40 Burst results for "Yale"

Fresh update on "yale" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:37 sec | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "yale" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

"Rick Porcello balls to the rotation. Together. They went to Inten Miami one win from a surprising trip to the N B a Finals they beat. The Celtics won 12 109. They leave the final 3 to 1 37 points for Miami's Tyler hero. The most points scored by a 20 year old in MBA playoff games. It's Magic Johnson scored 40 to 40 years ago. Tampa Baby Dallas 5 to 4 to one lead. In the Stanley Cup final. The giant Sunday will not face the 40 Niners starting quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo out with an ankle injury, so it'll be the backup Nick Mullins, an unusual injury suffered by Chargers quarterback Tyrod Taylor, victim of Friendly fire. The team doctor was giving Taylor a pregame injection for his cracked rib and mistakenly punctured Taylor's long He's not playing this week, either Yale sailors being remembered as Wen healthy Perhaps the most exciting player in NFL history slayers has died at 77. John Stash. Our Bloomberg Sports. All right, John, Thanks 5 37 on Wall.

Tyrod Taylor Inten Miami John Stash Celtics Rick Porcello Bloomberg Sports Nick Mullins Jimmy Garoppolo Tampa Chargers Johnson WEN NFL Dallas
Microsoft Teams getting breakout rooms, virtual commute, and new ‘Together Mode’ backgrounds

Daily Tech News Show

02:09 min | 1 d ago

Microsoft Teams getting breakout rooms, virtual commute, and new ‘Together Mode’ backgrounds

"Microsoft announced new features coming to teams. Not Space or robots virtual commutes reflecting during commute time can increase productivity twelve to fifteen percent according to Microsoft. But if you're not commuting these days, you don't get that reflective time. So you can schedule a virtual commute on teams at the beginning and end of your day starting in the first half of twenty twenty, one meditation breaks in partnership with head space can be scheduled as part of your virtual commute or as its own break during the day Microsoft says, maybe like right before you do a big presentation Kinda help focus Microsoft. Says, thirty days of head space resulted in a thirty two percent decrease in stress in a study workplace analytics is providing the ability for managers to get data. On workers like after hours collaboration focus time. Meeting effectiveness. Cross company connections all users will be able to use the analytics to get recommended actions for changing their habits to improve productivity and wellbeing. If you unplug at the end of the day, it's going to give you credit. It'll help you reclaim time to focus reduce your meeting overload features like that are coming in October for managers and rolling out to the rest through twenty twenty one. There's also new together mode scenes, coffeeshops, conference rooms, auditoriums, and later this year machine language will scale and center participants better in that together mode. If you're like what's together mode, it's what they use in the NBA Games to put everybody together in the stands. Dynamic view is getting custom layouts for how content shows up during presentations. That's what you're standing in front of your presentation. On the video, you can point to it breakout rooms, the ability to split a meeting into smaller groups, and then you can pop around to the different groups and then bring them back into larger meeting. Later, there's also. RECAPS meeting recordings, transcript chat, and file shared in the meetings chat and attendee registration with automated emails, streamlined calling view and new devices. Some USB peripherals with dial pads, Microsoft team displays which Kinda like an Amazon Echo show but for teams team panels outside of meeting space when you get back into the office. audio codes polly and Yale Link will offer affordable team phones designed for common areas as well. So but stuff coming into teams.

Microsoft Twenty Twenty NBA Yale Link
Fresh update on "yale" discussed on Prince: The Story of 1999

Prince: The Story of 1999

00:32 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "yale" discussed on Prince: The Story of 1999

"But the music is. Generally pretty upbeat electing like playing the Sunshine House quake and. Even the dance stuff you know that we did like La- grind and send e C in this this happy joyful stuff. I can see it when I watched the movie, the sign of the times when the concert that we did. Over in the Netherlands. Watching recently after all these years, it gives me the compression of just manic untethered joy. Like being really joyful. But without a reason to be, it's not. tied to a birthday or Christmas or a happy event like getting married or it's just joy for the sake of joy and that's a little bit puzzling and a little bit troubling. But from that feeling, he got a masterpiece from it to some extent plumbed the depths of what he was feeling link with sign of the Times with the cross and with a door with it. And to another. Another set of songs he's not touching it. He's not touching what he's feeling. It's music made from the neck up it's purely cerebral yet it's a damn good. Most artists would be hard pressed to pull that off. You have to be a true maestro to be able to that. Good. That joy for the sake of joy may have seemed distant to those around prince in that tumultuous era. But looking back at Prince's work all these years later I think that's part of sign of the Times lasting appeal. It captured the full spectrum of the human experience from reckoning with deeply personal disappointments and spiritual epiphanies to embracing resilience and joy in other words as Yale Professor Daphne Brooks described in a previous episode he was finding ways to celebrate the expansiveness and the limitless possibilities of black artistic expression as Daphne reminded me the Camille Persona was just another example of the ways that prince pushed away boundaries. The technique that I picked my ears and still is the. Detail that is most alluring to me and inspiring is the emergence of the Camille Persona and she or they as they're younger fans might call got character right now.

Yale Professor Daphne Brooks Camille Persona Prince La- Grind Netherlands
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 3 d ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
Fresh update on "yale" discussed on KCBS Radio Overnight News

KCBS Radio Overnight News

00:41 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "yale" discussed on KCBS Radio Overnight News

"Effective. Almost all other vaccines under development right now require two shots about a month apart. A vaccine also would not need to be refrigerated. The vaccine study is one of the world's largest so far testing in 60,000 volunteers in the U. S. Central and South America and South Africa. Other vaccine studies in the U. S and abroad are already in their final phase. That would be Phase three. Minnesota opens its first saliva testing site for covert 19. The side offers a free saliva test to any Minnesotan. Okay. CBs's Marquis Schaefer spoke with the research scientists who helped developed the test with the support of the MBA. This covert 19 test was developed by Yale scientists and received emergency use authorization from the FDA last month. Now. Saliva direct is being adopted by governments, associate research scientist at the Yale School of Public Health and Wily helped develop the test. So we asked you to hit me in the virus genetic material. It is still PCR based, but very simple worker makes us kissed more efficient and much more affordable. They've managed to get the costs of the re agents down by 90% aiming for a dollar a test. Of course, they're still costs associated with logistics labs and staff to run the tests at the India and provided us with some research funds. We realized that when we had a conversation that you know values were really aligned with wanting to get a set was marked with a blow to local communities. Authors of the studies on Saliva direct say, well less sensitive than NASA Fair and deal swabs. Thes tests are a suitable alternative for first line screening. Margie Schaefer, KCBS Well, if you're planning on going to Yosemite anytime soon, Here's the good news. It will reopen on Friday. The park had to be closed last week when the air quality Index shot all the way up to the 700 range because a wildfire smoke Some roads reopened on Sunday to through traffic of the park remained close with the park will reopen Friday. And reservations are required Your sports line coming up victories for both the Giants and the A's tonight. It's 11 44 shell. We know from the time you get.

Marquis Schaefer FDA Giants Yale School Of Public Health South America Associate Research Scientist South Africa Minnesota CBS Nasa U. S Kcbs India
Building Your Brand as a Student

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

03:25 min | 5 d ago

Building Your Brand as a Student

"Know one of the things you think is important is. College Age students or students in general learning. How to brand themselves right building their personal brand. Normally, we think about maybe with movie stars or. Personalities or something but let's get into this. Why do you think this is important To me without giving away the shop how they can do this. And how you can help people do it. So let's let's let's hear what we got here. It's important for so many reasons and not just for college students for even students who are at the high school level or even at the middle school level thinking about why they are going to go to college. So the why is essential? So I don't know if you're familiar with Jeff Selene goes new book WHO GETS IN AND Y. But that book I think. It came out this week and I got a chance to preview the intro chapter and one of the So the basis of the book is that he was able to. Be in the admissions office of four universities One of them was emery in Atlanta One was I forget the names of the schools, but the example is from emory. So it was him going through the admissions office seeing how they pick their classes. So not the highest Yale's in the harbor is not the highly highly selective universities, but the you know somewhat selective universities and how they make the decisions. So he told the story of you know emory university going back and forth. With various students who are interested in going to the school and one of the examples that he used was a student who was, interested in microbiology however, on the student's application, there was no indication of any clubs, any volunteer work anything at all that would indicate that this was something that the suit it was really interested in had a true commitment to. So even at the middle school or high school level is important because if you're going to a college which is competitive with going you're going to be. Competing, with other students to get in, you want to establish what your brand is student. So if you are interested in, you know the sciences or stem or something in that regard, a highly competitive major you WanNa do things at in college or in middle school so that we use some at your college application You are standing out you're doing things that shows the university that you are truly. Committed and you have a history of being committed to whatever the major is whatever the industry is while you are an undergraduate's a consistent. Thanks. So they're looking at, you know not only your essay and your sat scores in your great but they're show it. They want to see that you are. You know you've done some thought you took in some you've taken some consideration about what you want a. Major an in why this is important for you. So that's the short answer. I know that wasn't that short but that's the short answer about why building a brand is important and as you said, is some you know you think of it as a business thing or maybe you know a celebrity may think of it but it's important throughout whether you're in middle school and even when you graduate from. College. You want to establish your brand as being someone who is. Expert or Going to be an expert in. In your major or in a particular field. So that's why building plan important

Middle School Emory University Yale Jeff Selene Atlanta
Fresh update on "yale" discussed on KCBS Radio Afternoon News

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

02:36 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "yale" discussed on KCBS Radio Afternoon News

"Case CBS news time 3 21, with some private and charter schools in San Francisco allowed to reopen for in person instruction. City's Department of Public Health has launched an interactive website. CBS's Jeffrey shot reports. The dashboard allows parents to track those re openings to date. 83 private, parochial and charter schools have applied to the city's Department of Public Health to allow them to reopen. Department spokesperson Deirdre Husi note that this is not a full re opening of a school. This is Children in cohorts limited capacity. The application. Process requires the schools to demonstrate they have developed appropriate safety procedures than each campus undergoes an on site inspection. Six tools have been approved so far. Others are at various stages of the process. To help parents keep track of their schools status. The city has developed the school reopening dashboard. I think parents have a lot of questions about where their school is in re opening as two administrators. I think it's Showing everyone what the process is and being transparent. Aware about where people are in the process. The dashboard can be found by logging on to sf dot gov or by using Google or other online search sites in San Francisco. Jeffrey Shop KCBS California State University is named Dr Jos Castro as its next chancellor. He will replace outgoing Chancellor Timothy White to become the first Mexican American and native California believe the nation's largest four year public university system, CSU's board of trustees announced Castro's appointment today. He's currently president of Fresno State University. He starts the new job in January with a salary of $625,000. Minnesota has opened its first saliva testing site recovered 19. The site is offering a free saliva test to any Minnesota who believes that they need to be tested. KCBS is Marquis Schaefer spoke with a research scientist to help develop the test with support from the National Basketball Association. This covert 19 test was developed by Yale scientists and received emergency use authorization from the FDA last month. Now saliva direct is being adopted by governments, associate research scientist at the Yale School of Public Health and Wily helped develop the test. So we asked her to pick Dane, the virus genetic material. It is still PCR based that are very simple worker makes us kissed more efficient and much more affordable. They've managed to get the costs of the re agents down by 90% aiming for a dollar a test. Of course, they're still costs associated with logistics labs and staff to run the tests at the N B A and provided us with some research friends. We realized that when we had a conversation that you know our values were really aligned was wanting to get a set was more sensible to local communities. Authors of the studies on saliva, direct say, well, less sensitive than NASA Fair and Jill Swabs. These tests are a suitable alternative for first line screening. Margie Schaefer, KCBS.

Kcbs Dr Jos Castro Department Of Public Health San Francisco Marquis Schaefer Yale School Of Public Health CBS Chancellor Jeffrey Shot Deirdre Husi Minnesota Associate Research Scientist Fresno State University California State University Google Jill Swabs Jeffrey Shop Nasa Fair Research Scientist California
Oxford to resume trial of coronavirus vaccine it's creating with AstraZeneca, days after halt due to reported effect

Bloomberg Best

00:38 sec | Last week

Oxford to resume trial of coronavirus vaccine it's creating with AstraZeneca, days after halt due to reported effect

"A closely watched vaccine trial is back on the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca have restarted a UK trial of an experimental cove in 19 vaccine. The study had been halted September 6th after one of the participants got sick. Oxford said in a statement that the UK regulator had recommended that the trials resume Dr Own Yama Oh Beulah Gu, principal investigator of the Pfizer, Phase three vaccine, try alight, Yale Mentioned the case today. The good news for that one participant is that it appears they're already recovering, and I think it's still unwelcome question if the disorder was caused by the passing he was interviewed on ABC is Good Morning America.

University Of Oxford UK Beulah Gu Astrazeneca Principal Investigator Oxford ABC Yale
Fresh update on "yale" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:07 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "yale" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"You see, this is a technical correction. Investment. What are you looking at, to give you some sort of compass through this period? Bloomberg surveillance podcast lots and lots of talk about what the Fed should and shouldn't come keen, Jonathan Farrow, Lisa Abramowitz and the names that shape the world's markets. Speak with Professor Schiller of Yale University. Bloomberg Surveillance. Listen today and Bloomberg dot com Business or subscribe on Apple Podcast The following is a message from P. Jim Welcome to outside Seon 60 perspectives from Paige and thought leaders. Here's Mark Barabak, head of global equity of Jennison Associates. You're looking at bigger implications of technology, playing a role in keeping us all connected. Giving us access to information or goods very quickly, So we don't see any of those trans changing. In fact, they're likely to accelerate. There's some new things that have come along know that people might find useful like tele medicine. There were sceptics about that, and I think the more people using especially the more doctors or using it today The more they're liking it. You can see more patients that can be more effective. That might actually be a better solution here. More peach in perspectives at p. Jem dot com That's PG i m dot com partner with Paige in investment management business of Prudential. These statements are not intended to be investment advice and should not be used as the basis for any investment decision. Imagine being fired because of who you love. Imagine being denied medical treatment because of who you marry. Imagine being evicted because of who you are. Millions of Americans don't have to imagine this. They have to live it because in 31 states, it's legal to discriminate against LGBT. People get the facts that beyond I do dot or brought to you by the Guild foundation in the Ad council. For the Jewish communal fund,.

Bloomberg Paige Jonathan Farrow Jewish Communal Fund Professor Schiller FED Lisa Abramowitz Jennison Associates Yale University Head Of Global Equity Mark Barabak Prudential Ad Council Guild Foundation Apple Partner
COVID-19 can invade brain cells, Yale research suggests

Jim Bohannon

00:25 sec | Last week

COVID-19 can invade brain cells, Yale research suggests

"A new concern on the Corona virus front, according to a new Yale University study. Kuroda virus may directly invade the brain doctor David Vegas is a CBS News Medical contributor. In the last week or two. We've heard about its effect on the heart, we know about its effect on the law and now More more data to effect on the brain. Many covert 19 victims experienced nagging headaches, confusion and being delirious. Jim Krystle, a CBS News

Cbs News Medical Jim Krystle CBS Kuroda Yale University David Vegas
How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

Data Skeptic

06:33 min | 2 weeks ago

How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

"So my name is Mush. Pot. Suzuki like the car last year a student at Yale University in Computer Science and mathematics and I'm supervised by Adrian Vata and from goalie. I'm very happy to be here and thank you for inviting me. I got exposed to your work. When I read the paper, I invited you to come on and talk about mostly today is how many freemasons are there consensus voting mechanisms in metric space so no less than three interesting ideas for me in the title maybe we should give some background to open up with consensus. What does that mean is that? Just the majority or how will we be using the word today? Consensus mechanism is Mecca Zeman which to select a candidate they're only if everyone agrees on it for instance, they said you're running for some group Peter, you get accepted only if everyone in the group agrees on it and you want you accepted otherwise. so that's like unanimity the Neha in here. Yeah. It's basically the same as unanimity but in different. Settings. Unanimity also implies that it's a property where you have if everyone agrees on that, you accept it but something can happen. If you know, let's say you can use different rules otherwise there's a different sort distinctions there, but it's basically the same as unanimity that particular choice leads to some interesting things and you guys are presented this really concise analogy to the freemasons. Well, I suppose getting down to the actual counter freemasons trying to conduct a census here that just formalizes. A funny title to give because as you know that freemasons are interesting sort of group there. Member only if everyone agrees on sort of it, fits our mechanisms today run their group through consensus voting Gotcha so it wouldn't surprise me if just given how much sort of folklore the surrounds the freemasons that there might be at least a few listeners confused about whether or not there are real organization. Could you throw a few facts Edis? have. Amazing temples in Montreal, phrases, I live in Montreal. So they have a huge temple here and they're very active and I don't know too much about their inner workings or I've never been inside the doors but they're very oh yeah you can go to their building for instance so real organization and in terms of getting accepted into it if I wanted to go in that building up there in. Montreal is this the actual mechanism they literally use or is this a sort of an analogy? So I don't know this for sure but I heard I read online that in order to get accepted that everyone in taboo are everyone in that group has agree on it. So is the medicine that they actually use. Cool. Well, I guess whenever that started it wouldn't be surprising that it could grow quickly. Right, if I was thinking of starting my own such organization and I I, invited my wife. Now we have two members and perhaps she and I can agree her sister joins and my sister joins. But at some point, someone's going to say no to the next member what can we learn about that and how do we study it? What are the interesting Totta questions? So you have two different settings. Here. So wondering is not remodeled people's opinions and you say I prefer my wife says I prefer my daughter you know or or so and so forth we need to the preferences of people. So one of the classic ideas in voting theory and actually just modeling through machine learning or any sort of the setting is this prioritizing people's opinion or privatizing people. So for instance, let's say you could be. Leaning like the political left or right. There's a spectrum for which you are lighted. Let's sure you can be at the centre or you could be very right thing or it could be a very level. So we can model that as any number between minus one and one, but two one being the right-wing minus one being the left-wing. So then that's one example of how you prioritize people right? Because you wanted to this rigorously and mathematically. So we need a method to represent people and our model is at. ISSUE, have this in which you represent urine. You couldn't space in some point. Is You your opinion and you vote for someone who similar to? Let's say you're very right wing than some candidate comes in then you're more likely to vote for someone who is right being than left-wing to someone who is closer to you in opinion or characteristic that's our model of but this question was asked actually before in one emissions but in one dimension. So you're basically just have an inch between minus one and one, and this was an extra Unin by very famous. Nogal. Yes. Paper in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fourteen I forget. But we did this in higher dimensions in actually specifically two dimensions because it introduces so much more complexity when you go up in a dimension, right so Francis, why do we need higher dimensions is because before you you're presenting people left and right but people are more complex than that. You can't just represent a person by just one number for instance you. have to use multiple features as people say. So you have this multiple characteristics of people and they become dimension. So we do this in two missions surprisingly the mathematical difficulty of asking this question John Huge becomes actually much more difficult in two dimension than one dish very interesting and I guess maybe the answers grounded in a lot of details. But is there an essence to what that challenges is it that there are more simulations or? Is there a complexity theory aspect of this? Why is a two dimension so much more difficult than one so for instance, if you look at random shape, you can characterize this voting as looking at something called random convex or some random shapes. The question bows down on understanding certain random shapes and here assuming that the candidates are appearing. Let's say uniformly at on interval you have existing group members and she accepts somebody then he becomes. Group member and you evolve. So the candidates are uniform at each time step and so to answer the question we knew looking at this sort of random judge shapes in one dimension there's only one shape is just an interval intimate conviction in one dimension is just an interval. Some number between attack could be minus zero point five to zero point one is, but let's say you go into the mission all of a sudden there's so Many different shapes so many different things second happen if the shape is convinced or even just not convex in two dimensions does different more complex shapes can get in one mission. You only have interested in two dimensions you have gone as you have China goals, you have something that approximates your face even that could be shade in two missions, but that's not going to happen in Wand mission

Montreal Suzuki Yale University Adrian Vata Mecca Zeman China John Huge Peter Francis
It's not just cars that make pollution. It's the roads they drive on, too

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

It's not just cars that make pollution. It's the roads they drive on, too

"Say a study that shows an increase in pollution from asphalt, which, as you know, it could speak by the sunlight and the heat, and we're going to have that. Those weekend, researchers at Yale studied roadways here in Southern California, and they found that hot asphalt produces secondary aerosol pollutants that can pass by the air quality monitors. A study published in the journal Science Advances says the admissions amounts to a greater quality of bones than the gas and diesel motor vehicles already using those roadways, all of them combined. As fault on the rooftops also adds to the pollution.

Science Advances Yale Southern California
Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

Steve Cochran

00:31 sec | Last month

Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

"Administration is also authorized the first rapid Corona virus test That doesn't need any special computer equipment results to go along with it. 15 minute test from Abbott Laboratories will sell for $5 its latest cheaper, simpler test if the U. S market provides some new options to expand testing the FDA also recently Green lighted a saliva test from Yale University. That bypass is some of the supplies that have led to testing bottlenecks. Both tests have limitations. Neither can be done at home

Abbott Laboratories Yale University FDA U. S
Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | Last month

Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

"Covert 19. Meanwhile, a Yale University professor is warning college students today returning to campus to prepare for widespread infections and even deaths. Yale psychology professor Laurie Santos says students should be emotionally prepared for a residential college life that resembles quote a hospital unit. Several of Ohio's colleges, including Ohio State are conducting covert 19 testing on their students who live on campus at

Yale University Professor Laurie Santos Ohio State Ohio
FavyFav on Planeta G!

Latinos Who Lunch

06:55 min | Last month

FavyFav on Planeta G!

"With us today, we have the Amazing Justin Fella Aka five, eighty five. He's Guatemalan American artists from Nevada known for his large scale sculptures that plays with American pop culture and the lat next experienced. He's the host of a couple of podcasts including the art people podcast and one of my favorite podcasts. Latinos who lunch welcomed Fathi. Welcome. Still trying to figure out technology. Technical difficulties. We're like we're right there. Thank you. Thank you for having me. I am in Las Vegas Nevada right now since. Yes in city where people don't believe that wearing masks is a big so. Crystal. Very similarly. You know we we started working at Greenpeace right around the same time and we really didn't see a lot of lat next representation in the environmental movement in these big green organizations and so we thought hey, like maybe we can just do something like that and on your show you talk about sort of the intersection between being Queer Latinas and sort of like this idea of Spangler. Inside this Anglo world out what do you think is the importance of intersection analogy was important to talk about. Oh my gosh. That's one of the. That's one of the big big missions of Lebanon's lunches that. If it's not intersectional it it's really not for for anyone really like if it's not intersect, the revolution is intersectional whom we will never be free basically you know. So from the very beginning, we've been checking ourselves on our privilege as gender males on the show, and because we recognize the all the you know the misogyny within own you know belief systems just based on how we were raised in America and I'm saying America like North South and Central America and so And then something that happened maybe like a year or two intellectuals who lunch was the recognition of the erasure of Central American culture, and also after let me move out. So we actively before people are using the term anti-racists or. Really. Intersection analogy I think I heard that a lot after the the white woman's March that happened a few years ago So but they got fizzy hatsaw haven't seen many at the black lives haven't seen many at the black lives matter protests but so wh-. Anyway, We really we really started paying attention to like oh my gosh we're really like Mexico centric on our show we need to actively be anti-black and talk about colors and talk about the erasure of offer. Let the needle on our show and we recognize that it was our own. You know that was our one of our personal goal was to really openly talk about that and have sometimes uncomfortable conversation. Let I love what you said. We can't have revolution if it's not intersectional because the sort of Traumas and the histories and experiences are compounded with each identity that include you both you know in a way that's like. Boosts Society and helps you in society also not. About yeah. especially with climate change because at the end of the day, we're all going to be affected by climate change but to what degree and how soon it really depends on where you are how much you have, how much you given, how much you're supported in society. It's funny because like recycling and incur the environment it seen this very same in or you know white people saying but it's like no dinos have been trying to take care of the environment for a very long time. We just don't talk about it in the same way you know what I mean. So I mean I also like to pretend that I'm Vegan. Just people mad because you know that's US relegated to just white people. You know I'm so like Oh. Yeah. I. Don't I don't wanna eat cows anymore because it's bad for the environment and that's like the real thing that I'm doing now that we're talking about claim it and how much Linex do people care about it maybe not in the same context that you know white people are recycling or being around this like we have our willows. Teaching on like here's the. Deal or like rub this like urban you're like sore foot and you'll wake up of. The best. Or some other iteration of that Linex people care about the environment and we quote like or reference this study that happened recently at Yale that seventy percent of people in the United States, Horley care about the environment, and so how do you see that or not see that reflected in our culture and how do you see annex values reflected in the conversation around the environment? yeah, I mean there's there's very different schools of thinking within my own family for example, but like my will lead, you know isolated people do it saying this online to we've been saving plastic bags and containers from jump? Right. That's just something that we do in our like is that sour cream in the fridge? That's probably. Some leftover beans or something. You never know you never know I'm so in little ways like that we're very resourceful as Latinos because we have to be, but also it's just part of our culture even in Latin? America. But I am example that pops up to my pops up to my head is recently visited what the my life for the first time as an adult and went back to where my mom is from this little little village called. We let the in Garland which is right in the center of a psychopath in Guatemala and so. HALF OF MY A. Family are farmers and then half of them are. are raise cattle So it's like. That's when I realized like Yo my family is responsible for like the deforestation of Quantum Allah because I'm seeing all this open land my GRANDPA has. but they don't see that way. They're like, no cows our money we're going to raise cows we're GONNA make you know we're gonna them or dairy cow. So then we'll be sold for me and so there's this acres and acres of land that my family owns that is is just it's just grass now when it used to be rich rainforest

America United States Justin Fella Nevada Fathi Central America Las Vegas Nevada Greenpeace Traumas Linex Lebanon Spangler Garland Mexico Guatemala Yale
An attempted Coup in the US

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:31 min | Last month

An attempted Coup in the US

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries either host Kit Chrome today the story of a coup against one of the presidents of the United States today's Podcast is the result of myth and mystery coming together to form a truth, a truth confirmed by data revealed by both the Freedom of Information Act an archive letters regarding lawsuits against the Bush family made public in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, eight. This podcast is without political bias and exists only to. demystify myth and mystery whenever possible in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, three, a group of Americans wealthiest businessman powerbrokers including the grandfather of George W Bush Prescott Bush plan to stage a coup against then President Franklin Roosevelt to change the regime one year later retired Marine Corps. Major General smedley Butler revealed applaud the wait Prescott Sheldon Bush was an American banker and politician Wall Street executive partner the Brown brothers and a US senator he was the Father President. George H. W Bush in the grandfather to President George W Bush he attended Yale and was a member of the skull and bones. Prescott Bush seems larger than life and he was a business plot in nineteen thirty three referred to as the white. House. Coup was led in part by Prescott. Bush, the purpose of the alleged conspiracy was to replace the Roosevelt Administration with a fascist dictatorship, a coalition of many influential billionaires and powerbrokers led by Prescott Bush. Plan the coup the reason behind this attempt was the policies of the Roosevelt Administration towards the business world the owners of some of the biggest corporations like General Motors. Goodyear Chase Bank and hines thought the government would destroy private enterprise. Thus, they wanted to create a business friendly zine so that they could preserve their power. However, the coup plan came to light when smedley Butler a retired burning corps major general alerted authorities in Washington DC of the conspiracy. According to his statement. So mysterious bankers and businessmen approached him and asked him to command an army of veterans who fought in World War one in order to stage a coup and overthrow the democratically elected President Franklin Delano Roosevelt Butler was a popular military figure then, and he also had influence over the veterans. That's why they chose him a committee investigated the allegations and Declared that some Wall Street elites were involved in the conspiracy but nobody was charged go figure. Then there was Prescott involvement with the Brown brothers the financial architects of Nazism the documents from the National Archives showed that the bushes and Brown brothers shipped valuable US assets including gold coal steel at US Treasury war bonds to their foreign clients overseas as Hitler geared up for his. Nineteen thirty nine invasion of Poland the event that sparked World War Two is business dealings continued until his company's assets were seized nineteen, forty, two, hundred, the trading with the Enemy Act. Then there is the Bush family stronghold Jupiter Island, but that will have to be another

George W Bush Prescott Bush President Franklin Roosevelt Major General Smedley Butler President Franklin Delano Roos Roosevelt Administration Prescott United States Brown Kit Chrome Marine Corps General Motors Goodyear Chase Bank Jupiter Island National Archives Washington Poland Senator Hines
New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

Squawk Pod

03:47 min | Last month

New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

"A potential breakthrough in the battle against covid nineteen, the FDA, just granting emergency approval, for Corona, virus saliva test calling it testing innovation game changer this test which is simpler cheaper and less invasive than naval swabs was developed by Yale University researchers. It's been used by the NBA and could greatly help expand testing capacity joining us right now is an Wiley. She is associate research scientist with Yale School of Public Health, which helped develop this new tests and it's great to see you. Thank you for being with us this morning. And Hugh morning. So this is incredibly exciting the idea that you could do the saliva test that it could be cheap and readily available How does it work? Actually, quite simple really. It's as the name suggests that we you've seen saliva as the sample time. And what we're trying to do is get away from that swamp. That's that can you know there's been quite a bit of the vision to the swamp time and we're hoping to get around supply chain issues that we've been saying with the swamps and we also Greenie. Fancy. Collection Devices to help ourselves down and so was actually also quite a make about it unique about is that we haven't actually developed a taste that we just packed up out to you. So you next one of these tests but what we've? What we've developed is the mythic full the taste recipe you could say and we're able to she had this taste with other labs for them to get this method often running in their labs. As. Tasted south with actually adapted the white commonly used piece the artist which takes the virus are a but we've done is removed the most expensive stiff of that replacing with a more simple workup, which again house is down at work though I mean if it still requires a lab to put together, you deliver it to me and then what I drive to the lab, and then how long does it take for me to get my results back? So indeed much psych you know what you're doing at the moment with a swap. So the swap is being ordered for your doctoral with A. Is million schools where you have like a little booth, we your saliva sample and had that taken to the lab and so taking out that was time consuming our in that results Ruby available Asta. You know this isn't one of those that will teach broken about you know we can get. Results, sorted through in about three hours about ninety two samples. But of course, depending on the through the lab is experiencing. You know this isn't to say that results will be available in three hours but just that it's a slightly faster protocol means that labs pamphlets room autistic day. So we do that. We can't see many in some situations. Same Day results if what we're really striving for us to get below that twenty, our timeframe that we're just not seeing. At the moment how much does this test cost I? Believe I've read that that nobody is looking to really make any money on this they're trying to put this out there and make sure it's available at the lowest cost. Possible. That's exactly right. So and we're being very very open about let's should be ambushed at expecting the regions cost and how much the people can speak in the. Cost and that's because the reagents of the chemicals that make up the test opinion that companies getting them from the only cost somewhere between one and four dollars for the reagents. That's just the reagents attest. We do know that there is a markups said, GonNa go onto this such as you know to. The logistics of giving the taste of personnel to run the also just you know they need to pay for the facilities that. Do those tests but. Is that that was still trying to limit that labs charge. So we do want this to be as cheap as possible society and went our you're part of compensation. How much I charge in China Steve Down.

Associate Research Scientist Yale School Of Public Health Yale University NBA Covid Corona Hugh FDA China
The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

The Savvy Investor Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

"The FDA on Saturday issuing an emergency use authorization for the new saliva Direct Corona virus test developed by the Yale University School of Public Health and the National Basketball Association. The test processes saliva samples to rapidly determine whether a person is infected with the Corona virus and does not need any swab or other specific collection device. The new test is also far cheaper than current tests costing about $4. There's a test for materials before any added labor cost. That price and a quick turnaround time could help encourage more frequent covert 19 testing in settings like schools, universities and office buildings. All Steven's Fox

Yale University School Of Publ National Basketball Associatio FDA Steven
The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test for COVID-19

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last month

The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test for COVID-19

"FDA has approved a new saliva test for the Corona virus test is called Saliva Direct, and it was developed by Yale through a program with the N B, A and the Players Association. The saliva test only requires a small sample, and it is much cheaper than swapping, according to CBS Medical contributor Dr David Vegas for $10 instead of over $100 that cost is dramatically lower. Now the goal is to make saliva direct, easily accessible and increased testing while the U. S and the world continues to wait for it. Moved. Coben 19 VACCINE

Saliva Direct Dr David Vegas Yale FDA Players Association CBS
"yale" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:12 min | Last month

"yale" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Help you unlock your best life right now and, you know That's why it's been difficult because I veered off that topic and talk about something that I believe is pertinent. Needs to be talked about, and that is covert 19. And more specifically our response to covert 19. I want to continue that conversation because there's been Mohr I would say development since our last two conversations about our response. Our reaction to mandates. Two shutdowns. To censorship. And most recently, we will have to navigate. How to respond to the upcoming messaging about the cove in 19 vaccine. So on the show, we're going to talk about A Yale study that is currently going on along with the U. S government. That they're doing clinical trials to develop messaging to persuade Americans to take the covert 19 vaccine. We're gonna talk about Our response to that, but also the messaging that you will hear soon about how effective the vaccine is. How that if you don't get it that you will be putting Your household and your neighbors at risk. You going to hear about the shame, the guilt, the embarrassment that anger you're going to hear about all the different ways they are just right now. Just experimenting. With messaging to see what works. To see how to best influence the general public to get the cove in 19 vaccine. Now, here's why this matters to you because if I asked you right now, Will you get the Corona virus vaccine? There's going to be three camps. There's going to be one that says absolutely. Give me another says. Maybe there's going to be another one that says absolutely not. And here's Why this matters because the Yale study is The goal is to convince Americans to get Corona vaccine. Is 4000 participants they found online and right now who is the Leader in the race when it comes to developing this vaccine and bring it to markets, Moderna No gates is. AH is a funder. Valachi with an H is a supporter. Remember that Moderna has never brought a drug all the way through the FDA to market and yet they are the ones leading the way currently. So it's 4000 person study. They tried messaging with 12 different groups in the study attempts different messaging against participants to find out which is the most effective and influencing the general public to get the vaccine when it comes to market. So they compared the willingness to get the covert 19 vaccine at three and six months, and they're goingto compare the effective willingness to get the cove it 19 vaccine..

Moderna No Yale Mohr FDA U. S
Department of Justice says Yale discriminates against Whites and Asians

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last month

Department of Justice says Yale discriminates against Whites and Asians

"The Justice Department is accusing Yale of discriminating against White and Asian American applicant after a two year investigation, the Justice Department concluded. Yale rejects scores of Asian, American and white students each year based on their race, whom it would otherwise admit. The Justice Department said Yale discriminates based on race in national origin and uses race in admissions to a greater degree than the Supreme Court allows. Yale denied it and said it absolutely complies with Supreme Court standards. The Justice Department threatened a lawsuit, but Yale said it will not change on the basis of what it called a meritless and

Yale Justice Department Supreme Court
DOJ says Yale is discriminating against Asian and White applicants

Tom and Curley

00:23 sec | Last month

DOJ says Yale is discriminating against Asian and White applicants

"Justice Department Review found that Yale University is violating civil rights laws by discriminating against white and Asian American applicants. Loyal law professor Laurie Levin says has been a long term investigation by the DOJ that in fact, Yale has gone too far. That they've given preferences. Applicants based upon the color of their skin, and not based upon their

Yale University Laurie Levin Yale DOJ Justice Department Professor
New York - Yale Discriminates Against Asian, White Applicants

All Things Considered

00:28 sec | Last month

New York - Yale Discriminates Against Asian, White Applicants

"A Justice Department says Yale illegally discriminates against Asian and white applicants. The two year investigation was launched after Asian American groups complained about the admissions process to the Ivy League school. Government found that Yale gave too much weight to race and its consideration of applicants. That's a violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1960 for university gets millions of dollars in taxpayer funding in exchange for agreeing to abide by the federal law. Yellow denies any

Yale Ivy League School Justice Department
LIVE from the Esselstyn Farm

Plant Strong

04:45 min | Last month

LIVE from the Esselstyn Farm

"Right. I am here. With my dad, this is this is fantastic and I want you to know that. You, think will now be the. The most prolific person on a plan strong podcast I think this will be your fourth episode episode that we've done together and the reason why I wanted to pull you aside and do something right now is because obviously we're at the farm. In upstate new. York. And we've got our big plants Doc, two thousand and twenty event coming up it'll be our ninth annual plants dock and I thought this would be an appropriate time for us to reflect on your childhood. Growing up here on the farm and how it impacted you as A. As a as a man growing up, and just you know what kind of let it flow and and see what happens but. Just for for starters. How long has this farm bending the S Allston family. Actually, was. My stepmother and you. In the nineteen, eighty, five or six. went to Albany. Police tricentennial. which is a farm that had been the same family for over three hundred years. So some some were of the order of sixteen seventy five. So the farmers got quite a tradition to it. To put it mildly I mean that's that's three hundred from my math is correct. That's. Three hundred and forty five years. Yeah we're moving on. And I think I've also heard that it's it's one of two. Two farms in the whole state of new. York, that had been owned and operated by the same family over three hundred years. which I mean. Incredible. Now, I want people to know. Before we dive into this that we're probably going to have some distractions, we've got like six six or seven grandchildren running around. And we're doing our best to kind of maintain order but. Of course of route twenty, three although it's Many yards from here often we'll have some heavy trucks and motorcycles give their little echo. Yeah. So bear with us. So when exactly did you and your your brothers and your sister and your parents moved the farm? Well, actually my dad although he spent a fair amount of time at the farm here growing up as well. His parents who lived at the farm also his father was a lawyer. Working in new. York, city so That Grew up in New York City when he went to He went to Yale and he went to. Medical School. Two years at Yale in the last two years at. Columbia. And then he began his practice of surgery in new. York. City we lived in Riverdale, which is suburb of. Of of New York City. Until I was seven years old and it it always been my father's dream. To come back in practice medicine up here. Using the farm as a home base. and. So it was in nineteen forty one in September that we moved from. New York City. To the farm. So nine, hundred, forty, one you were born in thirty three. So that makes you about eight years old I was seven because. I. Was about three avas eight three months after we moved up here. Okay. All right. and. What I mean so can you remember back? Coming from the city to the farm at. That's a pretty big adjustment. I would imagine. Yeah it was. It was. You know just seem to flow though I. Mean there was just. Nothing that was really difficult about it with a we were in sort of. A little. Local School Clark School. easy to make friends. And A state. School onto the eighth. Grade. And then Then attract began to get a little hotter my. Parents. Sent me to difficult academy. I was there for all four years. Thought deerfield was terrific. I really enjoyed. The friendships there? I love the athletics there. And fortunately, the academics there and they go to jail.

New York City York Yale School Clark School. Medical School S Allston Family Columbia Albany Deerfield Riverdale
"yale" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

07:24 min | 3 months ago

"yale" Discussed on Mom Brain

"You start doing it for the external reward. In Our podcast we talked to someone who is like obsessed with their fit bit Usta like going running on their own, but then it became about lake, getting the little dings on the Fitbit, and then stops being about running. You become obsessed with this external reward, and I think just of you said we've like actually created a culture where our whole education system is based on these external awards whether that's again like. Like, a gold star grade or getting into a school like Yale like in the data suggests that what's that's done is exactly what happened to you like a Princeton which is like you're working to get into. Princeton. You're working for like what you think is going to give you this external validation, but then when you stop and think you're like wait. What do I actually really want? What do I WANNA learn what? What do I need to do as an adult? We've Kinda miss that so I think for parents thinking about this. I think it's really important to think you. When have you kind of push things off on external rewards whether that's your degrees. Your kids are getting in school. Even if it's like first grade or kindergarten or something like that, whether that's external rewards, you use to kind of motivate behavior. Those things kind. Kind of work in the short term the problems they work too well right, and then they can kinda steal the joy that underlies certain things you sit, you talk about the fitbit and I I realize for myself when I started using APPs to run I love to run that I was holding myself to a higher standard, well Iran slower today and I was one minute lesson this new start you it. It's so. Out of the body and what I learned was are I'm GonNa give myself a second time. I'm going to do thirty minutes and I'M GONNA run my best knows thirty minutes, and if it's not the same, that's okay, but literally having to have a conversation with myself without and now I'm almost seven months pregnant and I'm using now were in quarantine, and I can't run as well. I mean not just because the Indian, but because I'm very pregnant, and I'm using Peleton and they have all of these you know. You can compete against this one and that one and I'm like I'm going to do twenty minutes. I'm going to do whatever I want for those twenty minutes. Okay because I, need to listen to my body, which is just so smart i. mean I think the the problem? It's in everything, right? You know it's in fitness. APPS when we used to love running and exercising, it's in meditation. APPs right. You know like some of the meditation Apps I use or scoring me right whereas like we shouldn't get scored like literally. Literally on meditation on like being President Right, but that's but that's the thing. Is that really what it comes down to is that we're not capable of being with ourselves, and we're not capable of knowing if we're honest or not. Because so much is about this sort of appreciation from the outside. How many likes do I get on this? How much it has stars did I get on this APP this. Did I get on that? You know what's my grade on this constantly having to prove ourselves in this culture. I mean as a as a question I mean it feels right now. This is so there were at such a time of of of learning about how we can be better in Daphne are very. Active on our INSTAGRAM's, and we have relatively big followings, and what are what are certain things that you find can help people through instagram because I feel like both of us have of this positive outlook would like to share positive things. We'd like to get involved with different things that are going on at the moment. Try to help people reach out help MOMS. That was the whole idea of our podcast. Through our podcasts into our own instagram's and through the people who are listening who are also MOMS trying to reach out to other moms. What are things that you find to be helpful to ourselves into others? And what do you think are things that we're putting out there? That might be harmful to ourselves into others. Yeah I, think the key here is really trying to be mindful about what you're consuming and kind of pay attention. Attention to sort of what's nutritious often like to use these analogies with like eating exercise when I think about happiness, because I get works a lot the same way by as you're paying attention to your own instagram. Use as you're paying attention to what you WANNA post so on. You need to think about like what's nutritious for you right? And that's going to vary from person to person like some people are just GonNa like. Like love instagram and not get obsessed with the lakes and just recognize the value that they're having sharing this good content from that's one thing, but you might also start noticing like. Oh, I posted that and not as many people look the as last time, and like so so he is to kind of pay attention to what's working for you, and if it stops working if it starts to feel not nutritious like you're getting obsessed. Obsessed or you're paying attention to the wrong things or just feels gross like notice that and try to shift your behavior around it right? That might mean like forcing yourself not to look at the lakes, or that might mean doing it only a certain amount, and not getting obsessed with it, or trying to kind of interact with certain like certain feeds, and not others right I, think part of being nutritious for me has meant. Getting off of some of the lake, twitter followers that look at right 'cause it. I noticed like whenever I'm reading this stuff I'm not feeling nutritious I'm feeling gross feeling bad about myself or something like that and so paying attention to what's working for you and being kind of non judgmental about it. You know they're. They're like certain like accounts that we feel like we're supposed to follow. Follow, but it make it makes us feel bad. It's like you know it's. It's supposed to work for you like if it's not working for you, just switch it up. I love that what about helping other people because I know that something that Daphne and I are also very focused on is helping people and putting content out there. That's GonNa make people feel good and whether you. You have three people flying you or you have three million people falling. You have an effect on other people, and so, what for for all of listening to you? What kinds of stuff can we put out there and not put out there? That is nutritious for the world. Yeah, well I think one of the big things to remember scientifically is that our emotions aren't just like emotions that. That are in our body that are affected by what we're thinking. We're going through. We catch the emotions of other people, and there's some lovely data that have come out of Japan Cox suggesting that that's true on social media to you. Did this famous study where he had? He worked with facebook to get them to just switch their algorithm a little bit, so your feet had slightly. Slightly more negative content or slightly more positive content, and he found that that affected people's emotions and then affected what they themselves posted so i. think the biggest way we can help. Other people with our feeds is making sure that we're putting stuff out that we are proud of right that that would make us feel good. That wouldn't make us feel bad about ourselves if we were looking. Looking at it in someone, else's feed and I think that can be. That can be lots of different things that can be regulating emotions so like you know twenty twenty rough enough already like we have to face the news and we have to face what's going on, but there are different spins. We could have on that bad information, and is there a way to get a more positive? Positive spinner, a more optimistic spin I'm hopeful spent like that matters a lot The other thing is to realize what we're putting out and trying to think about. Can this make someone feel bad about themselves? You know maybe I might really love the photos of my vacation, but is that GONNA make everybody in my feed. Feel crappy because they didn't get to go to. I don't know. Know Barbados last week or something like that like I. Think it's a matter of realizing that the content you put out is going to affect other people's emotions, and that's cool. It means we have this responsibility in what we put in our feed to like other people positively like we can be the change. We want to see on these platforms because we're the ones posting stuff, right. Around mom off. This past handful of months has been some of the most distressful in our lives.

INSTAGRAM Princeton Yale Daphne President Peleton Iran facebook Barbados Japan
"yale" Discussed on #GoodMuslimBadMuslim

#GoodMuslimBadMuslim

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"yale" Discussed on #GoodMuslimBadMuslim

"I'm seeing is that they're saying we're distancing ourselves from this guy who's giving his testimony about our Republican president. Yes. Because he's a trash guy. Anyway. And so you can't listen to anything. He says also he's just Trump's lawyer. He doesn't actually work as part of the government. Okay. That's what they're saying. Right. Is that an accurate recap? Sure. Yeah. If it's inaccurate. I will say Yale backed me up. And yellow smart. So if they don't say anything approval again. So all right. They're basically saying is like just take all of his testimony about his illegal activity. That's coming from his lawyer and put it in a little bottle and put that inside of another little bottle. And we'll just toss it all the Russia and. So what are the creation of a new fallacy that I'm referring to the Russian doll. Dismount? Narrative in a narrative and inherited a narrative that makes no sense in the first place stacked on top of each other that they're talking that. They're not allowed to Chuck. Yeah. I always say what I'm getting from. What you're saying is nonsense. Is would. Sure, okay. Yeah. Like non ridiculous. I mean, I think also this like narrative inside of narrative, it's just like causing confusion like there's nothing linear about it. So people are just getting because it's so confusing now people are just couldn't toward it. Yeah. And the continued to contorts what is already contorted that. You can't exactly like you said, there's no linear trace to argument, a mess, and it's a MAC, dick. And it's brilliant one and as a Persian conspiracy theorist I lot it at the same time. It's an appropriate. I fought with it on behalf of you my thought. Well, all right. Let's hear is chain tting at yoga like, okay. Like Nations what? like what you're talking about. So like, I went to yoga because maquis punches says the need to stretch, my, I know I'm a big spin class person. I don't really I'm not into the yoga Steph, mainly because I'm a Brown person. And when I go to yoga, and it's a room full of white people doing yoga, they looked to me. Like, I'm supposed to be the expert. And I don't know what I'm doing. And I'm like the one Brown person in the room who's like not able to stand on my one leg with the other foot sticking out over my head. And like, I'm not very bendy. Okay. Not a thing that I do, and I just feel so judged in most yoga spaces. So anyways, I went because acupunctures told me to go into this one yoga class in a I like because I'm the first one there. I'm like, I'm like, okay. This is gonna be good classes like good vibes and the guy walks in and he like whips out her Monia, which is kind of a hard thing to it. Because they're very big. And I actually wanted to buy a harmonium, and I've been looking at them on Amazon they're like four hundred dollars really pricey. And so he like he's like this very like gentle white guy, and then because of the first one in the room like five minutes until the first session. I look around the room was like holy crap. I'm the only Brown person here. I was like, okay. This is gonna be interesting because like, no, I'm just going to ignore the weird things and just go with it because I need a stretch. And I need the exercise. And then it was not the typical flow like exercise yoga, it was like Chilin, which is what it's called chill chill. I was called chilled yoga. I am in California..

Trump acupunctures president Yale Brown Russia Chuck Steph Chilin California Amazon four hundred dollars five minutes
"yale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"yale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Hank Burien wrote a great piece yesterday with the headline three female students, sue, Yale and fraternities. So that the fraternities would be forced to admit women. So you have female students at Yale University who are suing the university to force fraternities to accept women. Why why were they? Fraternity except a woman. And if a fraternity accepts a woman is it still a fraternity, and does this means sororities must be forced to accept men. Yesterday. Three female students at Yale University. They filed the lawsuit against the university and against nine fraternities to force these I turn it is to accept women as members to the students were juniors. One of the student was a sophomore. The the lawsuit states that when these three females arrived on campus as first year students, they encountered a thriving all male fraternities seem Yale had a drastic shortage of university runs social spaces. And the fraternities were the de facto social environment students male students routinely controlled the admission. Alcohol lighting and music for many Yale social gal gatherings. This dynamic created dangerous environments in which sexual conduct misconduct thrived. The lawsuit claims that these three women were groped at fraternity parties during their first semester at Yale..

Yale University Hank Burien
"yale" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"I believe we I investigation on Brett cavern on now has more to work with tonight than it did last night, including this statement tonight by Brett Cavanaugh's Yale roommate, Chad leading ten. Roommate said he never saw him blackout. He. He was with him when he got home at night and saw when he woke up your response to that. I unfortunately believe that my my probably now is is lying. Brad Kavanagh was questioned under oath last week about his drinking because he was accused of an attempted rape with his friend Mark judge while he was drunk stumbling drunk according to Dr Christine blassie Ford. And in the Senate confirmation hearing brick Kevin was questioned under oath about his drinking in college because Dever Ramirez has accused Brad Kavanagh of aggressively exposing himself to her while he was drunk stumbling drunk at a party in a Yale dormitory. Deborah Ramirez says that when she had to push cavenaugh away, she was forced to touch him in a way that disgusted and horrified her and so- descriptions of Brett Cavanaugh being belligerent and aggressive while being drunk at Yale are now highly relevant to the FBI background investigation of Brett Cavanaugh Brett Kevin under oath answers to last week. Last week's questions about drinking Dow the basis of this week's questions about perjury, the New York Times. Times is now reporting according to unnamed White House sources that the f. b. i. will actually be allowed to interview anyone the FBI deems necessary in the cavenaugh investigation. After initial order from the White House limited the FBI investigation do interviewing only four people in those four people did not include Brett Kavanagh or Dr Christine blessing Ford, but did include Deborah Ramirez Friday on this program to women who were roommates of Deborah Ramirez at Yale said that Brett Kevin are frequently got very drunk and they believe that his Senate testimony minimizing his drinking was a lie because they themselves both drank with Brett cavenaugh while in college. Both of the women said that they believe Deborah Ramirez, Deborah Ramirez, accusations against Brett Kevin on yesterday Cheddington that Yale classmate of birth Kevin was issued a written statement saying that he was deeply troubled by Brett Kavanagh's description of his. Is drinking at Yale. Cheddington is now a professor at North Carolina State university. He was a varsity basketball player at Yale. Brick Cavanaugh was not on the varsity team, but he enjoyed socializing with the varsity players according to Chad leading him in his written statement, professor leading ten said quote, Brett was a frequent drinker and a heavy drinker. I know because especially in our first two years of college, I often drank with him on many occasions. I heard Brett slurring his words and saw him staggering from alcohol consumption, not all of which was beer when Bret got drunk. He was often belligerent and aggressive on on one of the last occasions. I purposely socialized with Brett. I witnessed him respond to a semi hostile remark, not by diffusing the situation, but by throwing his beer in the man's face and starting a fight that ended with one of our mutual friends in jail..

Brett Cavanaugh Brett Kevin Brett Deborah Ramirez Brett cavern Brett Kavanagh Yale Roommate Brad Kavanagh Brett cavenaugh FBI Cheddington Yale dormitory Senate Dr Christine blassie Ford Chad White House Bret professor New York Times
"yale" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I have rarely been ripped off is a testament to their honesty or my charm at think it's probably both, but I cannot help but protests the perpetual necessity for either. How does that feel to have to rely on other people? Yeah, yeah, that was that was part of a movement that was ultimately successful led by the American Council, the blind to make our US currency accessible. We're the only industrialized country where you can't tell other than visually the difference between a five dollar Bill and a twenty dollar Bill. And so I got involved with that movement in and it's true that that's one of the that's one of the areas where you know, unfortunately, because those bills are not distinguishable right now, they will be soon. A person who's blind or low vision even can can be vulnerable and the, I think the important thing there is it's not just a lack of independence when it comes to like a consumer, but it's also the idea that someone who's blind ought to be able to work at a Starbucks. I had to plug a Seattle company or another coffee shop. They ought to be able to do that and be able to make change for people. You raise the issue of employment for people who are blind. The overall unemployment rate in the country is a, you know, historical lows, but tell folks what the unemployment rate is among blind people in the United States. Yeah. Well, as as recently as a few years ago, the unemployment rate for blind Americans was about seventy percent and since that and I would also say of those who are employed, many are under employed, and so we've got a long ways to go. Oh, so you, you know, you have sort of mediocre academic career, Columbia, Oxford Yale after which at some point you decided to get into politics. Why on earth would you do that? Mainly so that I could use the expression. I went from braille to Yale on podcasts like this and get lattes, believe that is going to be the title of the episode. Thank thank you. All right. You know, without teachers without social services without the the person taught me how to use a cane or read braille or use software on the computer that reads, what's on the screen without any of those things. I wouldn't have been able to travel the road from braille to Yale. So as I graduated law school and came back and entered into private practice in Seattle, you know, I heard about all these attacks on social services. One of the things you would hear often times would be education being pitted against social services. And I knew first hand that you need both. You need good schools.

Oxford Yale Seattle United States Starbucks American Council Columbia private practice seventy percent twenty dollar five dollar
"yale" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Think, free. Speech prevents the government from preventing speech you the. Right to, stand on the sidewalk and rant and rave. Yeah absolutely nobody can. Put you in jail already can arrest you know that's probably. The greatest thing about this country. This is James Kirk he's a visiting fellow at Brookings and about. Fifteen years ago James was a student at. Yale I was a freshman Yale in the spring of two thousand. Three and that semester James was cut off guard when someone he strongly disagreed with, was invited to speak on campus The African. American cultural center on campus had. Invited a poet by the name of Amiri Baraka who passed away. Several years ago and he was notorious at. The time for having published a poem called somebody blew up America And in this poem that he had written he alleged that the government of Israel, had warned all Israelis in Manhattan not to go to work at the twin towers that day And he was invited, to basically read this poem at Yale to read that yes Somebody blew up America they say as some terrorism Barak Arab in Afghanistan. And It was a fairly traumatic experience, for me and I grew up in a fairly well to do Boston suburb but never experienced real anti-semitism in my life before and then to come to Gale's freshman and see something like. This happen was disturbing and my instinct was, not to shout. Mr. Baraka down I was a columnist for the elderly news the school newspaper so.

Amiri Baraka Yale James visiting fellow Barak Arab America Boston Gale Israel Afghanistan Manhattan Fifteen years
"yale" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"For a while logan call appearance sang one day rotor he sing i should've asked him just now that's how this whole thing started he came up and he he'll probably tweet me in two seconds and he belted something on the really good job and that was how we got to know him and he was like come to come to my wedding so a couple years i went to his wedding and it was super far away alexa alexa i got into harvard yale this spring you get into harvard and yale i which one are you going to wow we have a listener who goes to harvard what are you gonna study you guys love you to what are you going to study studying government wow i just want to i'm gonna give you a hundred bucks just now today and then like in thirty years when you're worth a billion dollars i'm gonna call and say i gave you one hundred bucks now gimme whatever you give me some money i'm gonna i'm gonna invest in you i'm going to buy your books or something i don't know just so i can say that i invested in a harvard grad don't forget about me when you invent the next brilliant medical cures solution or something alexa thank you for calling god harvard and yale amazing jesus hey tiffany good morning hi tiffany what's your claim to fame well growing up i played football and i was the only girl football team when i was in high school kicker thing.

logan harvard football yale billion dollars thirty years two seconds one day
"yale" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Commencement addresses on disagreement day to somebody disagree with me that most commencement addresses are disappointing boring meaningless repetitive full of platitudes and cliches you remember the i think it was at penn jodi foster gave a particularly awful commencement address at penn and then i think it was also at penn that elizabeth warren was trying to sing some taylor swift and somehow it's just not the same when senator warren delivers it but in any event hillary clinton who graduated from yale law school she she was in her class because she was a class of sixty nine at wellesley college so she was not eligible at that time to go to yale as an undergraduate but she spoke to yell undergraduates at yale college on class day just a couple of weeks ago and offered profound advice on how to handle moments when you're feeling down listen everyone everyone gets knocked down what matters is whether you get back up and keep going this may be hard for a group of yale soon to be graduates to accept but yes you will make mistakes in life you will even fail it happens to all of us no matter how qualified or capable we are take it from me i remember those first months after that two thousand sixteen election we're not easy we all had our own methods of coping i went for long walks in the woods yell students went for long walks and east rock park i spent hours going down at twitter rabbit hole you spend hours in the yale memes group i had my fair share of chardonnay practice yoga and alternate nostril breathing you took psych and the good life.

penn elizabeth warren hillary clinton yale law school wellesley college yale yale college jodi foster twitter
"yale" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Miracle in a panic and carey's running over there ran in a panic and you know macron was a planned deal but you know what was number one on the list don't kill this deal exposed to many people now they're talking about if you if you pull out it'll cause world war three inside your country maybe people in your country going to jail because you guys lied to euro people mirko you lied macron you weren't there at the time but helen's lonzo big trouble i think theresa may and the people that put her office behind her they're going to be in trouble at the uk and you know obama and kerry and jared and everybody else obama administration is going to be in trouble yeah well she was she was working on that before she could give her that as a pass because he wasn't there when this deal went down but she was there with the uranium one deal went down and did some of that uranium which was never supposed to leave the country that some of that uranium end up in what syria or or iran or did some that uranium end up in in hands of people that could drop it on us later in a c b m know what left the united states through canada we know that that is been documented even though we know retz right many people will tell us to this day the out that it's not as bad as you think 'cause iranian never left the country i saw yale rail saying well you know daddy til yale yale law school yale the imbeciles at yale that traders at yale tackling with it but they never mentioned it wasn't side so let me get this straight you imbecile imbecilic idiot yell to a hundred and fifty billion dollar deal and not get a signature you're in basilic you put but they are the home now greg they are the home of the skull and bones the yeah yeah coup stupid to be still which harry which john kerry with john kerry was a members going bone dave.

theresa harry greg yale canada iran syria uranium one jared panic euro carey john kerry united states obama uk helen fifty billion dollar
"yale" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"The word together we can change the world well hello my friends there is so much talk to you about so students all over the country left classes to demonstrate for gun control the democrats are jubilant totally understandably the ability to identify the threat of being killed with republicans is just too great a cause not to be allowed students in many instances were not marked as absent or truant because the teachers and the principal support the idea that they go out and march remember yale just announced i read this to you l announced the assistant head of admissions at yale said you have a better chance of being admitted to yale if you were an activist and by that it is man it was clear what it was it was for social justice i mean the word social justice reuse in other words if you're a left wing activists in high school you have a better chance of getting into the left wing yale university so those are moments by the way where in i at least admire the honesty it's when youtube claims to be neutral and then put prager you videos on a restricted list that's when you really understand that this moral compromise here aside from from the desire to indoctrinate that you're not even honest enough to admit we we put you on restricted list because we don't like your content so students are all out there marching and i always ask the question what law and i i don't ask it as a challenge by the way i'm totally open to challenging people i don't ask it as a challenge i ask it because i i wanna make up my own mind i am open to more laws believe it or not i just want you for the record i just want you to know that i hope it doesn't disappoint too many of you i am open to more laws i have to be convinced that they honor the second amendment and that they also are effective but if they do and i don't think the second amendment is completely elastic nobody does nobody thinks you're you can own a bazooka or or a surface to wear missile so obviously there are limitations but i wanna know what laws would if they had been emplaced would have stopped any of the school massacres that's what i want to.

yale wing yale university youtube prager principal
"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"I decided to attend yale because i an actor and i've always really liked politics and at yale they do both of and they've got a lot of people who've done very well in both i also get a kick out of being a conservative very lefty place you know yale produced buckley in the bushes and there's this kind of a much maligned conservative movement that keeps coming out of jail i actually didn't really apply to other colleges i applied early and then i started applications and a couple of other places i received an email i started my favorite application i got an email from the admissions office with typo in it they used a comma wrong so they didn't and i took that as a sign from god that i shouldn't go there i i pulled my application and my interviewer there told me that i was making the stupidest decision my life and yelled at me and everything but very glad i did it's really sad to see fall into total pit of despair right now but on this as a broader point to people who are going to college looking at colleges for themselves at their kids i highly recommend going to a leftwing school it will make you smarter it will make you know what you think it will make you think through what you think iron sharpens iron or whatever they say you know you really do want to be around very smart lefties you will have the intellectual advantage over them because you'll constantly have to defend your ideas and you will you will just figure yourself more figure out what it is you have a right throughout which ones are wrong disregard those and get a deeper education i really recommend it even though it's kinda counterintuitive from andy.

yale buckley andy
"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"I decided to attend yale because i an actor and i've always really liked politics and at yale they do both of and they've got a lot of people who've done very well in both i also get a kick out of being a conservative very lefty place you know yale produced buckley in the bushes and there's this kind of a much maligned conservative movement that keeps coming out of jail i actually didn't really apply to other colleges i applied early and then i started applications and a couple of other places i received an email i started my favorite application i got an email from the admissions office with typo in it they used a comma wrong so they didn't and i took that as a sign from god that i shouldn't go there i i pulled my application and my interviewer there told me that i was making the stupidest decision my life and yelled at me and everything but very glad i did it's really sad to see fall into total pit of despair right now but on this as a broader point to people who are going to college looking at colleges for themselves at their kids i highly recommend going to a leftwing school it will make you smarter it will make you know what you think it will make you think through what you think iron sharpens iron or whatever they say you know you really do want to be around very smart lefties you will have the intellectual advantage over them because you'll constantly have to defend your ideas and you will you will just figure yourself more figure out what it is you have a right throughout which ones are wrong disregard those and get a deeper education i really recommend it even though it's kinda counterintuitive from andy.

yale buckley andy
"yale" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WGTK

"Mirage of social justice after reading it she had concluded social justice does not offer a particularly useful take on the moral problems of society and other standards justice toward individuals protection of personal rights peace and nonagression neutral and impartial application of law are better now suppose she put that in her yale application knowing that screeners would be looking for some indication she was quote versed in social justice unquote would it affect her chances of making the cut ual says it will overlook gun walkouts for this round and up for other causes as well to test that an applicant might engage in a peaceful walkout for a cause of which the admission staff disapproves say second amendment rights but one high schooler would want to be that test case that being said yale started out as a base for the trimming of puritan clergy one wonders whether it is really changed all that much in other words we now have a new puritanism at our universities yale amongst them and that is the puritanism of leftism which is of course the most dominant religion most widespread and influential religion of our time more than christianity or islam leftism well that this is of surpassing importance we would like you to be engaged in social activism on behalf of social justice you have a better chance of getting in to yale the only good thing about it is at least email admit it all right mike mlc good though california hi mike dennis prager i thank you so much for your excellent show an excellent prager university videos you know many times went this gets to be in control in a position of hiring or admissions two for jobs or for students to be a new to schools they exercise their biases to filter screen out conservatives you'll see that newspapers like the only time now others where they obviously lack diversity in terms of political viewpoints and having conservatives there and um i'm wondering what you saw the idea if conservatives were to safely fight that otherwise they'll clearly lose.

yale california mike mlc mike dennis prager
"yale" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WCTC

"The road in new haven at yale university yale played dartmouth like i said was last weekend and in football and they were celebrating the anniversary of the dartmouth yale football game which is always a big rivalry and they put on the program old programme covers the nature showed what it look like in forty fifty years ago and one of the programs was from the image of the program on the cover of the new programme was from 1944 and it showed a yield player setting fire to an american indians clothing i mean it was a cart is a cartoon image of because we were the dartmouth indians and the executive director of yale indigenous performing arts program you can't make this up called the images dehumanizing e l athletic director tom beckett acknowledged to the new haven register that the cover was offensive i'm offended by their fecklessness n wimpish nece that's what i i am so offended that now athletic directors' or whipped into this politically correct frenzy it's dehumanizing cartoon this is a cartoon this is all it isn't it from 1944 when what nn people then get so wound up about the indian name and by the way most indian chiefs as the washington post confirmed which confirmed my old poll of indian chiefs from back when i was at dartmouth that like eighty five percent of indians have no problem with the indian symbol actually think was nine out of ten i was nine out of ten will was 83 percent when i did it 1985 or whatever what i did the poll with the gallup bug gallup organisation so indians don't care it's liberal arenas on college campuses who care about the indian symbol they are so offended by the indian symbol but they're fine if i remember that you t story with those those young women university of texas walked around with those uh those you know male anatomy member they were they were protesting something at you t where they protesting can't remember what they're protesting but they walked around all day with their you know what i want to say the word but assists gross is disgusting what was it through they were protesting remember the gun laws because now you have the right to carry so they were all up and out of these expects toys they had a bunch of dealers said rodionov out anywhere that's what the.

yale university yale football dartmouth indians executive director tom beckett washington post rodionov director women university of texas eighty five percent forty fifty years 83 percent
"yale" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WCTC

"The court of public opinion or otherwise in right down the road in new haven at yale university yale played dartmouth like i said was last weekend in in football and they were celebrating the anniversary of the dartmouth yale football game which is always a big rivalry and they put on the program old programme covers you know the nature showed what it look like and forty fifty years ago in one of the programs was from the image of the program on the cover of the new programme was from 1944 and it showed a yield player setting fire to an american indians clothing i mean it was a cart is a cartoon image of because we were the dartmouth indians and the executive director of yale indigenous performing arts program can't make this up called the images dehumanizing e l athletic director tom beckett acknowledged to the new haven register that the cover was offensive i'm offended by their fecklessness and wimpish nece that's what i i am so offended that now athletic directors' or whipped into this politically correct frenzy it's dehumanizing cartoon this is a cartoon this is all it isn't it from 1944 when what and and people then get so wound up about the indian name and by the way most indian chiefs as the washington post confirmed which confirmed my old poll of indian chiefs from back when i was at dartmouth that like eighty five percent of indians have no problem with the indian symbol think was nine out of ten i was nine out of ten was 83 percent when i did it 1985 or whatever i did the poll with gallup bug gallup organisation so indians don't care is liberal leanings on college campuses who care about the indian symbol they are so offended by the indian symbol but they're fine if i remember that you t story with those those young women university of texas walked around with those uh those you know male anatomy member they were they were protesting something that you were they protesting can't remember what they're protesting but they walked around all day with their you know what i want to say the word but assists gross is disgusting what was at drew they were protesting remember the gun laws because now you have the right to carry so there were all up and out of it he's expects toys added much ado odors the exceptionally out and all that anywhere that's what the.

yale university yale football dartmouth indians executive director tom beckett washington post director women university of texas eighty five percent forty fifty years 83 percent
"yale" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WDRC

"To seventeen three one eight eight eight five seven four to seven to three thanks so much for joining us one thing i wanted also bring up of we start windings down here uh regarding uh uh you know the fall of western society as i see it i'm kind of being tongueincheek give it some of this stuff is just bizarre to read about this this broke late last week in it made a few of the mainstream sources but this is fries snubbing enshrining yale now we have a new word here i know we we we we we have we've had microaggressions macro aggressions we've had safe spaces we've had uh what's not will trigger triggers like what he said trigger mees undergone the corner and cry you know things like this ready for this now ain't write this number in this new one you'll have the quiz on this tomorrow the weren't is the password is d colonize cheer about this one ah this is a new one d column ice ual yale university new haven bulldogs bulldogs bowao ally yale he aol decolonized says the english department after complaints that studying white authors actively harms students a folks you can't here's the problem with this though and i'll get into the details in a minute when you do stuff like this and i don't care whether it has to do with race relations sexually shoes um issues of gender issues of nationality issues of disability when you put stuff like this forward that is so active and patently idiotic eight dole's perhaps the message of legitimate issues you may have it's like the nfl kneeling thing it's come to the point now where so much of it is focused on the kneeling and almost none of it is focused on okay it players now you have have our attention what are you going to do about fostering better understanding of what should be done meaner city janica.

dole nfl enshrining yale yale university aol