for a fine. Oh, it just will be different. My feeling is that. It probably probably didn't change. Yeah. But I'm not sure what needs to be quite so radical they had tried to push through less radical changes without any success of maybe that was why they went so radical to try and to try and just Jiang something. But it does feel like it's lost a little bit of its essence. I do agree with the French players when they say that marrying Shelley made an interesting point about, you know, one of the benefits of is is the fact that a lot more money now will be hopefully going to the smaller federations. And you know, Yannick Noah has experienced the best of the Davis Cup rarely he he doesn't know what it's like for some of those smaller nations, necessarily, so hopefully now with the investment, you can help small the nations and put it into junior tennis, and all that side of it, which makes the IT episode of pushing this good thing, and hopefully it will be hopefully, the money does get that. But you know, the other side of it is when you are at a tie like the one we've just had you know, which one go down as I- spectacular. Davis Cup tie. You know, that was probation with dominant in the singles it wasn't. It wasn't a sort of an all time classic the doubles as I said yesterday was fantastic. But even so it felt, you know, just like everyone they're cared about it and. For that weekend. It was a special weekend. And. That to me it felt when you're there fairly healthy. But oversee there's all the other sort of things that go with it. You know, the fact that it wasn't on TV in the UK and the top players have chosen to play, and then kind of move on from it and all the various other issues. So you know, I feel conflicted about it. That was a sadness today leaving the stadium having that it won't be like that again. But equally I am also intrigued to see how this new place out. Very well said both my view, I'm also conflicted. I what I would say before I give my own personal view is is just the I think we can get a little bit lost in the seductive words of Janik. No and all the French team and partly because they're so passionate. They they mean it so much they they're in love with the divest Cup. And I don't want it to change. And I have such a lot of respect for that. Because they brought so much to it. I feel similarly when I listened to lighten Hewitt talk from an Australia perspective. These people are always have had their hand up. They have every right to give their view because they've given everything of themselves to this competition and said that they have all the credibility in the Bank as a result of that having said, which does Myron Chile ch and he came on the tennis podcast in February and said, he thinks these plans are very good plans. And they're a good idea..

Yannick Noah Davis Janik Cup Myron Chile tennis Jiang Shelley Hewitt UK Australia
"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"yannick" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"But yes, as you said very quickly. Well, it turned the other way because church broke in the very first game And wind. wind. Is about a minute game. Yeah. And he showed he had a couple of double folks. And there was a moment where the big screen zoomed in on Jahic. Now is face. It was grimacing if to say, oh, good Lord. What have I done kind of? And broke. And then he went onto in fifteen points in a row before lavar and say stemmed his authority and eat any never lost it to be honest. I'm from their Croatia in shock and just his back to your point about sort of. Why felt this was a bit of a mismatch? Just looking at the teams know France without their top three singles players this week gas gazing Jude my face and Seema not picked they've got their differences. I think with Yannick Noah, and then he's benched the number four Luca pre. And you've even it up in a situation where Jeremy show these the lowest ranked number one Frenchman to ever play in Davis Cup final and Sanga the lowest ranked number two against two players who've been in the top ten this year. So it kind of play true to form. I think the thing about the Davis Cup is Janet no has expression way says you you try. Control everything you can control. And then you you just hope for of madness in the match. But the madness never came. They were relying on that to disrupt church disruption. They needed the fans they needed all the background elements, but really church in Chile that such a good job of just stripping back those elements and just treating it like a normal match, and they were the superior players. And and that's how it played out. Come through. That's really sorry to. Yeah. I think that's really interesting. I think. No choice to make it about so much. Moving tennis doesn't he talked yesterday about his mystical quality? And obviously on paper more than ever he needed to make it about all the things other than the tennis today in the Croatians just said, no, this is going to be about, Janice. And and we're better at tennis, the new, you know, these these players are better than these players. And that's what it's going to be about today bearing in mind cutter. What I was gonna say he's given all of that we make a big play for what an amazing capital unit Noah has been and look his record stands there for all to see champion ninety one champion Ninety-six champion last year. And he has made inspired choices. He has motivated like nobody is motivated before we were talking yesterday about is his Yannick Noah retreat that we all suddenly wanted to sign up to. But does he have a big case to answer here with? Those team selections not only dropping Luca que-. But not picking is you Simone who has had a good year. I think he's he was thirty four wins twenty two losses. This year is thirty in the world. He's he's reached the fine of play court events. I mean, how hard at this stage. I know it's it's not over. But it's you could say it's as good as I ever what we'll get the stat from that in a bit. But how strongly do you feel about it yet? And that's probably something. We didn't talk about much yesterday the place. He didn't even pick for the for the scored. Notably. Of course, seem on and Mofaz. Yeah. He we understand. They're all philosophical differences varying degrees with both of them gas scare I think is is struggling with an injury. I believe, but but I mean service song is struggling with a fee..

Yannick Noah Luca que tennis Simone Jahic Croatia Chile France Seema Janet Jeremy Davis Mofaz Janice
Group intentionally crashes drone into nuclear plant to reveal security vulnerability

Phil Valentine

05:02 min | 3 years ago

Group intentionally crashes drone into nuclear plant to reveal security vulnerability

"Designed to be non lethal that's right yankee dog your head just catch on fire but did not kill you don't worry then blow up in front of you heck catch on fire but did not lethal i promise the weapon is designed to do things such as setting fire to illegal banners at a protest or setting fire to the hair or clothing of a protester it is not designed explicitly for killing like a gun that uses bullets and cannot cause the instant carbon ization of human skin and tissues he says it's a fifteen millimeter caliber weapon weighs about six and a half pounds has a range of twenty six hundred feet can pass through glance and other transparent obstacles so there you go i mean not that you would need this to suppress your population or anything you know in case they have banners that are like i don't know against the country you know against the government i don't know what else you would need this but don't be worried about it in the meantime ladies and germs greenpeace has crashed a drone into a french nuclear plant video released by the environmental group shows the zone zipping through restricted airspace above the buggy plant about sixteen miles outside of leo before crashing into a building on site it said the drone struck a storage pool for spent nuclear fuel next to the reactor one of the most radioactive areas of the site according to yannick rousselet head of greenpeace france antinuclear campaign said this is a highly symbolic action it shows it spent fuel pools are very accessible this time from the year and therefore extremely vulnerable to attack on that they are right i mean you know somebody probably needs to do something about it if you can just run a drone into it with no problem i mean you probably do have a security problem i would think richard branson ladies and gentlemen you know him as the head of virgin records virgin air virgin anything but he's anything but virgin one solution to income inequality he says is giving out free cash that's right a basic income should be introduced in europe and in america he told the new york times he was responding to the question what do you think those in positions of power should do to address social problems like income inequality a report published in january the global charity oxfam found that eighty two percent of the growth in global wealth from the previous year went to the top one percent of individuals ranked by riches meanwhile the bottom fifty percent had no increase in their wealth it's a disgrace to see people sleeping on the streets with this material wealth all around them he says as he flies in his private jet from town to town what is what this guy the guy's worth billions i would think at least hundreds of millions and he's saying but you yanks you need to be giving people money just hand out money on the streets is here's the deal folks and this is something that liberals don't quite understand and i don't understand it especially the rich ones richard branson made his money and he has he has put together some very successful companies why virgin records was probably i wasn't before virgin airlines that's how he made his money right in the record business he was probably that snooty guide the record bar you know there would always roll his eyes anytime you brought the album up to the you know you're buying their and that's probably how he started anyway so he starts off in the record business and then he introduces airliners and everything else and he's been very successful he's building a hotel here in nashville they tore down a beautiful historic house to do it but hey you know it's progress folks i mean we need another hotel another cat condo like a hole in but we got it but here's the deal with folks like branson and he lon mosque and the rest of these people they starting to feel guilty about everything but they don't feel guilty enough to liquidate everything they've got to help alleviate poverty so they suggest that the governments do it you see that way they can feel real good about themselves and advocate that the governments do this that or the other and then when the government started to do it they get their cpa's to find ways that they can pay less in taxes it's hypocrisy what they should understand as business people who have built businesses is that anybody can do this but not everybody's going.

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