35 Burst results for "Yale University"

"yale university" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

07:47 min | 5 d ago

"yale university" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"This is Colonel Dana Gillum. This is the final formation for this hour on front lines of freedom. We're continuing our conversation with Steve Kirby on Islam in America. Steve. We're about to get to looking at specific conflict between Islamic law and doctrine, and the Constitution is they don't want to cover before we get there. No, we can jump right into that. Okay, Let's talk about that conflict. Because we have tohave elected officials who will actually honestly support and defend the constitution. So let's talk about the Constitution. Talking. And as I mentioned in the first statement, I'd live this last week about the question I sent out asking Muslim public officials and candidates to choose between freedom of expression and the Islamic doctrinal prohibition. Criticism of Mohammed And we can focus on the freedom of speech that our Constitution guarantees but is forbidden by Islamic doctor and this started out in your early days of this. In 6 24 to be exact when Mohammed was consolidated news power in Medina, and he started ordering the killing of bullets and individuals who had criticized him. And I'll give you a good example. Jewish Port calm Minallah Schroth had criticized Mohammed Mohammed ordered him to be killed in combat skill, and it caused a lot of consternation in the Jewish community. So they came to Mohammed and said, Hey, what happened right here. Here's the key words of foot. Mohammed said he's stalking Mark Cobb. He says if he cub had remained as others of similar opinion remained You would not have been killed treacherously. But he heard us and insulted us with poetry. And one does not do this among you, but he should be put to the sword. This set the standard for criticizing of Mohammed. A lot of people might be think. Well, Gina was back in seventh century. It means nothing now. Absolutely wrong. Let's jump to 2005 Danish cartoon situation. A Danish newspaper published cartoons ridiculing Mohammed. It caused riots in the Middle East people were killed. And Kurt Vestergaard, the artist who did this had repeated attempts on his life because he criticized made ridiculed Mohammed. Now in 2009. If you think all that was that was in Denmark, it still big deal 2009. A book came out about the cartoons and the title was the cartoons that shook the world and it was published here in the United States by Yale University Press. The kicker is Yale University Press said. We'll publish the book. But it can include any of the Danish cartoons or any other illustrations of Mohammed. The author reluctantly agreed to publishing the book, So the title is the cartoons that shook the world. There's no cartoons in it at all, and it's interesting because John Donne a Titch, the director of Yale University, Press, said this, he said the decision to exclude the cartoons and illustrations of Mohammed was difficult. But he said, when it came between that and blood on my hands There was no question Yale University Press, acknowledged Islamic doctor a prohibition and criticizing Mohammed right here in the United States. 2010 Southfork, the satirical cartoon series. They were gonna have a serious for Mohammed appeared dressed as a bear. They received threats from a group called Revolution Muslim. And they took that sequence out later that year. A lot of people don't know about this mauling Norse editorial cartoons for the Seattle weekly because of what happened with self part, she said, You know, some I'm gonna having everybody draw Mohammed and it was publicized. She immediately started getting death threats. Finally, on the advice of the FBI, Molly Norris went into hiding. Change. Your name completely disappeared. This was in 2010. Molly Norris has not appeared again and bring in a 2015 Robert Spencer. Pamela Geller hosted a Muslim art exhibit and contest in Garland, Texas, were drawings of Mohammed or judge. Two heavily armed Muslims came driving up. They're going to shoot the place up. Fortunately, a police officer engaged them. Shot most of them and into the writer, But the bottom line is even here in the United States. Islam does not allow freedom of speech, especially about Mohammed. So this is something we need very concerned about. Wow. It certainly is. I had heard about a few of those. I hadn't put them all together till you just did that. This is kind of funny. Dylan from lots of freedom. We're talking Islam in America with Steve Kirby. Steve, that is really violation. I mean, the First Amendment to our Constitution, our listeners apartment read hundreds of times says. Freedom of press freedom of speech. Congress shall make no law abridging an establishment of religion for every the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press, or of the right of people to peacefully assemble to petition Congress if you can't Have a public art drawing. You can't publish a book that's a violent constitution. And if you can't do it, well, it is And you know what makes earth Wow you know, and we'll make it even worse, like Molly Norris. Here is a journalist who received threat. Because she was gonna happen. Everybody draw Mohammadi, and she's disappeared Spin since 2010 she's disappeared. There was virtually no coverage in the American media about a journalist having to disappear because of threats. Because of the threats because that journalists want to exercise The First Amendment. Can you imagine if, say, a right wing group and spreading a journalist? Oh, don't draw pictures of so And so we're going to attack you. The media in the United States would be in screaming and yelling about First Amendment right? When it comes this one. Even the US media knows the rules. Wow. And what you're saying is true. All you gotta do is think about what's been covered What hasn't been covered? Can. It's not surprising to those who pay attention of the media that they Are very, very selective in the really news if they cover Wow, that's scary. As we wind up for today. We've got a couple of more minutes talk to us about where we're going next week. Well next week. Maybe we could continue just a little bit on Islamic doctrine conflicts mother aspects of U. S Constitution. But what I'd like to do is really talk about some concepts that are important to understanding this. Once you understand these concepts, it'll give you a better perspective, even really a better understanding of Islamic doctrine. Well and troops. I hope you understand that we are to be politically correct here or to throw rocks at anybody, but to make it clear that this is a potential threat. And certainly there's an indication that many of the candidates are not Three to whether it's because they can't or won't but they haven't responded to his survey. This is something that's scary. And that's why I wanted here. Group. This is the second of three interviews were doing with Steve. He'll be joining us again next week. Steve. Thank you. Thank you for taking time to join us today. Thank you for your concern for our nation's Thank you for your service to our nation in law enforcement..

Mohammed Mohammed Steve Kirby United States Molly Norris Yale University Press America Colonel Dana Gillum Middle East Kurt Vestergaard Denmark Yale University Minallah Schroth Medina Congress FBI Pamela Geller Seattle John Donne Gina
COVID-19 can invade brain cells, Yale research suggests

Jim Bohannon

00:25 sec | Last week

COVID-19 can invade brain cells, Yale research suggests

"A new concern on the Corona virus front, according to a new Yale University study. Kuroda virus may directly invade the brain doctor David Vegas is a CBS News Medical contributor. In the last week or two. We've heard about its effect on the heart, we know about its effect on the law and now More more data to effect on the brain. Many covert 19 victims experienced nagging headaches, confusion and being delirious. Jim Krystle, a CBS News

Cbs News Medical Jim Krystle CBS Kuroda Yale University David Vegas
"yale university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:46 min | Last week

"yale university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The research out of Yale University's medical school indicates the Corona virus in some cases can directly infect brain cells. How did they get there is a good question. We don't understand. Still. Dr Akiko Iwasaki from Yale. She is the author of the new study. Possible that you know there was a route from the nose to the brain through the olfactory bone. But we don't really know exactly how the buyer Scott to the brain. Other viruses can attack the brain. But the virus that causes covert 19 is so new researchers are still learning all of its capabilities. Charles Feldman. Can x 10 70 news radio or tonight on connects in depth at eight. The president is defending his decision to downplay the deadly effects of the Corona virus made the uproar surrounding the taped interviews that he gave to journalist Bob Woodward's then the released audio clips from February. The president's was saying Covert 19 is airborne and deadly. But during the White House briefing today, Mr Trump blames the journalists. Woodward's for withholding information then he should have immediately right after I said it gone out to the authorities so they can prepare and let him know, but he didn't and he said he didn't think it was bad. He actually said he didn't think it was that it was bad or thinks it was bit where the fake news media because they take it and they try and Put it a certain way. Think that was Philip Rucker at the Washington Post, saying Bob over. It is not the president In explaining why he decided to downplay the effects of covert 19, The president said he wanted to show a level of confidence in strength as a leader. There has to be a calmness. You don't want me jumping up and down screaming. There's going to be great death is going and Really causing some very, very serious problems for the country. Mr. Trump also lashed out at Joe Biden, claiming his Democratic opponents is using the pandemic for his political game. Cruise.

Bob Woodward president Yale University Mr. Trump Charles Feldman Dr Akiko Iwasaki Yale Joe Biden Philip Rucker White House Washington Post Scott
How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

Data Skeptic

06:33 min | Last week

How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

"So my name is Mush. Pot. Suzuki like the car last year a student at Yale University in Computer Science and mathematics and I'm supervised by Adrian Vata and from goalie. I'm very happy to be here and thank you for inviting me. I got exposed to your work. When I read the paper, I invited you to come on and talk about mostly today is how many freemasons are there consensus voting mechanisms in metric space so no less than three interesting ideas for me in the title maybe we should give some background to open up with consensus. What does that mean is that? Just the majority or how will we be using the word today? Consensus mechanism is Mecca Zeman which to select a candidate they're only if everyone agrees on it for instance, they said you're running for some group Peter, you get accepted only if everyone in the group agrees on it and you want you accepted otherwise. so that's like unanimity the Neha in here. Yeah. It's basically the same as unanimity but in different. Settings. Unanimity also implies that it's a property where you have if everyone agrees on that, you accept it but something can happen. If you know, let's say you can use different rules otherwise there's a different sort distinctions there, but it's basically the same as unanimity that particular choice leads to some interesting things and you guys are presented this really concise analogy to the freemasons. Well, I suppose getting down to the actual counter freemasons trying to conduct a census here that just formalizes. A funny title to give because as you know that freemasons are interesting sort of group there. Member only if everyone agrees on sort of it, fits our mechanisms today run their group through consensus voting Gotcha so it wouldn't surprise me if just given how much sort of folklore the surrounds the freemasons that there might be at least a few listeners confused about whether or not there are real organization. Could you throw a few facts Edis? have. Amazing temples in Montreal, phrases, I live in Montreal. So they have a huge temple here and they're very active and I don't know too much about their inner workings or I've never been inside the doors but they're very oh yeah you can go to their building for instance so real organization and in terms of getting accepted into it if I wanted to go in that building up there in. Montreal is this the actual mechanism they literally use or is this a sort of an analogy? So I don't know this for sure but I heard I read online that in order to get accepted that everyone in taboo are everyone in that group has agree on it. So is the medicine that they actually use. Cool. Well, I guess whenever that started it wouldn't be surprising that it could grow quickly. Right, if I was thinking of starting my own such organization and I I, invited my wife. Now we have two members and perhaps she and I can agree her sister joins and my sister joins. But at some point, someone's going to say no to the next member what can we learn about that and how do we study it? What are the interesting Totta questions? So you have two different settings. Here. So wondering is not remodeled people's opinions and you say I prefer my wife says I prefer my daughter you know or or so and so forth we need to the preferences of people. So one of the classic ideas in voting theory and actually just modeling through machine learning or any sort of the setting is this prioritizing people's opinion or privatizing people. So for instance, let's say you could be. Leaning like the political left or right. There's a spectrum for which you are lighted. Let's sure you can be at the centre or you could be very right thing or it could be a very level. So we can model that as any number between minus one and one, but two one being the right-wing minus one being the left-wing. So then that's one example of how you prioritize people right? Because you wanted to this rigorously and mathematically. So we need a method to represent people and our model is at. ISSUE, have this in which you represent urine. You couldn't space in some point. Is You your opinion and you vote for someone who similar to? Let's say you're very right wing than some candidate comes in then you're more likely to vote for someone who is right being than left-wing to someone who is closer to you in opinion or characteristic that's our model of but this question was asked actually before in one emissions but in one dimension. So you're basically just have an inch between minus one and one, and this was an extra Unin by very famous. Nogal. Yes. Paper in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fourteen I forget. But we did this in higher dimensions in actually specifically two dimensions because it introduces so much more complexity when you go up in a dimension, right so Francis, why do we need higher dimensions is because before you you're presenting people left and right but people are more complex than that. You can't just represent a person by just one number for instance you. have to use multiple features as people say. So you have this multiple characteristics of people and they become dimension. So we do this in two missions surprisingly the mathematical difficulty of asking this question John Huge becomes actually much more difficult in two dimension than one dish very interesting and I guess maybe the answers grounded in a lot of details. But is there an essence to what that challenges is it that there are more simulations or? Is there a complexity theory aspect of this? Why is a two dimension so much more difficult than one so for instance, if you look at random shape, you can characterize this voting as looking at something called random convex or some random shapes. The question bows down on understanding certain random shapes and here assuming that the candidates are appearing. Let's say uniformly at on interval you have existing group members and she accepts somebody then he becomes. Group member and you evolve. So the candidates are uniform at each time step and so to answer the question we knew looking at this sort of random judge shapes in one dimension there's only one shape is just an interval intimate conviction in one dimension is just an interval. Some number between attack could be minus zero point five to zero point one is, but let's say you go into the mission all of a sudden there's so Many different shapes so many different things second happen if the shape is convinced or even just not convex in two dimensions does different more complex shapes can get in one mission. You only have interested in two dimensions you have gone as you have China goals, you have something that approximates your face even that could be shade in two missions, but that's not going to happen in Wand mission

Montreal Suzuki Yale University Adrian Vata Mecca Zeman China John Huge Peter Francis
Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

Steve Cochran

00:31 sec | 3 weeks ago

Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

"Administration is also authorized the first rapid Corona virus test That doesn't need any special computer equipment results to go along with it. 15 minute test from Abbott Laboratories will sell for $5 its latest cheaper, simpler test if the U. S market provides some new options to expand testing the FDA also recently Green lighted a saliva test from Yale University. That bypass is some of the supplies that have led to testing bottlenecks. Both tests have limitations. Neither can be done at home

Abbott Laboratories Yale University FDA U. S
Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

"Covert 19. Meanwhile, a Yale University professor is warning college students today returning to campus to prepare for widespread infections and even deaths. Yale psychology professor Laurie Santos says students should be emotionally prepared for a residential college life that resembles quote a hospital unit. Several of Ohio's colleges, including Ohio State are conducting covert 19 testing on their students who live on campus at

Yale University Professor Laurie Santos Ohio State Ohio
New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

Squawk Pod

03:47 min | Last month

New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

"A potential breakthrough in the battle against covid nineteen, the FDA, just granting emergency approval, for Corona, virus saliva test calling it testing innovation game changer this test which is simpler cheaper and less invasive than naval swabs was developed by Yale University researchers. It's been used by the NBA and could greatly help expand testing capacity joining us right now is an Wiley. She is associate research scientist with Yale School of Public Health, which helped develop this new tests and it's great to see you. Thank you for being with us this morning. And Hugh morning. So this is incredibly exciting the idea that you could do the saliva test that it could be cheap and readily available How does it work? Actually, quite simple really. It's as the name suggests that we you've seen saliva as the sample time. And what we're trying to do is get away from that swamp. That's that can you know there's been quite a bit of the vision to the swamp time and we're hoping to get around supply chain issues that we've been saying with the swamps and we also Greenie. Fancy. Collection Devices to help ourselves down and so was actually also quite a make about it unique about is that we haven't actually developed a taste that we just packed up out to you. So you next one of these tests but what we've? What we've developed is the mythic full the taste recipe you could say and we're able to she had this taste with other labs for them to get this method often running in their labs. As. Tasted south with actually adapted the white commonly used piece the artist which takes the virus are a but we've done is removed the most expensive stiff of that replacing with a more simple workup, which again house is down at work though I mean if it still requires a lab to put together, you deliver it to me and then what I drive to the lab, and then how long does it take for me to get my results back? So indeed much psych you know what you're doing at the moment with a swap. So the swap is being ordered for your doctoral with A. Is million schools where you have like a little booth, we your saliva sample and had that taken to the lab and so taking out that was time consuming our in that results Ruby available Asta. You know this isn't one of those that will teach broken about you know we can get. Results, sorted through in about three hours about ninety two samples. But of course, depending on the through the lab is experiencing. You know this isn't to say that results will be available in three hours but just that it's a slightly faster protocol means that labs pamphlets room autistic day. So we do that. We can't see many in some situations. Same Day results if what we're really striving for us to get below that twenty, our timeframe that we're just not seeing. At the moment how much does this test cost I? Believe I've read that that nobody is looking to really make any money on this they're trying to put this out there and make sure it's available at the lowest cost. Possible. That's exactly right. So and we're being very very open about let's should be ambushed at expecting the regions cost and how much the people can speak in the. Cost and that's because the reagents of the chemicals that make up the test opinion that companies getting them from the only cost somewhere between one and four dollars for the reagents. That's just the reagents attest. We do know that there is a markups said, GonNa go onto this such as you know to. The logistics of giving the taste of personnel to run the also just you know they need to pay for the facilities that. Do those tests but. Is that that was still trying to limit that labs charge. So we do want this to be as cheap as possible society and went our you're part of compensation. How much I charge in China Steve Down.

Associate Research Scientist Yale School Of Public Health Yale University NBA Covid Corona Hugh FDA China
The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

The Savvy Investor Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

"The FDA on Saturday issuing an emergency use authorization for the new saliva Direct Corona virus test developed by the Yale University School of Public Health and the National Basketball Association. The test processes saliva samples to rapidly determine whether a person is infected with the Corona virus and does not need any swab or other specific collection device. The new test is also far cheaper than current tests costing about $4. There's a test for materials before any added labor cost. That price and a quick turnaround time could help encourage more frequent covert 19 testing in settings like schools, universities and office buildings. All Steven's Fox

Yale University School Of Publ National Basketball Associatio FDA Steven
Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white students in admissions

Mac and Gaydos

00:35 sec | Last month

Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white students in admissions

"The Justice Department accused Yale University today of discriminating against White and Asian American applicants after a two year investigation, the Justice Department concluded. Yale rejects scores of Asian, American and white students each year based on their race, whom it would otherwise admit. The Justice Department said Yale discriminates based on race and national origin and uses race in admissions to a greater degree than the Supreme Court allows. Bail, denied it and said it absolutely complies with Supreme Court standards. The Justice Department threatened a lawsuit, but Yale said it will not change on the basis of what it called a meritless and hasty

Justice Department Yale Yale University Supreme Court
DOJ says Yale is discriminating against Asian and White applicants

Tom and Curley

00:23 sec | Last month

DOJ says Yale is discriminating against Asian and White applicants

"Justice Department Review found that Yale University is violating civil rights laws by discriminating against white and Asian American applicants. Loyal law professor Laurie Levin says has been a long term investigation by the DOJ that in fact, Yale has gone too far. That they've given preferences. Applicants based upon the color of their skin, and not based upon their

Yale University Laurie Levin Yale DOJ Justice Department Professor
Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white applicants

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white applicants

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the justice department concludes Yale University is discriminating in its admissions process the justice department says it has found Yale University has been discriminating against Asian American and white applicants in the admissions process and that Yale racially balances its classes the findings came after a two year investigation the investigation concluded Asian American and white students have only one tenth to one fourth the likelihood of admission at Yale as African American applicants with comparable academic credentials Yale issued a statement denying the allegations the investigation followed complaints from students about the application process at some Ivy League schools Mike Rossio Washington

Mike Rossi Justice Department Yale University Ivy League Mike Rossio Washington
Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white applicants

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white applicants

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the trump administration accuses Yale of discriminating against some applicants a two year justice department investigation has found Yale University illegally discriminates against Asian American and white applicants in violation of federal civil rights law the justice department detailed its findings in a letter to Yale attorneys Thursday in a statement Gail said it categorically denies the allegation the investigation was prompted by a twenty sixteen complaint against Yale brown and Dartmouth the justice department had previously filed court papers siding with Asian American groups who had raised similar allegations against Harvard University Mike Crossey up Washington

Mike Rossi Yale Yale University Gail Justice Department Mike Crossey Washington Yale Brown Dartmouth Harvard University
DOJ accuses Yale of discriminating against Asian, White applicants

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:30 sec | Last month

DOJ accuses Yale of discriminating against Asian, White applicants

"The Justice Department has found that Yale University illegally discriminated against Asian American and white applicants in the admissions process in violation of federal civil rights law. After two year investigation, DOJ concluded that yell rejects scores of Asians and whites based on their race Otherwise. They'd be admitted to the school. It marks the latest action by the Trump administration aimed at rooting out discrimination in the college application process following complaints from students about some Ivy League colleges.

DOJ Ivy League Justice Department Yale University Donald Trump
Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test

All Things Considered

01:50 min | Last month

Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test

"Delays delays continue continue to to hamper hamper efforts efforts to to quickly quickly identify identify people people infected infected with with the the Corona Corona virus. virus. There's a push for cheaper, faster tests. NPR's Alison Aubrey reports on a new saliva test developed by researchers at Yale University who are awaiting emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. If you've been tested for Corona virus, you may have experienced the sting of a swab being inserted deep into your nasal passages. But there is a less invasive way of testing that involves spitting into a cup or tube. Nathan grew Paws, an assistant professor of epidemiology and microbial diseases at the Yale School of Public Health. Early in the pandemic, he started comparing saliva samples to the swab samples from patients who were hospitalized with the virus. We were finding To our surprise, really more virus in the saliva. Then we were in the swamps and also we could detect it from the same patients more consistently. The challenge has been to develop a test that won't be subject to supply chain snags and Khun deliver results faster and cheaper. So what group on his colleagues have designed is a streamlined diagnostic test that uses heat to break open the virus. We get rid of the most cumbersome step, which is extracting and Play a passive and we replace that with something really simple. You Adam ends. I heated up. She lose the most expensive step in the most time consuming and most skilled group says this cuts down on the labor costs and with people taking their own saliva samples, it could reduce the cost of the health care system to collect the samples. He estimates will cost somewhere between $1.4 dollars plus labor to do a test and with emergency use authorization from the FDA commercial labs could license the Yale test. We're not a

Nathan Yale School Of Public Health Yale University Khun Yale Food And Drug Administration Alison Aubrey Assistant Professor NPR Adam FDA
Colleges plan for virus testing, but strategies vary widely

On The Media

00:37 sec | Last month

Colleges plan for virus testing, but strategies vary widely

"Dozens of U. S. Colleges are announcing plans to test students for the Corona virus this fall. But their strategies vary widely. Colby College in Maine plans to test all students every other day for two weeks. And then twice a week. Harvard University will test students on campus three times a week. But some plan to test students on ly if they show symptoms or come into contact with a positive case. Federal health officials discourage widespread testing and college campuses. But researchers at Cornell and Yale University's say that without widespread testing covert 19 could be spread by infected students who don't show symptoms.

Colby College Harvard University Yale University U. S. Colleges Cornell Maine
'Silent spreaders' may be responsible for half of Covid-19 cases, study finds

Anderson Cooper 360

04:47 min | 2 months ago

'Silent spreaders' may be responsible for half of Covid-19 cases, study finds

"New Study out of Yale, says it. Half the coronavirus cases half could be caused by so-called silence spreaders, people were symtomatic or those who are pre symptomatic. The study suggests that the onset of the virus may be the most contagious in that pre-symptomatic stage, which researcher says uncommon for respiratory infection and one of the CO authors of the fascinating study outs and Galvani Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Modeling Analysis at Yale University professor. Thanks so much for being with us. Can you walk us through what your research because I for a lot of us? It's pretty frightening to think that that a majority people might have the virus be transmitting it without even knowing it. Thank you for inviting me Anderson. So. Of covid nineteen is that the peak of infectiousness occurs during the recent dramatic phases. You just summarize by translating clinical data on viral load and symptoms to population level epidemological impact. We found that the majority of transmission is attributable to people who are not exhibiting symptoms, either because they are still in the matic stage, or the infection is ACM to matic, so not only are people infectious when they're not symptomatic. That's actually when they're the most infectious. So from a public health standpoint I mean. What do you do about that? If somebody doesn't even know, they have it, you know it's I mean that's. That's not good news. exactly so this makes control of Cobra Nineteen, particularly challenging in some ways more challenging than disease, even as frightening as a Bola, so for example was a bola. People do not become really infectious until they're extremely sick, so measures based on early symptoms, such as temperature checks are quite effective in the control of Bulla by contrast with Covid, nineteen. People are most infectious before any symptoms appear so most people who were transmitting the or doing so inadvertently without even realizing that there are sick. For, example, younger people are at lower risk of. A serious Kobe outcomes, but they're disproportionately responsible for silent transmission. So that's. Also something that came out of this that that young people are disproportionately responsible for transmitting the virus. Yes, they have more contacts and they're more likely to be symptomatic, and that means that they are disproportionately transmitting as well. So. Is there any? So, then, what do you recommend? I mean just from a public health standpoint I guess it just makes it all the more important that people wearing masks and social distancing, and doing these things which we know helps stop the spread of the virus, and it's more important than ever based on your research to do that because. You can't wait until you feel sick to start wearing a mask infect others. Exactly our results underscore the importance of contact tracing and testing that is fast enough and extensive enough to identify pre-symptomatic cases prior to the onset of symptoms right now the gap between back goal and the reality in America today continues to expand as the outbreak rates, and currently the epidemic is far outpacing the availability of chests. Until we have adequate contact tracing and testing capacity. Staying at home is still the best thing you can do to keep yourself and others. Safe Masks help keeping a distance helps. But if folks are frequently adjusting removing their masks, they may actually be transferring virus from their hands to their face. Do then when you think about schools reopening. If you know if it's young people transmitting the virus disproportionately, not showing symptoms I mean that again just raises a whole bunch of red flags about the ability to reopen school safely. Absolutely given that people are disproportionate responsible for silent transmission reopening schools would be adding fuel to the fire. Even if all symptomatic cases were kept at home like when kids started to feel sick, our study shows that a vast outbreak. Would likely nonetheless unfold from silent transmission alot. Ellison, go Vanni. I really appreciate your research. I mean it's I gotta say it's. It's hard to hear and and This is a this has been a tough our of with a lot of bad news, but it's important to know the facts, and I really appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you,

Center For Infectious Disease Galvani Director Yale University Kobe Researcher Covid Anderson Professor Ellison Bulla America
What Would It Be Like To Fall Into A Black Hole?

Short Wave

02:34 min | 4 months ago

What Would It Be Like To Fall Into A Black Hole?

"Of all the objects bopping around in our universe. Few are as bizarre and enigmatic as black holes just ask PREETI nitrogen. It's like the point where all known laws of physics breakdown. She's an astrophysicist. At Yale University studying extremely cool cosmological phenomena like black holes so for me the personal attraction the gravitational pull pun intended to wear black hole is really is they kind of represent the limits of knowledge because way before black holes were mapped studied their picture. Taking you may remember that famous image from last year black holes were just an idea a mathematical solution to Einstein's theory of general relativity. So you know. Newton was able to tell us how gravity worked but Newton could not tell us why gravity is that way Einstein was able to come up with this beautiful theory that combined the shape of space matter and motion into one theory. The theory of general relativity absolutely theory of general relativity does exactly that so it was just incredible sort of deep connection that he found between the shape of space matter and motion and therefore masses would distort space time which he envisioned as a four dimensional. Kind of fabric a sheet. So picture our universe as a 4-d fabric fusing space and time and the fabric is bumpy dotted with planets and other kinds of matter. And what matter does it causes little potholes in these. You drop mass somewhere to create a pothole and the size of the pothole. The depth of the pothole depends on the mass of the object and how tightly packed the matter is in that object okay. Massive caused distortion space. Time but astrophysicists building off this work. What happens when you have an object whose mass is so compact that the pothole becomes a puncture in the fabric of Space Time itself? And so the buckwald solution is one of the simplest solutions to these very complex equations. Which was the shape of space around really concentrated kind of point mass and the extreme pothole that such a mass would generate around itself and we now know. The Universe is filled with billions and billions

Einstein Newton Yale University
Isaac Newton

5 Minutes in Church History

04:19 min | 4 months ago

Isaac Newton

"On this episode five minutes in Church history. Let's talk about a scientist Sir. Isaac Newton. He was born in sixteen forty three. He died in seventeen twenty seven he was actually born in the exact same year of the death of Galileo. He was born in originally humble circumstances. His father died three months before he was born in sixteen sixty one he went off to Cambridge. He had a grasp of Latin and a very curious mind. He would pass the time sketching clocks and windmills and other kinds of gadgets. Once he got to Cambridge he studied astronomy. This was the era of Copernicus and Kepler and of course he studied the classic Philosophers Aristotle and Plato. He kept his notebooks and in one of them. He wrote amicus Plato. Amicus Aristotle's Maga's Amici Veritas. Plato is my friend. Aristotle is my friend. Truth is my best friend. And he also let Cambridge embarked on studying mathematics. In fact he would come to the way in this field he is credited for inventing the study of Calculus as he called it the calculus of infant hassles and it was also while he was at Cambridge that he studied the motion of the moon and the planets and he recognized this force. That was acting on these planets orbit. He was discovering what would come to be called the law of gravity. He would go on to publish. His books is famous book in Seventeen. O four the book called optics and in There. He puts forth his theory of colors. A very interesting a young student in the colonies at the College of Connecticut. We know it as Yale. University would get a hold of Isaac Newton's book optics and he devoured it. This of course is Jonathan Edwards. And he wrote his own little scientific paper he called of light rays and this was all from. Reading Isaac Newton and Edwards draws this corollary from just being amazed at how the actual physical human eye processes light rays. This is what Edwards had to write hence the infinite art that was exercised in the formation of the eye that has given it such an exquisite sense that it should perceive the touch of those few rays of the least fixed stars which enter the eye which all put together won't amount to the million million million million million to part of the least moat of such an exquisite sense that it should distinctly perceive an image upon the retina that it is not above the eighty million millionth part of an inch wide. That has so nicely polished the retina that it should receive so small a picture upon it when the least pro Tuba Rinse or an evenness would utterly destroy and confound it here's Edwards amazed at the human eye but far more amazed at the God who created the human eye and the God who created the universe and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for Edwards and it was Isaac Newton who unlocked this for so many other people as Alexander Pope. The poet has it that nature and nature's laws lay hidden by night. God said let Newton be and then there was light Newton as the father of modern science. Believed that no way would science give us less room for God or somehow make less space for God and understanding of him? In fact it was the exact opposite for Isaac Newton. The more he studied God's universe the more he was led to acknowledge and worship God. Newton once said gravity may very well explained the motion of the planets for the can't explain who set the planets in motion. God governs all things and God knows all that is or all that can be known. That's the Great Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton Jonathan Edwards Cambridge Aristotle Scientist Seventeen Kepler Yale College Of Connecticut Alexander Pope
WhatsApp Pay to Launch in India

Why It Matters

11:04 min | 4 months ago

WhatsApp Pay to Launch in India

"India a potentially decisive moment in digital freedom is going down right now. India's ruling party has put forward new rules that would allow it to trace and censor private communication. Standing in. Its way is what's up. An American made encrypted Messaging Platform. That's used by hundreds of millions of Indians and the outcome could have ripple effects across the globe. I'm Gabrielle Sierra. And this is why it matters today. India's government versus what's up and the looming threat of digital authoritarianism. India is the world's largest democracy if you can imagine nine hundred. Million PEOPLE VOTED. Alas national election last year out of a population of one point. Three billion people. It's just it's it's a massive exercise election. Yeah it's huge it's populace and that's what also makes it really fun and exciting to be on the ground. You certainly feel the energy especially in the city like Mumbai. Politicians routinely insult each other on the campaign trail criminals of every flavor. Run for office and win so do Bollywood movie. Stars Cricket Stars it just never ends has always been a fairly Jackie democracy. We talk a lot. We argue a lot that our culture. Okay so help me understand why. What's APP is such a big deal in India? How many people are actually using it? They're awfully four hundred million people. It is indeed this is Chinmaya ruined. She's a resident fellow at Yale. University and the founder of a research center at National Law University Delhi. She's also a leading legal expert on the intersection between freedom of speech and technology. And so why WHATSAPP wine? Not you know instagram or snapchat. The elite platforms are used by everyone. But what's happened? The one that really appeals to people if you have a phone that's not too fancy. If you don't speak English you don't read or you don't have access to inexpensive data connection. You can still use. What's APP so it started with? Hey you don't have to spend one rupee or two rupees per tax. You just save them up and then they send whenever you're in Wifi and saw a lot of people with not lot of money. Which is many many Indians decided that this works for them. And then what's up had these multimedia features which people started using it started liking and? I have mixed feelings about this because the good thing is that I get to talk to my grandma. And she finally has forgiven me for moving across cushy can look at my home and you know say things about my plants or whatever course but if you're sitting in an Indian airport and watching the number of people who do video calls subject you to their conversations mixed feelings what's up is really a messaging platform and that can be one messages like me sending a message to you. But it's also very commonly used in India for groups. I am do oil and I am a technology reporter for the New York Times based in Mumbai. India vindaloo also covers Indian economics and culture and has written extensively about free speech and misinformation under India's ruling party. We called him at his home in Mumbai on. What's up what's has become so embedded in life in India that people use it in their business transactions so you can order groceries from your corner grocery store over what's APP. I buy airline ticket from make trip. Which is one of the big online travel agencies? They send me a confirmation message on what's up with by e ticket details so for those of US based outside of India handling a basic transaction may require a few different platforms. You find out about a concert on instagram. Rsvp FOR IT ON FACEBOOK. Maybe share the notification on twitter buyer ticket on ticketmaster and received the confirmation on g mail but for Indians. What's APP is often the one stop shop for everything? In other words an application from Silicon Valley has become basic infrastructure for the second most populous nation honors. That's a pretty big deal and it helps. Illuminate why the government is pushing for greater control. What's up was founded in two thousand nine by two former employees of Yahoo? It's an American company. It was founded in Silicon Valley and they basically built a very simple messaging service became very popular. It caught the attention of Mark Zuckerberg the chief executive and founder of Facebook Zuckerberg beside it in two thousand fourteen to by what's APP and pay the still stock price of twenty two billion dollars for this message company so facebook is making a mobile push with steal the buy real time messaging service. What's APP? It's still a pretty incredible price to pay for a company that stress a few years old. It also makes tiny what's APP more valuable than some of the most established companies in the country including American Airlines Marriott hotels and Xerox and it came at a crucial moment for facebook when it really was trying to find ways to diversify its revenue base and also get in touch with more mobile users. I'm Seema mody global markets correspondent with CNBC business news and suddenly came this messaging platform. That was not only gaining prominence here in the US but around the world in fact I believe the average daily use a rate on WHATSAPP was much higher than Facebook Messenger. Facebook saw that and said this is such a strategic bet for us. Let's acquire it and find a way to really incorporated into our user base platform. But what's APP is free right. What's APP is free? And I think this is still a developing story to see how facebook is really trying to incorporate what's up into its business and you know will you one day see ads on what's that that's certainly been one of the big questions sucker. Berg was pressure in that. This technology of very simple messaging APP was going to become very popular today. Whatsapp has more than two billion users. Around the world it is by far the most popular messaging APP in the world and one of its biggest claims to fame. Is it emphasizes privacy. All messages on the service use. Something called end to end encryption. Okay so in most cases when you send an email or a text message it gets encrypted that means that the information inside is locked up in a code so that outsiders can't read it however the service providers that pass your message along can read it whether that's apple or G. Mail or facebook whoever they all have the keys to that code and that makes your message vulnerable enter end to end encryption with this technology none of the men have the keys. Only you and the person you're sending it to break the code. What's up can't read. Even if the government came knocking at the door of what's up what's up. What have nothing really to give up. And so your information is private and that makes it unique to other services messaging services like whether you're sending a text message or even facebook Messenger where that information does live somewhere. Yeah most other. Messaging Services in the world are not and encrypted and certainly none of the popular ones. But what's up has made it really easy. You don't think about corruption it just is encrypted Because so much of India's communication happens on WHATSAPP end to end. Encryption has made it very difficult for the government to investigate messages in the name of national security. People are not making phone calls anymore. They're not even walking over to their neighbor. Say This texting and where the speech there is harmful speech. It's not news that social media can bring out the worst in people the platforms. We use everyday are teeming with sexism. Racism misinformation and violent ideologies. It's the same. In India or social media has amplified problems that are a lot older than the internet rumors and lies spread like wildfire across the Internet including across chat and applications. Like WHATSAPP Many I. I'm used US India or live. Whatever comes in the woods his true the one that's really made the headlines is there was a lot of fishers. He'd speed circulating on what's APP so for example. The Muslim community is under quite a lot of pressure in India. Right now and it's really sad one of the ways in which they're discriminated against is that some upper caste. Hindus don't eat beef and so the rumors circulating on what's apple say things like X. has beef in his fridge are why is transporting COW CARCASS. And since it's already been sold to people as it stretched to their religion when a rumor like that reaches people that already feel threatened and feel like these people are out to get all the Hindus and they're trying to destroy religion by eating beef and Lynch mobs attacked them and their popularly called. What's APP lynchings? Early twenty eighteen. There was a wave of false messages. On whatsapp about child kidnappers prowling parts of India. Trying to steal people's children and this panicked a lot of people and mobs attacked strangers in various parts of India and killed them. Beat the Tied the mob hung them all kinds of terrible things. More than twenty people died in just the span of a few months because of these rumors and after these rumors started appearing the central government. When after what's happened said you need to find a way to trace these messages and stop these messages. And this set off a feud with what's out that has still not been resolved. The government says it doesn't WanNa read your messages. The government says they don't want to spy on the content of messages. They're not asking what's up to break the encryption of messages and show them what's in the messages but they are saying. Is You need to be able to trace back the pathway of a message. And you have to find a way to do that because if you have some message goes viral we WANNA find out who sent it and we'll see what happens. I mean what's up has said that to that would require significant changes to their service and they haven't said whether they'd be willing to make such changes to their

India Facebook Government Mumbai United States Gabrielle Sierra Founder Cnbc Yale Apple Silicon Valley Yahoo New York Times Chinmaya Whatsapp Twitter Mark Zuckerberg National Law University Delhi
"yale university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:51 min | 5 months ago

"yale university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Yale University back in nineteen ninety four with degrees in history and economics he then joined the Denver post as a reporter in nineteen ninety six he became one of the first employees at the St dot com which was a ground breaking financial news website back in nineteen ninety nine he then joined the New York times at the times covered everything from the drug industry to hurricane Katrina and he served two stints as a correspondent in Iraq he left the times in two thousand ten to devote himself to writing fiction but conversations with his wife let him do begin researching the science around cannabis and mental illness the project that became the book tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence time permitting tonight with Alex we'll talk about that book as well he has been all over the country and in different stories being quoted as the ex New York times reporter warning about big pivot from officials to justify lockdown strategy and I thought let's bring him on Alex first of All I Want to thank you for the guts for coming forward to talk about this because it echoes a lot of things that we believe here on this program so walking to coast to coast Alex pleasure to be on this side this coronavirus story is unbelievable it's I've said from the get go that I believe that was concocted in a lab that the media was creating the hysteria what's your take on this now Alex is is is IT insider looking in basically what I measure not an insider at all I'm really an outsider and really what all turned to look at some of the data that's come out around the corona virus and who who's really most likely to be affected by a which is very clearly elderly people and people with underlying conditions and.

Yale University Denver post reporter New York times hurricane Katrina Iraq cannabis Alex marijuana
"yale university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:51 min | 5 months ago

"yale university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Yale University back in nineteen ninety four with degrees in history and economics he then joined the Denver post as a reporter in nineteen ninety six he became one of the first employees at the St dot com which was a ground breaking financial news website back in nineteen ninety nine he then joined the New York times at the times covered everything from the drug industry to hurricane Katrina and he served two stints as a correspondent in Iraq he left the times in two thousand ten to devote himself to writing fiction but conversations with his wife let him do begin researching the science around cannabis and mental illness the project that became the book tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence time permitting tonight with Alex we'll talk about that book as well he has been all over the country and in different stories being quoted as the ex New York times reporter warning of a big pivot from officials to justify lockdown strategy and I thought let's bring him on Alex first of All I Want to thank you for the guts for coming forward to talk about this because of that because a lot of things that we believe here on this program so walking to coast to coast Alex pleasure to be on this so this coronavirus story is unbelievable it's I've said from the get go that I believed it was concocted in a lab that the media was creating a hysteria what's your take on this now Alex is is is IT insider looking in basically what I measure not an insider at all I'm really an outsider and really what all turned to look at some of the data that's come out around the corona virus and who who's really most likely to be affected by a which is very clearly elderly people and people with underlying conditions and.

Yale University Denver post reporter New York times hurricane Katrina Iraq cannabis Alex marijuana
Can Voice AI have Emotional Intelligence? Feat. Rana Gujral CEO of Behavioral Signals

Inside VOICE

08:38 min | 6 months ago

Can Voice AI have Emotional Intelligence? Feat. Rana Gujral CEO of Behavioral Signals

"I WANNA start off with a recent study that was done by Michael Krause of Yale. University and his research contended that the voice including both speech content and the linguistic impera linguistic vocal cues meaning hitch cadence speed and volume that accompany. It is a particularly powerful channel for perceiving the emotions of others and so he wrote that this assertion supports the central prediction tested in these studies. That voice only communication enhances empathetic relative to communication across senses. Can you speak to this at all? Why are we able to detect more empathy through voice? Yeah for sure. So first off a Weiss's are very bar. Fleischer of deducing the emotional state of mind more so than people understand and this study in particular by Professor Krausz is incredibly interesting. So let's talk a little bit about what he actually did. So basically he took a video feed of interaction and obviously there was audio as well and he turned the video off a just tried to measure the emotion based on simply the audio alone. Andy benchmark that I and he then turned up your back on and realize that you're looking at two data points. You're looking at the audio but you're also looking at the facial and you would expect that the read on emotions would become more accurate. But when he found was that it became actually less accurate and he was really surprised by that. And that's sort of pieces of the study and so thou sort of the whole study which minute think. Why is it that when I'm looking at both the visual and audio I'm actually getting a lesser read than men? I'm looking at just the audio. And so what he found was that as humans very adept at master emotions to facial expressions or not really very good at doing the same throughout the tone of voice. So if you just queuing in onto the tone of voice which is just listening to somebody on the phone. You actually have a better read on the emotional state of mind than when you're looking at the person enlisting to that and the reason that is is we sent out a lot of false alerts from facial expressions and bathrobes us off so although I'm sensing somebody something in someone's voice a facial expressions tell me otherwise and that's sort the interesting part of this whole study and so for us. The high quality data is voiced data in a variety of the use cases. We apply ourselves to provide us with a lot of data like call sanders contact centers including interactions virtual assistance where there's no visual feedback available. So not only. Is it more accurate to focus on waste but for us this more data available on voices visual data and then it adds to the accuracy? 'cause data leads to better outcomes and so those bandages provide us with a compelling differentiation from competitors because focus exclusively voice. That's kind of what we do. And the founders of this company have been researching the space for over twenty years. A lot of work has gone into the analysis poison reactions as well as the Bushland vehicles did apply behind the Watson Rashes yet and it's funny because when I read that study this was actually not the first time I've heard someone. Tell me that I had a psychologist years ago. That you can. Actually you get more honesty and more truth than a person from their voice than you do by seeing them which brings to the point right when you're talking to people sometimes. Somebody's talking to you and you're like I'm feeling this now like no no no. That's not what I'm saying like something feels off and I'm curious like do you think that that is the truth like whatever you're feeling from someone else or is that our own perception. No I think you perceptions accurate for the most part the feeling which you are. Deducing is based on a variety of factors. And I'm in. Your mind is processing the words but there's a lot more processing that's going on behind the scenes. You're doing off on the pitch on total variance in your acuity golf on the emphasis behind certain words. So let's take quick example if I ask you a simple question and You respond to be with a quick simple response. But I sent sarcasm in your voice. I'm going to take that into consideration right. Not just what you're saying how you're responding to me a what responding to me but how you're responding to me matters to me a lot because I understand your state of mind or I get a sense of his State of mind and that Jews into better. You mean what you're saying are not are you relating to my point of view So it's incredibly yes. I am personally faster by because I love this kind of psychology communication space with your company behavioral signals. Your team is answering the question. Can Machines be intelligent without emotions? What do you think about this? This is my favorite question. Because it's like it's got so many different layers to this question so I believe there are two parts to this question. I I is better. Machines can really be emotionally intelligent and the second part is whether there should be and that's a question which I guess asselot resist ethical or is from morality standpoint. Is that the right thing to do. So let's take those rights for the first part machines definitely. Can I mean one of the things that he is focused on is getting machine to do things that humans are just better at doing today but machine software systems inanimate system where you are call them they have their own superpowers for example they can process? Huge amounts of data and compute power can be dedicated to a specific task but as humans. We are distracted by a lot of different things. So you have those capabilities in a machine that can be leveraged to bring intelligent use cases to a picture and we're seeing now what we're seeing now is we're interacting with machines. Orrin bar and it's not just delegating tasks for a machine to do but actually interacting with the machine and talking to it for example we were talking about earlier like when it comes to churchill assistance like Google Assistant Alexa. Cortana were literally treating these inanimate entities as a human substitute bedridden directing that machines through Royce. We need to understand how interacted all humans? And when I'm interacting with you. I'm just saying something to me and I'm saying something back. I'm not just chewing on what you're saying. I'm also queuing on how you're saying it and trying to empathize with your cognitive state of mind and your feelings your emotions behind the words you're using and so when we're GONNA go back to the whole equation but machines I mean that erections best thing between human and machine and as a result a lot of these interactions don't really have a superior use case they're just very transactional and our goal is to provide the ability to these machines to be as good as humans than processing affect twitches or the technical term of emotion s and emotional state of mind so that they could be more relatable and how much more user engage experience for the fellow and it can be and there's a need to be for machines to be emotionally aware. Now let's tackle the should question and that's a little bit more complicated so in a way this touches on morality and I think morality is a tough question. And I don't know if I'm equipped to judge that personally but I would say that. The technology moralities are on proper disclosures about making a choice on your behalf right so by giving you the choice to experience what you want and don't want but there it serves the greater good or one-sided purpose if it is towards a one-sided purpose than yes. You're tampering on morality but if it's for a larger good that you're in the right direction but anything else you'd have a sense of discipline to be able to understand those subtle differences. Let's think about one particular thing so while we can bet on is that we are going to depend on machines more and more and that is something which is given and the second thing that we can bet on is. That machines are going to be more and more intelligence. And that's already starting to happen but if you sort of agree to those Detroit's Andy agreed Troops in mind would rather have a machine that you're interacting with and depending on which is very very intelligent emotionally aware or not emotionally aware and so that is a question when he draws ourselves to. How would you respond to that human question and that human contact's but if you think about that in the human contact me if you have a human who you depend on and who's very intelligent but is not emotionally aware? Well that is the clinical definition of psychopath. I mean so. It would be one machine cycle PATs. I want I in my emotionally. Intelligent machine would typically be more ethical and fairer rather than very diligent machine. You depend on. Who has no ability to process emotions? So that's how I feel and that's where we believe in

Andy Michael Krause Yale Weiss Fleischer Sanders Detroit Professor Krausz Google Orrin Bar Cortana Churchill
"yale university" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

"In saw the good life and they're like Oh this is the thing and for anyone you won't get if you're watching this then you'll be able to see Larry but if you're not and you're listening Laurie also drops in a lot of drake references giving you sixty days of free shipping only with our code purpose the digital world we live in now make selling online very easy but getting orders out can be a real obstacle sending your product out can be time consuming expensive I've and there are just way too many options this is why ship station dot com will be a new best friend and making this easier now team always send things out and it's crucial to me that they get out quickly easily and cost effectively ship station dot com is the most affordable way to manage and ship your orders so it's a great place to get started it doesn't matter what you're selling ship station brings all your orders into one simple interface and easily manageable from any device ship station is the number one choice online sellers and you ship more in less time with the best rates available remember you can try ship station free for sixty days when you use the Promo Code purpose does risk you can start your free trial without your credit card information just visit ship station dot com and click on the microphone at the top and use the code purpose let's dive deeply into some of those practices that you were teaching both from a science.

Larry Laurie drake sixty days
"yale university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That is from Yale University Press a small book slim read but jam packed with the very of slides here this is one as we go back to the calls up front page ninety nine those who wave the flag for free speech on campus that's in quotes are generally convinced that the regulation of content even when the intention is to protect the vulnerable puts us on a path to authoritarian censorship but the call for the free exchange of ideas no matter what the cost to quote some people quote doesn't resonate with most college students who recognize that not all ideas make it to the market at that when one claims to be tolerant of all kinds of discord certain groups of people tend to get hurt again and again I'm not aware of a whole lot of discourse out there that is aimed at hurting certain groups of people again and again I'm not sure exactly I suppose what it is you're referring to racist language we hear it all the time such as usually racist language what exactly did you have in mind the language that refers to African American people into you and Ising ways and such as I mean I just don't I just I missing all of this that I don't hear a a lot of of of what I would call rate that is a pretty nice page refers to of people immigrating from the south of the border as an infestation or it as being animals that said do you meaning language and it has a sequence of invasion I mean again that we could I suppose turn this into a discussion on immigration the fact is you do not have granted the president has a way of picking language which is a sort of like trying to extinguish the coals and a barbecue pit with big jar of the of gasoline about that but now the state it is an invasion and no one has a right to enter another country I give you a simple example jealous of if I had when I was a student would not have been unusual for professional walk into a room that now had women and men in just ten years before had only men and settled in a class honey look good today well obviously there was going to say that anymore right and the reason they don't see that anymore is because we know that's inappropriate speech well considered to be it's the meeting she can't have access to the full benefits of an education in the same way as other people not necessarily the strikes in a very key part of this discussion I think the fact that you look nice today does not even have why any such thing woke you what did you said what did you say Hey sweetie you're well sweetie is a is a at a level of familiarity that that that should be avoided I would agree someone that you do not know I would I would concur with that but again I think most of us don't say things like that I like to make any comment about a woman's appearance because we realize that will walk into this same PC trap even though I see somebody does look nice today I just don't say I mean it's like if I was there so if if somebody talked about I would tell you that our veterans on campus yes I want to talk about our veterans come to see president right and this has happened how could you have those veterans on campus aren't some of them suffering from PTSD are likely to kill people no that's just ignorance but that is that is it but I don't recall that that that for example a comment about how someone looks does not automatically imply that without nice clothes or make up that they couldn't succeed or whatever there's the inference is supposed to be you know what I'm saying well I'm I'm trying to obviously you know I'm not trying to be up to see Mister rob I really don't but professors used routinely come wanted women students in their classrooms and and make them objects of theirs as a sexual desires in ways they got in the way of their learning for that if it didn't go past just to look nice today I I agree to get in the way they did go past that then yes I agree completely when it was just a passing comment and nothing was ever be pushed beyond that I think that's a that's what I would call hypersensitivity well I I whether you know you you might call it a hypersensitivity yes I will you might say that about the veteran who was insulted as someone yeah but the point of it is that there is no evidence to point out that the all veterans have PTSD are going to people say that that you know what women should be treated as as the object of the professors aesthetic judgment my only point about that in that in that section is that our students today see the use of the rhetoric of free speech as a way of defending the citizens United decision and other things that make them suspicious of the rhetoric Jim I want to make sure I make clear I think free speech is an essential value on campus but there are times in there it will happen a few times when he comes into conflict with some other values well I I'm glad to hear that you say that it.

Yale University Press ten years
"yale university" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"To fifty five one hundred fifty five one hundred Elvis Duran in the morning show. I told him for God, I'm in LA. I got to walk out to the Hollywood walk of fame and clean my star. Did you see the picture? I posted of the my star of the other day. It's also let's see what happened. Well, it's right outside a nightclub which doesn't help people. Go in there and get trashing come out and throw up on my star. Stop it based frown. Yes. Puking on my star. Anyway, I think I'm gonna go get some sort of handy wipes or what what do they call them the Colorado ups? No handy wipes. Let's handy white. You know, what it is you why do you ask questions like this thing? It's a white the little blue cloth. I know you're talking about. Zach don't you clean your house? Yeah. But not with that I use like Lysol wipes and stuff like that. Those would work nights to buy all the whites. I can get. Go and clean that mess up. You know, I think Luther Vandross is stars right next door. And he he's no longer with us. Why make clean historic respect? Nobody else is doing it. Right. So what's cleaning star? Anyway. Let's talk about what you can do online. You do a lot of stuff online. Jan Daniel you shop. I do. Yeah. And. Gandhi, Gandhi argues with people on social media too. Me, bro. Now, I know you're listening. If you're listening to us in New Haven, you go to Yale Yale University is doing their most popular class ever. And you can get it online. Now, it's the science of wellbeing. It's a class about happiness. How cool is that? It tells you how to be happy. That's awesome. We await ways step-by-step it's to find more happiness in your life that I want to go look up some of their key ways to be happy. While I've gotten a few key way. I'll get to that in a second. So I know that Nate was looking into this. Are you thinking about taking this online courses? Well, yeah, it actually starts today at believe Andrew was putting up the website at your Twitter at Elvis Duran. Okay. It's it's free. One hundred percent online. Nineteen hours to complete. So it's like three hours a week, and it it's got a four point nine out of five. Yeah. Are saying that that four out of five students at Yale have taken. This course, they love it so much. Okay. It's taught by taught by psychology, professor with daily exercises and homework that allows you to recognize and then drop bad habits while while developing Goodwin's to put in their place. Why? So you're asking Gandhi, what are some of the key things? They focused on any happiness course, focus on your strengths. All right. Think about it. Like, what are you? Great at doing. Everyone is great at doing at least something right? I agree. I think it's on that. I'm a good friend cell up. Oh that was good. Invest in experiences rather than material items. We all know that when you're giving a gift for a birthday or whatever make it a make an experience in not just like a thing that they can put with their other things that we have enough things. Yeah. We definitely do. Now, here's one and I think this is one we could all learn to be a little better at be present in the really great moments in your life. If you're having a great moment stop down in. No, it's happening. Like, oh my God..

Elvis Duran Gandhi Luther Vandross Zach Yale Yale University Yale LA Colorado New Haven Twitter Nate professor Andrew Goodwin One hundred percent Nineteen hours three hours
"yale university" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on No Agenda

"What this was a dab was about collusion of people who went to the same schools and have the same religion. Let me be very specific among the Democrats and cavenaugh everyone of them almost almost every one of them went to Yale University among the Republicans four out of eleven, that's thirty. Six percent are Mormons, let me be more specific when Amy klobuchar was asking. I like his clover Jarrah globe Bacher clothes block. That's her new name by the way. It's not Clovis yards. Clo- blocker. Is it Steve? He's, he's, he's in a rush the Mormons, let me be more specific when Amy klobuchar was asking questions of cabinet who went to Yale Law School. I was wondering, why is she so adamant she went to Yale, then I looked at Cory Booker who that the what I call the pixie from New Jersey fleeting around standing up making a drama themselves. He Sparta gifts. And then I said, I wonder where he went to school. It was Yale University, but folks, he got a degree at Oxford. Now, let me tell you something about Oxford. You pay for that degree including Gorsuch. You can get a PHD at Oxford University in England for a minimal son, some, and just by the teacher, some liquor, and you can read a book and right in there. Do you think that's true? Well, I, if if I knew about this. Right? That's how you get a PHD. But that wasn't enough. Then I look at Sidney Blumenthal and I looked at his totally reconstructed faith. No job is face and I said, my God doesn't look familiar. I wonder where he went to law school. It was Yale folks. Then I looked at Whitehead sid Charlie, Sidney Sheldon Whitehead, his father went to Yale. Why? How Whitehead right has White House. I think you know what he saying was running against another candidate in Rhode Island who also went to Yale and was in stolen bones and guess what white had went to Yale cavenaugh went to you. So what exactly do we have here?.

Yale University Yale Law School Yale Cory Booker Amy klobuchar Sidney Sheldon Whitehead Steve Oxford Oxford University Sidney Blumenthal Bacher White House New Jersey sid Charlie Rhode Island white England Six percent
"yale university" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"You really think so i really think so talking to earn does your about johnny manziel's comments concerning his is his bad seasons is initial outing with cleveland browns or he doesn't do xs and os and ios we'll study film and the browns should have known that so you wanna disabuse a guy of that any any guy that thinks he's he's hot stuff got going to give an example we played i wanna play for the helm tiger catch there was a quarterback forty rough riders and his name is gary messy and he was a canadian actually k p played it at but hell gill and the school yale university around toronto at this guy thought he was great and in point of fact he had a great offensive line he had one of the most amazing offensive lines i think i've ever seen in canada or in the national football league you know they played twelve bene side so you have you always have the option of an extra man up on the line so you have your four you have to tackles two guards then you've got a tight end and then you have the option of bringing up a you back or another you back so you have five six even seven men offensively on the line and you still have five flares quarterback running back okay and free wide receiver so you can do a lot with offense like that that this this guy jerry messi who played for the ottawa rough riders was so good and the offensive line they had was so good at ottawa.

johnny manziel cleveland browns gary messy gill school yale university toronto canada jerry messi ottawa football
"yale university" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Welcome back to the town all review on your my colleague michel met that is one of yale university's distinguish grad graduation worthwhile back however in a different win call it political correctness on steroids in three blowing across from through new haven michael is not opposed to calling out his alma mater for some academic bullishness united states is far from the most racist society that ever existed in fact you could say we as the least racist recited ever existed the one that is least based upon some kind of distinctive ethnic diversity and as a matter of fact one of the things that concern me about the tremendous success and all of the over the top praise for the movie black panther is the idea that it's about a magical mystical wonderful amazing overachieving incredibly advanced a secret black society that exists in the center of africa the truth is the the most achieving if you take a look at that almost fifteen percent it took thirteen percent of america the african american and you look at the contributions of americans of african descent over the years of our history that they have been phenomenal there's no nation no sub nation of the people of african descent this ever achieved more than the people here right here in the united states and yet there is this desire to again polarized america based on race based on skin shade and unfortunately there is a particularly loathsome example of that it seems to me over at my alma mater at yale university yale university is offering a course this semester which aims.

michel michael united states america yale university yale universit thirteen percent fifteen percent
"yale university" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WCTC

"The road in new haven at yale university yale played dartmouth like i said was last weekend and in football and they were celebrating the anniversary of the dartmouth yale football game which is always a big rivalry and they put on the program old programme covers the nature showed what it look like in forty fifty years ago and one of the programs was from the image of the program on the cover of the new programme was from 1944 and it showed a yield player setting fire to an american indians clothing i mean it was a cart is a cartoon image of because we were the dartmouth indians and the executive director of yale indigenous performing arts program you can't make this up called the images dehumanizing e l athletic director tom beckett acknowledged to the new haven register that the cover was offensive i'm offended by their fecklessness n wimpish nece that's what i i am so offended that now athletic directors' or whipped into this politically correct frenzy it's dehumanizing cartoon this is a cartoon this is all it isn't it from 1944 when what nn people then get so wound up about the indian name and by the way most indian chiefs as the washington post confirmed which confirmed my old poll of indian chiefs from back when i was at dartmouth that like eighty five percent of indians have no problem with the indian symbol actually think was nine out of ten i was nine out of ten will was 83 percent when i did it 1985 or whatever what i did the poll with the gallup bug gallup organisation so indians don't care it's liberal arenas on college campuses who care about the indian symbol they are so offended by the indian symbol but they're fine if i remember that you t story with those those young women university of texas walked around with those uh those you know male anatomy member they were they were protesting something at you t where they protesting can't remember what they're protesting but they walked around all day with their you know what i want to say the word but assists gross is disgusting what was it through they were protesting remember the gun laws because now you have the right to carry so they were all up and out of these expects toys they had a bunch of dealers said rodionov out anywhere that's what the.

yale university yale football dartmouth indians executive director tom beckett washington post rodionov director women university of texas eighty five percent forty fifty years 83 percent
"yale university" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WCTC

"The court of public opinion or otherwise in right down the road in new haven at yale university yale played dartmouth like i said was last weekend in in football and they were celebrating the anniversary of the dartmouth yale football game which is always a big rivalry and they put on the program old programme covers you know the nature showed what it look like and forty fifty years ago in one of the programs was from the image of the program on the cover of the new programme was from 1944 and it showed a yield player setting fire to an american indians clothing i mean it was a cart is a cartoon image of because we were the dartmouth indians and the executive director of yale indigenous performing arts program can't make this up called the images dehumanizing e l athletic director tom beckett acknowledged to the new haven register that the cover was offensive i'm offended by their fecklessness and wimpish nece that's what i i am so offended that now athletic directors' or whipped into this politically correct frenzy it's dehumanizing cartoon this is a cartoon this is all it isn't it from 1944 when what and and people then get so wound up about the indian name and by the way most indian chiefs as the washington post confirmed which confirmed my old poll of indian chiefs from back when i was at dartmouth that like eighty five percent of indians have no problem with the indian symbol think was nine out of ten i was nine out of ten was 83 percent when i did it 1985 or whatever i did the poll with gallup bug gallup organisation so indians don't care is liberal leanings on college campuses who care about the indian symbol they are so offended by the indian symbol but they're fine if i remember that you t story with those those young women university of texas walked around with those uh those you know male anatomy member they were they were protesting something that you were they protesting can't remember what they're protesting but they walked around all day with their you know what i want to say the word but assists gross is disgusting what was at drew they were protesting remember the gun laws because now you have the right to carry so there were all up and out of it he's expects toys added much ado odors the exceptionally out and all that anywhere that's what the.

yale university yale football dartmouth indians executive director tom beckett washington post director women university of texas eighty five percent forty fifty years 83 percent
"yale university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Harry instead of villa's first up this morning harry good morning good morning great i've heard tim how repeat federal tax oh uh proficiency hats or is it a fall more city school in that uh the principles make more than the governor because there is now proposing apparently to uh write a new curriculum to the math can you fleets can give your opinion as to what that means what's that that's likely to me if you want to create new correct one who sat me everybody should pay half well that's what it would seem to me as well because what do you do with the curriculum do make it do give allowances for people who say two is five so that your as long as your within one point either way you're okay i mean it's math is a pretty quantifiable thing if they are techniques in math where the teachers are teaching math as effectively as they might that's one issue but setting new standards and new curriculum uh it's it's a little a little retrograde i guess is a word or use this is like yale university you can now be an english major and never reach shakespeare on never read the great masters because some of its two challenging for yale is to do this so if it's happening at yale it's only common sense that we should expect that can have in the baltimore city schools they're going to dumbdown the tests so that students can pass so they don't look as incompetent as they actually are well it's olga predictions for years the shortfall inner tecnology new teachers in mathematics and engineering which seem to me now it's time to be stomach down any curriculum see me over he called the others gretchen math a little bit more fungal there in his message but it seems to be the standard article up thousand five thought about this kelly kids in baltimore city schools oh further uh uh spending more per pupil them in other school district in the state and one of the highest amounts of money being spent per pupil of any school district in the country if she will say well i'll tell you what um uh uh dumbed down the tests that it looks like you're passing now does that actually prepare the students let's take a look at it from of.

Harry tim yale university shakespeare baltimore
"yale university" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WDRC

"Now it's all about the neely while here we have once again yale decolonized says the english department after complaints that studying wide authors actively harms the students a year and a half after petition circulated calling for yeltsin decolonized the english department the first tombs her roldan a new course created by the department to increase the breadth of curriculum and back claims of departmental racism now it's fine to widen the curriculum in to combat racism is on the wall la now previous requirements for the major include a now previously previous requirements for the major included twocourses in major english poets including chaucer shakespeare builtin elliott and others but that to course series of petitioners had deemed act fifthly harmful due to its focus on white male poets the series is no longer a graduation requirement for yields english majors think about that so they had a series major english poets were you'd have to study people i chose her which i did in high school shakespeare which i did my son jesus did in college he's he's thus them shakespearean acting from time to time milton an elliot but now it's no longer a graduation requirement for yell english majors this isn't joal's acme college this is yale university but for some reason they whenever the grads students to the students at yale started petition and actively um i don't know threatened the administration the adminisration ever it is not only at yale it's easy to all these other schools they sit in the corner and he cower any gong k o fixing not enough people in these schools say shut up we run the schools we decide the curriculum you don't if you would like to submit a suggestion we'll take that but the minute you come here demanding stuff shut up you know if you don't like what we offer here go somewhere else now a bubba a google document which has been missing spin made pride i wonder why critiqued the perceived whiteness fee english department requirements here's what the google document said quote a.

yeltsin english department elliott elliot yale university yale neely decolonized milton google
"yale university" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WDRC

"To seventeen three one eight eight eight five seven four to seven to three thanks so much for joining us one thing i wanted also bring up of we start windings down here uh regarding uh uh you know the fall of western society as i see it i'm kind of being tongueincheek give it some of this stuff is just bizarre to read about this this broke late last week in it made a few of the mainstream sources but this is fries snubbing enshrining yale now we have a new word here i know we we we we we have we've had microaggressions macro aggressions we've had safe spaces we've had uh what's not will trigger triggers like what he said trigger mees undergone the corner and cry you know things like this ready for this now ain't write this number in this new one you'll have the quiz on this tomorrow the weren't is the password is d colonize cheer about this one ah this is a new one d column ice ual yale university new haven bulldogs bulldogs bowao ally yale he aol decolonized says the english department after complaints that studying white authors actively harms students a folks you can't here's the problem with this though and i'll get into the details in a minute when you do stuff like this and i don't care whether it has to do with race relations sexually shoes um issues of gender issues of nationality issues of disability when you put stuff like this forward that is so active and patently idiotic eight dole's perhaps the message of legitimate issues you may have it's like the nfl kneeling thing it's come to the point now where so much of it is focused on the kneeling and almost none of it is focused on okay it players now you have have our attention what are you going to do about fostering better understanding of what should be done meaner city janica.

dole nfl enshrining yale yale university aol
"yale university" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WTMA

"The the joe germany crazy crazy people out there speaking of college campuses fittler nuts britiah other good i gotta go to sound bite nineteen in a minute have ever seen this yale university the woman who was accepted two medical school at yale and it's kind of an extraordinary story for a number of reasons but a a woman who is caucasian a announced excited excitedly on her facebook page that she had realizing i lifelong dream been accepted to medical school at yale at yale university that's pretty good that's quite an accomplishment not so bad right well a friend day facebook friend at least uh who is f african american weighed in with a liberal racist screed that is perfectly ordinary today it's it's you know not even considered to be an outrage anymore because it's the liberal brand of racism yale admit meeting she's been admitted to male yale admit shamed on facebook for her white privilege a student accepted to yale university who posted her big news on facebook wasn't congratulated but shamed for what one critic called her white privilege the facebook post cited by the newspaper the daily mail and on named user wrote about her exempted acceptance to the yale school of medicine it wasn't long before another username melissa said yale accepted the future student because of her white privilege.

yale university facebook melissa yale germany yale school of medicine
"yale university" Discussed on We The People

We The People

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on We The People

"Some of these statues uh or maybe many of them should come down i i am personally wary of the efforts and even the admonition to some people the take them down right by any means i uh i think we should be a discussion and it should be city council votes in those sorts of things rather than private citizens tearing them down in the middle of the night and that sort of thing but i i think them the message in around the monuments what they meant than what they mean now and how people perceive them short of the constitutional question i do think creates a really interesting and important civic discussion but i think like bird plywood but much rather see that discussion unfolding as opposed to kneejerk reactions one way or the other while we'll bring you taken a squarely into the renaming to be a yale university recently issued a report setting out four principles for whether or not a uh th th the institution should be renamed and they include uh is a principle legacy of the namesake fundamentally at odds with the mission of the university was the relevant principle legacies significantly contested in the time and place in which the namesake lived did the university at the time of the naming honor namesake for reasons at odds with the mission of the university and does the building whose namesake has a principal legacy fundamentally at odds with universities mission or was a name for reasons fundamentally at odds with a mission play substantial role in forming community at the university some have argued that these principles were reverse engineered to allow the renaming of kowloon college at yale but to prevent the renaming of yale itself that since yell own slaves but it's a thoughtful set of principles and my question to you is uh is there might there be a constitutional restraint on yale if yelled were public university.

yale university kowloon college yale principal