35 Burst results for "Yale University"

Naomi Wolf Discusses Her Recent Speech at Yale

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:06 min | Last week

Naomi Wolf Discusses Her Recent Speech at Yale

"Welcome back. Thanks so much for having me so great to be speaking with you again. Certain people are many people are difficult to sum up. I will remind people that you and I were in the same class at Yale, class of I think I was in the class of 84, but that couldn't be. That would make us way older than we know that we are. But we were in the same class at Yale. You are now the author of many, many bestselling books, including most recently and unfortunately, most importantly, the bodies of others, which we've discussed, the CEO of daily clout. I want to talk to you about everything that you're talking about, substack, and wherever you're writing. And but probably maybe start with something that you wrote about, not very long ago, that you visited Yale University and experienced the weirdness of that. I don't know. Can you frame that for my audience? What happened that day? Sure. So, gosh, Yale university has mandated on its poor students that they must, even if they've had COVID, even if they have had the first and second mRNA injection that they must have a booster, the same booster that was tested on 8 mice prior to returning to campus for spring semester and the deadline is this month, the 31st. So I have to say, if that were my kid, there is no way I would let them get those injections so they could attend, quote unquote, Yale University. But you're telling me they are mandating this. It is just unbelievable, especially now that even the mainstream media is beginning to report on the adverse effects like death is reasonably adverse of these injections.

Yale University
"yale university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:05 min | Last month

"yale university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Of the Yale University investment committee on the board of the Vanguard group for more than a decade, and way too many things to mention, author of 19, now 20 books, the most recent being inside Vanguard, let's talk a little bit about not just Jack bogle, but the era and the team he assembled that was so crucial to Vanguard's success, tell us a little bit about how this 1927 Yankees came together. Great question. First, Jack was men with the mission. And if you spent time with him, you could be infected with that sense of mission and purpose, and if that rang the bell for what you wanted to do with your working career, it was almost magic because there wasn't very much competition from other people doing things in the investment world. Secondly, this was a man of tremendous conviction about what was going to be the right thing to do, sometimes that worked very much the advantage of Vanguard. There were sometimes when it worked just the other way. And it was a real negative. But decisive, whichever way, it was characteristic of check as a personality he could put on the charm in a way in which almost anybody would melt. And then, of course, there were hard hitting times when he was absolutely determined that everybody was going to do this or that. You were already on board and you sort of say, well, you take the good with the bad, we can work this one out. So on and so on. Really interesting. Tell us a little bit about Jack Brennan, the man who succeeded bogle as the second CEO of Vanguard. He's really quite a fascinating character. Well, he had a terrific impact. If you look at the impact in terms of assets under management, what bogle did in his time, Brennan did ten times as much in his time. Ten times as much. And he did it by putting together a team of other people empowering them to be strong and effective at what they were doing. And it goes back to a couple of different root factors. Boston, Irish, Catholic training. His dad was told by his guidance counselor in high school, no kid. You're not going to become a mechanic. You're going to go to school because you're too good and too smart to stop your life right at this graduating from high school. You're going to college. And that was a breakthrough. And father became a consequential banker in the Boston area. But he always stayed clear to his basic roots. Jack Brennan grows up as a son of that kind of straightforward guy. And becomes a very, very straightforward guy himself. The second characteristic is he was a very good athlete. And he was very good at lacrosse in particular. And one day his kids were asking, well, dad, were you the highest scorer? He said, that's not the right question. What do you mean, dad? They gave him a copy of the Dartmouth Indian. Student newspaper, Brennan. 28 assists. 8 goals. He said, it's not what you score. It's whether your team scores. And that's Jack Brennan all the way through he's all about bring the team for it, as he said himself. Being famous is not on my agenda. Right. And it's very clear. Most people have never heard of Jack Brennan. He probably the most important person in the development of Vanguard is an organization. That's quite a statement. I don't disagree, but I don't think most people are aware how he professionalized Vanguard, how he brought in a huge team of people, but he also found all sorts of both cost savings and growth that as good as bogle was, it was just outside of his expertise. Yeah. Look, Jack bogle always said, I'm a small company guy. And Jack Brennan understood to be the really right Vanguard. The future going to have to be a big organization. Second, you're going to have to have a lot of computing power because technology is a secret to keeping costs low, low, low, and long run. Check bob would say over and over again. Computers are too damn expensive, and he was right on the day that you buy them, but if you can only think of them as that moment, you're not going to be able to get a payoff. If you think of them as minimal for 5 years or ten years, I'm going to use some tools to bring the cost to the operation down. It's a completely different answer. And so Jack Brennan was absolutely key to the whole idea using technology, particularly computers, and moving in advancement that direction. Second thing is a very good at distributing responsibility and hiring in outstanding individuals to do in a quiet way the things that needed to get done so shift from one person to a team, and the team has got maybe a dozen key players on it, then you get something that's got tremendous capacity to manage a larger and larger organization which Vanguard had to become, in order to get the economic power that it has today. To keep driving costs lower. So Brennan and bogle were very close eventually to Brennan's dismay, the relationship fell apart, tell us a little bit about that episode. Easy analogy would be father and son. Older guy, younger guy. Mister outside, Jack bogle, mister inside Jack Brennan. So long as that was the working relationship things were great. But Jack bogle always thought of Vanguard as my company. And when you have a possessive view like that, you can talk yourself into making serious mistakes. He had greed with Jim reby way back

Jack Brennan Jack bogle bogle Yale University investment com Vanguard Brennan Boston Yankees Jack bob Jim reby
"yale university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | Last month

"yale university" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A new book from Stephen roach of Yale University and then Kyle ricker down to join some B and B Perry by the shock of the job trooper. Linda surveillance starting at 7 a.m. on Bloomberg 11 three O the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com. And watch us on Bloomberg television Xfinity channel 1122. It's time for today's stem tip. Okay, you know recycling is important. No one wants plastic in the ocean. Here's a cool way to repurpose a plastic bottle. Build an awesome terrarium. Cut a large plastic bottle in half and fill the base with sand, pebbles, potting soil, and your favorite plant. I chose an African violet to the top of the bottle over your base and place it in the sun. Your plant will grow, sealed in its own ecosystem. Fun, right? Learn more at she consume. A message from the ad council. Wake up and text text and eat. Text and catch the bus. Text and miss your stop. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. Text and be late to work. Sorry, Blake. Text and work. Text and pretend to work. Text and act surprised when someone calls you out for not working. Who me? Text and meet up with a friend you haven't seen in forever. Hi. Oh, hey. Text and complain that they're on their phone the whole time. Text and listen to them complain that you're on your phone the whole time. Ugh. Text in whatever. But when you get behind the wheel, give

How Eric Came to Know Christ

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:17 min | 4 months ago

How Eric Came to Know Christ

"You tell us a bit about your Salvation experience? How was it that you came to know Christ? Well, for me, I wrote about it in my book, fish out of water because it was a strange journey, not typical. I was raised in the church. You could say, but it was the Greek Orthodox church. So it was very cultural and ethnic. And it didn't really, the penny didn't drop, so to speak for me. I was just going through the motions the way a lot of people do with church experience. When I got to Yale University, I was an English major. I kind of fell into the deep end of how can we describe a vat of Kool-Aid? Marxist liberal agnostic Kool-Aid, I really didn't know what I believed and it became clear to me. I didn't know what I believed. And I drifted away from whatever faith I'd had. I'd had some faith. I really had some experiences which I write about in the book fish out of water. But by the time I graduated Yale, I was thoroughly confused. I was utterly confused. I was never some proud agnostic. I mean, some proud atheists, but I was really lost. And I had come to the position, which I think a lot of people are at, where they don't believe you can know. They think when people say I know God or I know Jesus, I think they just think you're a little crazy or a little diluted or a little wishful thinking because they'd say, well, I'd like to know, but I don't think you can know. And I think if you're honest, you can't know God. And I went through a really hard time around my 24th year, moved back in with my parents, and during that time I met a man. He's a dear friend who was sharing with me about the faith, but I was keeping the whole thing at arm's length, but over that time, I think my mind opened up just the tiniest crack to say maybe, maybe. And one day, this is the punchline around my 25th birthday. It's the culmination of my book fish out of water. The lord spoke to me in a dream and in the dream Jesus made it crystal clear to me that he was real, that he knew me that he was God that the Bible is true that it's all true. I mean, it was a mind-blowing miraculous experience and the next day I was a different person

Greek Orthodox Church Yale University
"yale university" Discussed on Truth For Life Daily Program

Truth For Life Daily Program

03:55 min | 4 months ago

"yale university" Discussed on Truth For Life Daily Program

"Simplistic analysis undoubtedly, faithfully true, yes. In other words, such cries are far removed from the contemporary president of Harvard, who said just recently, things divine have been central neither to my professional nor to my private life. Issues of divinity, he says, do not influence me in my professional capacity. Nor do they play any part of significance in my private life. I admire his honesty. At least it's true. But it is a long way removed, isn't it? Let's just pause and acknowledge something that is patently obvious. Ideas have consequences. And people know that ideas have consequences, and that's why advertising is as profoundly impactful as it is. Because it is essentially the packaging of ideas of concepts of notions, some of them very subtle some of them almost deceitful is amazing the way in which somebody sells their product to us by making us feel good about a funny little golden retriever that is running through the grass. But it's got nothing at all to do with the exorbitant fees that the bank is going to charge you for leaving your money in their establishment. But somehow or another, the retriever did it, you know? We got caught up by the retrieval. They sold as an idea. They packaged it. David Myers wrote a book called the American paradox. Spiritual hunger in an age of plenty was the subtitle. It was published actually by Yale University press. And this paradox he described as follows. We're better fed better paid better housed, better educated, and healthier than ever before. And with more human rights, faster communication and more convenient transportation than we have ever known. Alongside all this large S, however, are the signs of life in pain and travel. Since 1960, the divorce rate has doubled, teen suicide has tripled, violent crime quadrupled, the number in prison has quintupled, illegitimate children, 6 times, sex tools. And the number of those cohabiting has increased 7 fold. And these are facts. Ideas have consequences. The idea that there is a God to whom men and women are accountable has an impact when believed on the lives and lifestyles of those who believe. The idea that we are simply a random collection of molecules held in suspension with no particular significance at all also has implications. Not least of all in how we spend our time, our money, and with whom we spend our time and money.

Harvard David Myers Yale University
"yale university" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:23 min | 5 months ago

"yale university" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"When researching for the show, I wanted to know more about this. The common foods we eat today, they're just not what people were eating 50 or more years ago. I found research on PubMed. It was a meta analysis done at Yale University that included data from 25 different studies. So there were almost a total of 200,000 participants, mostly women in the studies. The studies looked at what foods were most addictive. I'm just going to throw out the top ten. Not a lot of surprises here. Chocolate, chips, cookies, ice cream, French fries, cheeseburgers, regular soda with sugar, cake. Cheese. Think about it. Listeners almost all of those foods are high sugar, high carb, and if consumed on a regular basis, I could see how those would certainly lead to higher blood sugars. So stay tuned for more about this, we'll be right back.

Yale University
"yale university" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:37 min | 5 months ago

"yale university" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"And then I make fun of myself for the bad dad joke. You get it, guys, all right? You know, we gotta have all time highs, and that means some of you listing now need to subscribe. And we really like reviews in the Apple store, the podcasts for our podcast. So if you can give it's 5 stars the best or four starts the best. 5 stars is the best. No four stars only 5 stars. Lots of one stars two, so there are some haters that are listed. Give us one store. Can you believe anyone just likes this really? Stunning. Your mom's a right. We're the most likeable people on the planet. It's really disappointing. Barbarians. Yeah. John in Virginia got some thoughts. Oh, he just decided to literally hang up the second I asked for John, buddy. Terry Stewart fame. He just gave it up once. He just wanted to see if we would take his call. Terry and Columbus, Ohio, where I believe we are odd number one. I want to give my perspective your first hour you talked about tuition and the $10,000 gifts that Biden's giving. I went to Yale University as an undergraduate 1966 to 1970. And then I went to medical school, then later on, I put my daughter and son through Ivy League type tuition schools. But when I was when I was at Yale, it was about $2000 a year tuition and a $1000 room and board. Now, my parents, my fathers was a machinist and my mother was a secretary so that their income was a modest means, but they paid my whole way. I had no bills at all after medical school or after college. So they were able to do that, looking back now, I'm sure they sacrificed. I didn't realize it at the time. My daughter went to Penn in 19 around 19 90 or just late 1980s. At that time, tuition was 13,500, around 14,000 and about another $2500 for a room and board. So we decided that we would go ahead and tuition is now $60,000 a year, by the way. I just checked. Yes. She later after freshman year transferred to University of Michigan as a out of state student. And it was actually more expensive than ten. Yeah. Oh, it's the school price are crazy. Terry, thanks for calling in with your perspective. Matt in Rockville, Maryland, what he got for us, Matt. How you doing guys? Jump right into it. One of the reasons one of the things that they bring up about student loan forgiveness is that the kids were 18, they didn't know what they were doing. We don't want them to have something that could affect them for a very long time. How come at the same time, they're allowing ten year old kids to go and have transgender surgery. It's actually a fantastic artist for the entire life. And not only that, but in 18 year old is legally an adult and you're saying they didn't know what they're supposed to be doing. But his ten year old you have to believe. Amen. That is a map. Matt high 5 on this one. He's right. Gender transition surgery for 14 year olds, liberals say, great idea. You can make that choice. That's right. But you know exactly what you're doing to get whatever you want done to you. But how could you be expected to understand the implications of taking out loans to go to college when you're 18? That is an amazingly good argument. The country understands the implications of defund the police, which Democrats are responsible for. We'll talk about the latest on this. Coming up

Terry Stewart Yale University Terry John Ivy League Biden buddy Columbus Apple Virginia Ohio Matt Penn University of Michigan Rockville
Title IX: WNBA owner among women athletes running businesses

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Title IX: WNBA owner among women athletes running businesses

"Jenny gilder is co owner of the Seattle storm She realized what title 9 means 46 years ago on the Yale University rowing team We didn't have showers So the first thing that started happening as we started doing practices out there was that people started getting sick And that was when the idea of a protest started to develop It set off the Yale strip in in 1976 to protest inequities in the treatment of men and women rowers It propelled gilder to become an Olympic silver medalist in rowing She became an investor and philanthropist co owner of her hometown WNBA franchise Gilder says without title 9 you would not have the WNBA You would not have all the women who get to compete at the Olympic level at elite levels whatever sport you're talking I'm Ed

Jenny Gilder Rowing Yale Strip Yale University Seattle Gilder Wnba Olympic
"yale university" Discussed on Marketing School

Marketing School

04:35 min | 11 months ago

"yale university" Discussed on Marketing School

"To do those things. So I can do a lot because I'm like doing the thing working on the things that are authentic to me. I'm excited about and I enjoy working on. Yeah. I mean, to your point, I can hear the pushback from people where it's just like, well, that's easy for you to say, right? But it takes there's levels to everything. You have to put in the work to actually get there and put in the self work to get there before you can get to the level where you're able to work on the stuff you want to work on. So I think there's progressions to all of this. Yeah, but even as someone who's like an entry like starting a new job, they're starting their career. You can still have choices. You have choices of what kind of job do you want to work on? Like a lot of people, I went to Yale University and then lots of my friends went and became investment bankers or consultants, right? And that's a choice. You don't have to make that choice. They're making a money optimizing choice. Possibly for many of them, some people really love those jobs, but most people who accepted those jobs were optimizing for money over learning, where they're happiness or being able to do the thing that they wanted to really want to do in the world. And so you always have a choice. Wherever you're at. Obviously, I have maybe more resources and experience to support my choices, but you'll get there eventually. Yeah. Well, I think over time you learn to make the right choices, the right decisions, and then it leads you to the next level. So that's how I look at it, at least. So you're so deep in the web three space right now. I guess what projects are you most interested in right now? And how are you learning and getting better at the space? Because there's just so much information coming every day..

Yale University
"yale university" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Org FED SOC dot org and he is also the CEO at the federal federalist society and we're going to be talking a bit about affirmative action challenges that are coming up before the Supreme Court The court has agreed to hear a pair of lawsuits challenging race conscious admission policies at a private university Harvard which is better endowed than probably the majority of members of the United Nations And then the university of North Carolina a public university dev and good evening Thank you so much Jim good evening to you Good to have you on the program You're like what are these cases about and do the two differ Why North Carolina and Harvard Well North Carolina and Harvard because they discriminate against certain of their college applicants based on the color of their skin The plaintiffs in this case the students for fair admissions organization which represents thousands of Asian Americans provided evidence and it's pretty clear I think to the Supreme Court which is why they've taken up these cases that Asian Americans in particular are downgraded at these institutions in favor of preferred races and ethnicities like black Americans and Hispanic Americans So that's why the university of North Carolina and Harvard are not alone Yeah I was going to say I hesitate to ask but are they unique in that regard I would gather not No they're not unique in that regard I do think that this organization has tried pretty and done a pretty good job of finding good targets that will make it all the way to the Supreme Court I think they've been vindicated in doing that and finding Harvard and UNC that have made it all the way not only do the Supreme Court but also to have the cases granted by the court to be reviewed this term They've tried Yale University as well In fact at the beginning of the Biden administration the Department of Justice dropped the lawsuits that it had filed against Yale University for the exact same behavior downgrading and discriminating on the basis of race but Yale University So this is not anything new They're not unique They just happen to be the right vehicles to make it all the way to the Supreme Court and to have those cases granted for review Now I gather that one of the responses from the schools has been to well we don't discriminate based on race races only one factor that we use in our admissions process which sounds a lot as if well again and I hate to put words in the mouths of others but it sounds a lot like saying we only discriminate a little bit Well that's exactly what they're saying And quite frankly they have elect stand on legally The Supreme Court has sanctioned this discriminating a little bit on the basis of race for over 40 years It originally allowed this discrimination as long as there were other factors that were taken into it as well as far back as 1978 and what's called baki case But in 2003 it reaffirmed and brought in this new element that allowed schools to continue to do this So long as those schools thought that it was going to provide them with these many benefits that diversity can provide educational benefits and diversity can provide So the Supreme Court has allowed this little bit of racial discrimination And what's called a holistic approach to admissions But I do think at this point Supreme Court is ready to and I don't think there's any doubt pair this back perhaps completely outlawed Interesting Now of course when the cases make the Supreme Court they make it on the basis of alleged violations of federal law I gather the federal law in this case is the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which bans institutions that receive federal funds from discriminating on the grounds of race color or national origin To go back to one of those preconditions there institutions that receive federal funds is there an institution of higher education in the country that does not receive federal funds Yeah that's a good question There are very few of them at the college and university levels that don't get some sort of federal support for certain programs activities unrestricted funds et cetera But typically those colleges those universities are sort of right at the political spectrum so to speak such that they are not the type of institution you would expect to discriminate and admitting their applicants or their students on the basis of their skin color or gender or what have you It is just not in Vogue on the right And so you don't see that occurring You really do see And again this is one of the reasons why you and see in Harvard Or taken up by students for fair admission the plaintiffs here They take that federal funding Well if it's not a Vogue I mean right off the bat in terms of institutions which receive federal funds now as it is worded in this summary that would include a lot of things There might be some forms of direct federal aid to the institution per se there might be research universities which receive federal money as sort of I guess a payment in exchange for services rendered if you will I'm not sure what all the line receives federal funds covers here but again it was assuming that it brought us possible definition That's why I suggested in the beginning that every institution of higher education receives federal funds in some way or another Sure I mean we can split hairs and really sort of abstract this out and think about sort of what is the minimum amount of federal funds or assistance that a university or college can receive that would draw them under the umbrella of the civil rights law 1964 Civil Rights Act as you just suggest that prohibits a number of different discriminatory acts by those institutions including discrimination on the basis of race as we're talking about here But it's clear at least with these two universities that they take mountains and mountains and mountains of cash from the federal government and all manner of ways including these are two huge research universities There are research departments and so on and so forth So they take loads of money They are clearly covered under the university of North Carolina the constitution but also by extension of civil rights law Harvard University as a private institution All right We'll come back We'll talk some more about all of this where it stands in terms of the whole process of getting the Supreme Court and now that the courts agreed to hear the arguments the reluctance of the Supreme Court to issue definitive rulings and they seem like they're afraid they won't win the New Hampshire primary Oh that's right They don't have to run for anything their free to issue rulings in whatever way they wish We'll talk some more with Devin west hill The president of general counsel of the center.

Supreme Court university of North Carolina Harvard University Yale University federal federalist society Harvard Well North Carolina Biden administration baki United Nations Department of Justice North Carolina Jim federal government New Hampshire west hill
'The Diversity Delusion' Author Heather Mac Donald on Young Americans' Move to the Left

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 1 year ago

'The Diversity Delusion' Author Heather Mac Donald on Young Americans' Move to the Left

"So Heather, I want to ask you about the study from axios that I'd love to get your commentary on it. The essence is that it shows that young people are going far to the left and they're not basically staying. And they're not conservative as conservatives prior generations. What would you attribute this to? You talk about this a lot in the diversity delusion. You talk about the several dynamics that come into play. How would you explain this? Well, it's a combination of overt ideology and prosperity. Decades decades, decades in America of stable society, limited government, extraordinary conquest of poverty, want disease, premature death, and young people have absolutely no idea what the west has accomplished to make their lives so, so cushy and so opportunity filled, but then of course that's the background and the more overt politicization is coming from the elite classes in the education establishment. And that are dedicated to tearing down the west that are filled with anti white hatred. They hate a civilization being too white and male. And they're very few competing voices. The establishment, you know, in the 50s, the establishment used to be viewed as conservative. And indeed, it often was the American bar association, the American medical association. These institutions were regarded as guardians of traditional bourgeois norms, respect for property, respect for the rule of law. And now they are almost indistinguishable from Brown university or Yale University or Harvard in their dedication to this phony ideology that says the white white supremacy and white racism is the defining characteristic of American

Heather America American Bar Association American Medical Association Yale University Or Harvard Brown University
"yale university" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on WGN Radio

"New book the strategy of denial It's from Yale University press and subtitled American defense in an age of great power conflict One 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 will continue with more in just a moment News breaks every minute Now millions of Americans are turning to newsmax when they really need to know It's the fourth highest rated cable news channel in America with the latest on COVID Biden's inflation and the real truth from Washington Forbes calls newsmax a news powerhouse find out why Tune in today to the Chris Al Sato show as he probes the new vaccine mandates for adults for seniors and now even for children Salcedo asked the tough questions and reveals the real dangers that media won't Salcedo tells you the facts So tune in for Chris salsa on newsmax carried by all major cable systems If your cable operator doesn't carry newsmax demand it Or get newsmax streaming on Amazon fire Samsung Roku zumo Pluto LG YouTube and more Millions are also watching the newsmax app on their phones It's free And you can watch newsmax anytime anywhere So get the newsmax app for news you can trust I'm doctor Andrea Russo a cardiologist Maybe you're waiting to talk to your doctor right now But if you're having an irregular heartbeat heart racing chest pain shortness of breath fatigue or lightheadedness don't wait This could be a serious condition like atrial fibrillation which can make you about 5 times more likely to have a stroke If you're having these symptoms don't wait Talk to a doctor by phone online or in person Brought to you by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer Did you know that most adults.

"yale university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"Those decision makers unique to replace them you need to think about it and think about men as allies and partners you know. We have more men now who are applying to the campaign school because they're running campaigns for women and as i've all come to me on their applications they've all said patty you know. I've never run as a woman before. I want to be as effective as i can. In helping my candidates skin herself for success so the partnerships the strong partnerships allies. That you have available to you. Pay attention to all of those leaders that you have already in your world that you may not even realize i'd like to leave you with a quote. It's one of my most favourite quotes. It speaks to me every day in this moment. In this time that we're going through. I think about afghanistan and texas and floods and fires and the continuing challenges that pandemic the economy. It's so the heaviness of the world this quote by l. Our knauss te. A feminist poet speaks to me every day. And i hope your listeners will receive som- solace and joy and inspiration to lead from it. Do not be dismayed by the broken. Does of the world all things break and all things can be mended not with time but with intention so go lead intentionally love intentionally. The broken world waits in darkness so the light that is you. Thank you sonya. Thank you muna while. Thank you so much to both of. You really cannot thank you enough. Senator mona and executive director of the campaign school at yale university potty rousseau i will have links to mona site as washington state senator and the campaign school at gale you will probably be inundated with queries by us. Such a pleasure and privilege. You know you speak with me. Thank you so much. Thanks on lunch..

patty afghanistan Senator mona texas muna sonya yale university rousseau mona washington
"yale university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on A Desi Woman with Soniya Gokhale

"I can do that if that was posed to you which is really indicative of of what's required of them about to get into the campaign school at yale university for those that may not be aware is a partisan issue neutral leadership program whose mission is to increase the number and influence of women and elected and appointed office in the united states and around the globe. And as the executive director of the program patti russo and would senator thus as a graduate. In my humble estimation you really both represent the best that this country has to offer as it pretends to leadership empowerment and politics but the fact that you're also impassioned about helping other women achieve their political or leadership aspirations is so inspiring and not connotated. A what one might expect from the notoriously and stereotypically cutthroat historically male dominated domain of politics in this country so having had the great public of attending the back to basic course at tc. I can unequivocally state. The program is a revolutionary game. Changer for women. And it's as though women in the program are finally being given access to a coveted playbook that will give them the tools they need to succeed and thus far despite book has been sorely inaccessible to women and people of color. However i would state it is a no hold barred candid program that really exports the rigor hardships and challenges associated with politics and political campaigns. And so i do have to ask you both for women who might be listening right now. Who run the gamut. Those who think. Wow i would like to be an active participant in the democratic process. But how. And maybe even those thinking. Perhaps i would contemplate running for office or getting engaged in campaign management. How do you go from the hopeful hard-working. Private citizen mona. Thus for example to washington state. Senator mona dos or stab realistic. Why would you say to them and would really like your input on that first. Patty as active director of you know everywhere in in our country and really in the world you know..

patti russo yale university united states Senator mona dos mona washington Patty
The History of Experimental Research in Psychology

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The History of Experimental Research in Psychology

"Psychology has been an important topic of study for centuries the ancient greeks and egyptians had their schools of thought on it as did the people in ancient india and china. it wasn't until the nineteenth century. Though when psychological research turned from the philosophical to the experimental german psychologist gustave thickener started testing human brains response to various stimuli around the eighteen thirties from their experts. Such as herman ebbing house went on to study other functions of the mind from memory to introspection to classical conditioning psychology became a bustling industry of experimentation. Eventually scientists didn't just want to learn the limits of the brain. They wanted to understand what made people tick. Why were some individuals able to say no while others were more closers. Stanley milgram of yale university tested this in his famous milgram experiment in nineteen sixty one. He invited participants to administer electric shocks to someone in another room. As the shocks increased in power the screams of the unknown party got louder and more intense until they stopped completely. But don't worry nobody died. The electric shocks weren't even real but the effects on the subjects pushing the buttons certainly were milgram wanted to test how far a person would go in following orders from an authority figure even if those orders involved hurting or even killing someone else. He based his experiment. On the actions of the nazis during world war two the stanford prison experiment of nineteen seventy-one took things further by placing college students in a simulated prison environment. The purpose was to study. How power affected one psychological states one group of students was given the title of guard while another subset was placed in the prisoner role. Three guards were pulled out of the experiment early after demonstrating what were described as genuine sadistic tendencies. The prisoners also suffered they were referred to by numbers rather than their names. They were stripped naked and sprayed with a hose in shorts. They were humiliated the two week experiment was terminated. After just six

Gustave Thickener Herman Ebbing Stanley Milgram Yale University India China Milgram Stanford
"yale university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"And I love Americans Get it as well. Real real quick. Sorry. You're right. But this was this was May 18th 2021 so one month ago today One month three days ago. Med Med Rx Ivy. This is published out there, Right. This is article. Um This is again from the Yale Yale University. I mean, it's all there Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory out of Long Island. It says Mask, mandate and use efficacy and state level covid 19 containment and it says right here. Um They tested masks. Randomized controlled trials have not clearly demonstrated mask efficacy against respiratory viruses, it says, right. I mean, that's the thing that the Denmark study proved it or whatever. So they can censor. We calculated the total covid 19 case growth and mask use for the content. The United States data from the CDC. The estimated post mask mandate case growth in non mandate states. They look at all this stuff and the results were this case growth was not significantly different between mandate and non mandate states at low or high transmission rates. Surgeons were equivocal, meaning it's a virus. It's gonna virus mask use predicted lower case growth at low But not high transmission rates. So mask use predicted it predicts that growth rates were comparable between states in the first and last mask use Quintiles Masked mask use did not predict summer 2020 case growth for non Northeast states or fall winter 2020 growth for all continental states. Conclusions, mask mandates and use are not associated with slower state level covid 19 spread. Containment requires future research implementation, blah, blah, blah, so I can't do it. And yet he's like You know, we followed the science and the science said Mass didn't work. Then it said it did. What science said That? Was it somebody named Bill Science? You know, I said, Bill, I know a guy right? Listen, Bill. Science. Yeah, nice science is not even a scientist. But the matter I said, my name is Bill. I'll go. Last name Science. I say mass work and go. Boom. Science says mass work. Boom. Bada Bing. I got my scratch. So that's vouching for you. And then how do you believe anything The CDC says, right? We have kids. Unfortunately, dropping dead. Um, there's a woman named I don't know who this person is. But she's on Twitter got 47,100 followers, Tammy Beret GIs and she tweets out. A covid. Vaccination card for a young man who was born Oregon, August 2nd 2000 and 7 13 years old, almost 14. He got a fighter shot May 23rd the first one, The second one June 13th. He died. This woman writes a week ago today, My brother's 13 year old son had his second Covid shot less than three days later he died. The initial autopsy results on Friday, where that his heart was enlarged. And there was some fluid surrounding it. He had no known health problems was on no medications. Why would and what's crazy? This lady? She then tweeted out. Our family is devastated. I struggled with putting this out on Twitter. I am pro vaccine. We've activated my own 14 year old son as soon as available. I know it is mostly safe. But Jacob is dead now. And yet, the CDC put off their meeting on Friday. Such an emergency for Juneteenth, so as they could've made, it could've been a week before that they didn't do it. Uh, Dr Marty Makary. Johns Hopkins University is the one that wrote in the Wall Street journal. That will be it. Herd immunity by end April. He's all over this and he believes in the in the vaccines, But he's out there saying now I don't think anybody under the age of 18 should get a second shot. You can get a first, but not a second. The dosage. So he right. He retweeted this woman's tweet about the 13 year old dying, he said. He writes another child death immediately after the second back stows, FDA and CDC dragging their feet. Let me be clear again. Kids should not get a second dose until deaths are better understood, or dose lowered fighter already reacted internally by lowering dose planned in current trial of six months to 12 year old Children. Can you imagine, by the way, having like a seven year old kid, a one year old, a six month old and getting filled with this stuff? Getting filled with where you have a 99.99999% chance of survival. It sounds very Dr Manjula esque. It does, doesn't it? It does. I mean, it's It's sick, sick, but these more they're not people trapped in camps anymore. These morons are going there willingly willingly bringing their kids in and saying Inject my kids. Inject my kids. And how do you trust these? These? Okay? How do you trust these government agencies? Don't trust any government agency. Because then I'm going to tell you about this coming up and this this should be another big giant study. Cheryl Atkinson got this. A CDC senior scientists came out blew the whistle said. We trashed data showing vaccine autism link in African American boys The CDC. They get all racist. What I will tell you about it coming up, do not go anywhere. And by the way, how about the dirtbags like and again, the school's saying kids should say masked up until the vaccines available. What's going to happen by the way. Hopefully, 100% of the kids under the age of 12 will not get the vaccine hopefully But then they're gonna say all right, take off your mask now because it's saved. We're not going to ask you who got it? Who didn't but we assume some did And we're not going to. I mean again, kids. I know this because parents semi stuff they go to the Oral Valley town camp where the mayor, apparently as a child abuser, sent emails out and he responded to me when I asked him And he said, Well, there's no vaccine for under the age of 12. So anybody over 12 they can take off their mess. But under 12, keep your mask on. In oral Valley because there's no vaccine. So you want the kids to get the vaccine with her dropping dead? Freaking dirtbag. That's what this guy is Oral Valley and the town manager to Mary Jacob. She had dirtbag to They're all terrible. Human beings will continue. Do not go anywhere. It's Tennessee. The morning ritual with Garrett Lewis. So summer is always busy. Life is always busy, right? We actually have some friends that are coming down visiting us. Um and they're going to be at our home on Friday for the weekend, and the wife and I were like, Oh, my gosh, I'm like, Look, I got at least two hours games Monday Wednesday. I can't be bothered with cleaning the home we have. We have my son's hockey practice. We have other events happening. When do we get up Time? Thank God we have made in Tucson made in Tucson is going to be at our home on Thursday and they're going to clean our home. They're going to wipe down the baseboards going to wipe down the cabinets. They're going to wipe down the backsplash. Gonna wipe the mirrors. They're going to wipe down the get dust. The fans, the blinds, everything. Mop the floor, clean the toilets, the showers. They'll do it all. And probably just a couple of hours for us. They do such a great job..

Cheryl Atkinson Garrett Lewis Marty Makary Tammy Beret May 23rd Mary Jacob May 18th 2021 Jacob Friday Oregon Long Island Thursday August 2nd 2000 Johns Hopkins University six months Tucson 100% Yale Yale University June 13th Tennessee
The Dangers of Emotional Stress Impacting Your Physical Well-Being

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:04 min | 1 year ago

The Dangers of Emotional Stress Impacting Your Physical Well-Being

"Scientists actually discovered that emotional stress. Similar to adorn experience can be a trigger for the growth of tumors as a matter of fact any sort of trauma emotional or physical stress can act as literal pathway between cancerous mutations bringing them together in a potentially fatal combination for example at yale university scientists have discovered that everyday emotional stress is a trigger for the growth tumors. The finding showed that conditions for developing cancer can be significantly affected by your emotional environment including everyday work and family stress in other words. Your risk of developing cancer can be positively or negatively affected by your emotional environment including everyday work physical emotional and relationship stress. The traditional chinese medical view of cancer ideology has long held that emotions are a major contributing factor for cancer author. Son vignon writes in his book cancer treatment and prevention according to our understanding of the tumor patient most have suppression of emotions. They tend to hold in their anger. Although some patients have good results after treatment emotional stimulation can cause them to decline again and then the previous treatment would have been in vain. Some people have a severe phobia about cancer before they know the real disease. They have a lot of suspicion. They know they have cancer. Their whole spirit breaks down. This kind of spiritual state is very bad for treatment. In the book prevention and treatment of carcinoma in traditional chinese medicine. Jiakun gives ten recommendations for cancer prevention in addition to a good environment and personal hygiene proper amounts of physical activity and rest good eating habits and healthy food and avoiding smoking. He states that emotional changes such as worry. Fear hesitation anger irritation and nervousness should be presented mental exhaustion. It's harmful and life should be enriched with entertainment. Chinese medicine author sheila ming and she pecan also mentioned the ideology of various cancers and their book experience in treating carcinomas with traditional chinese medicine. They say the etiological factors of the disease involved chiefly the disturbance of the seven emotions especially melancholy anxiety and anger which are liable to impair the spleen and

Cancer Cancerous Mutations Tumors Son Vignon Yale University Jiakun Phobia Carcinoma Sheila Ming
How Did WarnerMedia Get Its Start?

TechStuff

02:09 min | 1 year ago

How Did WarnerMedia Get Its Start?

"Today i thought we'd start down the road to talk about the various companies that make up warnermedia kind of unravel it all and this is going to be a heck of a story because it includes several influential media companies that had their own distinct histories before coalescing into warnermedia includes companies that are not media companies at all like funeral homes for real now when i say complicated. I'm not kidding. Our story includes a window washing company. A parking company an online service provider company Few magazine publishers. And more there are mergers and acquisitions are spin offs. There's family betrayal and lots of other stuff. So where the heck do i get started. Why suppose. I should talk about the core components and then work to the point where they all come together and i could start pretty much anywhere because there so many different pieces to the story. But i'm going to begin with time because it's on my side. Yes it is henry. Loose and briton hadden. Had a lot in common. They both attended yale. University they both worked as reporters for the baltimore news and both of them were in their early twenties back in nineteen twenty two and they also wanted to try something. That was a new idea. Newspapers were thing obviously but loosen. Hatton had the idea for a news magazine. They decided to try and create one because no one had really done it before. And they raised more than eighty thousand dollars which was a princely sum in nineteen twenty two and they quit their jobs to found a company called time inc and a magazine called time it would publish weekly starting in march of nineteen twenty-three loose served as the business manager for the young publishing company and hadn't was editor in chief and together. They found success with this weekly magazine. Format

Warnermedia Few Magazine Briton Hadden Henry Baltimore Hatton Time Inc
Dr. Laurie Santos on Teaching the Most Popular Course Ever at Yale University

The Goal Digger Podcast

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Laurie Santos on Teaching the Most Popular Course Ever at Yale University

"I am dying to know. Where did your journey to study. Happiness and well-being begin. What is the story behind this story. Yeah yeah so i mean. I've been a an academic psychologist forever. Basically i've studied psychology for a really long time but my interest in the science of happiness started when i took on a new role at yale. I became a ahead of college on campus so yells. One of these funny weirdo. School is like hogwarts and harry potter where there's colleges within a college. So i'm i'm head of silliman college which means i live in the dorm with students right. I eat with them in the dining hall on. Hang out with them in the student. Coffee shop in in this new role. I really didn't like what i was seeing. I was seeing the college student mental health crisis up close and personal with like so many of my students reporting that they were. Just you know depressed. Feeling anxious overwhelmed students who are experiencing suicidality. It just wasn't what i thought. College life should be like right and so the journey. The science of happiness was really. I wanted to do something to help my students. I really wanted to give them strategies that were evidence base that they could use to feel better than because. I'm a nerdy professor. The best way to do that. Was you know to to teach in new class on it. So i developed this whole new class called psychology in the good life. It was like a new class. You know at this university. And so i thought like thirty or forty students would show up in so you can imagine my surprise when it became like the biggest class ever in yale's history over thousand students according to the entire campus showed up in. Wow oh yeah. I was a little surreal. But it you know. It really taught me that you know. Students are voting with their feet. They don't like the sensor feeling stressed and anxious and they wanted some strategies to do better.

Silliman College Harry Potter
Justice Dept Drops Lawsuit Claiming Yale Discriminated in Admissions

Bloomberg Law

05:15 min | 2 years ago

Justice Dept Drops Lawsuit Claiming Yale Discriminated in Admissions

"Talking to Audrey Anderson, who had the higher education practice of Bass, Berry and Simms about President Joe Biden's Johnson's Department dropping and Trump Administration lawsuit accusing Yale University of discriminating against whites and Asian Americans while favoring black and Hispanic applicants for admission. Move marks a swift shift in priorities for Biden's Justice Department, signaling its abandonment of the previous administration's efforts to reverse college diversity efforts. But the battle over race conscious admissions is far from over. After losing a similar Harvard case over discrimination in November, students were fair admission, said it would ask the U. S. Supreme Court to reverse the ruling and toss out decades of president. High court, which now has a 6 to 3 Conservative majority has yet to say if it will take up the appeal. The group has similar cases pending against the University of Texas and the University of North Carolina, alleging discrimination against Asian, American and white students and says it will file another lawsuit against Yale. Tell us what the strategy of students for fair admissions is what it's lawsuits across the country. Your students for fair admission. Will they bring cases? Challenging You'd admissions plans that have race as a factor. In admissions and say that those plans discriminate on the basis of race. Their plainness lately have been all Asian American. Do them. They say that when colleges consider race in admissions and the discriminated against Asians based on waste, that's what their complaints say they always in all of their cases. They have also Included a claim that Any consideration of race violates the Constitution. Even though that argument is We're closed by current law. The current Supreme Court lost, says the colleges may consider race An admission. If they show they other compelling interest in considering race that their use of races narrowly tailored Students repair admissions always make an argument that hey, we think that's wrong. We think the Supreme Court Current case law is wrong, and if we ever get a chance to argue this before the Supreme Court, we're going to tell the Supreme Court that we think that's wrong and they should overturn that law. So it seems prepared missions is where was doing by filing cases all across the country. They are trying to improve their chances that the Supreme Court Will at some point Decide to read you one of these lower court decisions and eventually rule. And prepared missions favor on that. Argument that the Constitution does not allow the consideration of race. And higher education admissions. So we know that the Harvard case went up to the circuit court, and that's as we discussed awaiting perhaps Supreme Court review. What about the other cases that they filed? Yeah. So the University of North Carolina, they filed a case against the University of North Carolina. They had a trial in that case in November. And, um, the Mr Court is waiting for the parties to file finding the facts and conclusions of law. Later this month. And so we are then awaiting a written decision from the judge in that case, and that's just the district court. The trial level. So it could be anywhere from You know 3 to 6 months. No longer before we get a decision. In that case from the trial court. You know what's happening with the Texas case? I believe. Yeah, So there's a case pending in Texas. And they're really at the very early stages of that case. I just checked and they Have a scheduling order that was just entered that has trial scheduled for September of 2022. It was gonna be a long time before there's any decision in that case on the merits. The strange thing about that case is that they're gonna be doing some briefing in the next few months. On some legal questions about whether the court should go forward with this decision at all, based on the fact that just a few years ago Of course, including the Supreme Court. Revered the admission process at the University of Texas Austin and found it to be constitutional. They're going to do some breaking the next few months about Hey, as if afraid. You get to litigate this all again now. Or have we already decided that so the case might go away on those grounds within the next, you know, six months. But if that doesn't happen, then it will be a long time before we get a decision in that case, so

Supreme Court Audrey Anderson President Joe Biden Johnson's Department Trump Administration Yale University Of Discriminat Biden's Justice Department U. S. Supreme Court University Of North Carolina Simms Harvard Berry High Court University Of Texas Bass Yale Mr Court Texas University Of Texas Austin
Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 2 years ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
"yale university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Who started the stocks Wait Keys. Gill says the value of his stake in the video game retailer dropped by more than $30 million after share sung by 60% on Tuesday. He says that as the more than five million he lost Monday, the Massachusetts man known by a pseudo name on Reddit revealed the losses on the sites. Wall Street bets for him where he's been sharing regular updates about his investment. Gil is an Internet celebrity because he and his fellow Wall Street bet users were able to Jack up. Gamestop share prices High is $483 last week he says he's still made about 7.6 million despite the losses. Rob Dawson Fox News Justice Department says it's dropping it's discrimination lawsuit against Yale University Last year, federal prosecutors claimed the Ivy League school was illegally discriminating against Asian American and white applicants. The Justice Department says it will continue to monitor yells compliance. Of anti discrimination laws. Payroll company ADP says the economy added more jobs than expected payroll processing company ADP says there were 174,000 new jobs added by private employers last month, the number is more than triple the number of new jobs from private employers estimated by economists. The job growth was in smaller businesses. And job losses in December, will revised to a smaller number. 78,000. The Labor Department reports the January employment report on Friday, and it is expected to show job growth. Last month. GeneCo's Sola Fox knew the British royal drama The Crown, Small Town comedy, Shits Creek and Crime thriller Ozark lead the pack of nominees for this year's Golden Globe Awards for television on the movie side. Nominees include the Father Manque, Nomad Land and the Trial of the Chicago Seven. The awards will be handed out later this month. I'm Lee Scylla, Sarah and this.

Gill News Justice Department Golden Globe Awards ADP Sola Fox Labor Department Nomad Land Lee Scylla Massachusetts Rob Dawson Reddit Gamestop Gil Yale University Ivy League school Chicago Shits Creek Sarah High
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"One auto rate in and you'll be kept a good but but early on the system and bid that comes risk cutting and are really sort of expanding that was and concentration of power more complexity. Avi making systems more fragile. I wonder i don't have any mathematical modeling. I think yes i mean. I think there's a sort of theories of entropy they're more ways for system to be disordered than there are ways for it to be ordered. And so that's why one of the intuitions behind wide disorder is so much easier to achieve an order So i i think yes. More complex systems may may be more susceptible to failure. But what. I guess. I would argue. Is that there is some fundamental enduring properties of social systems that You know that that transcend that that transcend politics that transcend history that transcend technology and you know. I would put some of the things that i've been discussing love and friendship and cooperation and teaching and also we are other qualities we haven't discussed like for example we live in. We tend to do best in mild hierarchy. You know we don't like despotic hierarchies over hierarchical social systems nor do we do well in total egalitarian. Systems so we like mild hierarchy. We evolved i think for various reasons to To to be that way. So so they're all these properties. You see that i think are transcend as i said history technology politics and so on. So you're right that there are certain complex systems that can break down but the breakdown of those systems does not subvert for example the love of the love of your partner for example interstellar -tarian regimes for example in In eastern germany. They tried to the families a very threatening unit Or as i discuss in blueprint if you look for example it is rarely kibbutzes. They tried very hard to to because of the burdens of burn on child rearing on women they tried to have collective child-rearing collect a child rearing has failed..

eastern germany one One auto
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Bag. Nicholas viewer talking about some of the interesting book that you do in human networks both face to face and electric a lab at yale human nature lab. I won't talk a bit about one of your books The origins of a good society That it came out. I guess few years ago just a year ago. I wasn't expecting to write apollo zero about the.

Nicholas a year ago both few years ago one of zero
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And and what this means is when you begin thinking about this way. This is also in in the defense industry. This is also known as defense in depth Once you think about this you can begin to understand a whole lot of phenomena for example it may not matter what any particular country does the virus so long as they do enough things like if each country can pick. Let's say three different things. No new zealand do border closures and contact. Tracing korea can do mask wearing and testing a grease can do school closures and a masking and gathering bands. It doesn't matter so long as you have enough layers than you can stop the epidemic. So that's one incite another insight. Is that for example. Why why did the white house become a superspreader event. Well because they only had one layer of swiss cheese they only had testing..

one layer each country korea three different things swiss one new zealand
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Purpose of social natural signs into medicine and by medical engineering at the university. He directs acumen needs lab at yale. His research is focused. On the social mathematical biological rules governing how social networks form and the social and biological implications so they operate influence thoughts. Feelings and behaviors belkin nicholas. Thank you so much for having me gill. Thanks for doing this so you lot of interesting. Very interesting work Accu lab at yale one eighty. Is you call it. Experiments with face to face network You say a significant amount of attention is devoted to the development of new ways to intervene in social networks of promote public health. This is sort of a topical idia for us right now and i so there was an an experiment that was completed or going on in contours. Yes we have. Two categories of broad categories of experiments. And before i talk about those. I'd like to back up and just give a metaphor for listeners. With most so's most listeners. Probably learned in high school. Chemistry carbon has different. Allah tropes are different forms of carbon. For example you can have graphite pencil lead which is soft and dark or you can have diamond. Which is hard and clear and there too two key. Intellectual ideas their first of all this. The softness and darkness and hardness and clearness are not properties of the carbon atoms their properties of the collection of carbon atoms and second which properties. You get depends on how you can the carbon atoms to each other. You connect them one way and you get one set of properties take the same carbon atoms and connect them another way and you get a completely different set of properties. And it's the same with human groups you can take a group of people and you can structure the topology of their social network ties. The architecture of the ties you structure those ties one way and that group of people might be happy healthy cooperative and innovative. We take the same human beings and the and you reconnect them in a different way. And they are unhappy. Unhealthy uncooperative and uninnovative. We can think of these properties as emergent properties of the system. that how the parts are connected. So this is how the whole comes to be greater than the sum of its parts so in my laboratory of the things that we do. Is we do experiments with this idea. And in two broad categories one category is a category of experiments. We do online. And we've written some software called bread board and there's a little video about it at bread. Board dot yale dot. Edu and this software allows us to create temporary artificial societies of real people..

one category yale two broad categories two key belkin nicholas Allah one set Two categories yale one eighty Accu lab first one way second Edu
"yale university" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WTVN

"Can you believe one week from today is Christmas Day? Where does the time go? I mean, it just flies. Unbelievable times. We're living in 809 41. Sean, If you want to be a part of this extravaganza, you know, now we have a second. Vaccine. One that the mom and the media the ones the big tech told us the one that Joe Biden said. There's not gonna be a miracle, though. It's kind of miraculous. That is now done and now being distributed and now given approval and now being put in the arms of health care workers and providers on the front lines of this pandemic. Which is amazing, and it's going to be getting in a nursing homes and then in the general population. Uh, does anyone in the media ever stopped to think what an incredible accomplishment pushed driven by a guy? That's a businessman named Donald Trump? We could barely ever see a nice words about him. It's a matter of fact, you're loving Democrats. Open kind loving, You know, the one that thinks we're all mother efforts. I'm sorry. That's Joe Biden's chief of staff. Like James Clyburn. They're actually urging Biden to establish a independent commission that would assign blame. For people that died from the pandemic. And they want to put the blame. Where do you think on Donald Trump? That's how sick It has gotten when you think it can't even get sicker. It does. Congresswoman Omar complaining that about the dangerous criminal neglect of Trump and his administration. Did anyone ever tell them? That he's the one that built the hospital's got. The PPE got the mascot, the gloves got the ventilators built. The hospital sent the Navy ships and ships, etcetera. No, I guess not. Never given credit. You know, I don't know how I missed this. Um American thinker. You probably don't know this member. I told you there were the two most widely Quoted studies on We're both pulled. One was from Lancet and I forget where the other one was. I think it was the Journal of Medicine. I'm not sure but I know one was Lancet. They were pulled because they weren't properly reviewed and wouldn't live up to a real peer review. Pretty amazing that we talked to you about Dr Daniel Wallace. The foremost expert in And again, it was Dr Oz saying. Well, of course, we wish we had the studies that could prove this. This this and this, But if the risk is nil, what have you got to lose? You go to war with the army? You have not the one you wish you had. And we have people like Dr Harvey Rush on this program and Dr Josh number on this program and Dr Oz on this program and our medical a team on this program and people from Baylor and people from U C L A and all over the country, put them all on They were all telling, you know, it actually taken early Now there's numerous studies starting with the Henry Ford study. That showed yeah, you taken earlier, actually very helpful. The A. M may when none of us were looking American Medical Association now they had vehemently opposed. Mob and the media because Donald Trump mentioned it. They just were clubbing him every day over it. Now they've reversed course. And I bet most of you didn't hear about this. The foremost group of medical experts now apparently agree with Donald Trump. That And by the way, Dr Rice has said, Now he's the Yale University professor of epidemiology. Actually had a nice webinar with him and Louie Gohmert and Rand Paul etcetera, and I think we could put it back up if we on Hannity dot com, he said that if the medical establishment Had endorsed the use of Gee, thanks a lot. American medical associations and all you all of you other people that play politics with a pandemic and still are playing politics with a pandemic. I am a adamantly against Reversed their opposition. The end of October, very quietly issued a new statement conveniently overlooked by the mob, given the green light to doctors to prescribe it to their covert patients. Resolved that R A. M a rescinds its statement calling for physicians to stop prescribing. Early in disease the disease course The updated position is we clarify our support for positions ability to prescribe the FDA approved medication for off loose use label. If it is in her or his best clinical judgment, with specific reference to the use of Aforementioned Harvey Rush. The guy from Yale who we've had on this show the number of Americans had died. He's saying 175,000 people might have saved their lives. Anyone gonna have an investigation? James Clyburn is now gonna have AH, independent commission looking into that. I mean, it's really insane out there on every level on every topic that Louis Farrakhan Currently good friends with Warnock eyes actually losing it. And now you know, White devils and my God teaches me the white man is the skunk of the planet Earth and obviously very on the anti Semetic. He's now claiming and urging his disciples to abstain from taking the Corona virus vaccine because it contains quote toxic waste. And was designed by White Devils and crackers to hurt black people. Our long speech that virtual speech to the National African and Black leadership summit this week, he goes on to say the vaccine is part of a death plan. Began with whites, making blacks more vulnerable to Corona virus. We have to survive because the death plan is in motion. What is the death plan was so frightened over this, Covad Well, now they're getting us ready for the vaccine. He said. Brothers and sisters do you believe that Satan is concerned about vaccinating you? You trust him. After all that he's done to destroy us. You trust him? And your trust this sickening because you love your enemy and you hate yourself..

Donald Trump Joe Biden James Clyburn Dr Harvey Rush American Medical Association Dr Oz Lancet Dr Daniel Wallace White devils Sean Covad Congresswoman Omar Journal of Medicine Dr Rice Louis Farrakhan FDA Navy Dr Josh Yale University
Former Chicago health commissioner named to Biden’s COVID-19 task force

Bob Sirott

01:07 min | 2 years ago

Former Chicago health commissioner named to Biden’s COVID-19 task force

"Announced his covert 19 task force yesterday. 12 of the 13 positions have been filled with doctors. W G A NEWS nation national political correspondent Dean Reynolds. Mr Biden held a call with his new Covad 19 Advisory council, chaired by Dr Vivek Murthy, a former surgeon general under President Obama. David Kessler, a former FDA commissioner, and Dr Marcella Nunes Smith of Yale University. The purpose of This is to let you know what we're going to do once worn in. And so there's a need for bold action to fight this pandemic. We're still facing a very dark winter. Chicago's former public health commissioner is among the experts joining that task force. Mayor Lightfoot have plotted Dr Julie Morita's selection. Dr Morita obviously knows the city very well. She's a national expert. There's already been some communications with her. Marina was a staff member at Chicago's Health Department for 20 years, she served as the city health commissioner from 2015 to 2019. Also on that task force. Former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel older brother Dr Ezekiel Emanuel. He's also been named to that new board. The FDA

Dean Reynolds Mr Biden Dr Vivek Murthy Dr Marcella Nunes Smith David Kessler Covad Mayor Lightfoot Dr Julie Morita Dr Morita Yale University President Obama FDA Chicago Marina Health Department Mayor Rahm Emanuel Dr Ezekiel Emanuel
Does working in daycare increase coronavirus risk? New study suggests no

The KFBK Morning News

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Does working in daycare increase coronavirus risk? New study suggests no

"Working in a daycare increased Corona virus risk? There is a new study that suggests No largest study of its kind exposure to child care not associated with a heightened risk of Corona virus infection. According to the authors of this new study, 57,000 childcare providers were researched by Yale University.

Yale University
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 2 years ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

Data Skeptic

06:33 min | 2 years ago

How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

"So my name is Mush. Pot. Suzuki like the car last year a student at Yale University in Computer Science and mathematics and I'm supervised by Adrian Vata and from goalie. I'm very happy to be here and thank you for inviting me. I got exposed to your work. When I read the paper, I invited you to come on and talk about mostly today is how many freemasons are there consensus voting mechanisms in metric space so no less than three interesting ideas for me in the title maybe we should give some background to open up with consensus. What does that mean is that? Just the majority or how will we be using the word today? Consensus mechanism is Mecca Zeman which to select a candidate they're only if everyone agrees on it for instance, they said you're running for some group Peter, you get accepted only if everyone in the group agrees on it and you want you accepted otherwise. so that's like unanimity the Neha in here. Yeah. It's basically the same as unanimity but in different. Settings. Unanimity also implies that it's a property where you have if everyone agrees on that, you accept it but something can happen. If you know, let's say you can use different rules otherwise there's a different sort distinctions there, but it's basically the same as unanimity that particular choice leads to some interesting things and you guys are presented this really concise analogy to the freemasons. Well, I suppose getting down to the actual counter freemasons trying to conduct a census here that just formalizes. A funny title to give because as you know that freemasons are interesting sort of group there. Member only if everyone agrees on sort of it, fits our mechanisms today run their group through consensus voting Gotcha so it wouldn't surprise me if just given how much sort of folklore the surrounds the freemasons that there might be at least a few listeners confused about whether or not there are real organization. Could you throw a few facts Edis? have. Amazing temples in Montreal, phrases, I live in Montreal. So they have a huge temple here and they're very active and I don't know too much about their inner workings or I've never been inside the doors but they're very oh yeah you can go to their building for instance so real organization and in terms of getting accepted into it if I wanted to go in that building up there in. Montreal is this the actual mechanism they literally use or is this a sort of an analogy? So I don't know this for sure but I heard I read online that in order to get accepted that everyone in taboo are everyone in that group has agree on it. So is the medicine that they actually use. Cool. Well, I guess whenever that started it wouldn't be surprising that it could grow quickly. Right, if I was thinking of starting my own such organization and I I, invited my wife. Now we have two members and perhaps she and I can agree her sister joins and my sister joins. But at some point, someone's going to say no to the next member what can we learn about that and how do we study it? What are the interesting Totta questions? So you have two different settings. Here. So wondering is not remodeled people's opinions and you say I prefer my wife says I prefer my daughter you know or or so and so forth we need to the preferences of people. So one of the classic ideas in voting theory and actually just modeling through machine learning or any sort of the setting is this prioritizing people's opinion or privatizing people. So for instance, let's say you could be. Leaning like the political left or right. There's a spectrum for which you are lighted. Let's sure you can be at the centre or you could be very right thing or it could be a very level. So we can model that as any number between minus one and one, but two one being the right-wing minus one being the left-wing. So then that's one example of how you prioritize people right? Because you wanted to this rigorously and mathematically. So we need a method to represent people and our model is at. ISSUE, have this in which you represent urine. You couldn't space in some point. Is You your opinion and you vote for someone who similar to? Let's say you're very right wing than some candidate comes in then you're more likely to vote for someone who is right being than left-wing to someone who is closer to you in opinion or characteristic that's our model of but this question was asked actually before in one emissions but in one dimension. So you're basically just have an inch between minus one and one, and this was an extra Unin by very famous. Nogal. Yes. Paper in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fourteen I forget. But we did this in higher dimensions in actually specifically two dimensions because it introduces so much more complexity when you go up in a dimension, right so Francis, why do we need higher dimensions is because before you you're presenting people left and right but people are more complex than that. You can't just represent a person by just one number for instance you. have to use multiple features as people say. So you have this multiple characteristics of people and they become dimension. So we do this in two missions surprisingly the mathematical difficulty of asking this question John Huge becomes actually much more difficult in two dimension than one dish very interesting and I guess maybe the answers grounded in a lot of details. But is there an essence to what that challenges is it that there are more simulations or? Is there a complexity theory aspect of this? Why is a two dimension so much more difficult than one so for instance, if you look at random shape, you can characterize this voting as looking at something called random convex or some random shapes. The question bows down on understanding certain random shapes and here assuming that the candidates are appearing. Let's say uniformly at on interval you have existing group members and she accepts somebody then he becomes. Group member and you evolve. So the candidates are uniform at each time step and so to answer the question we knew looking at this sort of random judge shapes in one dimension there's only one shape is just an interval intimate conviction in one dimension is just an interval. Some number between attack could be minus zero point five to zero point one is, but let's say you go into the mission all of a sudden there's so Many different shapes so many different things second happen if the shape is convinced or even just not convex in two dimensions does different more complex shapes can get in one mission. You only have interested in two dimensions you have gone as you have China goals, you have something that approximates your face even that could be shade in two missions, but that's not going to happen in Wand mission

Montreal Suzuki Yale University Adrian Vata Mecca Zeman China John Huge Peter Francis
Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

Steve Cochran

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

"Administration is also authorized the first rapid Corona virus test That doesn't need any special computer equipment results to go along with it. 15 minute test from Abbott Laboratories will sell for $5 its latest cheaper, simpler test if the U. S market provides some new options to expand testing the FDA also recently Green lighted a saliva test from Yale University. That bypass is some of the supplies that have led to testing bottlenecks. Both tests have limitations. Neither can be done at home

Abbott Laboratories Yale University FDA U. S
Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | 2 years ago

Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

"Covert 19. Meanwhile, a Yale University professor is warning college students today returning to campus to prepare for widespread infections and even deaths. Yale psychology professor Laurie Santos says students should be emotionally prepared for a residential college life that resembles quote a hospital unit. Several of Ohio's colleges, including Ohio State are conducting covert 19 testing on their students who live on campus at

Yale University Professor Laurie Santos Ohio State Ohio
New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

Squawk Pod

03:47 min | 2 years ago

New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

"A potential breakthrough in the battle against covid nineteen, the FDA, just granting emergency approval, for Corona, virus saliva test calling it testing innovation game changer this test which is simpler cheaper and less invasive than naval swabs was developed by Yale University researchers. It's been used by the NBA and could greatly help expand testing capacity joining us right now is an Wiley. She is associate research scientist with Yale School of Public Health, which helped develop this new tests and it's great to see you. Thank you for being with us this morning. And Hugh morning. So this is incredibly exciting the idea that you could do the saliva test that it could be cheap and readily available How does it work? Actually, quite simple really. It's as the name suggests that we you've seen saliva as the sample time. And what we're trying to do is get away from that swamp. That's that can you know there's been quite a bit of the vision to the swamp time and we're hoping to get around supply chain issues that we've been saying with the swamps and we also Greenie. Fancy. Collection Devices to help ourselves down and so was actually also quite a make about it unique about is that we haven't actually developed a taste that we just packed up out to you. So you next one of these tests but what we've? What we've developed is the mythic full the taste recipe you could say and we're able to she had this taste with other labs for them to get this method often running in their labs. As. Tasted south with actually adapted the white commonly used piece the artist which takes the virus are a but we've done is removed the most expensive stiff of that replacing with a more simple workup, which again house is down at work though I mean if it still requires a lab to put together, you deliver it to me and then what I drive to the lab, and then how long does it take for me to get my results back? So indeed much psych you know what you're doing at the moment with a swap. So the swap is being ordered for your doctoral with A. Is million schools where you have like a little booth, we your saliva sample and had that taken to the lab and so taking out that was time consuming our in that results Ruby available Asta. You know this isn't one of those that will teach broken about you know we can get. Results, sorted through in about three hours about ninety two samples. But of course, depending on the through the lab is experiencing. You know this isn't to say that results will be available in three hours but just that it's a slightly faster protocol means that labs pamphlets room autistic day. So we do that. We can't see many in some situations. Same Day results if what we're really striving for us to get below that twenty, our timeframe that we're just not seeing. At the moment how much does this test cost I? Believe I've read that that nobody is looking to really make any money on this they're trying to put this out there and make sure it's available at the lowest cost. Possible. That's exactly right. So and we're being very very open about let's should be ambushed at expecting the regions cost and how much the people can speak in the. Cost and that's because the reagents of the chemicals that make up the test opinion that companies getting them from the only cost somewhere between one and four dollars for the reagents. That's just the reagents attest. We do know that there is a markups said, GonNa go onto this such as you know to. The logistics of giving the taste of personnel to run the also just you know they need to pay for the facilities that. Do those tests but. Is that that was still trying to limit that labs charge. So we do want this to be as cheap as possible society and went our you're part of compensation. How much I charge in China Steve Down.

Associate Research Scientist Yale School Of Public Health Yale University NBA Covid Corona Hugh FDA China
The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

The Savvy Investor Radio

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

"The FDA on Saturday issuing an emergency use authorization for the new saliva Direct Corona virus test developed by the Yale University School of Public Health and the National Basketball Association. The test processes saliva samples to rapidly determine whether a person is infected with the Corona virus and does not need any swab or other specific collection device. The new test is also far cheaper than current tests costing about $4. There's a test for materials before any added labor cost. That price and a quick turnaround time could help encourage more frequent covert 19 testing in settings like schools, universities and office buildings. All Steven's Fox

Yale University School Of Publ National Basketball Associatio FDA Steven