23 Burst results for "Yandy Diaz"

 D-backs score go-ahead run on balk, beat Rockies 6-4

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 4 d ago

D-backs score go-ahead run on balk, beat Rockies 6-4

"The rays erupted for 7 runs in the 9th inning to beat the tigers 7 zero The game was scoreless until Gregory Soto walked yu Chang and yandy Diaz with the bases loaded Brandon Lau followed with a two run single and Randy arose arena added a two run double Raise opener drew Rasmus and pitched three scoreless innings and Colin poche got the win Tigers starter Matt Manning pitched 7 shutout innings allowing four hits and three walks while striking out 7 The outcome keeps Tampa Bay two games behind Toronto for the first AL wild card birth I'm Dave fairy

Gregory Soto Yu Chang Yandy Diaz Brandon Lau Randy Arose Tigers Drew Rasmus Colin Poche Rays Matt Manning Tampa Bay Toronto Dave Fairy
Lowe and Díaz homer, Rays beat Guardians 6-4

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last week

Lowe and Díaz homer, Rays beat Guardians 6-4

"The rays finally broke through against the guardians in a 6 four victory Brandon Lau and yandy Diaz built the two run homers for Tampa Bay which scored just one run in losing its previous two games Diaz put the raise ahead 5 one in the 5th Corey Kluber allowed four runs and 8 hits with a season high ten strikeouts in 6 innings against his former team Pete Fairbanks fan José Ramírez on three pitches with two on to end it Andres Jimenez homeward for the guardians who are 5 and 5 on an 11 game road trip Zach police act fell to two O 9 yielding 5 runs in as many innings I'm Dave ferry

Brandon Lau Yandy Diaz Corey Kluber Rays Pete Fairbanks José Ramírez Tampa Bay Diaz Andres Jimenez Zach Police Dave Ferry
Diaz has big hit, Rasmussen sharp as Rays beat Royals 7-3

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Diaz has big hit, Rasmussen sharp as Rays beat Royals 7-3

"Yandy Diaz and drew Rasmussen led the rays to a 7 three win over the royals Diaz laced a three run double to back Rasmussen who will add one run over 5 innings Diaz capped a four run fourth with a basis loaded bloop that put Tampa Bay ahead 5 one Francisco mejia went two for four with two RBIs helping the rays win for the 7th time in 8 games It's the first time the rays have won the opener of a road series since May 6th Losing pitcher Brad Keller was reached for four and runs in four innings Andrew benintendi had two hits and two RBIs for Kansas City I'm Dave

Yandy Diaz Drew Rasmussen Diaz Rays Francisco Mejia Royals Rasmussen Tampa Bay Brad Keller Andrew Benintendi Kansas City Dave
Rays score five in 7th, beat Boston 5-4 for four-game sweep

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Rays score five in 7th, beat Boston 5-4 for four-game sweep

"The rays completed a four game sweep by scoring 5 times in the 7th inning to beat the Red Sox 5 four Taylor walls and yandy Diaz delivered two run singles following Josh Lowe's RBI double Boston appeared to be in control with cutter Crawford taking a three hit shutout into the 7th inning but he allowed three straight hits to start the frame leaving after Lowe's double John Schreiber entered with a 0.60 ERA and had stranded all 14 inherited runners this season but he gave up the two run singles Tommy Romero worked a scoreless 7th for his first major league win I'm Dave

Taylor Walls Yandy Diaz Josh Lowe Cutter Crawford Rays Red Sox John Schreiber Boston Lowe Tommy Romero Dave
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:22 min | Last month

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"It must be a competitive advantage. So it's interesting because they are like, in terms of their sort of base running, which is our base running stat at fan graphs, which takes into account more than just stolen bases, right? They are pretty kind of middle of the pack, right? Like they, as a team, it's like 14th, but they have the same based on a number as the cubs. They're slightly better than Toronto, and then there's a bit more of a gap that starts to emerge. Like the rangers are just like really weird in the way here. Goodness. I haven't looked at this number in a while because it's not a thing I think about very often. But so it's not as if they are being penalized so much by their by their running into outsole though. I think that it is the thing that people notice the most. So based running takes into account weighted stolen based runs ground into double play runs and you be our, which is ultimate base running. And those are all available on our player pages and leaderboards so you can look at the individual components and like what they break down into and there's a lovely calculation on our glossary page if you're really curious about this stuff, but like zero and I will admit this table is from 2014. So these numbers might have moved a little bit, but like zero is average and then like 8 is really good and negative 6 is really bad. And so some of this stuff is probably moved around a little bit in the years since this piece was written. But they're not like terrible at it. They just are not, they're just doing the part that you remember the most. You know? Yes, right. I think that the outs on the bases number probably makes them look worse than they are, but I don't think they're good. I think looking at baseball reference, which breaks it down. They have made more outs than anyone at second base, which maybe is related to the fact that I don't think they have a great stolen base success rate, so far this season. But if you were to say that they were getting some kind of competitive advantage by yes, they're running into a lot of outs, but they're also getting a ton of extra bases. Then you would expect to see them at the top of some of these other columns on the baseball reference team based running leader board, which they are not. So baseball reference has a set called bases taken, which they define as bases advanced on fly balls, pass balls, wild pitches, box, defensive indifference, and the rays are below league average in that stat. And then they also have a stat called extra bases taken percentage, which is the percentage of times the runner advanced more than one base on a single or more than two bases on a double when possible. They are also below weak average or really right around leak average. In that stat. So it doesn't seem to me that this is just like a high risk, high reward strategy. It seems like they are probably just running into some of the three provisions. I don't know that there's any four G chest raised forward thinking competitive advantage going on here. And also, unlike some of the other teams that Peter mentioned, they don't have a high team on base percentage. So they haven't had a ton of base runners. I don't think. And so they can afford to lose a lot of them to outside the basis. So no, I don't think that this is an example of a competitive advantage. It could be could have a team that was like, yeah, we know that we're going to get thrown out at times, but it'll be worth it in the long run. I just don't really think that's what's happening in this particular case. And I think also generally teams have moved in the other direction where it's like we're not going to go for the extra base because we realize that outside the bases are costly. And so that's why in recent years we have seen that the rates of players trying to take the extra base and just stolen base attempt rates, the success rates have gone up because this attempt rates have gone down. Teams are being more conservative on the whole and that has to do with the run environment as well. But yeah, I don't think the race are a great base ready team. I don't think there's a really positive way to spin this. Well, they don't have a they don't have a ton of room for guys, right? No. Well, maybe they have more than they should. But actual fast guys. Actual fast guys, right? Like if you look at the sprint speed leaderboard for Tampa, you know, like, no, not all of these guys are getting equal amounts of playing time and some of them are heard. And so, you know, but like Kevin kier Meyer is their fastest guy, that is unsurprising, but like G man is slow and Mike's and you know who has been hurt for a while and that was slow and Esau parades is slow and Francisco mejia is slow. And yandy Diaz is slow. We got some slow boys out there. Guys, slow boys. Yeah, combination of slow and room mentality. Right. That's not ideal. And so I don't mean to suggest that they're like amazing at it. I think that they are probably not as bad as the memory of being out all the time. Not all the time, but making outs on the basis makes them feel, but they're not good at it either. And some of those outs might be really inopportune. They may come at it really bad moments, Ben. Yeah, good. Yeah. All right, Jacob writes the Orioles have in recent memory been notorious for their pitchers doing well when they leave. Kevin gossman, of course, our top of mind, but has some kind of corner been turned here. Keegan Aiken, Jorge Lopez, Dylan Tate, and dean Kramer have all seemed to have found something this year, is this small sample size noise, or is there something here? Are the newly semi respectable Orioles good at pitcher development? I don't know. Yeah, a little too soon to say. It would not surprise me if they were or if it were no longer a weakness at least, given that there are a lot of Astros people who are running the Orioles and that has been a strength of the Astros organization and still is in the paperback edition of the MVP machine I did afterward a new chapter at the end just about the Orioles because I had written a bit about the Astros in that book. There was one chapter on them and how they changed player development. And so I went and talked to some Orioles people because they were at the time truly terrible and it seemed like they were trying to follow in the Astros footsteps. And so I tried to look forward and peered to the crystal ball and see will they actually be able to file in their footsteps or is that tough to replicate or has just the player development landscape changed so quickly that it's tough to do with the esters did. And I don't know. I think too soon to say, but it would make some sense to me that they would be a lot better at that than they had been historically when it was a completely different regime doing things in a completely different way. And I think it's encouraging at least when you look at some of the Orioles results and some of the

baseball cubs Orioles rangers Kevin kier Meyer Toronto Francisco mejia yandy Diaz rays Astros Kevin gossman Keegan Aiken Jorge Lopez Dylan Tate dean Kramer Peter Tampa Mike Jacob Ben
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

06:08 min | Last month

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"What statistic would you want to know, which would give you the best sense of what kind of player you were watching. Not necessarily how good they are, but what to expect from a qualitative perspective. Like most, I'm a fan of war, but one of its downsides is that it's not very useful as a guide when watching a game where we'll tell you just generally if a player is good or not, but it doesn't tell you how are they fast? Are they patient? Do they have power, et cetera? Even something like batting average, weaker as it is in terms of predicting value, actually gives you a meaningful sense of what kind of hitter you're seeing in a given at bat. I think for pitchers, this is a little bit easier than hitters, something like fit, or perhaps some ratio of strikeout percentage to walk percentage would be explanatory for hitters. It seems a little harder, which you also want the hitters ratio of strikeouts to walk, perhaps something like slug minus on base percentage. I'm having a hard time thinking about what statistic real or invented would give you the most information about player type, understanding that anyone's statistic will always be somewhat lacking. Boy. This is such a really good question. Yeah. Yeah, 'cause war on purpose isn't trying to describe the shape of the production. Right. I want you to know the value. I like the idea for pictures of well, I think the idea of like for pictures is good because it's also kind of sneaky. And I guess it's only sneaky if you know ERA also. So now it's not sneaky, but that's good. I think that having a sense of strikeout to walk ratio is also informative there and probably tells you that is kind of sneaky because you're getting information about both things probably. Two stats and one, really if you strike at the walker strike up minus walk, whatever. So that's like, that's fun and sneaky and also descriptive in an interesting way. Gosh, it's like type of, it does give you a sense of the type of hitter in a sense. It gives you good versus bad, but my go to for like, you know, offensive stuff is generally WRC plus, but I don't know if that's the best option here, right? Because it doesn't, it's not going to necessarily help you distinguish what kind of hitter the hitter is. Yeah, and strike out to walk ratio is not bad for hitters, but it also would not necessarily distinguish between, say, Steven Kwan, and we surprise her one Soto or there are players who have very good strikeout to walk ratios with no power and players who have a ton of power with that. So that would not tell you everything. I think if you can use statcast stats, if they count. Then I think that would probably be the best bet. I think they count. As long as this is not like something that needs to apply across all previous eras, like for pitchers, I think maybe just something about their repertoire would be most helpful. If you just gave me their fastball velocity, that tells you a lot, or maybe even their fastball usage rate would tell you a lot because, I don't know, maybe that would give you some sense of how good their fastball is and then you would know like, are they a pitcher who pitches, quote unquote, backwards, like are they someone who's going to be trying to strike you out with a bunch of breaking balls or are they going to be just pumping that fastball by you? And you never know with anyone hit her like we talked about Shohei Ohtani and how he can throw super hard, but sometimes he doesn't throw his fastball that much and so you would not necessarily know from his fastball usage rate that he's got a great one or from his fastball velocity that he has a whole bunch of fun secondary pitches. So it wouldn't be a perfect measure, but that would tell you a lot, I think. So maybe with a hitter, then hard hit rate. Yeah. Or gosh max exit velocity. I mean, that's going to tell you is this guy strong, probably you might get a yandy Diaz situation where you have a beef boy, but it's ground beef, so you never know, but if you hit the ball really hard, I mean, that doesn't tell you anything about does the guy have plate discipline or anything. So you're still getting it incomplete picture. So maybe, I mean, hard hit rate that would probably be the best thing I can think of. If we had bat speed, which we don't, I guess there's like inferred bat speed or teams have bat speed from stat cast and I think there's some plans potentially for that to start showing up on broadcast sometime which would be fun. They had that. On ESPN, like way back in the 90s, they had a different kind of technology that would measure that. But that might tell you something but not everything. So I guess hard hit rate would be my answer for hitters and for pictures. Either fastball velocity or fastball percentage probably. Yeah, yeah. It's hard to only have one. Who's doing this to us? I know. Why? Why are you depriving? There are so many stats. Why did we only have one? Yeah. And how are you throttling our Internet searches somehow so that we can only find one stat when we search? That seems intrusive. Yeah. I mean, like, yeah, I mean, at least let us know too, right? If we could just know too, we can, it's funny that I'm about to use the word triangulate, given this, but you can really kind of work your way to a better understanding. So give us two. It seems fair to give us two. Yeah, all right. Well, I think we did the best we could with this one. Maybe like swing rate or chase rate for hitters and pitchers or something so that you know like is this guy getting a lot of chases and then probably a lot of strikeouts or is this a free swinger or not? Of course you don't know if he's hitting it when he swings. You would hope that if you're swinging a lot, you're hitting it a lot, but it's not always the case..

Steven Kwan Shohei Ohtani Soto Diaz ESPN
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:42 min | 2 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Yeah, you could call it like a bleeder maybe. Yeah. Honestly, I have no problem with swinging, but really either. I think the term itself acknowledges that this is a contradiction in terms. It's an oxymoron swinging bunt because a punt famously you don't swing. That's the whole thing with a punt, right? So by saying it's a swinging punt, you are acknowledging that it was not a bunt that it was a swing, but that it produced a bunt like result. So it's about the bad at ball itself. It doesn't really have anything to do with the swing or lack of swing. Everything that transpired before the ball was put in play, right? So I actually think it's kind of a useful term because it tells you what the bad bowel was like. And then it clarifies though it was not a but it was a swing, but it produced a bad ball. This is fine with me. Not a qualm of mine. Yeah, I'm fine with this one. All right, Britney says the phrase contact hitting continues to rub me the wrong way. Am I alone in this? All hitting is contact hitting. Contact is literally what hitting is. I think that this is a more legitimate right. Okay. So I get it. I get this one more. I still think it's probably okay because the distinction we're drawing here is between like hitting for contact versus hitting for like over the fence power, right? Like that's the distinction we're trying to draw. And so I get how in isolation it reads as kind of redundant. It's like saying ATM machine, right? Because you're like, it's in the thing, right? But I think that we are, it is trying to differentiate between hitting for in the fields contact that is going to be potentially fielded versus something that goes over the fence, right? Yeah. This is almost like, I guess the opposite of the swinging bunt because it's telling you something about, well, it's telling you something about the process that produced the contact. And it's telling you maybe it's telling you something about the contact itself, but it's telling you that you were prioritizing contact or maybe if you're a contact hitter that means you make a lot of contact. Louisa rise, you would say, as a contact hitter, you would not say Byron buxton is a contact hitter. So I think that is a useful term. They both produce contact, but one produces contact more often and is more geared toward making contact. I guess you could say high contact hitter or low contact terror and that might be more precise, more accurate, but it is true that someone who strikes out a lot just is not a contact hitter because they just don't make contact all that often. Sometimes they do and when they do, I guess their contact here, but to be a useful distinction to differentiate between your slugger, your power hitter, and your contact hitter, obviously your power hitter makes contact and your contact hit or hits for power, but we're talking about a difference in degree here. Yeah, I get it more. I do. But I think it's, I think it's okay. Yeah. Last one in this genre comes from who, first of all, he responds to our conversation about things that have yet to be accomplished in an MLB game, and he suggests the ultra maculate inning is what he's calling it one inning pitched four strikeouts 12 pitches. That's a good one. That's happened. I like that. But his pedantic question is, when a power hitter gets jammed, breaks his bat, and bloops a single between the infield and outfield, the announcers will usually say something like he's so strong. He got a single because of how strong he is. While it's true that if he had less strength, the ball would have been caught in the infield, if he happened to be even stronger, the ball would have gone further in the outfielder would have caught it, so it's not really accurate to say he got a hit because he is strong, he got a hit because he was in some sort of Goldilocks zone of strength, not too weak, but not too strong, just right for a bloop single. Um. Does this bother you? No. I want to validate people's pedantry here. The segment to be people ready to get and us just shooting them down and saying, no, forget about it. This is fine. Obviously we have our pedantic hang ups here too. I started this episode with one. But this is not one for me because I think this is usually said about a mish hit, right, where you don't make solid contact you're not squaring it up. So the ball couldn't have gone much farther than it did in light of the quality of contact. It's only the strength of the hitter that allows it to travel as far as it does. It's like you hit it poorly or you broke your bat or whatever and you still manage to whoop it over the infield because you're so strong, right? So you could certainly hit it more squarely or cleanly and then it would go farther, but I don't know if you could hit it much farther given the same angle and timing and like a realistic level of strength, right? I mean, I guess you could be the strongest person in the world and maybe it would go farther, but talking about in the realm of Major League Baseball players and their strength. Generally this is something you would say about a strong hitter like someone who is big or strapping or hits for a lot of power, you probably would not say it about a quote unquote contact hitter that often. Yeah, I guess you could have strong contact hitters too sometimes, but I think generally this is said when you just don't really make good contact, but you still manage to propel it that far because you are sufficiently strong. And I don't think that you could be stronger realistically and propel it much farther than that. You could only hit the ball better. And then it wouldn't even require as much strength because you would be making more solid contact. Yeah, yeah, I think that that's right. I think that that's right. You'd have to be like, now I'm just envisioning yandy Diaz's arms, but like bigger. Bigger than that. Bigger than that. Is it like kind of like, they're so big and strong, but are they so heavy that he can't lift them? Yeah, can you even swing? What sort of bat speed would you be able to generate? I feel like this is like something in a philosophy class. I want to give someone validation here. I want to agree with someone. I think we might have when that I will agree with in a second, although I'm not sure it's this one. Another Ben says the pedantic question about calling first and third base the corners a few episodes to go led me to this. Another pedantic question that doesn't necessarily bother me, but I could see bothering others. This is like we're in pedantic concerned trolling territory. He is not bothered by this, but in theory. He might be. Why do we call it a baseball diamond? Isn't it a square? It seems like there isn't a clear definition of what a diamond shape is, but in general, it's just another term for a rhombus, which is not the shape of a baseball field. Once again, this does actually bother me, and I like the way baseball diamonds sounds more than baseball square, but I could see someone being potent about it. So if there is a hypothetical person who is pedantic about using baseball diamonds instead of baseball rhombus or baseball square or something, does it offend you that it is not technically a diamond? Do you think it.

Byron buxton baseball Britney Louisa yandy Diaz Major League Ben
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:15 min | 2 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Looking at a leaderboard of qualified hitters sorted purely by on base percentage is making me really appreciate the season that Paul Goldschmidt is having, but that is not the purpose of this segment because it's like, what if you had a guy who also got a biscuit, but then he slugged 5 98, and that would be Paul Goldschmidt, who was also done, I think hit a home run today. So anyway, that's not the point of this segment though. So I'm going to pound the table for a ride just because I want there to be like biodiversity within the ecosystem. And so this is not a knock on Byron buxton, but having Luis arises in the game makes you better able, in my opinion, to appreciate the Byron buxtons because baseball is a land of contrasts. This heightens the contrast. And that's really great. So I'm going to say a rise, but not because I don't like fire and buxton. He's pretty great too. Yeah, we love them both, but I'm with you. Yeah, a rice has about 20 more plate appearances than buxton thus far this season. And rice has 60 singles. Yeah. And yeah. That's a lot. Because fucks and has 15 singles. So arise has four times as many singles. I guess you could argue that a single is that super exciting, but singles are so scarce now. It's the most single averse era in baseball history. So arises giving us that he is, he's sending you home happy in terms of like what percentage of his plate appearances make you pleased. If you're a twins fan, he's gotten on bass. He has achieved his goal of not making it out almost 45% of the time. Whereas 68 hits in 60 of immersing goals. Don't change even one thing. Yeah. Not even one. I love it. Yeah. And bexton, meanwhile, has like 31% he's getting on bass and he's sending you home happy in his plate appearance. And sometimes he hits a Homer and he makes you happier than his singles will make you, but yeah, I'm totally with you. We've got plenty of low average sluggers. It's a low average sluggers game right now. And so arises just completely going against the grain and he's a ton of fun. So yes, purely on the bat and what they have produced thus far. I think I would rather watch Louisa rice right now. Really enjoying taking in this leaderboard because it is just a poo poo platter of different kinds of guys. Like, can I give you some lines? Can I just give you some lines here? So first, I know that we talked about him and when he signed the extension and we've talked about how he's underappreciated. But are you conscious in front of your face kind of way of the fact that you are done Alvarez's line for this year is three 15 four three 6 25. That's pretty great. That's pretty great. A rise in buxton combined. Yeah, he's like everything they do. It works. Yeah, he doesn't strike out. He hits for power. He hits the average. He just does all the kinds of hitting that you can do. Yeah, it seems like a Houston was right to want to sign that guy to an extension. So there's that. Then we need to take a moment to appreciate the yandy Diaz line because he is sitting two 66 four O one three 43. I love it. The ground beef nickname that yes. Kind of tried to give him. Yeah, we kind of tried. We didn't we didn't put our we didn't put a beef boy swing into it, but we tried. The full weight of our bully pulpit here we reserved for more serious matters. But it's almost 60% of his possible. He has a .077 ISO Ben. I love baseball so much. What a great surprise, yeah. Yeah, what a great what a great stupid sport we've got here. We got a great stupid sport on our hands. I also like I'm realizing that this is tightening up certainly as the ball has become livelier and less French. But I'm still I'm still kind of surprised by lines and what that means in terms of WRC plus. I'm still not quite dialed in on that, but anyway, that's neither here nor there. So yeah, those are those are some lines. Mike Trout, two 93, three 92, 6 34. Yeah. It's like, man, should we take a moment to appreciate the big sluggers? Let's do it. Oh, it's the little guys you think, you know? It's those guys you think. It's Aaron judge and then José Ramírez in the mic trout and then Bryce Harper and then you are an Alvarez. That's the top 5. So anyway, this has been Meg looking at her own website, a new segment that we are seeing on a victim. Yeah, the more extremely offensive environment, the more it makes you appreciate the plus stats. Oh yeah, gosh. Pluses and the WRC pluses. Yeah. That's when you need them. Yeah, otherwise you're just like, you know, you're swimming without a life preserver Mookie bets as if 5 36 lug. Yeah. All right, Mookie. Look at you. Anyhow. Pete Alonso, Pete Alonso 5 59. Sorry, I didn't know. I know that I know what's coming in the show so I didn't know if that would be a useful transition for you..

Paul Goldschmidt Byron buxton Byron buxtons buxton bexton baseball Louisa rice Luis Alvarez Homer rice Mike Trout Diaz José Ramírez Houston Bryce Harper
Kluber, Cole duel, Rays end Yankees' 4-game winning streak

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Kluber, Cole duel, Rays end Yankees' 4-game winning streak

"The race scored in the late innings to bounce back and beat the Yankees three to one after two straight losses to them The angst grabbed a one zero lead just three batters into the game as Anthony Rizzo sacrifice fly played a DJ le mayhew But the raised Corey Kluber and three relievers shut out New York in just two hits the rest of the way Garrett Cole had a shutout going for New York with two out in the 6 but Tampa Bay scratched out a run to tie to one on Randy or rosarina single The race took the lead in the 7th and yandy Diaz's infield hit and another in the 8th of Manuel Margot single I'm Tom

Anthony Rizzo Le Mayhew Corey Kluber Garrett Cole Yankees New York Rosarina Tampa Bay Yandy Diaz Randy Manuel Margot TOM
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:25 min | 3 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"The thing with Yelich is that he is hitting the ball very hard. He is in the 98th percentile in hard hit rate right now. So he's hitting the ball even harder than ballinger is and he's up there in average exit philosophy he's up there and max exit velocities up there in barrel rate and he is still pretty selective too. I mean, he doesn't strike out a whole lot. I guess he's striking out more, but he doesn't chase much and he still walks a lot. So I don't know like with him you would think that if it were injuries if it were the back that would manifest itself in him not hitting the ball hard but instead he seems to have gone back to his old morrowind's self with more strikeouts where he's just hitting the ball on the ground a lot and so his average launch angle is higher than it was last year, let's say, but he still hitting more than half of his batted balls on the ground and it's just hard to be an elite power hitter when you were doing that and he seemed to have corrected that. I mean, when he peaked and when he was MVP and nearly back to back MVP, it seemed that he had figured out how to hit the ball in the air a bit more often. And that's the part that confuses me, I guess, is that I could see if he just were not hitting the ball hard anymore because of physical ailments, but why would you continue to hit the ball hard and yet sort of unlearn what you've learned when it comes to not pounding the ball into the ground constantly, yandy Diaz style. So I guess that could be injury related to maybe like the knee or the back or whatever has restricted his mobility in some way that makes it hard for him to get that loft on his swing, but it's like, I guess it's a sign of optimism that he is still crushing the ball because if you could just redirect it, then he'd be all set. But that was something he struggled to do for years and years before he finally broke through and put it together for a year or two. Right, it's like, do we have the most confidence in guys ability to change? Like, which of the things is harder? And I would imagine hitting the ball hard in the first place as a harder thing to do than starting to hit it at a more optimal angle, particularly when you have hit it at an optimal angle before. So it's not as if there's no precedent for that being a component of your swing. It is just a very strange, it's a very strange thing. Like he's hitting it hard enough that I would imagine that even with the increased drag on the ball, it should be going. It will go over the fence more if it were just up in the air more than it is now. And his expected weighted on base is three 40 right now, his actual weighted on base is two 84, but three 40 as an expected rate on base. I mean, that's what it was last year too. And that is not what it was when he was 2018, 2019 when it was like a almost a hundred points higher than that. So yes, he has underperformed his bad at ball quality thus far, but his batted ball quality thus far is like a little bit above average, not superstar. Yeah, if I were a baseball player, I mean, I know that all ballplayers have to contend with this because even the guys you are incredible as they age do eventually see skill decline, like that just happens. That's part of being a human being whose body only moves in one temporal direction, right? But I'm just like too anxious of a person to be a pro ball player. I think is what we keep we keep coming to when we have these conversations, but the idea of a skill that you have previously demonstrated an ability to not only execute on, but to execute on to an MVP degree, right? It's not like he, you know, he did it okay. Like he was an MVP, you know? He was like, he was Christian Yelich, and we were like, wow, cool, yeah. And the idea that it can just leave you, potentially. I would think about it every day, and it would absolutely be to my detriment if it were me at the plate. So I hope you don't listen to the podcast Christian, I guess, is what I'm trying to say, because that feels like an intrusive thought. Yeah, well, sometimes players will have a breakthrough mechanically and then they will revert. And it's weird because you would think that, well, if they figured out how to play at that level, whether it's throwing a pitch a certain way or developing a new pitch or changing your swing or your setup at the plate or whatever it is. You'd think that you could retain that. It's one thing if you just don't have the physical skill and capacity to do it. But if you do and it was really just a matter of unlocking it by changing something about how you work physically, then you'd think that you could sustain that, but that's not always the case. I mean, sometimes players really will just peak for a year or two and it's not necessarily a fluke, but it doesn't mean that they can continue to play at that level forever or even until they really reach an advanced stage of decline physically. Sometimes it's that, yeah, you do have some nagging injury and maybe that's the case with Yelich that makes it harder to execute in that way. Sometimes it could be that teams start pitching you differently and they find a way to counteract whatever you manage to unlock there or maybe you just get into bad habits for some reason and you just forget how to do what you were doing so well or a coach changes or something else about where you're playing or how you're playing changes or something's going on in your personal life that we don't even know about. So you can't necessarily count on these things continuing, but it is confounding when you have someone like that who played at that level for a couple of seasons and obviously the brewers banked on him continuing to play at a very high level because they gave him a long-term contract to do just that. So, you know, I guess there's still some hope as long as he is still crushing the ball, then you kind of can convince yourself hope maybe he's just one adjustment away from crushing the ball in the air instead of on the ground. He's done that before. There is some precedent for him making that adjustment. So I guess there's still hope, but it's not something that he's really provided me with much more faith that he can do in the small sample that we've seen thus far this season. Yeah, it's like when in 2020 Eric Hosmer was just like putting the ball in the air and we were all like, oh wow, like maybe he finally figured it out and then he was really not very good at all last year, although I am now for the first time sort of engaging with Eric Hosmer's early 2022 line and hey, look at you, Eric. Good for you, friend. We aren't Friends. I don't dislike him necessarily. We're just not acquainted friend it was a weird thing to say, but yeah, it was like, you sit there and you're like, okay, for a 156 plate appearances, you had it sort of figured out that you had to hit the ball, even some amount in the air. Right. You know, it wasn't like he had a crazy launch angle, but some amount in the air. Like his average launch angle was like, who? Or something the year before? And then, you know, it was like 8.7 in 2020. We're like, okay, we're just gonna figure some stuff out and then he was like, no, I'd prefer not to. Yeah. Eric Hosmer has a four 57 babbit. Yeah. Sustainable. I bet.

Yelich max exit yandy Diaz ballinger morrowind Christian Yelich Eric Hosmer baseball brewers Eric babbit
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:18 min | 4 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Are in this era where you have a very true outcomes type ball and you have players who have been conditioned to swing for the fences by the juice ball and buy analytics that say, hey, home runs are good. You should try to hit the ball in the air. That makes some sense. And so we've got a lot of homers. We just don't have a lot of hits at this point. A lot of walks, but not a lot of singles and now fewer homers, more of those flies are turning into outs and so you just wonder whether well in the absence of some other change, unless you're going to do something with pitcher usage or where the mound is or whatever to curtail the velocity or just the unhittable stuff the pitchers are throwing these days well. If you take away the juiced ball, long term, I guess you could say, well, batters will be incentivized to aim for contact more often and they will stop swinging for the fences as much and they'll try to put the ball in play and I guess if you take the shift away then maybe that could be a bit more advantageous possibly but right now if all you've done is deaden the ball a bit, then you are taking away the one weapon that hitters really had. And so we might end up with a pretty stagnant offensive profile this season. Again, we'll see inevitably the numbers will pick up as the weather gets warmer, but even with sticky stuff banned and to some extent being enforced at least, we're still seeing not the offensive profile that you would probably choose super low batting averages and now not a lot of slug either and less scoring. And I think on the whole fence like scoring and they tend to tune in and go to games more often when scores are higher at least some studies have suggested. So worrisome in the short term, maybe in the long term, there will be an adjustment, but I just, I don't know if you can adjust to the average fastball being 94 and then sweepers on top of that. So you take away the one thing that was counteracting that. It's risky business and maybe it's a bit disturbing that MLB looked at the way offense was working and said, what we should do is make things harder for the hitters. Right. Well, and I think part of what is frustrating here is that, you know, when you look at what they are trying to do with rule changes, like we have remarked that they're testing in the minor so many things at once in some cases. And so it's like, what is actually going to be meaningful to shifting the balance between hitters and pictures? And how are these things interacting with one another? And I feel like we don't always have a great sense of that. And then operating in the background of all of that stuff is going to be this just huge unknown variable, which is the baseball. And so it seems like this is a place where if what you're trying to do is test some stuff with the aim of improving piece of play and putting more balls in play and making the game sort of more dynamic and less reliant on the three true outcomes, like you especially in that instance seem to be able to say very clearly like here is the ball and here's what it's going to do most often and we're not in that spot. And it's very strange. Yep. All right, to end just a few rapid fire follow-ups here. We talked about beef boys on our previous episode on an email show, what one has to do or be like to qualify as a beef boy. We talked a lot about yandy Diaz in the discussion because he is a beefy boy, but he doesn't hit for a lot of power and he hits a ton of grounders. And we said his name many times, we said beef many times we talked about his grounders many times, but as Ashton moss pointed out on Twitter, we did not make the obvious connection and call him ground beef. It's kind of the perfect nickname for him. Can we make this a thing? Yeah. Yes. Ground beef? I mean, it's so much better than nutting. Yeah. Yeah. I like both. But yeah, yandy Diaz, we're dubbing him ground beef for now. And we got a couple of follow-up questions can pictures be beef voice? Would you like to rule on that? Yeah. Oh yeah. Totally. I think they can be beef boys. Yep, yeah. Winston. He's a beefy boy. Yeah. No problem with that. We also got a question about whether vegetarians could be beef boys, for instance, prince Fielder, who was a vegetarian at least for part of his career, can he be a beef boy? And what I pointed out is that cows are herbivores, and they are literally beef. So I think absolutely if vegetarian can be a beef boy. Yeah, I mean, I know that there is a particular mammalian context for beef, but it can be a more generic term to refer to one's flesh. You know, we talk about moist as a bad word, but we maybe don't talk about flesh as like kind of a Nicki. You know, I don't know, here I am. Complaining about nutting and then I'm introducing that idea. So I think so. I do not I do not think that it requires it does not indicate the consumption of a particular kind of food in order to achieve one's imposing stature, right? It is not as if the beef boys are inherently consumers of beef, I wouldn't dare speculate. Don't know whether any of the so called beef boys are vegetarian, maybe some of them are pescetarians. We don't know, but I don't think that it implies anything about one's particular consumption habits, nor is it specific to cows. It is just about the flesh. Yeah, I guess this goes against the you are what you eat, principle, but it's not about what you put into your body. It's about your body, or it's about the state of mind, as I think you said on that episode. So yeah, you don't have to eat beat necessarily. But another follow-up, we talked about the over the ear headphones gesture coming to represent replay review and whether that would continue to represent replay review now that I'm sorry, not really using over the ear headphones for that process anymore. And whether this would linger and whether people would eventually forget what it originally signified or why that became the signifier. Well, kazuto yamazaki, listener, informed me that in NPP and he sent me a video of this, which I will link on the show page, but managers there to signal replay reviews. They basically draw a box in the air to symbolize the screen seemingly. So yeah, they just kind of like draw a square sort of a rectangle kind of thing. Sort of sloppy. It ends up being kind of circular in practice. But basically they draw a screen in the air with their fingers. And that is a replay review. So if managers and MLB are looking for a new signal to adapt for that now that we're no longer using over the ear fed headphones, don't know that we need to make that change, but if you're looking for a substitute managers, there is already one in NPV. So we could just borrow that from them, I think. I guess we could. I mean, again, I think the most important thing is that we understand what it is. What it is meant to communicate. And so I think that it is not so much that the headphones signal might always be meaningful and sort of interpretable by fans, but that is that symbol is understood now. That action is understood now. And in the future, maybe they have to do a different thing, maybe they have to do a square. Maybe they will kind of point to their temples to be like, you know, beam it into my brain with your brain rates. Might end up being the thing. But I think that as long as there are instances, as we said of over ear headphones out in the world, the fact that the specific equipment has changed within the context of the game, it doesn't lose any meaning. And just changing it to change it might be more confusing. Right, yeah. And then I also learned it was suggested that Jackie Robinson might have been a candidate for our stinky draft, not because he broke the color barrier, but because of another rule that he might have inspired. So this is something I was first exposed to. This past week on Jackie Robinson day, but Jackie apparently he would sometimes or at least on opening day 1955 he did break up a double play by letting the ball hit him. So he was on second base, another Dodger was on first, a grandeur was hit to short. He wet the ball hit him, which, of course, ruled him out, but prevented.

yandy Diaz MLB nutting Ashton moss prince Fielder kazuto yamazaki Winston Twitter Jackie Robinson Jackie
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:34 min | 4 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And that's true of the ones who hit the ball on the ground for less often than yandy Diaz. But I also am interested in an examination of beef boys, a state of mind. And in that respect, I wonder if we are, we are perhaps too quick to characterize yandy as a beef boy because he just puts the ball on the ground to a remarkable extent for a guy who was built the way he is. I mean, he has to be one of my favorite players to think about because it isn't a sensical. It doesn't, it doesn't track or register or seem right that someone who is that powerfully built in his arms would put the ball. I'm just gonna, you know, people know about yandy Diaz in his ground ball tendencies, but we're gonna spend some time contemplating them. This is yandy Diaz's ground ball percentage since 2017. 59%, 53.3, 50.8 66 in 2020, which as an aside, in 2020, which again, like this was a 138 plate appearances across the 34 games he played in in an abbreviated slate, but he put the ball on the ground 66% of the time, one 39 WRC plus the highest of your C plus he's had his entire career. And then 51.8 last year and 50% of the time so far in the early going of this 2022 season. Again, 6 games, 22 plate appearances from yandy. So he has a nice who are C++ 69 going into today's action. But so like for yandy, you know, does yandy know himself to be a beef boy is his understanding of his own personhood that I wouldn't dare to speculate because I don't know him. And you know, beef boy, we mean it affectionately and we mean it to describe a vast typology of physiques, right? There's some beef boys who are like Giancarlo Stanton who look like a baseball aliens. Like demigods in terms of their physique and then I think we would also say the lady Daniel vogelbach is a beef boy. Different kind of beef boy. So it doesn't need to be an overly restrictive definition in terms of the aesthetic or the physiology that it is describing, but in terms of how one understands oneself like epistemologically, I don't know that I want to speak for yandy, but it is one of the great contradictions of baseball in 2022 that that man puts the ball on the ground as often as he does. It is. Remarkable. How many, what's the record for saying beef boy on a podcast? I think I broke it. Possibly. Yeah, I mean, in terms of physique, like he's cultivating the beef, obviously. That is a lot of time in the dark building that he would not mind. I don't think being described as a beef boy. I mean, if we're talking about his build. Exactly. He's going for. Probably the worst thing we could suggest is that he is not a beef boy, if you're a bodybuilder to that degree, like you don't want someone downplaying your gains, right? So I don't know. I'm sure be flattered. He would be pleased to be a beef boy, I would think, so the question is, then, is beef boy about the physique or is it about the production? Because he does not have the production that one would associate with his size or with a beef boy necessarily. And so that's the question. Do you have to be a slugger to be a beef boy? Or is that purely a description of your physique in your appearance? And there are different types of appearance that could be described as a beef boy too, right? We're saying focal park is different from Stanton is different from Diaz. They're all just large men. So that's kind of the constant there, but the specifics of the body composition differ a bit from before to beef. So it's just, you know, where do you tip the scales is a big part of it. I suppose, and you can tip the scales for any number of reasons in any number of ways. So that's the question. Do you have to have the power output that one would stereotypically associate with a beef boy to be a beef boy? And I guess that we're saying the answer is not really no. I mean, if you look like yandy Diaz, you can be a beef boy regardless of whether you hit the ball in the air or over the fence. I think that beef boys are state of mind, man. Yeah. Yeah, and maybe even for someone who hits like a beef boy, walks through the world like a beef boy has like beef boy energy without necessarily. Looking the part right. You know, let's be broad in our applications of the term. All right, Jacob says, Manfred's decision to give every player a pair of headphones on opening day wasn't the only headphone related tidbit that caught my eye in opening weekend when watching the Mariners twins game, the Mariners manager wanted to challenge a call, so he made the motion like he was putting on some over ear headphones to trigger the review. But I saw that the umpire was no longer using a headset to review the call, but instead has a small earbud that can be popped in and out with one hand. So should the replay review signal be altered to reflect the new technology being used, if not, years from now, do you think fans will forget the origin of the replay review signal altogether if it continues to no longer correspond to what the umpires are actually doing? I think it no, I think it'll be fine because there are still over ear headphones in the world. It is not as if, you know, rob Manfred was I guess it did not extend his generosity to the population more broadly. So we are all still possessed. I'm wearing over ear headphones right now. I mean, just to record this podcast, it is, I will say the only time I do that because they pinch the top of my head, they become uncomfortable on top of my head, not on my ears, but on the top of my head, it is a design flaw in these particular ones, but anyway, no, I think that you don't need to over complicate these things. We don't have to have our signifiers be infinitely adaptable to the moment because people know what that means. And I'm doing the motion right now. None of you can see it, but you'd be like, oh, Meg's signaling with her headphones. Whereas like, if you are putting in like an earpiece, I think that's a much more ambiguous motion you might be like, is there something in your ear? Do you need to pop your ears? Yeah. Are you worried that there's something in there? Remember the one time that an umpire got a bug in his ear? And they had to take it out. Or player had a moth in zero, yes. That happens. Yeah, that happens. So like, do you need medical assistance or are you trying to assess whether the call on the field was right? You don't want ambiguity in that moment, especially if you do, in fact, need medical assistance. So I think it's fine. I think people will understand. I think it's funny that Manfred seemed to pick like, I have like bows in ear headphones so I can say this. He picked like the dorkier version of headphones. He wasn't like, I'm gonna send everyone beats, which seems to be a much more popular choice. I think he did, actually. It was initially reported that they were posed, but then there was a follow-up. Clarification, I saw that they were, they were indeed beats. Okay, so now I'm gonna do something wildly unfair. Are you ready? So he went the how do you do fellow kids route? Not nice of me. Rub. Damned if you do Dan if you do..

yandy Diaz yandy Giancarlo Stanton Daniel vogelbach baseball Mariners rob Manfred Manfred Stanton Diaz Jacob Meg Dan
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:54 min | 4 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And so when you're just sitting there, especially if you're off to the side or something, and you're not seeing the view that you're used to. On TV, you get a centered or centered ish view from behind the picture, you're looking right at it, you're maybe seeing the signs, you can see which way it moves, you're getting the immediate feedback of the velocity at least in most cases, which helps you narrow it down at the very least, but you take away all of those cues and all of those crutches and boy, it can be pretty tough to pick up on what someone is pitching. All right, question from Michael in Chicago. With the new system, more people than just the pitcher can have receivers to hear what pitches being called, typically it's the middle infielders in the center Fielder. IE the players who would have seen the signs anyway. What if the home plate umpire also had a receiver? How would knowing the expected pitch type and location help or hinder their ability to call Paulson strike? So this is sort of along the lines of what we were just saying. If you know what's coming, then you're certainly able to hit it much easier. Do you think that you would be significantly better at calling those pitches as the umpire if you could anticipate not just location, I guess you already get some sense of location from where the catcher is setting up. You would know how the pitch was going to move, how fast it would be that would be a lot more information than you usually have. I think it would help some, right? I think that it maybe would combat sometimes a catcher will sort of hurt their pitchers caused by the way that they are receiving the ball where they are getting it in the zoom, but they are jerking it so much that I think the umpire assumes that they are framing a ball into a strike. And so if you knew what kind of pitch type it, if you knew what pitch type it was and so it could sort of mentally project where in the zone it might end up landing. I think that some of that stuff might get ameliorated, but I don't know. I went back and forth on this when I came in because on the one hand, you would imagine that it would sort of help to have the umpire train where they think it's going to go more precisely even than the catcher setting up because sometimes catchers set up in a trixie sort of way. Like they set up in a tricky way to try to fool the hitter. And so in that respect, I think it would be useful because you aren't relying on the visual cue of where the catcher is setting up. But I also wonder if, you know, for very close borderline pitches, does it really does it really help one way or the other? Does it help her hinder? I'm not quite sure because you're still having to make a snap call about something that is very, you know, we're talking about very minute differences in where the ball is relative to the zone. So I'm conflicted about how much I think this would help. I don't know that I don't think it would hinder the accuracy of calls any more than anything else does, but I'm not, I'm not convinced how much I think it would help. How much do you think it would help Ben? A little bit. Measurably appreciably? Sure. Not like suddenly they'd be robo ups or anything. But I think it would help a little bit to be able to anticipate that movement and not be so fooled by the pitch that you're like flustered or that you lose track of where it actually crossed the plate. I think that would help. So I don't know. I wonder whether there'd be any risk of the umpires, being overheard by the batter. It's apparently not loud enough in some cases. Garrett Cole complained about not being able to hear the pitch come because of one of those obnoxious sound effects at Yankee Stadium, which granted those are really loud. Yeah. Maybe they should just turn those down instead of turning the pitch come up. But you would think that in the playoffs, for instance, when there's lots of noise and big crowds, you would want to make sure that those are loud enough to be heard. So I don't know whether there's a possibility that if the umpire had a pitch come device, the batter could eavesdrop, but if not, then I could see it being beneficial, like sometimes we've talked in the past about maybe the ump having some kind of assisted reality device, like some sort of tracker that would show them where the pitch crossed the plate. Ether, it could be just a signal like a visual cue like a light goes on or something so that they're able to see that. Like the robo ump system, the APS system would not be making the call, but it would just be an assist for the empire potentially, or that they could just see something in real time, some goggles or something so that they could see where the pitch crossed the plate and they would still have the latitude to make the call as they saw it, but they would have some sort of visual feedback or assistance there. So this would not be that. And it would be a little less heavy handed and it would still preserve more of the human element, but it might help it might help compensate just for the fact that it's an impossible job that you can actually see where this bottle that is traveling so fast and moving so much crosses the plate. Just with the way the human eye works. So if you're able to anticipate the movement so that you could maybe focus on a certain part of the zone. And say, well, it's going to drop because it's a curve or it's a slider or something. And so I don't have to look at the entire zone. I mean, I guess you could get yourself in trouble there, right? Right. Hyper specialized. You're like, it's going to go there and I'm going to just focus on there and then the picture misses a spot or something and it goes somewhere else. What do you do? Maybe if you're missing by a lot anyway, it's going to be a ball, but not necessarily. So that could get you in trouble. But it could also help. It's like with a hitter if a hitter can focus on a certain part of the zone. Hitters ahead in the count knows that the pitcher is going to try to come into the zone and you can just kind of eliminate a large portion of that real estate that usually you have to control that makes you better. I think it could do something similar with umpires potentially. I think that you're right, I think the moment for us to have done funny goggles has passed because the real joy of it would have been telling Joe west he had to wear them. And now he's retired. So what is what is the joy of funny goggles? I want to be in the room when that gets pitched to the umpires union, by the way. As an aside, you know how you get heckled at work every single day. We're gonna add goggles. That'll make it better. All right, this one is mostly for you, I think this is from Mark. It seems there has been a lot written on yandy Diaz and his lack of obvious power, despite the size of his biceps, this made me wonder can be labeled a beef boy despite his career one 34 isolated power. Did the stats need to match the size or is being a beef boy just a physical description of a beefy boy? What a, I mean, just a tremendous question. Real banger on this a Friday. I would assert the following, which is that being a beef boy is, well, see, I'm gonna potentially contradict myself. I guess I'm curious if yandy Diaz understands himself to be a beef boy because on the one hand, I'm inclined to think that being a beef boy is as simple statement of fact. It is a descriptor. It carries with you regardless of your performance. You know, not all of the beef boys are big boppers. They're not all, they're not all succeeding at the plate. Some of them are not actualizing their beef boy potential. Despite the possession of beef boy tools..

Garrett Cole Fielder Paulson Chicago Michael Yankee Stadium Ben yandy Diaz umpires union Joe west Hitters Mark
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

06:06 min | 4 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Out of nowhere at age 32 with that one incredible season, be enough to erase all his previous mediocrity and lack of fame for him to make the 2023 MLB the show cover. And as we speak, he is leading the grapefruit league with 7 home runs. So it is happening. No wonder, they needed to trade Gary Sanchez to free up space for the big power bat of Kyle higashioka. We all know that homering a lot in spring training means you're going to home or a lot. Was it Jake? The socks was at the oriole. Like a decade ago? That was one of them. Yeah. Yeah, there's some slight predictive value to having a super hot spring, but not a perfect correlation. So, I mean, I think that the real answer here is that you don't have the arms that bend as if you can't hit home runs. And I know that power has not been his thing historically. It doesn't do it. And it's shocking because of the arms. But I think he should. He should try. He should decide to be more like Tyler O'Neill than like yandy Diaz in terms of what the arms suggest he should be able to do. Exactly. I feel very nervous about their catching situation just generally. I mean, I know that Sanchez wasn't thriving. In New York, but I feel a little I feel kind of nervous for them when it comes to catching. But I think that the depth in the rotation is really where I see them being potentially vulnerable. Although we thought that too last year and then it ended up being fine. So yeah, it would be a nice change to have a catcher who can do the catching part at least. I know that I believed in Gary. I still kind of believe in Gary, but it was frustrating to watch him. So I will also note that yes, well, Brett Gardner remains in play. I think the blue chase were reportedly talking to credit card as well. So that would be intriguing. But Aaron hicks speaking of Vlad and a 30 30 season Aaron hicks has said that he wants to have a 30 30 season as well, although he's like, he plays 30 games. And then 30 more. Does that? Is that what he means by that? Sure, yeah. Well, that would double last year's total. So that'd be good. And that would bring him right into Leiden with his totals from the previous couple seasons, although we can't blame him for 2020, I guess. But I like Karen hicks when he's healthy, it's just that that's a huge caveat for him. Out of the question that if something happens to hicks, like just stick one of the beef boys out there because we talk all the time about how Gallo and judge are really underrated as defenders and their great corner guys and they're not total strangers to center. I mean, I guess there's a health concern, but it wouldn't be like the worst defensive solution to have one of those guys out there and then I guess you'd have to put them out in a corner and then there's the entry risk there too, although he also hit better last year when he was playing the field, so there's that consideration too. I don't know, I'm just saying like, you know, Stanton even when he was with the Marlins was kind of in that same camp of underrated defensive outfielder. So that would be a way to get all those bets in the lineup and, you know, at least not have a huge hole defensively in center, but it would kind of depend on everyone staying healthy. It's my general opinion that you can't not play an outfielder who plays in right regularly like Gallo or judge in center just because you're worried about them getting hurt. Like if you're gonna extend Aaron judge, which Carlos Beltran may have broken that they already have, I don't know, at least it wasn't just nice anonymous Twitter account this time. It was the first day with the yes network his first broadcast. Yes. You're going to suggest that there is the extension and that has to walk it back yet. He needs to be able to make a throw from center field or like make place at center field. Even if he does the Bryce Harper doesn't lay out for everything and his defense kind of suffers for it so that he can remain healthy. Even if he does that, he needs to be able to play center field. Like they don't need to just sign Bret Gardner in the instance that, you know, Aaron hicks gets hurt in my opinion. All right, breakout pick. Anyone other than Kyle higashioka? I picked clay Holmes. Clay homes, I think, could be the next great Yankee reliever they got him in kind of an under discussed trade last year, which seemed like just a way to clear some 40 band space. They sent Diego Castillo and hoy park to Pittsburgh and Holmes had always had control problems with the pirates and over a hundred career innings. He walked more than 6 batters per 9, but with the Yankees after the deadline last year, he just had four walks in 28 innings, he boosted his strikeout rate. He had a 1.61 ERA, a 2.1 5th. So I think add him to Chapman who is a free agent after this year and the green and they're going to be in really good shape even if Chapman has his annual four week stretch when he can't hit the strike zone or somebody gets hurt Holmes under control for a while and I think he's a very good reliever now that. Thank you have figured out how to get him to throw strikes. I mean, I know that the shortstop who is promised is volpi, but like Oswald peraza is floating around in the high miners and he's like a top 100 prospect. So there's the chance that something weird happens on the middle infield and he ends up pressed into duty sooner rather than later and then he might have a chance to work out. Can David Garcia break out still? Is it possible for him to write it down? David Garcia or will we scale? Those guys on a team that might end up hurting for pitching debt at some point. They could perhaps break out and have an opportunity to do that. I mean, they do have talented guys in the high minors. We're all excited as I said about volpi, but there are other names here. Yeah, I mean, to some extent, even if those guys don't play their kind of the most important rookies in that they contributed to the short step situation that we have here. I don't know how much of it. Don't blame that on them. That's not their fault. I don't know how much of it was Yankees nutting in not wanting to spend more than they are. Sorry, Meg. It's caught on. I know. It's really a problem..

Aaron hicks Kyle higashioka Gary Sanchez Tyler O'Neill yandy Diaz Karen hicks Gallo Gary Brett Gardner Aaron judge Carlos Beltran MLB Jake Sanchez Vlad Leiden Bret Gardner clay Holmes hicks Diego Castillo
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:11 min | 8 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Was a two one player, you know, Josh Rojas and Austin Meadows and Alex rodo and Michael a Taylor were like basically two in players yandy Diaz hunter renfrow. And like they were, you know, they were contributors to teams and some of them were contributors to playoff teams, but you're not looking at those guys being like, how will we put together the Hall of Fame case for Josh Rojas? That's not what you're doing. No, he is still doing harder thing than that because he is also pitching, but I do think that he needs he needs more star turns to be, you know, a guy we look at and go, wow, yeah. Oh Tony, Hall of Famer, no. You know, like you said, provided he stays healthy. I think that the possibility exists that he just does what he needs to to get there on his own merits, and we don't have to worry about it and you'll get to vote for him and won't that feel so good you'll be so excited. You'll be like, I gotta go for a honey and you'll get to tell people the story of the season that meant so much to you, but if what you are is like Jameson tie on plus you know Andrew benintendi, I think that people will read that a little bit differently. So he should just keep being awesome and then we don't care about it, but I'm with you. I think that I understand why especially as guys retire, there is this instinct to start to. I mean, you're not eulogizing them exactly, but you kind of are right, your eulogizing their career and the natural question to ask is where do they stack relative to other guys and then you think about the other retire guys? And you're like, some of those guys are in the Hall of Fame, so we should wonder if this guy is. But we could just we could take a breath to appreciate guys careers and just, you know, remember fondly, the times that they shared with us and that we got to watch them and how we got to derive joy and wonderment from it, like we don't have to wonder is a couple of seasons of Cal Cointreau plus Michael a Taylor a Hall of Famer it's like no, but like we could just be excited about these guys as they, as they sort of move on to other things in their lives and appreciate their careers as they work. It's very, I don't know, it feels like it's jumping the gun if for no other reason than we spend so much time on Hall of Fame discourse. Why do we have to do it two times? Just do it the one time. Every year, like you're going to. It's like, you know, it's like when people celebrate Christmas in July, I'm like, I get where you're going for, but we don't have to do it. You've got a whole month and it's most of November, too, so. Anyway, related question from Reggie Patreon supporter who says reading about icho exploits and some of his recent exploits love each row. The post playing career eater who just like show up and just strike out a bunch of high school players or hit a bunch of bombs in high school batting practice if you write him a letter. He's like the great pumpkin or something where you're like. Just like show up at the most sincere team that wants him to appear and he'll just appear in your pumpkin patch magically someday except he actually will up here in table suit up and play baseball for you on the great pumpkin. But it's wonderful. I just love how much he loves baseball. But Reggie says reading about more etro exploits made me ponder a question that I will share with you. I think it is safe to say that a redraft of the 1992 amateur draft would have made Derek Jeter the top pick, my Astros blew it. I believe even the Astros have acknowledged blowing it on that pick. But now ponder, if we had a true worldwide draft and ponder also, if Japanese players in high school were in this alternative world eligible for that draft, each row turned 18 in October 1991 and would also have been in Jeter's high school graduating class looking back if each row could have been taken in the same draft as Jeter could a case be made that each row would have been the top pick. I mean, sure, 'cause we know stuff. Yeah. I think he should have been. I don't think he would have been because there would have been a big bias across him at that point by team. Even when he ultimately came over and years of succeeding in the NPP, there were still some skepticism about whether his skills would translate. So certainly, at 18, even though he was already a good and well-known player, I think a lot of MLB evaluators would have dismissed him. So he would not have been taken, but in retrospect, knowing what we know, yeah, I would take each trove over cheater, right? I mean, even if you look at the time that they overlapped in MLB, I think each row pretty easily outward Jeter from 2001 on and Jeter was already a really good player before that as was Jeter, but if we assume that they're queer that started at the same time or maybe even each row could have debuted a bit earlier, perhaps I think that he would have had the superior career record at least value wise. Yeah, no, for sure..

Josh Rojas Austin Meadows Alex rodo yandy Diaz hunter renfrow Andrew benintendi Hall of Fame Cal Cointreau Taylor Michael Reggie Patreon Jameson MLB Jeter Tony Astros Derek Jeter Reggie NPP
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"I agree with the podcast that making the number of bases being awarded probabilistic or runner based would be too complex this was in reference to hunter Renfro and the ricochet ball off of him that resulted in yandy Diaz not being able to score, but being instead awarded a ground rule double, but it does feel like the ground rule double rule, that's hard to say, is broken if the intent is to award the offensive team proportionally for what they produced, almost every time there's a runner on first and a ground rule double happens, we've grown that the fielding team caught a break. To me, if the fielding team is catching a break, the rule isn't fairly rewarding the offense. I'd hypothesize that the true rules for everyone rule is a relic of ancient based running athleticism where the average based runner was likely to only move up two bases. With modern base running, changing the rule to be a ground world triple makes more sense to me or alternatively having ground rule doubles clear the bases by default. What do you think the ground rule double should be? Ground rule double rule, that's, you know, we should call it something different, first of all, because that's impossible to say. I guess you could say, what do you think the ground rules should be? Yeah. That's not quite. It's not specific enough. Yeah. I don't have any problem with it being a double. Sorry. I know it's not very controversial. I feel like I've seen plenty of gradual levels where the runner wouldn't have scored. Depends on the runner and as you guys correctly pointed out, that is very hard to handle. Yeah, you need something hard and fast because otherwise you're going to get manager fights every time. Yeah. It is true that stadiums are bigger now, so the ball is landing when it goes for ground rule double further from the plate. Yes. Which makes it easier for the runner to score. If they switch it to ground rule triples, I think I'd feel a little cheated because triples are so cool. Interesting. And if you look to people's triple stats and they were grounded rule triples, I would be less interested. Interesting. Okay, so I responded to this email and said that I quite liked the idea of a ground rule triple because there aren't enough triples I enjoy watching triples and I don't feel that there are enough of them, but this is an interesting viewpoint to have on that because you would be of the mind that it makes them less special and thus we would enjoy them less. Yeah, if we just said kind of by Fiat that everyone hit ten extra triples this year. Yeah. But none of them had the crazy rounding the bases at full speed and ball rattling around in the outfield. And they were just on the stat pages. I don't think I would really get the warm fuzzy that I do from actual triples. Okay. Of actual triples. They're so enjoyable. They are one of the like most pure aesthetic moments in baseball. They are just like unambiguously excellent when they happen. Triples and hustlers are my favorite hits. And I don't think ground rule triples would feel any different than ground for doubles to me. That is a fair point. Plus, you know, this sort of puts them into intentional walk territory where you have to mentally pull them out of a hitter's accomplishment to have a real sense of walker, not that we really have to do that with pictures because there aren't that many intentional walks anymore, but sometimes a guy has like a couple intentional walks and then you're like, oh, his rate's a little bit different than I thought it was. And that's irritating. One thing I can tell you is, I hate writing on people who batty. Because I always pull the intentional walks out. Right. Like we should do that to do analysis, but every time you write about it, someone's like, well, did you consider that they're batting 8s again intentionally walked? Yeah. Yeah, I did. You're like, yes, I did that. I am good at my job. It was in the article. But that's a guaranteed thing that happens anytime you write about anyone who has 8 and I wonder if it would start being the case with triples. Right. I think maybe you could have them clear the bases like Sean said. And again, it's actually not a bad idea. Many hits advance runners more than the batter himself or herself advances. And I think switching to that rule, it's a two base advancement for the runner and a three base advancement for every batter would basically cover all the things that you're worried about. Right. It would also not cheap and triples. And honestly, a lot of those hits wouldn't actually be triples, even if they would clear the bases. Yeah, that's fair. Well, I hope that that is an acceptable alternative. I like that as a rule. Well, Ben, I really appreciate you coming on yet again, filling the Ben void being Ben prime, at least for now. Is there anything that you would like to plug in particular before we remind people how many underscores are in your Twitter account? I would like to plug the use of underscores in general. They're great. Spaces are very difficult and hard to parse, but if he's an underscore, it's clear that there should be a space there, but you're still putting a character there so known as to wonder how many characters need to go there. And never used to underscores in a row, also very, very useful guide. That's hard to tell. But if you're using one, it's great. I don't know why everyone gives me so much crap for it..

hunter Renfro yandy Diaz Fiat baseball walker Ben prime Sean Ben Twitter
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

06:29 min | 10 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"The World Series, or they just like flop out in the division series in three or four games. Right. The two John Ferrell trips, but yeah, I don't know what to make of it. I mean, the only common denominator here is Alex Cora and I know that there's the, I don't know if you want to call a theory or whatever, but the idea that teams essentially reflect their managers, managerial style, and their managers personality. And I think that makes sense because the style and personality that Korra at least presents in the decisions he makes and the way he runs the team is just peer on the hell with it. It's real fire fest. Let's just do it and be legends energy. All the time. Yeah, you know, and a series marked by that exact energy. We had we didn't have a chance to podcast after the game that your team won in extras the day before. But you know, when a crucial moment involves a strange deflection off of hunter Renfro to deny yandy Diaz a run, you know that you're swimming in very strange waters at that point. They got three of the maybe the three best innings of Nick pavetta's life. Yeah. Which I don't like Nick pavetta himself who is just an avatar of chaos on his own. As all ex Phillies prospects must be, but yeah, everything about the Red Sox and the way they do things. There is a there is sense to everything that is done. And this is something our Cora doesn't give me the same vibes as it's funny. I can't even really think of a truly wild manager who just makes gut decisions without even really I don't really think those guys exist anymore. Yeah, they've largely, they've largely faded into the background. I think that there are certainly guys who have a better potential for those kinds of moments than others, but in terms of it being a consistent managerial approach. It does not really comport itself well with modern baseball anymore. No, but I think Cora especially and we've seen in the postseason because we saw it in 2018 too, the way he had to rejigger the bullpen and his starters as relievers and mixing up the lineup and just changing things constantly, I think that that's just one that was his style, I think in the postseason because he recognizes this is the time when pretty much everything needs to be done pedal to the metal, and there's no real room for just oh, we'll wait for tomorrow. But at the same time, the decisions he makes, you can see at the very least the logic and all of them, and for the most part, you agree with pretty much all. And I think there are only a small handful of moments throughout the series where I was like, wait, why is he doing that? That doesn't make any sense. And of course, you know, it's very easy to arm sure and say that doesn't make any sense. But truly, I think Cora is somehow kind of, if not perfected at least gotten really good at finding that balance between chaos and calm logical rational thought where at least feels like all the rash, all the chaotic decisions at least have some element of logic and rationality to them so that you don't feel like this is a guy who's just shooting from the hip at every at every possible angle. It's more that he's he's shooting like he can see what he's shooting at and he's got his aim right, but he does that thing where you turn the gun sideways? And so it looks cooler. It probably makes your aim worse, but it looks way cooler. But the unnecessary gangster movie. Yeah. Of twisting your pistol. Yeah, exactly. Twisting your pistol because that's how people talk about gangster movies. That is exactly how they that's a famous line from Goodfellas where Robert De Niro tells ray Leo to twist his pistol. Yeah. I always his entire life all he's been wanting to do is throw some pistol. Yeah, I mean, like the ones that stood out to me have been sort of at the margins even, right? Where it's like, so why aren't you pinch running for Christian Vasquez sooner with Danny Santana? That seemed like it took longer than it out to have. But in general, it seemed like he was doing fine. I want to ask you two specific questions about this series. And then I do want to briefly indulge in a little bit of rule book talk because it is not effectively wild if Meg does not insist on rule book talk. I am curious when in your experience of the 2021 Red Sox, you realize that you needed to appreciate and understand Gary whitlock. So that came relatively early from because I do remember in spring training that he was already getting talked up as being good, not just in the way that a lot of teams talk about rule 5 players with their desperately trying to convince everyone listening. No, no, no, we're going to keep and we're going to keep them more serious. Right. But like a legitimate like, no, this kid's actually good and is actually going to have a role. And part of that was because the Red Sox bullpen isn't good or wasn't good, briefly was good, got bad again, and now has settled into somewhere around okay, depending on who happens to be in at any given moment. But to me, it became really clear early on that this was not just your average rule 5 guy who was going to show up on your downer up 5 runs and give up a run in the process. This was if nothing else the legitimate velocity working 97.99 with good movement on everything. And just the fact too that and I think you definitely saw it in the playoffs and I love the big celebrations I loved every time Nick pavetta came off the mound. You know, he was just he was marking out like just wild the chest slapping, the jumping. I love that stuff, especially in the playoffs. But I do find it instructive or at least noteworthy that when you watch whitelock pitch and he walks off the mound, he just looks he just looks like he just finished taking his driver's license test. Right, right. It's just the most unaffected, like, okay, fine, that just happened. And it's like, even just beyond the stuff. Like any, you don't even recall the top of my head how old he is, but he's can't be any older than like 23 or 24. I would guess. He's 25. He's a he's a June June 25. So he is 25 years, four months and one day. Happy past four months one day. Whatever. Point is. It is kind of crazy to see a 25 year old kid who's also and it's worth noting too coming off or came off at one point reconstructive elbow surgery and is way past I would imagine any amounts of at least performance, if not innings that he's ever had in his life and he's still just looks like this is just the most simple thing in the world to him. And that's just like, that really stands out, I think, especially because he keeps getting put into situations that are absolutely terrifying. I mean, okay, there is the one core move where and I do think this core thing is more about the trust and relationships he has with the players.

Nick pavetta Cora John Ferrell Korra hunter Renfro yandy Diaz Red Sox Alex Cora ray Leo Christian Vasquez Danny Santana Phillies Gary whitlock swimming Robert De Niro baseball Meg whitelock
"yandy diaz" Discussed on Red Sox Beat

Red Sox Beat

05:01 min | 11 months ago

"yandy diaz" Discussed on Red Sox Beat

"Ends October 10th back with Alex barth of 98 5 the sports hub and you can follow them on Twitter at real Alex barth, apparently doesn't know how to center himself on his camera as we're doing. Podcast. Are you with us? Yeah. Okay. You could move over to your right just to see, I get because there's this. I don't have like a perfect way to balance everything here. Way to prep for this podcast, I appreciate it, Alex. You come through for us all the time, you're awesome. All right, let's spend some time as we wrap it up on the Tampa Bay Rays and the things that the Red Sox is going to have to do. First of all, they're starting pitching is going to have to control the top 5 batters in their order which figure to be. Randy, rosarina, playing left field, wander Franco, the super sensation rookie that was brought up in mid season and he hasn't disappointed. He's their shortstop. DH Nelson Cruz, who has experience up the wazoo. This will not be in a bigger than life situation for him batting third. Batting fourth cleanup is third baseman yandy Diaz and batting 5th, second baseman likely to be batting 5th Brandon Lau with a lot of pop. He had three homers in a game I believe recently against the New York Yankees a blowout win as the Tampa Bay Rays clinched a hundred win season in the best record in the American League. That's one thing. And the other thing is their rotation. The Red Sox are going to face Shane mcclanahan in game number one. And he it seems like we say this every year, Alex barth, about Tampa Bay pictures. He had a breakout year as a young picture in the ray's rotation. He's a left hander he had a ten and 6 record this past year, 3.43 ERA. He starts game one a little more than a year after he became the first picture in MLB history to debut. Make his debut in the postseason. He posted a 3.01 ERA with 99 strikeouts over the last three months of the season. And, you know, he is a guy that is really, I think in a try and give Tampa Bay a boost right out of the gate. Yeah, I mean, I think they've got a bank on him because without glass now. And we talked about this a while ago, like, I thought Tampa was out of it without glass now, because I wasn't a huge fan of their pitching rotation now. Mcclanahan's come on and sometimes it's hard to project with rookies right and he's obviously been that guy. So he checks a box, but Ryan Yarborough struggled Michael walker's struggle. So if you can, if you're the Red Sox, and this is obviously easier said than done. If you can take a game started by mcclanahan, you really put the raisin corner. It's not impossible for the Red Sox to win it if they lose game one. But it kind of becomes tough for the race to win it, right? If they lose it because then they're pitching potentially against totally blown up. So mcclanahan is a pivotal player in this series. I don't have a splits in front of the Red Sox when it pulls up right now because I'm actually curious, but I think this first game is going to tell us a lot..

Alex barth Tampa Bay Rays Red Sox rosarina yandy Diaz Brandon Lau Shane mcclanahan Nelson Cruz Tampa Bay Franco Alex Randy New York Yankees Twitter American League Ryan Yarborough MLB Mcclanahan mcclanahan Michael walker
Shane Baz wins MLB debut, Rays cut Blue Jays' wild-card lead

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 11 months ago

Shane Baz wins MLB debut, Rays cut Blue Jays' wild-card lead

"The blue jays led to nothing until yandy Diaz belted a three run Homer in the fifth inning of the res six to four victory Diaz had three hits and scored twice to back Shane Baz who worked five innings to earn his first major league win it was like a dream come true type thing trying to just keep my composure and remember the plan and just execute the jays fell to thirteen and for this month despite homers by Tasker Hernandez Florida's Gurriel junior and Marcus Semien Toronto trail six two on the nights until George Springer doubled and scored on Semien's forty first home run the race now we D. alias by seven games of the red Sox the blue jays are just a half game ahead of the Yankees for the second AL wild card on the ferry

Yandy Diaz Shane Baz Blue Jays Tasker Hernandez Homer Diaz Marcus Semien Jays George Springer Semien D. Alias Florida Toronto Red Sox Yankees
Díaz, Rays Tie Team Record With 6 HRs, Romp Past Twins 11-4

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Díaz, Rays Tie Team Record With 6 HRs, Romp Past Twins 11-4

"The rays are seven and a half games ahead of the Yankees after Tampa Bay won for the eleventh time in thirteen games and eleven to four routed Minnesota yandy Diaz hit one of Tampa bay's franchise record tying six home runs and drove in four Jordan Luplow Manuel Margot Rainier Rosa Reina Nelson Cruz and Brandon Lau also went deep for the rays the early run support help Chris archer get his first win since June twenty nineteen just the fact that our our guys put up that many runs that early no I just felt like I could challenge hitters archer tossed a season high seventy eight pitches while allowing four runs over five innings Jorge Polanco was three for four with a two run Homer for Minnesota I'm Dave Ferrie

Yandy Diaz Tampa Bay Rays Manuel Margot Rainier Rosa Rei Brandon Lau Chris Archer Yankees Minnesota Jordan Archer Jorge Polanco Homer Dave Ferrie
Rays Hit 3 HRs, Beat the Red Sox 7-3 to Tighten AL East Race

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Rays Hit 3 HRs, Beat the Red Sox 7-3 to Tighten AL East Race

"Tampa Bay is within a half game of the AL east leading red Sox after homers by yandy Diaz Mike Zunino and Randi Rhodes arena power to raise to a seven three win against Boston wander Franco added a two run double while the race bill to six to lead by the fourth inning Zunino arose arena had solo shots off losing pitcher Martine Perez for rays relievers limited Boston to two hits in four scoreless innings after starter Josh Fleming gave up three runs here as was tagged for six runs in four frames Boston played without third baseman Rafael Devers because of a leg injury I'm Dave Ferrie

Yandy Diaz Mike Zunino Randi Rhodes Zunino Tampa Bay Martine Perez Boston Red Sox Franco Josh Fleming Rays Rafael Devers Dave Ferrie
Rays Rally To Beat Indians in 10

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Rays Rally To Beat Indians in 10

"Austin meadows hit an RBI single in the tenth inning to complete the race come back in a five four win over the Indians it was the second straight game winning hit for medals who delivered a walk off single to beat the Orioles on Wednesday Tampa Bay trail for two on the night before yandy Diaz led off with a Homer and Brandon Lau followed with an RBI double it was a race thirty if comeback win and keeps them one game behind the first place red Sox in the AL east front meal raise slammed a three run Homer for the Indians I'm Dave Ferrie

Austin Meadows Tampa Bay Trail Yandy Diaz Brandon Lau Indians Orioles Homer Red Sox Dave Ferrie
Meadows gets 3 hits, Franco homers as Rays beat Blue Jays

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Meadows gets 3 hits, Franco homers as Rays beat Blue Jays

"The race ten game road losing streak is over after Austin meadows delivered three hits including a pair of RBI doubles to lead a win over the blue jays five to one wander Franco hit his second home run for Tampa Bay tying the game in the sixth inning yandy Diaz followed with a double and scored on meadows first two bagger DS had two hits and scored twice for the rays who had dropped five straight overall Ryan Yarbrough pitched five innings of four hit ball for the win losing pitcher Robbie ray allowed two runs and five hits in seven frames Randal Grichuk homered for Toronto I'm Dave Ferrie

Austin Meadows Yandy Diaz Blue Jays Franco Ryan Yarbrough Tampa Bay Robbie Ray Rays Randal Grichuk Toronto Dave Ferrie