35 Burst results for "Yale University"

'The Diversity Delusion' Author Heather Mac Donald on Young Americans' Move to the Left

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 3 d ago

'The Diversity Delusion' Author Heather Mac Donald on Young Americans' Move to the Left

"So Heather, I want to ask you about the study from axios that I'd love to get your commentary on it. The essence is that it shows that young people are going far to the left and they're not basically staying. And they're not conservative as conservatives prior generations. What would you attribute this to? You talk about this a lot in the diversity delusion. You talk about the several dynamics that come into play. How would you explain this? Well, it's a combination of overt ideology and prosperity. Decades decades, decades in America of stable society, limited government, extraordinary conquest of poverty, want disease, premature death, and young people have absolutely no idea what the west has accomplished to make their lives so, so cushy and so opportunity filled, but then of course that's the background and the more overt politicization is coming from the elite classes in the education establishment. And that are dedicated to tearing down the west that are filled with anti white hatred. They hate a civilization being too white and male. And they're very few competing voices. The establishment, you know, in the 50s, the establishment used to be viewed as conservative. And indeed, it often was the American bar association, the American medical association. These institutions were regarded as guardians of traditional bourgeois norms, respect for property, respect for the rule of law. And now they are almost indistinguishable from Brown university or Yale University or Harvard in their dedication to this phony ideology that says the white white supremacy and white racism is the defining characteristic of American

Heather America American Bar Association American Medical Association Yale University Or Harvard Brown University
The History of Experimental Research in Psychology

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:06 min | 5 months ago

The History of Experimental Research in Psychology

"Psychology has been an important topic of study for centuries the ancient greeks and egyptians had their schools of thought on it as did the people in ancient india and china. it wasn't until the nineteenth century. Though when psychological research turned from the philosophical to the experimental german psychologist gustave thickener started testing human brains response to various stimuli around the eighteen thirties from their experts. Such as herman ebbing house went on to study other functions of the mind from memory to introspection to classical conditioning psychology became a bustling industry of experimentation. Eventually scientists didn't just want to learn the limits of the brain. They wanted to understand what made people tick. Why were some individuals able to say no while others were more closers. Stanley milgram of yale university tested this in his famous milgram experiment in nineteen sixty one. He invited participants to administer electric shocks to someone in another room. As the shocks increased in power the screams of the unknown party got louder and more intense until they stopped completely. But don't worry nobody died. The electric shocks weren't even real but the effects on the subjects pushing the buttons certainly were milgram wanted to test how far a person would go in following orders from an authority figure even if those orders involved hurting or even killing someone else. He based his experiment. On the actions of the nazis during world war two the stanford prison experiment of nineteen seventy-one took things further by placing college students in a simulated prison environment. The purpose was to study. How power affected one psychological states one group of students was given the title of guard while another subset was placed in the prisoner role. Three guards were pulled out of the experiment early after demonstrating what were described as genuine sadistic tendencies. The prisoners also suffered they were referred to by numbers rather than their names. They were stripped naked and sprayed with a hose in shorts. They were humiliated the two week experiment was terminated. After just six

Gustave Thickener Herman Ebbing Stanley Milgram Yale University India China Milgram Stanford
The Dangers of Emotional Stress Impacting Your Physical Well-Being

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:04 min | 8 months ago

The Dangers of Emotional Stress Impacting Your Physical Well-Being

"Scientists actually discovered that emotional stress. Similar to adorn experience can be a trigger for the growth of tumors as a matter of fact any sort of trauma emotional or physical stress can act as literal pathway between cancerous mutations bringing them together in a potentially fatal combination for example at yale university scientists have discovered that everyday emotional stress is a trigger for the growth tumors. The finding showed that conditions for developing cancer can be significantly affected by your emotional environment including everyday work and family stress in other words. Your risk of developing cancer can be positively or negatively affected by your emotional environment including everyday work physical emotional and relationship stress. The traditional chinese medical view of cancer ideology has long held that emotions are a major contributing factor for cancer author. Son vignon writes in his book cancer treatment and prevention according to our understanding of the tumor patient most have suppression of emotions. They tend to hold in their anger. Although some patients have good results after treatment emotional stimulation can cause them to decline again and then the previous treatment would have been in vain. Some people have a severe phobia about cancer before they know the real disease. They have a lot of suspicion. They know they have cancer. Their whole spirit breaks down. This kind of spiritual state is very bad for treatment. In the book prevention and treatment of carcinoma in traditional chinese medicine. Jiakun gives ten recommendations for cancer prevention in addition to a good environment and personal hygiene proper amounts of physical activity and rest good eating habits and healthy food and avoiding smoking. He states that emotional changes such as worry. Fear hesitation anger irritation and nervousness should be presented mental exhaustion. It's harmful and life should be enriched with entertainment. Chinese medicine author sheila ming and she pecan also mentioned the ideology of various cancers and their book experience in treating carcinomas with traditional chinese medicine. They say the etiological factors of the disease involved chiefly the disturbance of the seven emotions especially melancholy anxiety and anger which are liable to impair the spleen and

Cancer Cancerous Mutations Tumors Son Vignon Yale University Jiakun Phobia Carcinoma Sheila Ming
How Did WarnerMedia Get Its Start?

TechStuff

02:09 min | 8 months ago

How Did WarnerMedia Get Its Start?

"Today i thought we'd start down the road to talk about the various companies that make up warnermedia kind of unravel it all and this is going to be a heck of a story because it includes several influential media companies that had their own distinct histories before coalescing into warnermedia includes companies that are not media companies at all like funeral homes for real now when i say complicated. I'm not kidding. Our story includes a window washing company. A parking company an online service provider company Few magazine publishers. And more there are mergers and acquisitions are spin offs. There's family betrayal and lots of other stuff. So where the heck do i get started. Why suppose. I should talk about the core components and then work to the point where they all come together and i could start pretty much anywhere because there so many different pieces to the story. But i'm going to begin with time because it's on my side. Yes it is henry. Loose and briton hadden. Had a lot in common. They both attended yale. University they both worked as reporters for the baltimore news and both of them were in their early twenties back in nineteen twenty two and they also wanted to try something. That was a new idea. Newspapers were thing obviously but loosen. Hatton had the idea for a news magazine. They decided to try and create one because no one had really done it before. And they raised more than eighty thousand dollars which was a princely sum in nineteen twenty two and they quit their jobs to found a company called time inc and a magazine called time it would publish weekly starting in march of nineteen twenty-three loose served as the business manager for the young publishing company and hadn't was editor in chief and together. They found success with this weekly magazine. Format

Warnermedia Few Magazine Briton Hadden Henry Baltimore Hatton Time Inc
Dr. Laurie Santos on Teaching the Most Popular Course Ever at Yale University

The Goal Digger Podcast

01:40 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Laurie Santos on Teaching the Most Popular Course Ever at Yale University

"I am dying to know. Where did your journey to study. Happiness and well-being begin. What is the story behind this story. Yeah yeah so i mean. I've been a an academic psychologist forever. Basically i've studied psychology for a really long time but my interest in the science of happiness started when i took on a new role at yale. I became a ahead of college on campus so yells. One of these funny weirdo. School is like hogwarts and harry potter where there's colleges within a college. So i'm i'm head of silliman college which means i live in the dorm with students right. I eat with them in the dining hall on. Hang out with them in the student. Coffee shop in in this new role. I really didn't like what i was seeing. I was seeing the college student mental health crisis up close and personal with like so many of my students reporting that they were. Just you know depressed. Feeling anxious overwhelmed students who are experiencing suicidality. It just wasn't what i thought. College life should be like right and so the journey. The science of happiness was really. I wanted to do something to help my students. I really wanted to give them strategies that were evidence base that they could use to feel better than because. I'm a nerdy professor. The best way to do that. Was you know to to teach in new class on it. So i developed this whole new class called psychology in the good life. It was like a new class. You know at this university. And so i thought like thirty or forty students would show up in so you can imagine my surprise when it became like the biggest class ever in yale's history over thousand students according to the entire campus showed up in. Wow oh yeah. I was a little surreal. But it you know. It really taught me that you know. Students are voting with their feet. They don't like the sensor feeling stressed and anxious and they wanted some strategies to do better.

Silliman College Harry Potter
Justice Dept Drops Lawsuit Claiming Yale Discriminated in Admissions

Bloomberg Law

05:15 min | 1 year ago

Justice Dept Drops Lawsuit Claiming Yale Discriminated in Admissions

"Talking to Audrey Anderson, who had the higher education practice of Bass, Berry and Simms about President Joe Biden's Johnson's Department dropping and Trump Administration lawsuit accusing Yale University of discriminating against whites and Asian Americans while favoring black and Hispanic applicants for admission. Move marks a swift shift in priorities for Biden's Justice Department, signaling its abandonment of the previous administration's efforts to reverse college diversity efforts. But the battle over race conscious admissions is far from over. After losing a similar Harvard case over discrimination in November, students were fair admission, said it would ask the U. S. Supreme Court to reverse the ruling and toss out decades of president. High court, which now has a 6 to 3 Conservative majority has yet to say if it will take up the appeal. The group has similar cases pending against the University of Texas and the University of North Carolina, alleging discrimination against Asian, American and white students and says it will file another lawsuit against Yale. Tell us what the strategy of students for fair admissions is what it's lawsuits across the country. Your students for fair admission. Will they bring cases? Challenging You'd admissions plans that have race as a factor. In admissions and say that those plans discriminate on the basis of race. Their plainness lately have been all Asian American. Do them. They say that when colleges consider race in admissions and the discriminated against Asians based on waste, that's what their complaints say they always in all of their cases. They have also Included a claim that Any consideration of race violates the Constitution. Even though that argument is We're closed by current law. The current Supreme Court lost, says the colleges may consider race An admission. If they show they other compelling interest in considering race that their use of races narrowly tailored Students repair admissions always make an argument that hey, we think that's wrong. We think the Supreme Court Current case law is wrong, and if we ever get a chance to argue this before the Supreme Court, we're going to tell the Supreme Court that we think that's wrong and they should overturn that law. So it seems prepared missions is where was doing by filing cases all across the country. They are trying to improve their chances that the Supreme Court Will at some point Decide to read you one of these lower court decisions and eventually rule. And prepared missions favor on that. Argument that the Constitution does not allow the consideration of race. And higher education admissions. So we know that the Harvard case went up to the circuit court, and that's as we discussed awaiting perhaps Supreme Court review. What about the other cases that they filed? Yeah. So the University of North Carolina, they filed a case against the University of North Carolina. They had a trial in that case in November. And, um, the Mr Court is waiting for the parties to file finding the facts and conclusions of law. Later this month. And so we are then awaiting a written decision from the judge in that case, and that's just the district court. The trial level. So it could be anywhere from You know 3 to 6 months. No longer before we get a decision. In that case from the trial court. You know what's happening with the Texas case? I believe. Yeah, So there's a case pending in Texas. And they're really at the very early stages of that case. I just checked and they Have a scheduling order that was just entered that has trial scheduled for September of 2022. It was gonna be a long time before there's any decision in that case on the merits. The strange thing about that case is that they're gonna be doing some briefing in the next few months. On some legal questions about whether the court should go forward with this decision at all, based on the fact that just a few years ago Of course, including the Supreme Court. Revered the admission process at the University of Texas Austin and found it to be constitutional. They're going to do some breaking the next few months about Hey, as if afraid. You get to litigate this all again now. Or have we already decided that so the case might go away on those grounds within the next, you know, six months. But if that doesn't happen, then it will be a long time before we get a decision in that case, so

Supreme Court Audrey Anderson President Joe Biden Johnson's Department Trump Administration Yale University Of Discriminat Biden's Justice Department U. S. Supreme Court University Of North Carolina Simms Harvard Berry High Court University Of Texas Bass Yale Mr Court Texas University Of Texas Austin
Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You focus for example you can focus on a certain kind of predator feeding on a certain kind of her before a group and when i say a certain kind of predator could be whole righty predators that are largely sit and wait predators or alternatively a whole variety of predators that are actively hunting predators. those groups have you know. Within those groups have the same kinds of effects on the herbivores and so by sort of grouping things and looking after injured connections. We can make some decent predictions about the amount of carbon that should be stored in soil given the nature of the way they interact. And we've been paper that that we're talking about right now is actually allegation of long prediction where we would argue that you know with this kind of predation you would see as much soil retention And then with another kind of predator you would see a very different Soil carbon retention. We've made predictions about that and the predictions actually other cross that that human land use gradient. Is this a disability. Being been done also. This sounds to me that there could be some sort of a monitoring system. There could be some a i techniques you could apply if if the objective function as and i'm just making this up if the object your functions to maximize carbon sequestration then a It is a characteristic that you looking for it. Turns off you know the animals and the plans actually in this case In six in the whole system rate and so could be actually have some sort of a monitoring system that provides decision guidance as to how to maximize sequestration. You could In the way you would do As you would think of the different species as part of a portfolio of yet of organisms that you can pick so you know building on your economic argument You could use what's called portfolio theory in a sense to think about you know with certain functional trade for groupings and you know how much if just that steve group were present. You would store x. Amount of carbon if you added a certain number of other groups from different you know or number of individuals from different groups you get an incremental increasing carbon storage It isn't always just simply added though but we can sorta come up with a way of characterizing how much carbon you can take up forever incremental increase in functional group that you add to to the system there is some what we call functional redundancy in the system so so so the portfolio theory idea is is you know you can. You can increment late at species from different functional groups and and sort of build up complexity and then you can sort of assess how much carbon you're storing for every incremental increase in number of of groups that you add an part of it also has. Its you're going to have diminishing returns eventually because there is some certain amount of redundancy among species in their functional roles so in other words within a group of species that perform similar functions. Obviously you don't need every every cici's necessarily to perform that function..

steve cici
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Well. You know what i'm gonna do here is sort of pointed. it's context. I've been involved in the last five years. It's it's called. Tom and et a c. L. us it's a prediction website. And so few. If you go to metaxas you can make predictions Now thousands of different questions if you go there right now. It's just trump cards on. That's that's what did in in the moment right. We got tens of thousands of visitors coming b because of that but but if you drill down or if you go to the topic Something that we've been running is a series of questions about Artificial intelligence outcomes and these questions run the gamut from near-term outcomes like for instance parameters will gp four have when it's released and will be released as though the questions that are going to resolve. You know timescale months two years so to longer scale questions like will the At vance general intelligence emerged boston. Questions about arkansas intelligence. And that's in the sense why we formed the site because we were interested in getting at the best consensus judgement sort of taken over a large number of diverse individuals. To what we. What kind of community whole thinks will happen. And it's known that prediction aggregation Techniques are the best way to get an idea of what will happen. It's not in the salad bowl but it's you know the the the ideas predictions that around metaxas. I would warrant to probably our best current view of things like win dance. General intelligence is going so rather than speculating here scenarios to the site and urge them. If they're not interested in politics tasks light right now. Which i certainly can can understand given the teak with all that there's a really really interesting Set of questions. That are a little bit lower down the the the the traffic west that dell into exactly the kinds of issues that we've been talking about. Yeah i will definitely try it and so so big be couldn't get to your finance papers but they can do another another podcast specifically in that area but yeah that's tough. This has been great. Great thanks so much for spending time with me and good luck. Okay thank you. thank you bye bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you do sponsor this podcast please reach out to in full. At scientific sense dot com..

metaxas arkansas Tom vance dell boston
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Is that it literally will get come off the wall idea and right about that so it will connect with something that it's iterating on hughes to what it's supposed to be doing and then something in the model to think something else when using the word thank berry and it'll come up with with insights that are just staunching. And and so. For instance there was there was I also Have been been kind of disillusioned with the endless stream of habitable planet stories like extraordinaire spine. Mr that have a planet. Were thinking this or that star and it's always always the first time in like a dozen. I housed planet so what i did was students. Night collected all the article hip written in a number of venues ranging from fox news new york times we collected all the articles about how little planet discoveries over the last ten years and fined trained. Jt to of bath and then gave gt to just like a made up planetary.

new york times Jt hughes berry
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It's it's kim. Yeah they can to a giant break now again. I have no idea what it would want. Or why it would be thinking what it thinks no presumption. The only the only thing that i know is that if it were to exist would be an extraordinarily powerful information processing. And there was a story by Fred foil wonderful science fiction book that probably many of your readers to read titled the black cloud and he effectively descried low energy version of exactly that His in the the only difference between by a cloud and the entity that i'm envisioning and simply that the red giant diner giant has a lot more energy for computation. But by cloud is really. That's the model. And i think that was really really insightful. Store near insightful idea. He had For that time and amazing amazing so this this should be something evolutionary Next step in the sense that civilizations like ours without completely run out of energy may vanish for other reasons But over time Wife me What may be finding. The universe are advanced entities. Such as this so could be considered this potentially sort of a next evolutionary step might not be next in the sense that that it may have been going on for for a long time once once it start it likely would be able to figure out how to feed the process in other giant stars That could be done remotely or it can be done by sending small small By newman mike machines through galaxy would not be that difficult. If you knew how to feed this process we get this going because once it gets going energy in the raw materials who their matter of of organization the cosmos to happen. Started happening a long time ago. He's got that have been happening in the red giants. But you'd out the material that.

His Fred
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"All the greenery all the clans absorbing sunlight and effectively. They're using them to do computation. And if you study. The molecular dynamics of those dna replication. You see that that the biology is actually figured out a way to do that. Computation very efficiently. Biologists probably somewhere between a factor in the pan under time Higher than absolute minimum bound. Which is much better than present. Day computers although present day computers are getting better and better Very very rapidly until approach biological limit likely within our lifetime but nonetheless the earth using a substantial fraction of the amount of light the it to actively do computation so can the last four and a half billion years least last say three billion years earth has been you know acting as a computer do normal number of the that resulted. Those calculations are all diversity that we see in life so we Like discovered mazing molecules all sorts of interesting ways of doing things that's result a lot of competition and so it's just interesting to see if you think of things in terms of of that way. A computer is not just something seeing on your desk but rather computation is really the the way by which the universe manages to do interesting. Things like it's so so you understand this correctly greg. So the current budget In terms of power usage by artificial computation you said via using about ten to the power minus six off the off the solid incidents about minus seven. So okay okay. And and the by and plan saw you said a ten motives much third plant. They're much more efficient. Transfer probably probably of order The at least a thousand and probably more like several hundred thousand times more efficient curbed it then are fast our best computers and then they're leaving. You know something like like like a twenty percent. Ten to twenty percent of the solar energy is striking striking plants from being absorbed so right now the amount.

greg
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is purpose. A gregory lachlan. Who is a professor at sony and astrophysics at yale university. He is implicit in hydrodynamics. Simulations against roy adaptation affects the solar planets platforming environments as well as the future of the universe has done glitch a variety of topics including star formation extra solar planets interstellar objects and fred adams case off the flight ages of the universe. They'll concrete. thank you go sure. yeah so. you have Unpublished paper that. I found very interesting. And it's titled on the energetics of large scale computation using astronomical resources. You save global energy expenditures floor. Artificial computation continue to increase at the current rate. Which is almost exponential now the required power consumption will exceed the power consumption of the biosphere in less than a century. So if this condition. Jose you said this commotion holes even with assumption that all artificial computation proced- it's optimal dynamic efficiency so even if the get the optimum efficiency. You're basically arguing that you're going to run out of power compute so so yeah so could you describe you. Know sort of the The numbers that you're using to conclusion. Sure the What kind of got me interested in this problem of large scale computation. There was an article in the new york times two years ago. About how data centers were moving to iceland. And the reason why they were moving to iceland is because a hydraulic power. There is a pretty inexpensive. And then also because the cooling servers very efficient in addison big facility and speed and too so most of northern scandinavia. Yeah yeah deanne. Google and setup servers princeton in hood river oregon to take advantage of the columbia river. And and so what what is kind of going on. Is that The use of power to do computation that is to run servers as well as to run all of our devices now uses about two percent of The electricity that's produced on earth and it's equivalent to taking all of the sunlight that falls all your round on a patch of earth. That's about one hundred kilometers Square and so something like one. Ten million of the energy that striking iraq earth and the sun equivalent of that is being used to do computation here on earth. And that's a number that is growing exponentially And then another thing that kinda got me really got my attention was was this idea of of using proof of work as a way of Running crypto currencies and proof of work. In which is what is underlying bitcoin. It's really interesting way of equating energy of money and Bid operations and sort of showing that. Those three concepts are all fungible in to one another. They're all equivalent at some level. Energy is computation. yeah so so. Bitcoin essentially it's the process even get into the details south at Bitcoin mining. I think it's called sometimes requires ted amount of computing Computing power To to do that. So so what you're saying that Really if you if you love successful in that..

gregory lachlan iceland yale university hood river oregon fred adams deanne professor new york times columbia river sony roy Google Jose scandinavia iraq
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Former Chicago health commissioner named to Biden’s COVID-19 task force

Bob Sirott

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Former Chicago health commissioner named to Biden’s COVID-19 task force

"Announced his covert 19 task force yesterday. 12 of the 13 positions have been filled with doctors. W G A NEWS nation national political correspondent Dean Reynolds. Mr Biden held a call with his new Covad 19 Advisory council, chaired by Dr Vivek Murthy, a former surgeon general under President Obama. David Kessler, a former FDA commissioner, and Dr Marcella Nunes Smith of Yale University. The purpose of This is to let you know what we're going to do once worn in. And so there's a need for bold action to fight this pandemic. We're still facing a very dark winter. Chicago's former public health commissioner is among the experts joining that task force. Mayor Lightfoot have plotted Dr Julie Morita's selection. Dr Morita obviously knows the city very well. She's a national expert. There's already been some communications with her. Marina was a staff member at Chicago's Health Department for 20 years, she served as the city health commissioner from 2015 to 2019. Also on that task force. Former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel older brother Dr Ezekiel Emanuel. He's also been named to that new board. The FDA

Dean Reynolds Mr Biden Dr Vivek Murthy Dr Marcella Nunes Smith David Kessler Covad Mayor Lightfoot Dr Julie Morita Dr Morita Yale University President Obama FDA Chicago Marina Health Department Mayor Rahm Emanuel Dr Ezekiel Emanuel
"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Does working in daycare increase coronavirus risk? New study suggests no

The KFBK Morning News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Does working in daycare increase coronavirus risk? New study suggests no

"Working in a daycare increased Corona virus risk? There is a new study that suggests No largest study of its kind exposure to child care not associated with a heightened risk of Corona virus infection. According to the authors of this new study, 57,000 childcare providers were researched by Yale University.

Yale University
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | 1 year ago

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
"yale university" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"This is Colonel Dana Gillum. This is the final formation for this hour on front lines of freedom. We're continuing our conversation with Steve Kirby on Islam in America. Steve. We're about to get to looking at specific conflict between Islamic law and doctrine, and the Constitution is they don't want to cover before we get there. No, we can jump right into that. Okay, Let's talk about that conflict. Because we have tohave elected officials who will actually honestly support and defend the constitution. So let's talk about the Constitution. Talking. And as I mentioned in the first statement, I'd live this last week about the question I sent out asking Muslim public officials and candidates to choose between freedom of expression and the Islamic doctrinal prohibition. Criticism of Mohammed And we can focus on the freedom of speech that our Constitution guarantees but is forbidden by Islamic doctor and this started out in your early days of this. In 6 24 to be exact when Mohammed was consolidated news power in Medina, and he started ordering the killing of bullets and individuals who had criticized him. And I'll give you a good example. Jewish Port calm Minallah Schroth had criticized Mohammed Mohammed ordered him to be killed in combat skill, and it caused a lot of consternation in the Jewish community. So they came to Mohammed and said, Hey, what happened right here. Here's the key words of foot. Mohammed said he's stalking Mark Cobb. He says if he cub had remained as others of similar opinion remained You would not have been killed treacherously. But he heard us and insulted us with poetry. And one does not do this among you, but he should be put to the sword. This set the standard for criticizing of Mohammed. A lot of people might be think. Well, Gina was back in seventh century. It means nothing now. Absolutely wrong. Let's jump to 2005 Danish cartoon situation. A Danish newspaper published cartoons ridiculing Mohammed. It caused riots in the Middle East people were killed. And Kurt Vestergaard, the artist who did this had repeated attempts on his life because he criticized made ridiculed Mohammed. Now in 2009. If you think all that was that was in Denmark, it still big deal 2009. A book came out about the cartoons and the title was the cartoons that shook the world and it was published here in the United States by Yale University Press. The kicker is Yale University Press said. We'll publish the book. But it can include any of the Danish cartoons or any other illustrations of Mohammed. The author reluctantly agreed to publishing the book, So the title is the cartoons that shook the world. There's no cartoons in it at all, and it's interesting because John Donne a Titch, the director of Yale University, Press, said this, he said the decision to exclude the cartoons and illustrations of Mohammed was difficult. But he said, when it came between that and blood on my hands There was no question Yale University Press, acknowledged Islamic doctor a prohibition and criticizing Mohammed right here in the United States. 2010 Southfork, the satirical cartoon series. They were gonna have a serious for Mohammed appeared dressed as a bear. They received threats from a group called Revolution Muslim. And they took that sequence out later that year. A lot of people don't know about this mauling Norse editorial cartoons for the Seattle weekly because of what happened with self part, she said, You know, some I'm gonna having everybody draw Mohammed and it was publicized. She immediately started getting death threats. Finally, on the advice of the FBI, Molly Norris went into hiding. Change. Your name completely disappeared. This was in 2010. Molly Norris has not appeared again and bring in a 2015 Robert Spencer. Pamela Geller hosted a Muslim art exhibit and contest in Garland, Texas, were drawings of Mohammed or judge. Two heavily armed Muslims came driving up. They're going to shoot the place up. Fortunately, a police officer engaged them. Shot most of them and into the writer, But the bottom line is even here in the United States. Islam does not allow freedom of speech, especially about Mohammed. So this is something we need very concerned about. Wow. It certainly is. I had heard about a few of those. I hadn't put them all together till you just did that. This is kind of funny. Dylan from lots of freedom. We're talking Islam in America with Steve Kirby. Steve, that is really violation. I mean, the First Amendment to our Constitution, our listeners apartment read hundreds of times says. Freedom of press freedom of speech. Congress shall make no law abridging an establishment of religion for every the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press, or of the right of people to peacefully assemble to petition Congress if you can't Have a public art drawing. You can't publish a book that's a violent constitution. And if you can't do it, well, it is And you know what makes earth Wow you know, and we'll make it even worse, like Molly Norris. Here is a journalist who received threat. Because she was gonna happen. Everybody draw Mohammadi, and she's disappeared Spin since 2010 she's disappeared. There was virtually no coverage in the American media about a journalist having to disappear because of threats. Because of the threats because that journalists want to exercise The First Amendment. Can you imagine if, say, a right wing group and spreading a journalist? Oh, don't draw pictures of so And so we're going to attack you. The media in the United States would be in screaming and yelling about First Amendment right? When it comes this one. Even the US media knows the rules. Wow. And what you're saying is true. All you gotta do is think about what's been covered What hasn't been covered? Can. It's not surprising to those who pay attention of the media that they Are very, very selective in the really news if they cover Wow, that's scary. As we wind up for today. We've got a couple of more minutes talk to us about where we're going next week. Well next week. Maybe we could continue just a little bit on Islamic doctrine conflicts mother aspects of U. S Constitution. But what I'd like to do is really talk about some concepts that are important to understanding this. Once you understand these concepts, it'll give you a better perspective, even really a better understanding of Islamic doctrine. Well and troops. I hope you understand that we are to be politically correct here or to throw rocks at anybody, but to make it clear that this is a potential threat. And certainly there's an indication that many of the candidates are not Three to whether it's because they can't or won't but they haven't responded to his survey. This is something that's scary. And that's why I wanted here. Group. This is the second of three interviews were doing with Steve. He'll be joining us again next week. Steve. Thank you. Thank you for taking time to join us today. Thank you for your concern for our nation's Thank you for your service to our nation in law enforcement..

Mohammed Mohammed Steve Kirby United States Molly Norris Yale University Press America Colonel Dana Gillum Middle East Kurt Vestergaard Denmark Yale University Minallah Schroth Medina Congress FBI Pamela Geller Seattle John Donne Gina
How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

Data Skeptic

06:33 min | 1 year ago

How The Consensus Voting Mechanism Works

"So my name is Mush. Pot. Suzuki like the car last year a student at Yale University in Computer Science and mathematics and I'm supervised by Adrian Vata and from goalie. I'm very happy to be here and thank you for inviting me. I got exposed to your work. When I read the paper, I invited you to come on and talk about mostly today is how many freemasons are there consensus voting mechanisms in metric space so no less than three interesting ideas for me in the title maybe we should give some background to open up with consensus. What does that mean is that? Just the majority or how will we be using the word today? Consensus mechanism is Mecca Zeman which to select a candidate they're only if everyone agrees on it for instance, they said you're running for some group Peter, you get accepted only if everyone in the group agrees on it and you want you accepted otherwise. so that's like unanimity the Neha in here. Yeah. It's basically the same as unanimity but in different. Settings. Unanimity also implies that it's a property where you have if everyone agrees on that, you accept it but something can happen. If you know, let's say you can use different rules otherwise there's a different sort distinctions there, but it's basically the same as unanimity that particular choice leads to some interesting things and you guys are presented this really concise analogy to the freemasons. Well, I suppose getting down to the actual counter freemasons trying to conduct a census here that just formalizes. A funny title to give because as you know that freemasons are interesting sort of group there. Member only if everyone agrees on sort of it, fits our mechanisms today run their group through consensus voting Gotcha so it wouldn't surprise me if just given how much sort of folklore the surrounds the freemasons that there might be at least a few listeners confused about whether or not there are real organization. Could you throw a few facts Edis? have. Amazing temples in Montreal, phrases, I live in Montreal. So they have a huge temple here and they're very active and I don't know too much about their inner workings or I've never been inside the doors but they're very oh yeah you can go to their building for instance so real organization and in terms of getting accepted into it if I wanted to go in that building up there in. Montreal is this the actual mechanism they literally use or is this a sort of an analogy? So I don't know this for sure but I heard I read online that in order to get accepted that everyone in taboo are everyone in that group has agree on it. So is the medicine that they actually use. Cool. Well, I guess whenever that started it wouldn't be surprising that it could grow quickly. Right, if I was thinking of starting my own such organization and I I, invited my wife. Now we have two members and perhaps she and I can agree her sister joins and my sister joins. But at some point, someone's going to say no to the next member what can we learn about that and how do we study it? What are the interesting Totta questions? So you have two different settings. Here. So wondering is not remodeled people's opinions and you say I prefer my wife says I prefer my daughter you know or or so and so forth we need to the preferences of people. So one of the classic ideas in voting theory and actually just modeling through machine learning or any sort of the setting is this prioritizing people's opinion or privatizing people. So for instance, let's say you could be. Leaning like the political left or right. There's a spectrum for which you are lighted. Let's sure you can be at the centre or you could be very right thing or it could be a very level. So we can model that as any number between minus one and one, but two one being the right-wing minus one being the left-wing. So then that's one example of how you prioritize people right? Because you wanted to this rigorously and mathematically. So we need a method to represent people and our model is at. ISSUE, have this in which you represent urine. You couldn't space in some point. Is You your opinion and you vote for someone who similar to? Let's say you're very right wing than some candidate comes in then you're more likely to vote for someone who is right being than left-wing to someone who is closer to you in opinion or characteristic that's our model of but this question was asked actually before in one emissions but in one dimension. So you're basically just have an inch between minus one and one, and this was an extra Unin by very famous. Nogal. Yes. Paper in two, thousand, sixteen, two, thousand, fourteen I forget. But we did this in higher dimensions in actually specifically two dimensions because it introduces so much more complexity when you go up in a dimension, right so Francis, why do we need higher dimensions is because before you you're presenting people left and right but people are more complex than that. You can't just represent a person by just one number for instance you. have to use multiple features as people say. So you have this multiple characteristics of people and they become dimension. So we do this in two missions surprisingly the mathematical difficulty of asking this question John Huge becomes actually much more difficult in two dimension than one dish very interesting and I guess maybe the answers grounded in a lot of details. But is there an essence to what that challenges is it that there are more simulations or? Is there a complexity theory aspect of this? Why is a two dimension so much more difficult than one so for instance, if you look at random shape, you can characterize this voting as looking at something called random convex or some random shapes. The question bows down on understanding certain random shapes and here assuming that the candidates are appearing. Let's say uniformly at on interval you have existing group members and she accepts somebody then he becomes. Group member and you evolve. So the candidates are uniform at each time step and so to answer the question we knew looking at this sort of random judge shapes in one dimension there's only one shape is just an interval intimate conviction in one dimension is just an interval. Some number between attack could be minus zero point five to zero point one is, but let's say you go into the mission all of a sudden there's so Many different shapes so many different things second happen if the shape is convinced or even just not convex in two dimensions does different more complex shapes can get in one mission. You only have interested in two dimensions you have gone as you have China goals, you have something that approximates your face even that could be shade in two missions, but that's not going to happen in Wand mission

Montreal Suzuki Yale University Adrian Vata Mecca Zeman China John Huge Peter Francis
Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

Steve Cochran

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment

"Administration is also authorized the first rapid Corona virus test That doesn't need any special computer equipment results to go along with it. 15 minute test from Abbott Laboratories will sell for $5 its latest cheaper, simpler test if the U. S market provides some new options to expand testing the FDA also recently Green lighted a saliva test from Yale University. That bypass is some of the supplies that have led to testing bottlenecks. Both tests have limitations. Neither can be done at home

Abbott Laboratories Yale University FDA U. S
Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

Sean Hannity

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Yale professor warned students of ‘widespread infections and possibly deaths'

"Covert 19. Meanwhile, a Yale University professor is warning college students today returning to campus to prepare for widespread infections and even deaths. Yale psychology professor Laurie Santos says students should be emotionally prepared for a residential college life that resembles quote a hospital unit. Several of Ohio's colleges, including Ohio State are conducting covert 19 testing on their students who live on campus at

Yale University Professor Laurie Santos Ohio State Ohio
New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

Squawk Pod

03:47 min | 1 year ago

New Saliva-Based COVID-19 Test Could Be a Fast and Cheap 'Game Changer'

"A potential breakthrough in the battle against covid nineteen, the FDA, just granting emergency approval, for Corona, virus saliva test calling it testing innovation game changer this test which is simpler cheaper and less invasive than naval swabs was developed by Yale University researchers. It's been used by the NBA and could greatly help expand testing capacity joining us right now is an Wiley. She is associate research scientist with Yale School of Public Health, which helped develop this new tests and it's great to see you. Thank you for being with us this morning. And Hugh morning. So this is incredibly exciting the idea that you could do the saliva test that it could be cheap and readily available How does it work? Actually, quite simple really. It's as the name suggests that we you've seen saliva as the sample time. And what we're trying to do is get away from that swamp. That's that can you know there's been quite a bit of the vision to the swamp time and we're hoping to get around supply chain issues that we've been saying with the swamps and we also Greenie. Fancy. Collection Devices to help ourselves down and so was actually also quite a make about it unique about is that we haven't actually developed a taste that we just packed up out to you. So you next one of these tests but what we've? What we've developed is the mythic full the taste recipe you could say and we're able to she had this taste with other labs for them to get this method often running in their labs. As. Tasted south with actually adapted the white commonly used piece the artist which takes the virus are a but we've done is removed the most expensive stiff of that replacing with a more simple workup, which again house is down at work though I mean if it still requires a lab to put together, you deliver it to me and then what I drive to the lab, and then how long does it take for me to get my results back? So indeed much psych you know what you're doing at the moment with a swap. So the swap is being ordered for your doctoral with A. Is million schools where you have like a little booth, we your saliva sample and had that taken to the lab and so taking out that was time consuming our in that results Ruby available Asta. You know this isn't one of those that will teach broken about you know we can get. Results, sorted through in about three hours about ninety two samples. But of course, depending on the through the lab is experiencing. You know this isn't to say that results will be available in three hours but just that it's a slightly faster protocol means that labs pamphlets room autistic day. So we do that. We can't see many in some situations. Same Day results if what we're really striving for us to get below that twenty, our timeframe that we're just not seeing. At the moment how much does this test cost I? Believe I've read that that nobody is looking to really make any money on this they're trying to put this out there and make sure it's available at the lowest cost. Possible. That's exactly right. So and we're being very very open about let's should be ambushed at expecting the regions cost and how much the people can speak in the. Cost and that's because the reagents of the chemicals that make up the test opinion that companies getting them from the only cost somewhere between one and four dollars for the reagents. That's just the reagents attest. We do know that there is a markups said, GonNa go onto this such as you know to. The logistics of giving the taste of personnel to run the also just you know they need to pay for the facilities that. Do those tests but. Is that that was still trying to limit that labs charge. So we do want this to be as cheap as possible society and went our you're part of compensation. How much I charge in China Steve Down.

Associate Research Scientist Yale School Of Public Health Yale University NBA Covid Corona Hugh FDA China
The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

The Savvy Investor Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

The FDA Authorizes a Cheap, Fast Saliva Test, and the NBA Is Involved

"The FDA on Saturday issuing an emergency use authorization for the new saliva Direct Corona virus test developed by the Yale University School of Public Health and the National Basketball Association. The test processes saliva samples to rapidly determine whether a person is infected with the Corona virus and does not need any swab or other specific collection device. The new test is also far cheaper than current tests costing about $4. There's a test for materials before any added labor cost. That price and a quick turnaround time could help encourage more frequent covert 19 testing in settings like schools, universities and office buildings. All Steven's Fox

Yale University School Of Publ National Basketball Associatio FDA Steven
Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white students in admissions

Mac and Gaydos

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white students in admissions

"The Justice Department accused Yale University today of discriminating against White and Asian American applicants after a two year investigation, the Justice Department concluded. Yale rejects scores of Asian, American and white students each year based on their race, whom it would otherwise admit. The Justice Department said Yale discriminates based on race and national origin and uses race in admissions to a greater degree than the Supreme Court allows. Bail, denied it and said it absolutely complies with Supreme Court standards. The Justice Department threatened a lawsuit, but Yale said it will not change on the basis of what it called a meritless and hasty

Justice Department Yale Yale University Supreme Court
DOJ says Yale is discriminating against Asian and White applicants

Tom and Curley

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

DOJ says Yale is discriminating against Asian and White applicants

"Justice Department Review found that Yale University is violating civil rights laws by discriminating against white and Asian American applicants. Loyal law professor Laurie Levin says has been a long term investigation by the DOJ that in fact, Yale has gone too far. That they've given preferences. Applicants based upon the color of their skin, and not based upon their

Yale University Laurie Levin Yale DOJ Justice Department Professor
Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white applicants

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Feds say Yale discriminates against Asian, white applicants

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the justice department concludes Yale University is discriminating in its admissions process the justice department says it has found Yale University has been discriminating against Asian American and white applicants in the admissions process and that Yale racially balances its classes the findings came after a two year investigation the investigation concluded Asian American and white students have only one tenth to one fourth the likelihood of admission at Yale as African American applicants with comparable academic credentials Yale issued a statement denying the allegations the investigation followed complaints from students about the application process at some Ivy League schools Mike Rossio Washington

Mike Rossi Justice Department Yale University Ivy League Mike Rossio Washington
"yale university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Yale University back in nineteen ninety four with degrees in history and economics he then joined the Denver post as a reporter in nineteen ninety six he became one of the first employees at the St dot com which was a ground breaking financial news website back in nineteen ninety nine he then joined the New York times at the times covered everything from the drug industry to hurricane Katrina and he served two stints as a correspondent in Iraq he left the times in two thousand ten to devote himself to writing fiction but conversations with his wife let him do begin researching the science around cannabis and mental illness the project that became the book tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence time permitting tonight with Alex we'll talk about that book as well he has been all over the country and in different stories being quoted as the ex New York times reporter warning about big pivot from officials to justify lockdown strategy and I thought let's bring him on Alex first of All I Want to thank you for the guts for coming forward to talk about this because it echoes a lot of things that we believe here on this program so walking to coast to coast Alex pleasure to be on this side this coronavirus story is unbelievable it's I've said from the get go that I believe that was concocted in a lab that the media was creating the hysteria what's your take on this now Alex is is is IT insider looking in basically what I measure not an insider at all I'm really an outsider and really what all turned to look at some of the data that's come out around the corona virus and who who's really most likely to be affected by a which is very clearly elderly people and people with underlying conditions and.

Yale University Denver post reporter New York times hurricane Katrina Iraq cannabis Alex marijuana
"yale university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Yale University back in nineteen ninety four with degrees in history and economics he then joined the Denver post as a reporter in nineteen ninety six he became one of the first employees at the St dot com which was a ground breaking financial news website back in nineteen ninety nine he then joined the New York times at the times covered everything from the drug industry to hurricane Katrina and he served two stints as a correspondent in Iraq he left the times in two thousand ten to devote himself to writing fiction but conversations with his wife let him do begin researching the science around cannabis and mental illness the project that became the book tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence time permitting tonight with Alex we'll talk about that book as well he has been all over the country and in different stories being quoted as the ex New York times reporter warning of a big pivot from officials to justify lockdown strategy and I thought let's bring him on Alex first of All I Want to thank you for the guts for coming forward to talk about this because of that because a lot of things that we believe here on this program so walking to coast to coast Alex pleasure to be on this so this coronavirus story is unbelievable it's I've said from the get go that I believed it was concocted in a lab that the media was creating a hysteria what's your take on this now Alex is is is IT insider looking in basically what I measure not an insider at all I'm really an outsider and really what all turned to look at some of the data that's come out around the corona virus and who who's really most likely to be affected by a which is very clearly elderly people and people with underlying conditions and.

Yale University Denver post reporter New York times hurricane Katrina Iraq cannabis Alex marijuana
"yale university" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

12:12 min | 1 year ago

"yale university" Discussed on KTOK

"From Yale University back in nineteen ninety four with degrees in history and economics he then joined the Denver post as a reporter in nineteen ninety six he became one of the first employees at the St dot com which was a ground breaking financial news website back in nineteen ninety nine he then joined the New York times at the times covered everything from the drug industry to hurricane Katrina and he served two stints as a correspondent in Iraq he left the times in two thousand ten to devote himself to writing fiction but conversations with his wife let him do begin researching the science around cannabis and mental illness the project that became the book tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence time permitting tonight with Alex we'll talk about that book as well he has been all over the country and in different stories being quoted as the ex New York times reporter warning about big pivot from officials to justify lockdown strategy and I thought let's bring him on Alex first of All I Want to thank you for the guts for coming forward to talk about this because of that because a lot of things that we believe here on this program so walking to coast to coast Alex pleasure beyond this this coronavirus story is unbelievable it's I've said from the get go that I believe that was concocted in a lab that the media was creating the hysteria what's your take on this now Alex is is is IT insider looking in basically what I'm actually not an insider at all I'm really an outsider and really what all turned to look at some of the data that's come out around the coronavirus and who who's really most likely to be affected by a which is very clearly elderly people and people with underlying conditions and questions about you know the bottling that shows the shooter step counts and what that you know whether that model has been accurate which is clearly has not been and you know now I think there are questions about these but some of it the death tolls and hal Walker correct if we I would say the United States and New York City in their state accounting yes you know what I mean it's not it's not a secret that they're doing this is public that they're doing this in a in a fairly aggressive way and you know any questions about the efficacy of the lockdowns and lockdown versus social distancing versus masks I'm I'm I'm to be honest I'm not particularly interested in where the the coronavirus came from whether I I doubt it was biologically engineered or anything like that in in general my my explanations for human events in human decision making ten to run towards incompetence and political pressure and people talking themselves into positions that they have a hard time talking about out of I I I don't really believe in grand conspiracy so I mix different than you or for your listeners in that way that doesn't mean we don't have a problem that we have a problem we have lock downs that are very very economically destructive and societally destructive and constitutionally destructive and we basically did does in a matter of days he's in mid March and I understand why we did them there was a lot of fear at the time and we hadn't really prepared for this thing well you know in February we could have and we you know we absolutely hit the panic button and the media encourage that but now that we have a lot more data about the corona virus in it doesn't seem to be quite as scary or is the interest of the general population as we thought you know I think it's it's it's time and past time to consider what we're gonna do next so that's that's my focus and I'm not some insider and I don't have people whispering to me from the C. I. A. K. you know what they really know I I I you know about the corona virus in it I'm not going to that's not a game I'm gonna place so I just I just wanna be clear but that's as somebody who's been in the media for about a number of years when we look at what was happening as this for started breaking I've never seen media handle a story like this where they were giving us and they still do now daily counts of deaths and infections when they never did this with the seasonal flu were upwards of sixty thousand Americans die every year they never reported on that didn't didn't know know where ever did I see stories about twenty people have died from the flu tonight but with this every day that was account and I think they scared the living daylights out of people and that's clearly true that part is clearly to first or even just to say you know it's not true that every year sixty thousand inside houses that have up to up to up to but yes but but you know the flu comes and goes every year and with the exception in the last twenty years of the you know the H. one and one swine flu in two thousand nine nobody pays any attention to it you know it calms and you think they tell you to get a vaccine and some people do and some people don't and and you know and then if you you know a few people die from it and that's the end of it I I totally agree and we don't count the deaths this way we don't shut down the country the it's way and you know we we have treated this entirely differently and partly I mean you can clearly see several reasons one is you know it came out of China and it was scary yeah okay and it's it's not the flu I mean physically obviously different than the full if the different viruses he different file by rolled back to the flu and you know so far as the original stars and murders are very weasel so so you know this this has something in common with those so people were scared okay that's one reason a second reason is that you know when it came to the United States where it really hit hard where has it really hit hard what New York City so so what what we know we're near street near city is the media capital of the world so anything that happens in your city gets magnified and blown out of proportion yeah you know I mean and if this is an important thing so the things that are important get really blown out of proportion and what else we know well I mean people in the media hate Donald Trump I mean a lot of them not all along yep and let's you know let's not exist so if you lived in Brooklyn or if you live in Brooklyn and you you know you grew afraid in mid March late March that this might actually kill you or kill someone you knew and at the same time you hate Donald Trump and you personally blame trump for this well there was a there was a hysteria that picked up but you can see in both the articles in the you know in the CNN coverage and the tweets and it was off the charts and it has not gone away and then look I understand why people are scared but what has happened now is people are actively mislead people in the media and they are actively misleading Americans about what the risks are here so if you look at the risks okay one of the most unbelievable statistics and that is how each stratified the deaths or am in the best estimate is that more more people over the age of one hundred one hundred have died worldwide for miss them under the age of thirty this isn't this just does not affect you don unity you know children can get it but they don't get sick from it they don't die from it same with teenagers and people in their twenties also I mean there's gonna be some rare exceptions to this stuff just the way you know a plane crashes once in a while it does not use that flying is not straight this is incredibly age stratified and that doesn't mean that we shouldn't do a lot about it it doesn't mean we should try to protect people what but the strategy of shutting down the country to protect people who are who are in nursing homes is you know is a crazy strategy but if you're going to be honest you have to be honest about who's getting sick and dying in what about the governors who seem to me in my opinion they are petrified of their own personal political career so they all jumped on the same bandwagon going I got to do something to I mean if if the governor of Massachusetts shut down his state I've got to shut down mine and I think it begin the mushroom like that in snowball our art or trigger the other way it's not that they're petrified the people people because the media has spent this all right in favor of this most of the country at least maybe in the last week it has started to change a little bit but in March in in March in late March and early April there was nothing you could do that people wouldn't have support and so and so the governor and and by the way it looks the governor of New York state well you know into homo when he said I think we're gonna need a hundred forty thousand bags and you know we're gonna need forty thousand violators those numbers came from a real projection wasn't just making that up so that terror you know that he I mean he he you know he I'm not gonna say he was terrible but the terror that you could see going through you know state officials was real okay so that happened and it was and there's political keen for for some of these and they didn't want to be accused of doing nothing and they didn't want to use it or not so now where are we were entered worded dangerous spot because anybody who looks at the numbers with it with any sort of reasonable hi right now can see that the threat is not what we thought it was instead of needing a hundred forty thousand bets New York state yet most it's going to be eighteen thousand bets and that number is going down instead of instead of being forty thousand ventilators near St probably peaked at about four thousand dollars so the projections were off by ninety percent but the problem is the lockdowns have actually been even worse than we expected a month ago in terms of their economic here in terms of their societal hit arguably in terms of their you know constitutional hit and so the sure has proven to be really terrible and the disease has proven to be not as terrible as we thought so if you're a politician you how do you walk away and how do you back off it without blowing up your political career and I think that's where these guys are now absolutely and it stands in some of the mainstream media anchor people on these cable news channels they're still getting paid so of course they don't care what's going on and so they jump on the bandwagon of shut the country down let's protect everybody but they're still getting their checks Alex the big checks very yeah absolutely what a situation my gosh it's frustrating for a lot of people in the death count they've got up to about thirty thousand now that they claim have died from the corona virus do you think that include some of the seasonal flu well it's it's it's even more complicated than that and and you know actually tonight because I'm trying to get you know sort of look at the New York City number so New York City has reported about twelve thousand people in the last month has died from from the bars that seventy five hundred oracle confirm another four thousand problem where they actually don't even have a positive test result here's what's confusing all so that's eleven thousand hold that's not right there unless we're gonna get a break and come back we'll pick it up right there at that spot because that's a very important and then later on this hour let's talk a little bit about your book tell your children the truth about marijuana mental illness and violence coast insiders the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iPhone and now android four Dato one above listen live or on demand anywhere anytime go to coast to coast AM dot com and download it today.

Yale University Denver post reporter New York times hurricane Katrina Iraq
"yale university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A senior fellow at Yale University in the United States well continues our front what's first of all let's say let's look at let's look at China we were speaking to David Rennie the economist Beijing correspondent about the di Lemah that China is facing at on the one hand trying to contain the spread of the virus but on the other hand continuing to ensure that economic growth targets all home next how difficult is it for them to square that circle well we can't have it both ways Roger yeah certainly the highest priority is controlling the virus the economy will come later and I understand that the leadership is urging companies to send their workers back to to their factories but given the stringent quarantines in this critical who bay province given the draconian restrictions on intercity travel returning some three hundred million migrant workers sugar factories is not feasible under those circumstances so there's going to be a major shortfall in Chinese economic growth in the first half of this year whether the government wants it or not I'm so so I mean what what your outlining of course is the are the indications that the global economic slowdown was what we were all living ways how much should we be concerned then about the current trajectory outline for us kind of key indicators that we should be looking at well you only need to know a few things one by accepted metrics of the International Monetary Fund China is the largest economy in the world is about twenty percent of world output secondly since the financial crisis of two thousand eight China alone is K. accounted for thirty seven percent of the cumulative growth in world GDP China's up flat lining right now there's no other economy stepping up to fill the void Japan's back in recession France and Germany were exceptionally weak late last year and that the U. S. viewed as you know the the strongest economy in the world only grew two percent late last year so without China the world economy is probably in recession right now in the first half of two twenty twenty yeah shocking outcome for investors who believe that that was a largely impossibility are we already seeing a real manifestation of this a physical manifestation of this in the global supply chain given the importance of China sure I mean look no further than the announcement last week by by apple there's a major shortfall in revenues their supply chains clog and they're also losing demand so this is not just a supply shock but a demand shock especially as a Chinese consumers have really stepped up to emerge as a new source of a global demand in the world today what when we look at the the nerves on the stock markets around the world that that seem to be a reaction to the imposition by its heavy of a strict quarantine but well of course we've been seeing drops like this echoing in in the Far East to well in controlling a virus like this is extremely difficult China has really gone overboard in terms of quarantines in and travel restrictions and other countries are sort of following that template but the transmission of this disease whether it's from you know ships of the Yokohama harbor or other unexpected developments that are very very difficult to control man makes it exceedingly exceedingly difficult to limit this from becoming a global pandemic I'm not a scientist but certainly that's what the scientists are most concerned about today Stephen Roach former Morgan Stanley Asia chairman and now at Yale University thanks for joining us we are going to stay with the corona virus and the impact of it in African countries have so far been limited as far as contagion goes with any one case recorded on the continent in Egypt but African countries with close truck trade ties to China have begun feeding the economic impact of the outbreak six continental airlines have stopped direct flights to various cities in China while traders who buy goods from there are now reporting shortages of goods for sale China is Africa's largest trading partner the value of that trade estimated to be around two hundred billion dollars last year Emanuel the guns that reports from the Kenyan capital Nairobi.

senior fellow Yale University United States
"yale university" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"It it didn't take Yale University details anymore we're no longer democracy where an old darkie just like the Soviet Union used to be a rush she is now they're not gonna hand over the power it's going to take a radical change is gonna take Bernie Sanders times a hundred but to have that to give Bernie Sanders is anybody else the power to do that is gonna have to be else is going to have to be the people in the streets running financing even with small dollars a movement a candidate a conscious going to meetings participating become and I'm a member of the citizens climate lobby or three fifty dot org if that's your thing or anti gun organizations or taking money out of campaigns big money other campaigns and all of those organizations exist because there are people who are dedicated their lives in their finances and their time to those because couldn't could New Mexico become a player yeah there was a bill this year we got no where to move our primary up so it actually meant something made a difference but to do that we're gonna have to go to the governor to our party chairs to the legislators and Amanda right now there are bills that are popular like bills that have to do with teenage smoking in vaping that even in this session die or legalizing cannabis I understand it's not the most popular bill but it is the majority of people in any Mexico supported majority people supported the extreme protection at the red flag along which did pass the Senate did pass out of the Judiciary Committee in the house probably will pass the full house but it that takes year after year after year a banging your head against the wall by organizations like Mexicans to prevent gun violence to get new laws new regulations new rights for autistic children so they would not be I don't put in straight jackets locked in closet two years in those parents and some of those students last year last session and heartbreaking testimony to make things better I mean it it it it's up to us you want to change the primary talk your legislative find out who your senator state senator is if you don't like him vote amount stay wrapped her up every two years find somebody to run run yourself we need good people the legislators we have are there because a lot of them just by default because nobody will run against a richer Martinez who has done some good thing for as many on us any hasn't but as time has come and gone he voted against the marijuana yesterday legalization he voted against the gun red flag law as a Democrat mostly because he's confused doesn't do the research doesn't know the issues he needs to be gone somebody in Espanola besides city councilor hotter meal who is running against maybe animate maybe is the answer but we need good people with good ideas when I get up and fight spend their money spent their evenings and meetings and it's tedious I don't.

Soviet Union Yale University
"yale university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"yale university" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"That is from Yale University Press a small book slim read but jam packed with the very of slides here this is one as we go back to the calls up front page ninety nine those who wave the flag for free speech on campus that's in quotes are generally convinced that the regulation of content even when the intention is to protect the vulnerable puts us on a path to authoritarian censorship but the call for the free exchange of ideas no matter what the cost to quote some people quote doesn't resonate with most college students who recognize that not all ideas make it to the market at that when one claims to be tolerant of all kinds of discord certain groups of people tend to get hurt again and again I'm not aware of a whole lot of discourse out there that is aimed at hurting certain groups of people again and again I'm not sure exactly I suppose what it is you're referring to racist language we hear it all the time such as usually racist language what exactly did you have in mind the language that refers to African American people into you and Ising ways and such as I mean I just don't I just I missing all of this that I don't hear a a lot of of of what I would call rate that is a pretty nice page refers to of people immigrating from the south of the border as an infestation or it as being animals that said do you meaning language and it has a sequence of invasion I mean again that we could I suppose turn this into a discussion on immigration the fact is you do not have granted the president has a way of picking language which is a sort of like trying to extinguish the coals and a barbecue pit with big jar of the of gasoline about that but now the state it is an invasion and no one has a right to enter another country I give you a simple example jealous of if I had when I was a student would not have been unusual for professional walk into a room that now had women and men in just ten years before had only men and settled in a class honey look good today well obviously there was going to say that anymore right and the reason they don't see that anymore is because we know that's inappropriate speech well considered to be it's the meeting she can't have access to the full benefits of an education in the same way as other people not necessarily the strikes in a very key part of this discussion I think the fact that you look nice today does not even have why any such thing woke you what did you said what did you say Hey sweetie you're well sweetie is a is a at a level of familiarity that that that should be avoided I would agree someone that you do not know I would I would concur with that but again I think most of us don't say things like that I like to make any comment about a woman's appearance because we realize that will walk into this same PC trap even though I see somebody does look nice today I just don't say I mean it's like if I was there so if if somebody talked about I would tell you that our veterans on campus yes I want to talk about our veterans come to see president right and this has happened how could you have those veterans on campus aren't some of them suffering from PTSD are likely to kill people no that's just ignorance but that is that is it but I don't recall that that that for example a comment about how someone looks does not automatically imply that without nice clothes or make up that they couldn't succeed or whatever there's the inference is supposed to be you know what I'm saying well I'm I'm trying to obviously you know I'm not trying to be up to see Mister rob I really don't but professors used routinely come wanted women students in their classrooms and and make them objects of theirs as a sexual desires in ways they got in the way of their learning for that if it didn't go past just to look nice today I I agree to get in the way they did go past that then yes I agree completely when it was just a passing comment and nothing was ever be pushed beyond that I think that's a that's what I would call hypersensitivity well I I whether you know you you might call it a hypersensitivity yes I will you might say that about the veteran who was insulted as someone yeah but the point of it is that there is no evidence to point out that the all veterans have PTSD are going to people say that that you know what women should be treated as as the object of the professors aesthetic judgment my only point about that in that in that section is that our students today see the use of the rhetoric of free speech as a way of defending the citizens United decision and other things that make them suspicious of the rhetoric Jim I want to make sure I make clear I think free speech is an essential value on campus but there are times in there it will happen a few times when he comes into conflict with some other values well I I'm glad to hear that you say that it.

Yale University Press ten years