17 Burst results for "Yale Medical School"

"yale medical school" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:37 min | 8 months ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Emergency room, most people run into lung problems anywhere between days six and 10. And by the time that that it results in a decrease in their oxygen level, the damage has mostly been done. Peter and I've interviewed many doctors, many trained at Harvard. Many like Dr Fareed or Uh, Dr Reese, who was trained at Yale Medical School, or some of the best, most prestigious medical institution in the country. And they've been strong Proponents of therapeutics like Regeneron, the anti colonial antibody treatments, um, infusions. I know Rhonda Santa set up centers all across Florida, but nobody ever talks about that, either. I know a 74 year old man. That was tested positive. He was not vaccinated. He got the infusion of Regeneron at Emory University Hospital in Georgia, and he felt like a new man and in 48 hours, and he was fine. Same with his wife, also unvaccinated. I have a friend of mine in my town where I live in New York. Fully vaccinated had Regeneron infused in 24 hours, And then he was fine, too. So nobody ever talks about that science that seems to exist. Everyone wants to talk about, you know, ivermectin and and h CQ. There's numerous studies, starting with the Henry Ford study about 80 Cube. And take an early 84% affective and mitigating some of the side effects of covid. That's that's right there. The science, the Cleveland Clinic science that I mentioned I've ever met in okay? Yeah, they do use it in animals. That's the animal version. But the human version won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2015. And the fact that it might have crossover appeal by some doctors. I'm not a doctor. I am. I just don't. I'm that's not my area of expertise. Peter. I'm not going to tell people what to do. No, I think you're exactly right. Sean. Look, if you look at how we got the vaccine in the first place, it was not a Top down government effort. It was the work of scientists and researchers that pharmaceutical companies and government agencies the point is, I think what frustrates a lot of people about the way the doctor Fauci has been handling this. Is this sort of top down mentality that he is the one that has all the truth and all the information and the fact of the matter is that there are lots of, uh, possible AIDS that can help people get through this terrible illness that can take off some of the effects of the illness. You're exactly right. People need to take this deadly seriously and not just sort of fluff it off. But the frustration that people have is that when you have this top down approach that south she has had And he reverses himself 180 degrees from something, he said maybe two months ago. It leads people to distrust what they're being told. I think he and the American people need to have a lot more faith and recognize that there are lots of smart people in this country that have solutions in this top down. Government approach is not ultimately the way that we're going to get through this pandemic together. Well, said Eric. Let's get your take on that. Yeah, I think, In addition to what Peter said, I think the politicization of what the solution should be. I mean, people think that the Republicans have been Politicizing it. But in Florida, where we live, think the opposite is true, right? You mentioned that governed the scientist has been promoting Regeneron has in a treatment to be had in lieu of or in addition to the vaccine, and unfortunately, despite the many examples, you've listed the many examples that we all know personally of success. That is sort of dismissed. And instead of being touted as somebody that advocating a lifesaving treatment, Rhonda sentences criticized by both the media and the people that are running for his job as not being pro vaccine enough, not pro Fauci enough, right, not fighting by the guidance that the CDC says this week who knows what they'll say next week, But this week The government of scientists or anyone else. You dare to be intellectually honest and stand for something that isn't the politically expedient maneuver. The brothers of the Science says. They're criticizing. It's unfortunate, but we're seeing it right here in Florida. But we're thankful for the people that are willing to advocate solutions regardless of the political implications. Quick break. We'll come back more on the other side. Peter Schweizer Eric Eggers awaiting Joe Biden's pressers, supposedly at the top of the hour. Based on past history, It could be hours later. Mortgage rates still remain at all time low. Many are now predicting these rates.

Sean Eric Peter New York Florida 180 degrees Peter Schweizer Rhonda 24 hours 48 hours Cleveland Clinic Fauci Yale Medical School 2015 Rhonda Santa Georgia next week Joe Biden Emory University Hospital this week
"yale medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:34 min | 8 months ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"You need to go to an emergency room, most people run into lung problems anywhere between days six and 10. And by the time that that it results in a decrease in their oxygen level, the damage has mostly been done. Peter and I've interviewed many doctors, many trained at Harvard. Many like Dr Fareed or Uh Dr Reese, who was trained at Yale Medical School, or some of the best, most prestigious medical institution in the country, and they've been strong Proponents of therapeutics like Regeneron, the anti Cloney, ALS antibody treatments infusions. I know Rhonda Santa set up centers all across Florida, but nobody ever talks about that, either. I know a 74 year old man. That was tested positive. He was not vaccinated. He got the infusion of Regeneron at Emory University Hospital in Georgia, and he felt like a new man and in 48 hours, and he was fine. Same with his wife, also unvaccinated. I have a friend of mine in my town where I live in New York. Fully vaccinated had Regeneron infused in 24 hours. And then he was fine, too. So nobody ever talks about that science that seems to exist. Everyone wants to talk about, you know I've ever met in and and h CQ. There's numerous studies, starting with the Henry Ford study about 80 Cube and taken early 84% effective in mitigating some of the Side effects of covid. That's that's right there. The science, the Cleveland Clinic science that I mentioned ivermectin, Okay? Yeah, they do use it in animals. That's the animal version. But the human version won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2015. And the fact that it might have crossover appeal by some doctors. I'm not a doctor. I have. I just don't. That's not my area of expertise. Peter. I'm not going to tell people what to do. No, I think you're exactly right. Sean. Look, if you look at how we got the vaccine in the first place, it was not a Top down government effort. It was the work of scientists and researchers that pharmaceutical companies and government agencies the point is, I think what frustrates a lot of people about the way the doctor Fauci has been handling this. Is this sort of top down mentality that he is the one that has all the truth and all the information and the fact the matter is that there are lots of, uh, possible AIDS that can help people get through this terrible illness that can take off some of the effects of the illness. You're exactly right. People need to take this deadly seriously and not just sort of fluff it off. But the frustration that people have is that when you have this top down approach that south she has had And he reverses himself 180 degrees from something, he said maybe two months ago. It leads people to distrust what they're being told. I think he and the American people need to have a lot more faith and recognize that there are lots of smart people in this country that have solutions in this top down. Government approach is not ultimately the way that we're going to get through this pandemic together. Well, said Eric. Let's get your take on that. Yeah, I think. In addition to what Peter said, I think the politicization of what the solution should be. People think that the Republicans have been Politicizing it. But in Florida, where we live, I think the opposite is true. Right? You mentioned that Governor De Santis has been promoting Regeneron has in the treatment to be had in lieu of or in addition to the vaccine, and unfortunately, despite the many examples, you've listed the many examples that we all know personally of success. That is sort of dismissed, and instead of being touted as somebody that advocating the lifesaving treatment, Rhonda sentences criticized by both the media and the people that are running for his job is not being pro vaccine enough, not profile, she enough right now fighting by the guidance that the CDC says this week who knows what they'll say next week, But this week The government of scientists or anyone else dare to be intellectually honest and stand for something that isn't the politically expedient maneuver regardless of what the science says they're criticizing. It's unfortunate, but we're seeing it right here in Florida, but we're thankful for the people that are willing to advocate Solutions regardless of the political implications. Quick break. We'll come back more on the other side. Peter Schweizer Eric Eggers awaiting Joe Biden's pressers, supposedly at the top of the hour. Based on past history, It could be hours later. Mortgage.

Eric Peter Peter Schweizer New York Sean Florida 180 degrees Rhonda Fauci 48 hours 24 hours Cleveland Clinic Rhonda Santa Yale Medical School Georgia next week 2015 Joe Biden CDC Emory University Hospital
"yale medical school" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

04:32 min | 8 months ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on WTVN

"Most people run into lung problems anywhere between days six and 10, and by the time that it results in a decrease in their oxygen level, the damage has mostly been done, Peter And I've interviewed many doctors, many trained at Harvard, Many true like Dr Fareed, or, uh Dr Reese, who was trained at Yale Medical School, or some of the best, most prestigious medical institution in the country. And they've been strong Proponents of therapeutics like Regeneron, the anti colonial antibody treatments, um, infusions. I know Rhonda Santa set up centers all across Florida, but nobody ever talks about that, either. I know a 74 year old man. That was tested positive. He was not vaccinated. He got the infusion of Regeneron at Emory University Hospital in Georgia, and he felt like a new man and in 48 hours and he was fine, Same with his wife said, also unvaccinated. I have a friend of mine in my town where I live in New York, fully vaccinated. Pat Regeneron infused in 24 hours. And then he was fine, too. So nobody ever talks about that science that seems to exist. Everyone wants to talk about, you know, ivermectin and and h CQ. There's numerous studies, starting with the Henry Ford study about 80 Cube. And taken early 84% effective and mitigating some of the side effects of covid. That's that's right there. The science, the Cleveland Clinic science that I mentioned I've ever met in okay? Yeah, they do use it in animals. That's the animal version. But the human version won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2015. And the fact that it might have crossover appeal by some doctors. I'm not a doctor. I have. I just don't I'm that's not my area of expertise. Peter. I'm not going to tell people what to do. No, I think you're exactly right. Sean. Look, if you look at how we got the vaccine in the first place, it was not a Top down government. Uh, effort. It was the work of scientists and researchers at pharmaceutical companies and government agencies. The point is, I think what frustrates a lot of people about the way the doctor Fauci has been handling this. Is this sort of top down mentality that he is the one that has all the truth and all the information and the fact the matter is that there are lots of, uh, possible AIDS that can help people get through this terrible illness that can take off some of the effects of the illness. You're exactly right. People need to take this deadly seriously and not just sort of fluff it off. But the frustration that people have is that when you have this top down approach that south she has had And he reverses himself 180 degrees from something, he said maybe two months ago. It leads people to distrust what they're being told. I think he and the American people need to have a lot more faith and recognize that there are lots of smart people in this country that have solutions in this top down. Government approach is not ultimately the way that we're going to get through this pandemic together. Well, said Eric. Let's get your take on that. Yeah, I think, In addition to what Peter said, I think the politicization of what the solution should be. I mean, people think that the Republicans have been Politicizing it. But in Florida, where we never think the opposite is true, right, you mentioned that governed. The sentence has been promoting Regeneron has in a treatment to be had in lieu of or in addition to the vaccine, and unfortunately, despite the many examples, you've listed the many examples that we all know personally of success. That is sort of dismissed, and instead of being touted as somebody that advocating the lifesaving treatment, Rhonda sentences criticized by both the media and the people that are running for his job is not being pro vaccine enough, not profile, she enough, right? Not fighting by the guidance that the CDC says this week who knows what they'll say next week, But this week The government of scientists or anyone else dare to be intellectually honest and stand for something that isn't the politically expedient maneuver regardless of what the science says they're criticizing as unfortunate, but we're seeing it right here in Florida. But we're thankful for the people that are willing to advocate solutions regardless of the political implications. Quick break. We'll come back more on the other side. Peter Schweizer Eric Eggers awaiting Joe Biden's pressers, supposedly at the top of the hour. Based on past history, It could be hours later. Mortgage.

Sean Eric New York Peter Schweizer Florida 180 degrees Fauci Joe Biden 48 hours Cleveland Clinic 24 hours Rhonda Rhonda Santa Georgia Peter next week Yale Medical School Republicans Nobel Prize for Medicine Emory University Hospital
"yale medical school" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

The Sean Hannity Show

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on The Sean Hannity Show

"Six and ten and by the time that it results in a decrease in their oxygen level. The damage has mostly been done. Peter and and i've interviewed many doctors many trained at harvard many doctor farid or dr riche. Who's trained at yale medical school or some of the best most prestigious medical institution in the country and they've been strong proponents of therapeutics like regeneration the anti colonial antibody treatments infusions. I know ronda. Santa setup centers all across florida but. Nobody ever talks about that. Either i know a seventy four year old man that was tested positive. He was not vaccinated. He got the infusion of regeneration at emory university hospital in georgia and he felt like a new man in forty eight hours and he was fine. Same with his wife also unvaccinated. I have a friend of mine in my town where i live in new york fully vaccinated had regeneration infused in twenty four hours and then he was fine too so nobody ever talks about that science that seems to exist. Everyone wants to talk about you. Know ivermectin and an h. q. There's numerous studies. Starting the henry ford study about eight c cube and taken early eighty four percent effective mitigating. Some of the side effects of cova. That's that's right there. The science the cleveland clinic science. That i mentioned i've Okay yeah they do. Use it in animals. That's the animal version but the human version won the nobel prize for medicine in two thousand fifteen and the fact that it might have crossover appeal by some doctors. I'm not a doctor i am. I don't. I'm not my expertise peter. I'm not going to tell people what to do No i think. You're exactly right sean. look if you look at how we got the vaccine in the first place it was not a top down government Effort it was the work of scientists and researchers pharmaceutical companies and government agencies. The point is. I think what frustrates a lot of people about the way. The doctor vouch e has been handling. This is this sort of top down mentality that he is the one that has all the truth and all the information and the fact of the matter is that there are lots of Possible aids. That can help people get through this terrible illness that can take off some of the effects of the onus. You're exactly right. People need to take this deadly seriously. and not just sort of fluff it off but the frustration. That people have is that when you have this top down. Approach that sal. She has had and he reverses himself one hundred eighty degrees from something he said maybe two months ago it leads people to distrust what they're being told. I think he and the american people need to have a lot more faith and recognize that there are lots of smart people in this country that have solutions in this top down. Government approach is not ultimately the way that we're going to get through this pandemic together. Well said eric. Let's get your take on that. Yeah and i think. In addition to what. Peter said i think the politicization of what the solution should be. I mean people think that the republicans have been politicizing but in florida where we live. I think the opposite's true right and you mentioned that governor..

dr riche yale medical school cleveland clinic science farid emory university hospital ronda harvard henry ford Peter georgia florida new york sean aids sal eric
"yale medical school" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

08:00 min | 9 months ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Not. We don't have observation classes in school. The job environment doesn't allow us to develop it. Yes bosses tell. Their team going absorbed. But do you create the conditions for them to actually practice and out is very relevant. Why because visual out in especially the out before the aerial photography specialty ease visual language. Before you even use your is unique before you is in So before you even start to use words you need to use your eyes and you cannot just look at it for twenty seconds. You need to take the time and observes in ask yourself a question. First of all objectively. What do i see in front of me. I su- i see three men and two women. I see a whole see a cousin. I see a house. Then you need to ask yourself what happening over here people all. I think this is a queen and this is a king etc and then ask us if what is the relationship between the now this by itself will help you to become better observant when it's come to innovation and today at yale medical school and nursing school. Many of the medical team is a quiet to take those lessons in the yell museum because they found out that if you engage without you will have thirty percent better observation skins. You will have twenty percent more insights to what's going on in the situation and you will have fifty six more better ideas. If i remember correctly the number fifty six better ideas for what to do about it. And that's exactly what we need innovation. Sometimes you know in my workshop you asked me about that. Have been in the past and what i do is that i come to organization and not only that i provoked the way they think about innovation in show without is can do is that i put them in front of outwards announced. What do you see. And then i put them in front of business situation and ask them. What do you see. And i have a classic exercise that i do until today. More than one thousand people saw this exercise and it's an exercise that led the company to a product that generated more than two hundred million dollars. Only two people managed to see inside. And then i look at the business where you are. They innovative that have two hundred million dollars in front of you and nobody sees it fascinating. The you know the thing you talked about that. I think we've got a son of go. A bit deeper in is as you said. Leaders lofton tells them go and observe and that's kind of language inside of the business world but as you said they don't facilitate an environment for observation. What you just gave was observed this art and then observe this situation and looking for that. I wanna give a practicality here so leaders listening. They're going okay. I get this. But i don't get it. I get it intellectually. But i don't get it practicality practicality way how do i take this and become like what can i do to facilitate better observation inside of my organization not only for the purposes of innovation but maybe for the purposes of efficiency for the purposes of A million other things are even human beings. If you say so what would you. Can you give us some practicality around learning how to absorb. Yeah i can definitely do it. I mean i give you things you know since my work is work without i want to encourage people to actually open for that matter a google out project and choose a painting from the eighteenth century seventeenth century one one morning once a week for twenty minutes they can notebook and just write objectively. What do you see and then ask yourself. What do i see. And then make connections. And i know many of the business leader they will tell me we are busy. We don't have fifteen minutes to a look at a painting but observation is a skill that meet to develop hone in practice. And if you don't give the time for yourself it won't happen and for a other people that you know the one that maybe dr- using the a phone. Every time they enter to a place in waiting or using the there in the airport leave the phone for fifteen minutes. And then just look at the people around you. What do you notice. Who are they if you needed to build them a story. The thing is though is that what i say. Now sounds very obvious. In most of the people won't do it because it seems it sounds stupid by plenty to look it out. I'm managing one thousand people company. What is this guy. Tell me about a out but the observation and with this comes empathy with discount seen from different perspective with this. Come listening because one of the things that you will notice is that if you and me we'll look at the same situation you might see a how might see be and you know what especially now we both may be right so one exercise is just yeah view out and style to write down. What the those things that you see and if you want to improve your ability to perceive details because often when you go into a situation with clients they will do something super-quick. This is a simple game from the boy scout. It's called kim's game. You take twenty five different items you cover them and then reveal them for a few seconds. I don't know twenty thirty seconds and then you cover them again. Then you need to write down. What are the items on everage. Every a person would see e remittance will remember anywhere between twelve to fourteen different objects. But if you have twenty five and you start to practice the ability to perceive those different items you improve your eyes to actually pay attention to those small debts but yet again you know. Sometimes it's what i say. Sounds like a games. But thou proven game so they are games but games that actually improve the mind and improve the thinking and improve one of the things that i do with leaders in order to help them with creativity and innovation is is we play a game called make shit up. That's what we call. It makes it up because that basically is what you're doing and so i say okay and i'll take a leader out and i say okay. Let's go for coffee. And they go on monday gulf cup. Yeah we're going to go up. Don't worry i'll buy it. We'll go let me go for coming. You know pre pandemic days. We go for coffee and we sit there and i go. I want you to just pick two people who are having coffee together. My wife and i used to this when we first met and go. Yeah say i want you to make shit up and go. What do you mean when you're gonna make up a story about these.

yale medical school and nursin lofton google kim gulf cup
"yale medical school" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on KOMO

"From green coffee extract, so head to Duncan or order ahead on the APP for the brew. That's right for you and let's get it done. America runs on Dunkin Price and participation a very limited time. Offer well. Oh, it has been nonstop since we arrived at 5 30. I want to give people look at one of the side streets and the neighborhood that we're in. It's ah incredible conditions. As you can see here, it is very hard to distinguish between the road, the sidewalk and people's front yards. The snow is just that deep throughout here, and it's still coming down now. As a result, well, the snowplows have been working nonstop. They are mainly sticking to the main routes. Around the city of Olympia, and they've been busy. We've seen him pass us at least once every 15 minutes. So you know there is a lot of work that they are trying to get done and this storm with the strength that it's got. It's probably going to continue for hours and hours to come now these side streets so they could present a real problem for drivers tomorrow morning. I mean, this snow is deep enough that you know you could potentially get stuck in it a twist to be possibly a lack of control. On getting you know to one of the main routes that are plowed, and it's possibly something that people throughout the entire region are gonna have to deal with through the weekend. I'll send it back to you. Thanks. Gerald Cummings called Miller is live. It's Seattle's Queen Anne Hill where drivers have been sliding around tonight, Cole. Okay, move as much as I thought it would. But Clyde is officially underway and we're seeing that firsthand out here in the two hours or so that we have been out here. Cars coming and going up and down the hill very slowly. This road still not closed. It's a surprise to some neighbors that I've spoken with the one or two inches that we have here right now. That usually is the tipping point. We haven't seen any sign of a plow to come through here yet. We know that this road was treated. Seattle Department of Transportation does have its crews working those 24 hour shift 12 on 12 off. Here comes one of these cars right now we do see some sleds coming out here is well, so this is the climb. This is the challenge that so many drivers are faced with. Does not take much for this to get messy. Back to you guys. All right. Thanks. Gold. Stay safe, a major milestone tonight In our state's corona virus vaccination efforts. More than a million doses have now been administered across Washington. Ceremonial dose, which a woman named Ruby from East Wenatchee, the governor's office sharing these pictures of Ruby getting her shot and a certificate Today we crossed the one million mark eight weeks after the first shipment of vaccine arrived. The official total is actually close to 1,058,000. Now that 74% of all the doses delivered over half way of goal of giving 45,000 doses a day. The current average it's right around 26,700. Health Department says that pace will increase as the supply grows. The state is warning that appointments for first doses will be extremely limited next week at the focus will be on getting people their second dose of vaccine. But there's a shortfall because some providers use second doses as first does his last month, the Department of Health says they're still figuring out how many first doses will be available. But they say the priority will go to a long term care facilities, mass vaccination sites and other sites that address equity. It's the most watched original Serie is ever on. Netflix, the romance author behind Bridger Tin lives Right here in Seattle with her husband, who happens to be a top infectious disease expert. Come was standing with toss that has the exclusive story on this pandemic Power couple. All is fair in love and war magic of Bridget 10 has captured hearts around the world. Miss Stuff Nip registered during a very dark time. The show is resonating with people in a way that I never dreamed this'll, isn't it? The Duke and I, an Indonesian Julie Pottenger pen name Julia Quinn is the best selling force behind the eight book Bridger 10 series. The show is based on You Know what I couldn't have. She called Seattle home with her husband, Dr Paul Pottenger. Does he look familiar? This is such a bright shining thing. They're beaming at her blockbuster year. Highlighted with their visit to the London set meeting, the cast and crew and the show on the land adaptation. After all, she wrote the series 20 years ago, never expecting the show's popularity to rocket the books right back to the top of the best sellers list. It's crazy. I mean, every day, something new seems to happen. That's just Amazing and unbelievable. Everyone always asks. Who's the Paul? She dedicates her books too. Well, that's him. I love love, love that and I don't want to do that. Oh, earn it so much. Well, Julie specializes in escapism. His specialty is something no one can escape. Right now. It's a really good question. We feature Doctor Pottenger dozens of times on Cuomo news. And I've talked to him as a top expert in the cove in 19 pandemic. He's the director of U Dub medicines, Infectious diseases and Tropical Medicine Clinic, a professor and a Seattle top dog lot of people's hobbies connections. Have been ruined or really, really altered for me personally to have nothing but infectious disease in the day and come on one night to get nothing with Richardson. Yeah, I'll take it. It's been pretty good Pandemic Power couple met back in 88 during college before Julie briefly went to Yale Medical School and dropped out to write full time. It wasn't love at first sight.

Gerald Cummings Julie Pottenger Julia Quinn Julie Ruby tomorrow morning 74% one million Olympia second dose Cole Richardson Yale Medical School Today Netflix Paul Pottenger second doses Washington Seattle London
"yale medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tests have been made and released. The Arthur Point scale could tell Horn and infant intelligence scale. Columbia Mental Maturity scale. All of these tests you're hearing are actually banned for black kids in California. Still Gasol developmental schedule Good enough. Harris trying test Meryl Palmer preschool performance tests. Will that deprive me of my second question, which is Raven's progressive matrices? Have the test changed? It's been a while. Have the places that were found to be biased. Been de biased? Yeah, well, that question Let me Tio still there. I am here. This guy. Named Alan Kaufman just trying to park and no one No problem. We'll woman just left a car blocking May Okay, Ammo's driving. He's a professor at the Yale Medical School, and he says the tests have changed and he would know. Because he was one of the first people to start changing them. Story is starting in 1968. I was working for the psychological corporation in New York City. Allen was a young guy at the time I was 26. He starts working with a psychologist named David Wexler. David Wexler invented the whisk the test we talked about all last episode, David Wexler. Wass. Really founder of political assessment. He was like this giant in the field. And Alan, this 20 something nobody by assignment. Which helped him Revised the whisk. Now this was happening right as the Larry P trial was getting started. Black Psychologist association was very vocal. So Kaufman says the test company had pretty much accepted like we need to change the test. But Wexler not so much so I would go to his apartment on the East side of New York City, and.

Alan Kaufman David Wexler New York City Raven Harris Allen Gasol Horn California Yale Medical School professor Meryl Palmer Larry P founder
"yale medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lots of other tests have been made and released. Arthur Point scale could tell Horn and infant intelligence scale. Columbia Mental Maturity scale. All of these tests you're hearing are actually banned for black kids in California. Still, vessel developmental schedule. Good enough. Harris trying test Meryl Palmer Preschool performance tests to My second question, which is Raven's progressive matrices. Have the test changed its been awhile have the places that were found to be biased Bin D biased. Yeah, well, that question Let me Tio still there. Trust me. I am here. This guy named Alan Kaufman just trying to park and no one. No problem. We'll woman just left a car blocking may Okay, Moz driving. He's a professor at the Yale Medical School. And he says the tests have changed and he would know Because he was one of the first people to start changing them. Story is starting in 1968. I was working for the psychological corporation in New York City. Allen was a young guy at the time I was 26. He starts working with a psychologist named David Wexler. David Wexler invented the whisk. The test. We talked about all last episode David Wexler Wass really founder of Political assassin. He was like this giant in the field. And Alan, this 20 something nobody by assignment. Would you help him revised the whisk? Now.

David Wexler Alan Kaufman professor Raven Arthur Point Yale Medical School New York City Allen Meryl Palmer Horn California Harris founder
"yale medical school" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And welcome back. It is Frankie boy, a radio and welcome back. Joining us now is a very important conversation. Hugh Woodward is with us and he welcome back. It's been a while The Twist 25 story began with your father. Dr John Woodward. He's a gynecologist in bio identical hormones, replaces replacement specialist at medical city in Dallas and where he graduated. From Yale Medical School. And practiced in Dallas for over 50 years, and he found his patients. Reacted favorably to accustom compound ideology a cream That he created and and then you took Tell us how this all unfolded because it's such a fascinating early early story about 25. Well, he hey, always had great ideas. Very leading edge physician and I was up there visiting with him. And he told me about this this cream that his patients just loved and and that it was really helping these Pre and post menopausal women that were coming in to see him with menopause symptoms and he said you should use it used to try it. I said, You mean Justus good for men as it is for women, he said. Absolutely. The same pro hormone called the And just rub this cream on every day. And see which thing So he gave me a tube of it. And I used it for our three weeks and I was a stage where I was managing an operating room. And and it was a director in surgery and I would get home every night just whooped and I was just exhausted. And you know, of course, a stressful job. But I called him, he said. So how you like to create a little dot This stuff is amazing. I said, I feel I've got more my energy back. My focus. Dr. Um, muscle tone is really good. I feel lean and ripped. What is this, and that's where it all started for me, and I said, Why isn't this available to people? And he said, I don't know, he said, I I've discovered this mix this cream and it really works well. And so he he was a doctor and enjoyed doing what he did a doctor and he said, I'm not really gonna mess with it. But if you want to you can, and I said, Well, I will. And that's when I started health to G o. And since then we've gotten it out too. Thousands and thousands of people across the United Oh, yeah, yeah, I love it. I love it, And I just want to say that one of the things that is so critical during this covert time. So critical way watched in horror horror. What happened to our Veterans are older population in nursing homes in veterans homes. And Hugh. It's It's just the saddest, saddest story one could ever ever come up with you. I mean, it just is devastating. The story is devastating and my question Is that you shared with that? I will never forget the study that you brought to our attention months ago and the study Was a group of patients in nursing homes. Those that Years, D H E. A Versus those that did not thie difference. Oh, yeah, It's like Yeah, it's a base for your hormones. If you look at our listeners go look. Att Twist 25 dot com on Facebook Right now, we just posted what Frank he's talking about on our Facebook page a link to it, but it's a study that shows that frailty in older age. Physical frailty is what it's called. It's a medical term. Um, is reduced when you th e. A level is higher when you're th e. A levels are low. You've got less of a hormone base or precursor for some 50 different hormones in the body and hormones or what drive our function. They would they would give us our energy or mood are muscle tone are Leanness our fitness. We make the most th e AI when we're about 20 to 25 years old when we were in our reproductive prime, as humans are at our physical, best and mental best, and there's a reason for that. That's when we Typically bear Children and have Children and raise them and we need to have the energy and in the sharpness of mind, and that and all the other us to that to take care of offspring, But then we began to make less and less of it for the rest of our lives after age 25 And it's been found to be associated with all the different diseases of ageing cardiovascular disease. Risk of cancer. You know all the menopause symptoms where you lose the focus and sleep quality. All those things or hormone driven and DJ has no dangerous side effects. So it's very safe. Very well tolerated does not require a prescription, but the key is using the right way as a properly made bioidentical skin cream. That you absorbed and process in your Durmus in your skin. Not as a pill for years, people thought. Oh, yeah. D J would be great. And they used, you know pills. The supplement pills and people were like the studies. In fact work kind of insignificant. They didn't see any real results. Will they? Finally Dad figured out My father that when you use it as a skin cream, and you absorb it and process it in the right way in your Durmus, you actually get all the benefits that you can the anti aging benefits, So it's just so crucial that you use it the right way. And that's what Twist 25 th cream is. It's what it does. Yes, Yes. And you have some great specials going on for my listeners. So and you know, if I didn't know about this elderly study, I would've Yeah, yeah. Yeah, but the truth is, I want to be able to fight for myself As I get older. I want my cognitive thinking to be sharp. I want my muscle tone. I want all of that. I really do. And I think that this is I have to say I saw like a baby ice. I slept like a baby last night with this cream. I haven't had it for a while. And all my body like LA My body is loving it loving Will you get better get out all of.

Dallas Facebook Dr John Woodward Yale Medical School Hugh Woodward Frankie boy Justus menopause United Oh Dr. Um director Durmus Frank
"yale medical school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"So whether you stop by your local Napa auto parts store or a Napa auto care center or visit nap online, you can count on Napa. Know how David said Roni W. B Z is traffic on the threes and looking at the four day forecast some rain kicking in in some spots this evening, possibly a thunderstorm. Otherwise, tonight is going to be partly cloudy and down to 71 tomorrow. Partly sunny very well. ERM and humid highs ranging from 85 to 90 inland, low eighties of beaches tomorrow night. It's gonna be mostly clear in humid down to 71 on Tuesday. Partly sunny, breezy and hot, a thunderstorm in spots and a high of 89 then on Wednesday, clouds and sun warm and humid. A late day thunderstorm in a high again of 89. Right now it is 88 degrees and partly cloudy over Boston at 4 45 This is W b z Use Radio 10. 30 where the news watch never stops. Good afternoon. I'm Madison Rogers. Here are the five things you need to know at 4 45 The state Department of Public Health releases New Covad, 19 numbers 286 cases and 14 deaths. A small aircraft has reportedly gone down into a lake went up a sake at the entrance to MEREDITH Bay off Pinnacle Park. Stay with W. B. Z for updates on that story. It is developing U Mass Amherst investigating Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse and congressional can it. Morse is well over allegations of inappropriate conduct with students. Harvard and Yale Medical School is taking.

Napa Mayor Alex Morse Roni W. B Z Covad Madison Rogers MEREDITH Bay Holyoke U Mass Amherst Yale Medical School David Boston Harvard Pinnacle Park Department of Public Health W. B. Z
"yale medical school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"They do tow. So whether you stop by your local Napa auto parts store or a Napa auto care center or visit Napa Online, you can count on Napa. Know how David said Roni W disease traffic on the threes warm and humid this evening with a stray shower or thunderstorm, though tonight's going to be just partly cloudy and down to 71 tomorrow is gonna be a partly sunny, very warm, humid day temperatures between 85 90 quite a bit cooler of beaches. On Tuesday. Partly sunny, breezy and hot and a thunderstorm in spots high of 89 on Wednesday clouds and sun warm and human late day thunderstorm and a high again of 89. Right now it is 88 degrees and reading 91 in Merrimack, 88 in Hyde Park and 91 in Boston at 4 15 This's W B Z news Radio 10 30 where the news watch never stops. Good afternoon. I'm Madison Rogers. Here are the five things you need to know. At 4 15 Thie latest numbers from the Health Department in the covert outbreak, just in 286 new cases confirmed as well as 14 new deaths, bringing the death toll to 8540. A small aircraft has reportedly gone down on Lake Winnipesaukee at the entrance to MEREDITH Payoff. Pinnacle Park. This story is developing. Stay with W. B. C for updates. UMAss Amherst is investigating Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse over allegations of inappropriate conduct with students. Harvard and Yale Medical School is taking part in a national voter registration competition. On a hotel in Gardner hit with a $3000 fine after they reportedly held a 300 person wedding. The Colonial Hotel held two weddings last weekend that went well over the state's 100 person outdoor gathering limit. Part of the reason why Governor Baker has now Doc that limit to 50. He specifically called out that wedding, the state and city.

Napa Napa Online Mayor Alex Morse Colonial Hotel Lake Winnipesaukee Hyde Park MEREDITH Payoff Governor Baker Pinnacle Park Madison Rogers Roni W Gardner UMAss Boston Holyoke Health Department David Yale Medical School Amherst
"yale medical school" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Well, chemotherapy. Everybody thinks well, OK, so if I get cancer are just going to get chemo and that'll it'll kill it and be done with it. Well, Yale doctors, here's something interesting. Yale Medical School doctors Have developed a technique to predict whether cancer patients receiving a common chemotherapy drug are likely to experience heart failure as a result of taking chemotherapy. I don't know how many people would right off the bat say, well, one of the effects of possible effects of having chemotherapy which is a poison to poison the cancer, with the hope that the patient survives. They probably don't think about the fact that they may die from a completely unrelated disease. Heart failure from the chemotherapy, killing them. Well, the chemotherapy drug Doc, So Rubik in or Robison is used to treat several cancers, including breast bladder lymphoma. Capos, she sarcoma. It's a powerful drug. And researchers are now looking at severely damaged heart muscle cases. So use the problem. The tragedy here is doctors try hard, they they work with the tools that they have. But, hey, they're really here talking in this article about fighting new in not invasive ways nontoxic ways. And I think that's a good idea is something that I believe in and have been talking about that on this radio show for sometime in reminding you that we have right in her own backyard America's premier Centre for alternative medicine offering Advanced alternative medical care We're talking about now. Son Ridge Medical Center, right in our own backyard in Scottsdale. The physicians a son Ridge Medical Center offer scientific practices. Nature of having medicine, holistic alternative medicine and, yes, traditional medicine and sometimes side by side, traditional medicine when patients choose not to go You know, Hail Mary with the chemo, poison or the burning or that or, you know, straight Western medicine because they know I mean, how do you poison somebody back to health who's already toxic. How do you build somebody's immune system up with the poison When you're not even addressing what they should eat or not eat and the nutrients they should be taking in to bolster their immune system, which is not addressed in a Western Conventional setting. The doctor said Son Ridge Medical Center. Understand this, they're professional. They're competent. They're compassionate. And they deal with leading edge treatments that effectively treat the root causes of illness..

Son Ridge Medical Center chemo Yale Medical School Yale Capos breast bladder lymphoma Robison America Scottsdale
"yale medical school" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:21 min | 3 years ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep around fifty million Americans suffer from chronic pain. Wow, that's enough people to make a good sized country. All by themselves. Now, we typically think of pain is coming from an injury or an accident or an illness, and that does happen, but there could be another source. Studies show repeated exposure to trauma anxiety or depression, especially in childhood can leave a physical imprint on the brain, which makes some people more vulnerable to feeling physically hurt. NPR's petty name and reports. Janine is thirty seven years old and lives in Burbank, California. She suffered pain from head to toe since she was child. We're not using her last name for reasons of privacy over the years, Janin's gone to dozens of doctors x-rays, and MREs found no physical damage. She changed her diet or belts, to correct her posture and exercise to strengthen muscle. Nls nothing helped lightning bolts kind of going up from shoulders through my neck to my head that I also get this, like grinding pain in my hips, where I feel like I can't walk anymore. It's just very painful to walk. She was eventually diagnosed with five remain algebra, a disorder characterized by widespread pain throughout the body, the cause is unknown. Then about eight months ago, a friend suggested a new type of therapy, emotional awareness and expression therapy and Janine started writing a daily journal that paragraph I want to share with you here. In her journal. She looked backwards at the past when her health problems began I wrote down all the different health symptoms. I've had throughout my life pain wise, but also other things things that caused her distress for Janine who grew up in an abusive household, there was a lot to write down. If I was dressed in a way that my death that was too provocative, like it wasn't anything for him to call me, a whore, like just say, well, you look like a hor- today, like it just wasn't a call. My mother that too. And the aggression was also physical pushing shoving hitting and certainly a lot of belts, in childhood so spanking it didn't take much therapy for Janine to make a startling discovery. The backaches stomach aches and headaches, she suffered in childhood came around the same time as the hitting the yelling as young adult. She moved out of the house, the abuse stopped, but the pain didn't psychologists. Mark Lumley at Wayne State university in Detroit, says this is the case for a number of chronic pain, patients. There's a growing number of studies that have followed people prospectively over the course of years trying to predict to develop chronic pain, and they show clearly that difficult life experiences adverse experiences in childhood are later. Predictors of chronic pain, and widespread pain years later. So how does this happen? Amy Arniston neuroscientist at Yale medical school under healthy conditions. She says higher circuits and part of the brain, the prefrontal cortex can regulate whether individuals feel pain and how much pain they feel but these higher brain circuits atrophy, when we're exposed to chronic stress, especially stressors where we feel uncontrolled and frightened. In other words things like fear depression, or anxiety can weaken these circuits. And if the circuits aren't working properly, then on stem says people can feel more prolonged pain, long after a physical injury has healed and without. Out proper regulation. The brain can also generate pain, when there's no other physical damage the brain actually, has pathways where it can go down and control our body and actually create a pain response. And Arniston says this pain is real it can happen to adults too. But when it starts in childhood psychologists Lumley says it can set in motion a lifetime of chronic pain. Most people don't necessarily outgrow so easily some of those difficult early childhood experiences and even though one's life might look good. Now, people still remain haunted as memories of thoughts about family come to the fore. This is what happened to Janine at a specific time every day during the week that early on the drive home. I would start getting pain. And so then you think we'll, maybe it's because it's your long commute. You know you are in the car for forty five minutes to an hour. Maybe I'd had lumbar support. I had like heating elements but in therapy, she realize. It wasn't the car or the commute. It was going home, nothing. Bad is meeting me here on the drive home. But when I was, when I was younger, he no walking home gutting home was like I gotta go back there again. And it was just a dreadful feeling of now. I have to go back to that environment. My house never felt like a safe place for me the idea that there was a connection between her pain today and the trauma, she suffered during childhood just sounded. She says kind of crazy to me just doesn't sound logical. You never think about pain, like something hit, you something hurts. But it's physical. It's not like something hit, you emotionally in something hurts within five. In fact, that is the way it happens with emotional awareness and expression therapy. Janine learned had to confront what had happened to her as a child psychologist, Mark Lumley and colleagues developed the therapy. He says it helps patients face emotions. It's like anger sadness, or loss of love that they may have suppressed at the time of abuse, and part of facing, it means talking about it, giving it some expression with your words, and your face, and your body. Because when you face it, you feel more in control, and you can actually repair the weakened pathways in the brain and make them strong again. Janine psychologist, Laura pain says it wasn't easy. It got very tough and paint got a lot worse. And it became more persistent. And she continued we just continue to push through with doing all the things that she near is supposed to be doing and engaging in what you would typically void, and we kinda got past that, but it was a hard time, much research still needs to be done. But Janine tells NPR's.

Janine Laura pain Mark Lumley Amy Arniston NPR Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin California Burbank Janin Wayne State university MREs Detroit Yale medical school forty five minutes thirty seven years eight months
"yale medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

10:08 min | 3 years ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Done at all especially in the world of commenting on and looking into healthcare. Because what's going on with William bar? What's going on with Robert Muller? Well, these are all great stories, but when it gets to the election. One of the great questions. It's going to be asked is. Okay. Republicans you wanted to get rid of ObamaCare. You don't want ObamaCare. You can't stand Obama Care. What's your plan? Trained scientists MIT changes physician at Yale medical school and started writing about President Obama and the healthcare plans and ObamaCare before it was cool. He is a wonks wonky joins us right now. This problem. That the Republicans have. I mean, you worked you've worked with Mitt Romney you've worked with Marco Rubio you've worked on on presidential campaigns. The problem remains going into twenty twenty Republicans do not have a plan on healthcare. And my first question to you is DEA have to have a plan in what why are Republicans or conservatives in favor of some government type of plan on healthcare? Great to be with you. Thanks to the intro. Well, you you do have to have a plan in this set thing about when Republicans or form the tax code a couple years ago. Right. I mean, the Bill was like nine hundred pages. Why would I pay not because Republicans are love government technocratic plant it because the tax code is. So darn complex that if you want simple and clean out all the loopholes and make it fair for people. You gotta line by line tackle, each of those we polled and change them. So that's been works better and grows the economy for people the same healthcare the government is so Nassib involved in healthcare today. Thanks did not just care, but Medicare and Medicaid, and the VA all the other government programs have been built up for seventy years that if you want them and make cleaner and fair and cheaper. So it's not bankrupting our children, our, grandchildren. You've gotta get in the weeds and and Abbott. Plan to change it. So let's get into a what that is. You work done a series of things about competition. A market base plan for drugs, what Medicare can learn from other countries on drug pricing in the state of Indiana where I live Senator Mike Bron Republican. I knew to the Senate has got three different bills out there regarding drug pricing. How does what is the conservative if you will? But maybe a better question is how does government get involved in working on drug prices and not have government run healthcare. First of all to say, there are two members of congress in Indiana that are doing really great work on healthcare house. You mentioned one of the new Senator Mike wrong. There's another a congressman from northeastern, Indiana, Jim banks. We know have very very well here. He's he's done a tremendous job. He put out a Bill called the hospital competition active twenty nineteen which will tackle the huge problem. That Americans are facing all over the country, which is regional hospital. Monopolies that are basically crony capitalism taking advantage of government programs to rip off the taxpayers overcharged people for their hospital care and basically use the government to suppress conflict competitors. So they can charge even higher prices. And that's what's happening in drugs to what the premise of your question. Tony is that oh, we have this free market system. And what Republicans are talking about some government plan to change that. No, that's all what's going on. Today. The government is massively involved in regulating the way prescription drugs are developed and pay for massively involved in regulating, the way hospitals are structured and paid for and taxpayers on the hook for almost all that. So the idea here to say, let get rid of the artificial government rules that suppress competition. Limit your choices and force you to be to OB unit to pay more than you're supposed to pay that you more than you would pay food market that more competition more choice. But so that's listen. I'm a free market guy. And we've had these conversations before talking over grow you spell it av. I k by the way, it grow free up F R E O P P felling. What was that? Spelling it's an issue. I hear you the foundation for research on equal opportunity the very conversation. You're having his one that I agree with right? It is it is certainly about the markets. And when it comes to health care, we don't deal with a true market. We deal with a false marketplace because we have government so involved. I feel the same way about insurance for what reason do we treat medicine. Differently through this false economy of insurance. Then anything else, for example, like when you go get your car repair. There isn't this insurance bureaucracy that you have to deal with but making the claim as I sometimes do that we need less government involved in more market. Involve does not satisfy people who say, yes. But that's not a plan. That's just you wanted to support corporations. How do you how where does the plan part? Come in the plan part comes in. You really do have to have a plan a game plan. Just like you would on the football field. You know, you don't just walk on the football field say, hey, go out and have fun guys. No. You actually have a plan to attack the defense and attack the offense. Similarly, you gotta have a plan to tackle the the rise of the combination of monopoly power from corporations and the government which love those monopolies because they can then tell them what to do. And instead have a system in which there's more competition. What is competition? Do it allows for entrepreneurs to come in and say, you know. What this hospital charging you eighteen thousand dollars knee replacement? I could do it for three thousand let me do instead of putting all these barriers. These regulatory barriers in the way that prevent me from delivery service at a lower cost. So now, how do you deal with the following? Okay. The cost isn't going to be, you know, into thousands and thousands. It's gonna be three thousand dollars your words for the knee replacement. The response that you'll get from the Bernie Sanders Setzer is why should you have to spend three thousand dollars on a knee replacement. Why isn't that just taking care of we should set up a system to take care of your knee replacement? How do you respond? Well, you know, I've said this on Fox News the other day, you know, when when the plan most recent versions plan came out and Bernie Sanders. Oh, they'll be no out of pocket costs in my plan. Everything will be free. And I said look there absolutely will be out of pocket costs in the Bernie plan. They're called taxes. So yeah, you might not have a co pay the doctor's office, but you're gonna pay through the. Knows your taxes are going to double literally double to pay for the burning. So if you think you're not giving up your money to the IRS congrats on the very plan you twice as much as what you pay now for your taxes. So yeah, you would have out of pocket costs. They just would be sent to the government inside it to the doctor the drug company. It wouldn't save any money at all. So the key is how do you actually make the system less expensive is it's not only bankrupting people in terms of every day insurance premiums out of pocket cost, but it's bankrupting the country half of what we spend on healthcare in America is government spending Medicare and Medicaid of the things that drive our deficits you want to have the tall debt problem. You want it to solve our deficit problem you have to reduce the cost of healthcare. Going back now because I'm really pushing you on is there are certain stock answers that the that like presidential candidates are giving that are that take more time to rebut and in a world of sound soundbites. It's difficult to do. So we talked about taxes of corporate taxes are gonna go up. Certainly if you understand Bernie Sanders, if you understand this this very progressive mindset, the idea that a person who's rich makes five million dollars is not true. Eventually it has to work down to the person who makes fifty five thousand dollars in order for the system to work. But right now people say is short people have to pay taxes. That's why the rich have to pay more. And that's what they'll use as the response. How do you come back at them? You know, there's a simple answer instead of having the rich pay more. Why don't we actually come today is them left right now you Tony? And I and everyone listening to your show. Taxes? So that that Bernie would say millionaires and billionaires can get government subsidized health. That's not bad. Isn't that funny? Mitt Mitt Romney gets government subsidized healthcare warned bucket, get governments that that I felt here because we all pay taxes. So that people making whose network of three hundred five hundred billion dollars. You know, they're they're getting government. Why why is it that people who don't need the help are getting government subsidized? Okay. If you ask elected what they'll tell you. Well, the reason why Mitt Romney and Warren buffet have to ask government subside healthier because it solidarity. We just in which everybody has got. No, I am totally supportive. And a lot of people are telling truly poor if you're truly vulnerable, if you're truly disabled, you know, if if you will born with multiple both cystic fibrosis, if you've got some sort of disease, and you need help I think all of us want those individuals to be able to to get some help to Ford their coverage care, but if you've made three hundred million dollars do not eat government, subsidized healthcare, so instead of actually asking the rich to pay more. Why don't we just take away to subsidies and tax breaks that they take advantage of now to get subsidized healthcare. You do that you save enormous amount of when we say a hundred billion dollars a year by just getting rid of tax breaks or the richest five percent of the country that is that tax breaks in, you know, increasing their tax. I mean, like subsidy something that the gray free app..

Mitt Romney Indiana Bernie Sanders President Obama Tony Medicaid Robert Muller Medicare football Bernie Sanders Setzer Yale medical school Marco Rubio Senator Mike Nassib Bernie Abbott Jim banks Senate
"yale medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're hoping is that we're gonna see more diabetics taking insulin less complications for those patients and hopefully lower healthcare costs. He says the company which covers one point four million people who take insulin hopes, the lower prices will mean patients will be more likely to take insulin. According to their doctor's orders under the plan. Even people who haven't met their deductible or who usually pay a percentage of the drugs retail price will not pay more than twenty five. A month Express Scripts announced the new plan just a day after members of congress held a hearing on the high cost of insulin. Gail devore a patient advocate who has been dependent on insulin for forty seven years testified at the house hearing yesterday every day, I get emails from people asking how do I afford insulin every day? In every day. I have to help them find a way to find insulin. She says she has a good job and good insurance, but still has foregone car repairs and doesn't take vacations because she spent so much on our own medication. A recent study by researchers at Yale found that about a quarter of people with diabetes skip doses or use less than prescribed to save money. Kasha lips guy is a research professor at Yale medical school. She told the lawmakers that drug companies are using insulin to boost profits not come up with better drugs. I'll just go back to this vial of insulin. This is the same stuff, right? This is the same insulin. That's been around since one thousand nine hundred six nothing has changed except the price express. Scripts says the twenty five dollars copay plan won't apply to patients who have government sponsored insurance like Medicare or Medicaid. It'll be available to consumers whose insurance companies opt in covers insulin made by Lilly and Novo Nordisk two of the biggest insulin makers in the world. Alison, kodjak, NPR news. We should note. Both Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk have been NPR financial supporters in the past insulin. Made by the pharmaceutical companies sent fee will also be covered under this plan. It's NPR news man at five twenty nine. It's time for another look at bay area traffic.

Novo Nordisk Eli Lilly NPR Express Scripts Yale Gail devore Yale medical school professor congress Alison Medicare Medicaid twenty five dollars forty seven years
"yale medical school" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

08:05 min | 3 years ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Eighteen more than one thousand one hundred people were seriously injured in hit and run crashes and almost two hundred were left to die. If you're in a crash Florida law requires you to remain at the scene of the call for help leaving the scene is a felony. And the penalties are serious. He will lose your license for at least three years, and you could end up in prison after a crash state the scene, call for assistance and wait for first responders to arrive. A message from the Florida Department of highway safety and motor vehicles. We are back. You're listening to the Florida roundtable a surface of Florida's talk and team networks Reagan Smith, and I'm like react. Very special guest is day is Dr Roger decline he is an expert with the federalist society regulatory transparency project FDA and health working groups, and there's a mouthful for you. But a decline thank you for spending. All this time with us today. We know that you're a very busy person. And once again, I I had to interrupt you there to get that network break in and I want to give you a chance to go back up and finish that fought about some of the comments on where we're headed here. Okay. Thank you. So the the point I was really making is that the reason that prices are lower and other countries is because they're free writing off of our investments, and so really what what's going on is that because the incremental cost of manufacturing a drug that's already discovered and have been tested mall there. There's room to for other countries to negotiate down the price and the manufacturer manufacturers still make money on the drug because the the what what what these countries are paying for the drugs. It seems what caused them to produce the the individual pill, for example. So so they're still making money but in aggregate, what's really going on is that these countries I've trading off of our investment, and they're they're what again, the economic term it's free riding, and that that they're they're benefiting from crops and. Investments that we make. I bet they're not that they're not footing the Bill for. I want to go back for just a moment here because folks who joined us late along our network line may not Dr Roger Klein was previously. The medical director of molecular oncology at the Cleveland Clinic, he got his postgraduate medical training at the Yale medical school and obtained his JD from Yale Law School, and that is quite an accomplishment, sir. But I. Making some very good points. Here things that make great deal of sense now along our network line. How can our average listener get involved in this is there is there some way that they can help along with this movement. Well, I you know that it challenging because. It's challenging because again, the the incentives. Don't don't most people don't have a great deal of incentive to invest the time to understand that. They don't they don't even IBM Pentagon, even there to shop frightening. But I think that it behooves all of us as citizens and people who care about the country and care about our fellow man to educate ourselves on these issues. I think I think we we run a real risk right now. We've got from what I what I consider very potentially harmful proposal, which would greatly enhance the the power and strength of government in in our healthcare. And and really convert that converted to a two to assist in that would be entirely unaffordable without extreme extreme bureaucratic controls. That would that would take all the power away from the patient, the consumer and the doctor, and and put it in the hands of of government and government. Bureaucrats? I think I think that I think that we need to understand the issues we need to look more realistically at healthcare. So that we don't we don't support government political move that what that really could be very very different van pages and threaten our entire system. If we move toward a system of the summer are talking about this. They're calling Medicare for all, but it's really just a huge government run health service healthcare system. What's going to happen is if there's going to be a complete mismatch between value, and and and what's purchase they're going to be a negation of the importance of individual values and determination, and they're going to be extreme price control of the sort that we see in Europe. Now, what are the way you're describing it with drugs if we? If we get them here, if we have those we're an engine for innovation for the world and healthcare, if we had those types of of price controls that they that they have in Europe where they or other countries where they trade arc lavar invention. We are not going to have those conventions and nobody's going to be able to tell what we lost. Because what innovation what invented? What did we lose by sacrificing our system for for? Founded good, but but was really unrealistic and an unsustainable. There's always a car, nothing's free. The argument is on the other side of that is that it works. So well on these other countries, why couldn't at work here. Sounds like what you're saying though, is that the only reason of works. Well, in those other countries is because we have a free innovative system here. My correct on that I Don I partly. Yes, you're correct in that it makes them function. I'm not so sure it works. So well inaugur country. I don't I don't believe that Americans. For example. What do what do wanna wait for for for? They don't wanna wait six months or a year for their get replacement. I don't I I think that the be controlled in the restriction that addicted other country, what would not be palatable to American system. I don't I don't believe we would we don't wanna cut off carrots certain ages. We don't want to deny people think because because some bureaucracy Doug doesn't cost benefit study and your zip aids. And it's not worth it breath defend. The X amount of dollars to help you. We're we're really we really have them. That's that's still is primarily based upon what the patient wants tonight. You know, I think I are do not exist. The same way talk yet. Your premise is correct. Yes, they're their systems can can hold on and function because they trade off, and they they do a lot of trading off of our innovation. But again, I'm not so sure that that they work as well as people out them. And in fact, if you if you look at complex care for for major illnesses are our performance in in comparative measures tends to be better than just about anybody. You know, you look at aggregate measures taken about for thing. And yeah, maybe you can you can make a case that country. If I have the veteran certain measured. I'm some of that and accuracy and measurement or differences, not an accurate, and that's all he by differences in the way of imagined. But yeah, I mean, you can look at at those type of population how measured back that really don't have to do with medical care, and you can and you can make these types of argument sometimes, but if you look at treatment for serious illnesses, heart attack cancer, both things we we we generally fair on tap. And Dr Klein, we're just about out of time here, but you have a website where you make frequent appearances and radio and television. You've got lots of articles where can folks go to read and get updates from you, your your website?.

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"yale medical school" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"yale medical school" Discussed on The Pulse

"Someone becomes addicted the drug rewards begin to drown out the natural rewards and the brain gets wired to seek the drug above anything else. Charles brain imaging research revealed one very important way, the brain gets rewired people develop a conditioned response two things they associate with their drug use that mimics the effects of getting high. So even just the sight of a needle or a bottle could trigger powerful cravings that can make it almost irresistible to. Using again, even long after someone gets clean, they relapse because it's still in their brain is finding helped explain the hallmarks of addiction. How people almost always relapse and keep using drugs, despite the often devastating personal costs the work provided a scientific basis for calling addiction a brain disease and neuroscientists continue to build on this discovery. Trying to understand the complicated. And sometimes unexpected ways that addiction affects the brain in a basement laboratory at the university of Pennsylvania, psychiatrists Daniel language is using a giant FM RI machine to look inside the brains of people recovering from addiction. This is the the control room, basically of the three tesla whole body MRI scanner there's somebody inside, but all I can see our her legs sticking out from a dark tunnel. It definitely feels a bit like a place where aliens would take somebody they objected. What is that beeping? These are the gradients in the American. This basically means the Morris cannons running the woman inside is twenty five years old and a mom who's in recovery. From opioid addiction Daniels team is showing her a bunch of different baby photos, while the machine scans, our brain the task convulse you being asked to either rate how cute is the baby to what extent you would like to take care of it. These cute babies can activate the same part of the brain's reward system that lights up when people use drugs, specifically, schooled, nucleus, accumbens is very very small area. Deep inside the brain. Daniel says research suggests that our brains are wired to get a motivating hit of pleasure. Just from seeing baby. Schema the prophecies is that it is made to be rewarding exactly because nature needs us to take care of the young brain research seems to explain so many aspects of addiction from cravings and relapse to neglecting responsibilities like childcare that's helped move our understanding of addiction out of the realm of morality and into the medical world as a disease that can be treated scientists say that's reduce stigma and brings better treatments to people. One result is that the federal government is spending billions of dollars on things like medication assisted treatment to alleviate the opioid crisis. But the brain disease definition of addiction has a lot of critics when I hear the term brain disease. It sounds a lot like Alzheimer's, and that's often. How it's been an allergy is Sally Satele as the psychiatrist in Washington DC and a lecturer at Yale medical school. She's on board with all the neuroscience on a diction, but she still takes issue with calling it a brain disease. Sally says getting addicted isn't like catching an infection or a defect that spontaneously appears in the brain from a psychological standpoint from the question of motivation. Why do you have Alzheimer's it's meaningless if I were to ask you why drink too much why are using heroin every day? That's a meaningful question. And it goes to the fact that people use drugs for reasons, and that makes her skeptical that medication is really enough to help people. Stay in recovery. Medication can help stabilize people. So that they're not in withdrawal. They may crave. Less, but a lot of people still want alter their consciousness there in a lot of psychic pain. Third avenue in Manhattan. I've come to New York to see my salads who's trying to reconcile these two sides of addiction its roots in both biology and behavior, my is a journalist who has been covering addiction for thirty years. She was also to drugs herself when she was in college. She writes about this in her book unbroken brain is the title kind of double entendre of a Grateful Dead song..

Alzheimer Daniel Sally Satele accumbens Charles university of Pennsylvania federal government New York Yale medical school heroin Manhattan Washington lecturer twenty five years thirty years three tesla