31 Burst results for "Yale Law School"

Twitter Suspends JD Vance Campaign Account

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Twitter Suspends JD Vance Campaign Account

"You see what happened to jay. Vance jd vance the author of hillbilly elegy the Appalachian raised kind of half appalachian. Half middletown ohio raised a young man. Who went on to become A yale law school. Nor i take that back. I think he went to yale. For as undergrad got his law degrade ohio state. Beg your pardon at anyway you'll jedi vance now. Senate candidate jd. Vance is one of the top senate candidates at least according to polls rising. He's got a lot of very powerful people behind him. Not a lot of which by the way or not all of which are full on full conservatives. he's got some silicon valley support but jd. Vance is a senate candidate to replace rob portman who is retiring and is not running for reelection here in the state of ohio again in which i reside so i will cast votes in this election. Jv vance's campaign account was suspended from twitter. Twitter is not now just censoring conservative individuals. Like you know the former president of the united states now. They're actually practicing. Election interference the campaign account for jd. Vance was suspended without any rhyme or reason offered. You just can't have a place on twitter anymore. They're still trying to find out why. To my knowledge they have not found out why. But it's an issue. It's a massive issue. Free speech the ability to communicate the ability to use modern tack. Everyone else's using modern tack in campaigning. All of that now is up in the air.

Vance Jd Vance Vance Jedi Vance Ohio Senate Yale Law School Middletown JAY Rob Portman Twitter United States
Amazon Wants FTC Chair Lina Khan Recused From All Its Cases

All Things Considered

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Amazon Wants FTC Chair Lina Khan Recused From All Its Cases

"Friday 25 page petition with the Federal Trade Commission today, arguing that newly installed FTC chair Lina Khan Ought to recuse herself from any antitrust conversations involving Amazon. Khan has made no secret over the years at Yale Law School, a prior stint as an FTC staffer and most recently teaching antitrust law at Columbia of her worries about big tech. Amazon claims in the petition. The cons record were she to take part in Amazonian decisions would violate federal ethics rules and the companies due process rights. The FTC had no comment on the petition. I, however, I'm going to take the under on a recusal.

FTC Lina Khan Amazon Yale Law School Khan Columbia
"yale law school" Discussed on WDUN AM550

WDUN AM550

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"yale law school" Discussed on WDUN AM550

"Yeah, I know you're a Georgian, and I appreciate your service in the military. And what's so great is that, um You know, when you look at the military, and I believe in a all volunteer military, I do think that When we required men, and I guess it would be now women if we did that again to serve in RTC land grant colleges at least for two years until they decided to Until they decide whether they wanted to join or not. I think that was a good process because it taught a lot of discipline. And as the mother for as three boys and a girl, you know, I I loved that discipline. Okay, even though they didn't ultimately end up commissioning that discipline was was something that I think was helpful, and it also talked a lot about what it was to be American. But, uh, you know, I appreciate very much your service, your sacrifice and the fact that you're taken on Yale Law School. I think it's great. Well, thank you so much. I really appreciate that, and it was really just a privilege to serve. While Jeremy Hunt, We're going to have you back on to talk about issues as they come up, but I appreciate so much You've given us some of your time today. Thank you Have to have a good one. You have a great one to Jeremy Hunt at Georgian. Graduated West point. Uh, former military army Captain, now a Yale law school school student, and you see him on Fox News on a regular basis, He will be back on the Martha Zoller show. On Wednesdays newsroom We're.

Jeremy Hunt Yale Law School Yale law school school Wednesdays three boys two years Fox News today Martha Zoller RTC Georgian American
"yale law school" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"yale law school" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"To a lot of questions, and I'm right here. I can ask him my first question. Brad is as a part time hourly worker filling in for Mark Mason. Do I qualify for one of those $600 city checks? Well, you might. You know, you could go and apply Thursday, between three and six. I could be the only guy in my whole neighborhood gets really hope. The I really hope the people that need those do as you say and go online and fly because I I joke maybe inappropriately, but there's so many hurting people out there and they can take advantage of the city money. I hope they really follow through with it. Paul. It mean for Mark and word is the big guy will be back on Monday that your understanding that's right at this point. That's what I'm hearing back to change, but he's said to be doing well looking forward to his return. I know you are. A big day for me because the top quotes of the year out. I don't know how close you follow this bread, but there's a guy at Yale University. That Other people do Oxford and Merriam Webster do word of the year. This guy does quotes of the year. Interesting. Yeah, things you've been saying in the news all year before we get to the quotes of the year, the word a year, the Oxford people really. Copped out to use a phrase from an earlier time they booked out. They didn't choose one word toe describe or the best fits the 2020 year we've just experienced they pick 16 words. And I think that's just laziness on the part of those Brits will fall into a single sentence. Go well, that might start a bush A bushfire and you might be peach me impeach me for doing it, But I might find acquittal. I'm glad I don't have the coronavirus Rickover 19 You want 11 more because I'm gonna do it. But I just think that was that one of my favorite expressions in life. Is that really a long letter because they didn't have time to write you a short letter. The people that Oxford didn't take the time to boil it down into one word, but people that Merriam Webster's did okay. Their word of the year. What do you think? One word? Hmm. My guess would be pandemic that is right on Uh, Marrying, Webster says further research revealed people started first searching for that word pandemic. Two weeks earlier. Then the same day the person who was infected with the virus left the hospital in Seattle. That's when people start really sort of looking, but it was actually January 20th. The day that the U. S reported his first positive case of people went to the dictionary and started looking up to see what pandemic really mad, So they did their job. The Oxford people did not. So there's a guy at Yale University's name's Fred Shapiro. He wrote a book of quotations published in 2006. And since every year curates an annual list of the top 10 Quotes of the year is the librarian of the Yale Law School. And while his book of Quotations are really eloquent statements from literature and history, and people like Shakespeare, He says. There's no Shakespeare's among us right now. And so he's looking for quotes that became famous important, historic throughout the air quotes, say a lot about the nature of our culture and our society at the time. So I've got the top 10 here. I'm wondering if You guys would be interested in taking a crack it one quote of the year. Actually, there's nine of them. Meaning you want us to guess? Yeah. What's on the list? Yeah, no Such thing is too pretty best friends. Only you only you. I don't know. I don't know what he has done it again for you. She My words are important Words. Airpower. Words. E had journalism professors in college who stressed the importance of precision in language. I was on my way to a print career. And ended up in broadcast and Well, you gotta be current. More careful with your words and broadcast to temperate Because people tell you all the time. You said it wrong. You got an idea, Bret, you an idea of a quote? Quote of the year? I don't know. I was trying to think back over the year and trying to think of I don't I don't have. I'd have to spend little nobody's ever heard. Okay. If I give you an idea of what these are you'll, you'll sure I'm sure we'll help. Yeah, that's good. Yeah. From Dr Fauci. Wear a mask. Okay? Yeah, okay. Who said this one day it's like a miracle it will disappear. The president. Like how he says it all. Formal. Yeah, Trump me where a mask was Number one, The second most quotable quote. According to Mr Shapiro is tragic. It's I can't breathe. Yeah, sure, George Floyd said, And we all heard the audio and newscasts and it broke our hearts. But it was the second time that quote has appeared on this list. Eric Garner's but the same three words in 2014 before he died at the hands of police. That's a tragic one. Not the number four. I did number three. Number four days. I see the disinfect that the knocks it out in a minute, one minute, And is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside or almost a cleaning Brad? That's a long quote that's along that would be the president. I wish you would have seen this article and deliver that one to me. Wow, that's impressive. Um, Here's number five. I will never lie to you. You have my word on that. You said it, Mike. Biden Press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany. Oh, that's right. That was the first thing she said. Yeah, first briefing, right. She lied out the gate May 1st Um From Ruth Bader Ginsburg. My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed. Yeah. Joe Biden on the breakfast Club number seven. If you have a problem figuring out whether you're.

Oxford president Merriam Webster Yale University Mark Mason Fred Shapiro Brad Joe Biden Ruth Bader Ginsburg Yale Law School Paul Seattle George Floyd Shakespeare Trump Kayleigh Mcenany Mike U. S Bret
Fauci's plea 'Wear a mask' tops list of 2020 notable quotes

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Fauci's plea 'Wear a mask' tops list of 2020 notable quotes

"Yale Law School librarian Fred Shapiro is put together his most notable quotes of twenty twenty number one a quote first made by Dr Anthony Fauci in March wear a mask the second quote was in may as a Minneapolis police officers leg was pressed to George Floyd's neck in February president trump talked about the corona virus before it became what it is today one day it's like a miracle it will disappear two months later the president talked about possible ways the corona virus could disappear by injection insiders for almost a cleaning White House press secretary Kaylee McEntee has two quotes I will never lie to you you have my word on that the other on re opening schools the science should not stand in the way of this speaking to an African American audience president elect Joe Biden said in may on a radio show if you have a problem figuring out whether your for me or trump and you a black eye may Donoghue

Fred Shapiro Dr Anthony Fauci George Floyd Yale Law School Kaylee Mcentee Minneapolis Donald Trump White House Joe Biden
Supreme Court Rules New York Cannot Limit Attendance At Houses Of Worship Due To COVID-19

Here & Now

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court Rules New York Cannot Limit Attendance At Houses Of Worship Due To COVID-19

"Some religious groups in new york are celebrating last night's rare late night. Supreme court decision blocking an executive order from new york governor andrew cuomo that restricted attendance at religious services in their neighborhoods because the pandemic ultra orthodox jewish organizations in brooklyn and queens and the roman catholic diocese of brooklyn claim. That cuomo single them out. The state pointed to the recent spike in covid nineteen cases. And then there was that alarming ultra orthodox wedding last week. The two hundreds not wearing masks. The court's decision was five. Four with its newest justice emmy coney barrett considered the fifth vote. Emily brazilan staff writer at new york times magazine and fellow at the yale law. School is here emily. Thank you for taking a break from your thanksgiving thanks. You are welcome. Glad to be here. And we should say the to litigants the ultra orthodox jewish groups and the catholic diocese were already not subject to these restrictions. Because they've been lifted there's a color system for restrictions in new york and Cova cases had obey abated in their area. But what was the argument from the court in blocking even targeted restrictions. Well the corpus arguing that new york hadn't shown that less strict measures would be enough to protect public health. Which is a pretty cursory kind of way of thinking about this. You can see the concur. Ince's by justice gorsuch as justice cavanaugh. That some of the conservative judges didn't like the idea that essential businesses which were permitted to open a new york included stores but did not include houses of worship. And i think the odd thing about the majority's analysis here is what it's comparing so the majority behaves as if people going to stores are the same as people congregating in a house of worship even though it's very unusual in store for lots of people to be sitting together or certainly singing or chanting together for a long time. That's all in a church or synagogue or a mosque and we know that that is a riskier activity. So there was no discussion of the science or scientific public health considerations in the majority's opinion. And what about chief. Justice john robertson. The three liberal justices dissenting. What did they say. Well chief justice. John roberts says there's no reason for us to decide this right now for the reason that you gave earlier new york had a lift these restrictions for now because the krona virus spread is not as bad in the city so these restrictions said that in the red zone the highest risk new york. You could have ten people in a house of worship in the orange zone. You could have twenty-five people but the catholic archdiocese in the docks synagogues that have sued. They no longer are subject to those restrictions and so she's jeff roberts was making a kind of traditional conservative judicial modesty Moved here in which he said. Look if they're subject to these restrictions again maybe they will be proved to be unduly harsh but at the moment. They're not so we don't need to step in here. And this is a classic example of a judge saying you know what. Let's leave this in the hands of public. Health officials not have judges step in to make these decisions. Unless it's absolutely necessary will be clear. What does it mean. I mean be clear. Only because i'm not able to figure this out. Temporary decision made on an emergency basis by the way when ruth bader ginsburg was on the court roberts sided with the liberals and the decision was in favor of restrictions that was when california had restrictions in place. So obviously there's been a tilt here but what does this mean for other states for new york when it comes to restrictions on houses of worship in the pandemic y- i'm kind of scratching my head about that too. I mean it looks like what the court is saying. Is that if you have businesses open you have to treat churches and other houses of worship just like those businesses but without paying attention to the greater risk that the church that you know religious service can entail and that's very strange to me because it seems so at odds with the science and what we know about the spread of coronavirus. And so you're right. This is a decision. That's a temporary restraining. Order against new york. The merits the kind of larger case is still to be thrashed out the lower courts and so one hopes going forward that there will be more attention to these apples to apples. Comparisons and figuring out what the state really needs to do to protect public health and mall many have seen the video from the acidic wedding in brooklyn this month. Hundreds packing a synagogue. No-one wearing masks mayor. Bill de blasio said or organizers will find fifteen thousand for violating restrictions. And so we're keeping an eye on that to see what happens. There might be any kind of consideration of

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Roman Catholic Diocese Of Broo Coney Barrett Emily Brazilan New York Times Magazine Catholic Diocese Justice Gorsuch Justice Cavanaugh Justice John Robertson Cuomo Jeff Roberts Ince Queens Brooklyn Supreme Court Yale Emily John Roberts Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Free speech and the struggle against misinformation ahead of 2020 election

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 1 year ago

Free speech and the struggle against misinformation ahead of 2020 election

"Last week, The New York Post published a potentially damaging story about Hunter Biden, son of the Democratic presidential nominee. Based on emails, The Post said, were provided by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and originally harvested from a laptop computer left in a Delaware repair shop. There were enough questions about the authenticity of the emails that most mainstream media declined to publish the story, but it's the kind of content that Khun spread like wildfire on Social media. In a remarkable move Twitter on Wednesday Band users from sharing links to the story because it said the emails may have been hacked and contained private information. It reversed course two days later after Republicans accused Twitter of censorship. But the episode illustrates a question our guest, Emily Bazelon, has been thinking about in an age when questionable, Perhaps even fabricated content can sweep through the digital world unchecked. Does our traditional commitment to unfettered free speech still serve democracy. And the cover story for this week's New York Times Magazine, Basil on surveys the impact that lies and conspiracy theories sometimes promoted by foreign actors can have on our political discourse. And she explores how other countries think differently about free speech and its relationship to a healthy democracy. Emily Bazelon is a graduate of the Yale Law School and a journalist. She's a staff writer for the New York Times Magazine and the Truman Capote fellow for Creative Writing at Yale Law School. She's also the author of two books. She joins us from her home in New Haven, Connecticut. Emily Bazelon welcome back to fresh air. Thanks so much for having me you open your piece with a story that began making the rounds some months back, among right wing voices on the Internet that there was a plan by the forces of Joe Biden to stage a coup to take over the government in connection with the November election. First of all, what was the basis of this claim? Great. So this is ahh concocted claim and the sort of colonel at the center of it was a project called the Transition Integrity Project, a group of about 100 academics and journalists and pollsters and former government officials and former campaign the staff staffers. They started meeting over the summer to kind of game out various scenarios for the November election, and so they were basically testing American democracy in the event that President Trump wins in the event that vice President Biden winds To see in various scenario is what could happen. And in the event, there's a contestant result in a long, nasty count. Yes, exactly especially in the event if there's a contestant result in litigation and other possibilities, and so in one of their several scenarios, Biden wins the popular vote but loses the Electoral College. And so in that hypothetical case they imagined the Democrats would get desperate. And they might consider encouraging California and the Pacific Northwest to threaten to secede in exchange for pressuring Republicans to expand the size of the Senate. So Rosa Brooks, who was one of the organizers of this project, She's a law professor at Georgetown. She published an essay where she mentioned this threat to succeed in one sentence in an essay in The Washington Post. On the next day, you see someone named Michael Anton's, a former national security adviser to President Trump. He has an article called The Coming CU Question. Mark and based on Rosa Brooks is characterization of what the transition integrity project was doing. He starts saying that Democrats are laying the groundwork for a revolution and then you see that article take off in extremist online communities. There is AH podcast maker named Dan Bongino, who's a big trump supporter. He makes videos about it. One of them has the tag. They are telling you what they are going to do exclamation point his videos pull in millions of views. Then you see the story. My great toe, a right wing website called Revolver News Revolver. News starts to spin up the idea that Norm Eisen, who participated in the transition Integrity project and is a longtime Democratic lawyer in Washington. That he's at the center of this supposed coup. And from there, Tucker Carlson feature someone talking about this concocted made up story on his show. And then you see it just go viral on social media and get picked up by lots of groups, including, like a county Republican organization in Oregon, So it is Perfect kind of story because it pulls in both traditional media in the form of Fox and also social media. And then you see President Trump get involved. He tweets in praise of Revolver news, and then he tweets quote the November 3rd election result may never be accurately determined, which is what some want. And that's a kind of typical dark, slightly vague, foreboding kind of warning from President Trump that further perpetuates this coup narrative. And then Trump later retreat. Someone talking about a coup with regard to Nancy Pelosi. So you see from this hypothetical project that was really meant to be a kind of academic exercise about the election. This whole sat of conspiracy theories on the right that get a lot of play in the media on social media, and then from the president

President Trump Emily Bazelon Transition Integrity Project Joe Biden Twitter Hunter Biden Rosa Brooks The New York Times Magazine The New York Post Yale Law School New York Donald Trump Revolver News New Haven Delaware Rudy Giuliani Nancy Pelosi
A deadlocked Senate greets Amy Coney Barrett

Joe Pags

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

A deadlocked Senate greets Amy Coney Barrett

"Trump's choice choice to to fill fill the the Supreme Supreme Court Court vacancy vacancy made made her her opening opening pitch pitch to to the the Senate Senate Judiciary Judiciary Committee Committee today, today, Jamie Jamie Cockney, Cockney, Barrett Barrett says says she she reads reads every every opinion, opinion, she she writes writes from from the the perspective perspective of of the losing side. Even though I would not like the results what I understand that the decision was fairly reasoned and grounded in law. If confirmed, Barrett says she would bring new perspective to the court, the only mother of school age Children, the first justice in 45 years from the Midwest based seventh Circuit and the only sitting justice who did not attend Harvard or Yale law schools.

Senate Senate Judiciary Judici Jamie Jamie Cockney Supreme Supreme Court Court Barrett Barrett Donald Trump
Remembering Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

People of the Pod

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Remembering Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Epic luck is a professor of law and the Founding Faculty Director of the Solomon Center for Health, Law and policy at Yale Law school she is an expert on Congress and the political process federalism civil procedure and health law among her most recent work is the most extensive empirical study ever conducted about the realities of the congressional lawmaking process published as two articles. In the Stanford Law review she has worked for. A Mayor Governor and senator, but she's here today because she also worked for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg she and fellow former clerk Jillian. Metzger wrote a piece in the new. York. Times just days after Justice GINSBURG staff recalling her impact on them and on equality for men and women in America professor. Thank you for joining us and before we begin our deepest condolences to the loss of your mentor and friend. Thank you so much. It's really a loss for all of us. Yes. Well, I believe you were at the all night vigil last night for Justice Ginsburg I'm hoping you can kind of take us there and describe that experience. Sure. So many people saw on television yesterday the law clerk stood outside to receive the justices casket, which is a typical tradition, but was very striking. I think yesterday because we covered the plaza, an perse because there are so many of us. But second because you were social distancing for covid. So created quite a striking visual I'd ask her ceremony. There is a tradition that other justices have observed where there's an honor guard that guards the casket for the entire time at lays in the court and law clerks at the sign of honor to their boss. Often stand is shifts next to the casket what we did yesterday and are still doing until tomorrow morning actually for the full forty, eight hours, the casket is. The court is that we have two law clerks that are standing by her side every single minute from the time she got to the court through the night. So I was there last night at midnight that another shift at one forty in the morning it's not unique as you know in the Jewish tradition, there is that tradition of standing by the side of the body for burial and several people have asked me wells is happening because she's a Jewish justice. This part of the Jewish tradition at it's a happy coincidence. It's not just for her as happened before, but I was very meaningful I think and really special way to honor her well. Let's talk about just the Ginsberg's impact on you. What did you learn as her clerk started in July two thousand three, right? Yes. Can you talk about your time as for Clark but also impact on you going forward from that time I mean I think her impact on anyone Shane. Countered is really immeasurable as a law clerk for her her work ethic is renowned. She worked harder than anyone I just did another interview with someone else who's I? Well, very supreme court advocate who mentioned that you know nobody prepared more than Justice Ginsburg even the lawyers who are preparing their cases or less prepared than she was on as her law clerk, you could not out prepare her so was she taught us aw was this work ethic and the idea of Being incredibly careful. So you can stand behind your work, one, hundred percent she instilled that in us an enormous way, the other things that she instilled with us during the clerkship or some of her signature qualities. So she was remarkably collegial in the sense that she could disagree and dissent without throwing sharp elbows or causing fights and remaining friendly and close with her colleague. She's obviously the independent thinker. She also had just an amazing life outside the court she basically filled her. Entire. Day She would work until eight pm she would go to the opera than she will come back and work more and she sort of showed you how to have this incredibly full life where you could work hard and you know she wouldn't use your play hard but you know fill your life with all the things you love and every aspect and the last thing say about my time there that her relationship with her husband was as I said before one. For the ages and you could not work for her without seeing that relationship would have birthday parties for every law clerk in her office at her husband. Marty would big cake they were such equal partners. He was her biggest booster her stories through the ages were all about how they supported one another different times in their career. It was really an amazing experience for young person. I was newly married at the time to see that kind of marriage and learn from it. So did she maintain a relationship with her clerks after their terms the court we're up? Oh, absolutely. It was sort of remarkable and a Guy John Stronger and deeper and deeper. Every year I would say that with every passing year I felt closer and closer and closer to her, which is just

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Law Clerk Supreme Court Stanford Law Yale Law School Professor Of Law Solomon Center For Health Marty Metzger York Senator Shane Jillian Congress John Stronger Founding Faculty Director Ginsberg Professor America Clark
"yale law school" Discussed on Here's Something Good

Here's Something Good

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Here's Something Good

"Look into this. Huge something good a production of the Seneca Women Podcast, work and iheartradio. Each day we aspire to bring you the news. The silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere every day. We just need to look for in share it. Here's something good for today. If we're going to find a way out of the current pandemic. The answer may come through technology already. We've turned attack to share lifesaving health practices across the globe to ramp up production of medical equipment and to accelerate vaccine research. Looking ahead we'll be counting on the next generation of computer, scientists and engineers and coders to keep the world healthy and functioning. And women must be part of building that new world after all women have always been pioneers and tech since the eighteen hundreds when Ada. Lovelace envisioned the very first computer to the nineteen fifties, when grace hopper helped develop coble, the first standardized programming language to the rocket scientists and AI creators of today, but tech does have a major gender gap, only twenty four percent of computer scientists today are. Adroit from nineteen, ninety five when that rate was thirty seven percent. Fortunately there's an amazing organization that's helping to shrink that gap. Today. We talked to rush Masud Jani the founder of girls who code which is building the next generation of coders and computer scientists. Now one of the mantras of the tech world is fail fast. Fail often. That's how you learn and how you succeed, so it's no wonder that rushmore sue. Johnny decided to create a Tech Organisation for girls. Russia's motto is embraced failure something. She's done throughout her life whether when applying to Yale Law School and failing her first two attempts, a third, worked or conducting a vigorous but unsuccessful campaign for us. Congress the first Indian American woman to do so. Rush time on the campaign trail exposure to classrooms where she saw the lack of girls and computer science courses, she learned that the biggest drop-off in girls interest in computer science happened between the ages of thirteen and seventeen so rushmo set out to reverse this decline and to open new doors for women everywhere. Girls who code has clubs teach girls to use computer science to change the world with eighty five hundred programs around the globe and girls who code is definitely moving the needle. Its alumni go on to major in computer science at at least fifteen times the national average. We spoke with reshma about the amazing work of girls who code and here's what she had to say. For I always say I was a weird person to have started. Girls who code because I wasn't a coder. And when I was running for office in two thousand ten I would go into computer science classes and we bought a flat. And I, would just like lines and lines of coders who are boys like not a girl insight. We were in a moment in our country where forty percent of America's breadwinners for women where tax with becoming you know a job where you could march up into the middle class. But yet women weren't part of this kind of. Twenty first century growth. And so because you know became like an opportunity to really close the gender gap. Growth the code itself had taught hundred thousand young women to cove and reach million. The groundwork and there are other incredible organizations who are doing this work like. You know coach twenty forty and you know black girls code though like there have been a lot of progress. And we were getting to a place. You know from a policy perspective. We work with a lot of governors across the country and getting them to really move the needle in in getting computer science in the classrooms and and Cova Tap..

Seneca Women Podcast reshma Yale Law School Masud Jani Cova Tap Russia Lovelace Johnny coble founder Congress America
Why 'Cryptocurrency Would Not Exist Without Black People'

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Why 'Cryptocurrency Would Not Exist Without Black People'

"Actually WanNa ask you about this one tweet storm that you wrote and it began. CRYPTOCURRENCY would not exist without blind people. You explain to people what it is. He wrote there yeah, yeah, yeah, absolutely, and this was a talk. That I did at after a while I was even ignorant, so we talk about you know tokenism. You know a continuation of the evolving form of housing transfer body right, and that's from a lot of different different things, different peoples different cultures right, so it's not just say black people are the sole reason why cryptocurrency exist, but it is to say that the prevalence of Fiat currency only came into fruition through the US government in two particular historical instances made this happen one the funding of union troops right during the civil war who desperately needed feet this out at the time, which was one of the economic centers in the world. I don't think people realize how much fuel the cotton and textile. Textile Industry in the loan industries that came off of that globally a really created. Will they accommodate be happy that and created the financial centers like New York in fact back then there were more millionaires per capita. I believe in Mississippi than there were New York and in in this has changed over time in that experiment ride that Abraham Lincoln took in leveraging Fiat currency, which was more broadly understood as we all agree, this has value rather than being backed by or silver like the pound lead into the Nixon years where we quite literally came off the gold standard after establishing it. And this is the history right of how money has evolved in how Tokens Ation where we see the token ization of assets and even you know stable coins in terms of store value money. That, that's the evolution in its follow, and that some of the people the first people who were securitise were also black people We look at Monticello and Thomas Jefferson that was funded trauma loan, collateralized by slaves and also built by slaves. So the complexities in terms of how finances evolve very deeply intertwined into this systemic racism, you know that I call it on and that people you know unfortunately push off as or minimise as a well. They said the inward or well. They didn't let this person into this complex right in. It's really a lot more out. Actually love to be called the inward half systemic racism gone. in in a have the superficial racism right exists I can deal with that mentally and emotionally. You know, but but the constraints of the systemic aspect has quite literally change people's life trajectories in terms of whether they can be an entrepreneur whether they could be hired. How much access to credit they get and how that affects their lively. I don't know if people know this story, but Senator Cory Booker from new. Jersey often talks about this in his life trajectory where. Parents had been looking for a home in a suburb of New Jersey that had good schools, and it was considered a white neighborhood, and they kept being told that these houses that they thought were on sale were not available and this organization I can't remember They must have just worked on like fairness in housing or something. got white people to go as decoys after they had gone to these houses and found that the houses were suddenly available and this. This kept happening and so eventually they picked how they wanted, and when they should have to sign the papers, the sellers were surprised because they thought it was getting a white couple buying it, and that was foul. Corey ended up at you. Know in this great school district. Of course he lake went to Stanford. Was Ruth scholar went to Yale Law School now as a USA I mean he's like you know super successful, but yeah, that's just one story about. How systemic racism or in that case, the the fight against it or winning the fight against it in one instance did have a positive outcome.

Corey New York Senator Cory Booker United States New Jersey Yale Law School Thomas Jefferson Monticello Mississippi Stanford Abraham Lincoln Ruth Nixon
"yale law school" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:55 min | 1 year ago

"yale law school" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Lot of respect for Stewart Rhodes the founder national president of oath keepers he served as a U. S. army paratrooper until disabled and very rough terrain parachuting accident he's a former member of congressman Ron Paul's Washington DC staff he worked on both of Ron Paul's presidential campaign store graduated from Yale Law School where his paper solving the puzzle of enemy combatant status one yields top prize for a paper on the bill of rights Stewart has served as a volunteer firefighter as a state certified concealed carry arms instructor of course self defense as a volunteer instructor in college and in law school as well he also works on preventing the assault against individuals teaching them prevention store welcome to the program interesting night this is going to be good to have you back thank you very much appreciate it have you been I'm doing fine how are you doing I'm doing doing good I'm in Saint Louis right now and Tommy is in that California our producer and we had an event cancelled in Houston a live event which may be just as well but because I guess had he come in from California in Texas there were quarantined for fourteen days that's crazy isn't it there are Texas we were looking at all the the liberal run states and they're trying to make the argument that they are worse but Texas is actually pretty far down the road as well governor Abbott has gone up quite a bit down the rabbit hole aren't there any liberals look at the constitution and just simply say folks this just isn't right right now what was what conservative looking at here in Texas you worker of the same mindset and seven we saw post Malone at your mercy Maina said this is the New World Cup set aside rights for security at the same exact folks truly to be given again the coke in nineteen this is a medical nine eleven this lockdown which I don't believe is working medically has crippled the economy has ruins some lives has ugh you know turn the economy upside down and I don't know when it's going to rebound you probably heard Chuck Kopp is our newscast talking about he thinks it's going to be some time is this constitutional in your opinion or not store shut only to shutting things down no I don't regular retail preference to the next meeting Spanish flu they didn't do this during the Spanish flu even though it killed six hundred seventy five thousand Americans did not force the healthy to stay indoors though the quarantine the sick quarantine the well that wasn't done even in that dire circumstance didn't shut down the economy there was no no or William declaration of what is essential and nonessential activities I'm just to the day that we heard the NYPD on board telling people that a protest the governor and the mayor of New York City had declared their activities nonessential protests and there was therefore in unlawful assembly and head to the stores would be arrested who doesn't like waking up in in Brave New World this is like a really really isn't what's so bizarre is the lockdown hasn't solved the issue at all the problem is still there in Iowa we started I've been right if the flooding the crew with the whole whole goal we've done that but they moved the goal posts now if you're going to be you know we're forced to live under this new paradigm of emergency rule until the vaccine that's a new definition on which there may never be a vaccine who knows right whether we won or not that's not the point though is that they fear the excuse of the schools to coding and walked out of society under the logic that you have provided the curve was overwhelmed hospitals saw what you saw in Italy and so people like okay we can accept that for two weeks so it will stay home and shut down the schools than that came and went and now it's Microsoft governor Abbott yesterday saying Hey at sometime in the future we're getting closer and closer to eight it sure will make sure only that fewer is is created will be free of covert nineteen until then we have to co exist with nineteen the logic we under this coach will Burton C. until we have a vaccine of course the peeled open the remains of them what we're gonna be compelled to pick vaccine and isn't that unconstitutional as well I think so we apologize for the number of people like to you to your people the people have a right to their own personal items sold in their papers and effects read more we will search and seizures I mean I don't even take the flu shot stored I don't tell people not to take the shot that's their business they want to take a shot let him take a shot but I surely don't want to be that one of the people to get some experimental vaccine that they truly haven't tested and pump it into all of us because the ramifications could be horrible Robert Kennedy junior has pointed out vaccine companies old big three pharmaceutical companies are immune from being held liable that's right you are here the complete absolutely gross negligence and still get away with it because they're protected against you know special status a protection order out also that you know around the world have sterilized in third world experiment on four people these vaccines and they've been sterilized and do that what has been caused you know blind us all kinds of of hold for the next with no consequences absolutely I mean day there could be a memo somewhere that says this new vaccine that we're working on we'll do X. Y. and Z. to harm people and there's nothing we can do about it it illegally it's crazy Sarver correct account through the political system and that's the other big thing people didn't realize like this is the new you know cut the military industrial complex worked into the entrails of dust and dust a complex in the war on terror the knowledge of the medical industrial complex this huge massive pharmaceutical companies stand to make trillions of dollars which is exactly why they don't tell you takes longer or get your son get your sunshine and vitamin D. and I'm not downplaying how drugs Cortland because it's saying you know it's really all drug that's no longer under patent can't make money on that so we wanted to suppress knowledge about that in Moscow because only on the false choice of you all walk down and nothing's gonna go back to normal until you take the vaccine which we will sell at this high a high dollar amount stored our our founding fathers who created the bill of rights turning over in their graves I think so many brick they went through a smallpox attempt to make in the middle of the revolution right beginning of the revolution actually so they don't with that kind of what kind of situation and yet they didn't do the same thing we're doing now a good sacrifice all the liberty of the altar of security Julia medical nine nine eleven can people be manipulated I think intentionally into this false choice over petrol groups in mind set because then what's next but every every flu that comes through in October nineteen and you said earlier it's been shown to be you know those people are are are not gonna have a problem with it it's the elderly those with pre existing conditions like several so the affected that is not been as dire as as predicted and yet they still want you to say well now it's like Baltika saves one life liberty so what's next for the next will come through the exact same thing walk us down this is this is Carol going back to the final question about constitutionality you have governors who are making wall as they go through open their mouth in law comes out of his dictatorship the dictates of the law is whatever he says it is so we need to push fallen leaves open the malval walking out with governors are now hitting exactly the same way there's no state statute that lays out what is essential and nonessential business or central modest reflectivity during a and pandemic and delegates to the governor is going to shut them down there's no wall there's no still clear legal standard it's both over broad and void for vagueness and but but the final point as the governor has no authority to make law violation of separation of powers the legislature makes law the executive execute for nothing while at a crucial point sure why did these states fall like dominoes when one shut down another shutdown that another one and another one why didn't anybody stand up and say this is ludicrous I'm not sure any of my state down also because it sucks because she is a shining example of just that she took the same exact approach that sweetened the whole country she said Hey I'm going to give recommendations I will go ahead and pass on the CDC recommendations in the truck ministrations recommendations but I'm gonna leave it up to the people of South Dakota who are adults and are mature people to do their best to keep themselves safe what we carry on she did not do a shutdown should not make arbitrary capricious termination of what's essential not the glucose stuff about old Walmart's wide open you're going to Walmart but by potter panicking when the Walmart then I can go by that in Texas I can go to a pond pants to work you know the pontiff store would be safer I'm exposed to fewer people right but no I can't go there are going to go to the Walmart because Walmart's been decreed is as essential and and the little small stores decreases nonessential that's so weird how that works over the big box stores were open while these communities so what one state out of fifty right although it's specifically showing example by believe Wyoming's another one there's several others not not a lot to all no matter what what eight eight different varying degrees stuff because with the most you know the shining example but what about it out of out of all states didn't do a toll walked out west did some version of a lockdown in Franklin this all goes right back to president trump he issued the guidelines three T. H. us that said here's the guidelines for the state's on essential versus nonessential functions and activities and those of us even though it's a good dive lines not in order they were intended to be used by the states and help in years but the state's two then issue executive orders stay with the story we're gonna take a break we're gonna come back and talk more about why is this covert nineteen being hyped so much in our bid in the media since I was nineteen and I've never seen anything like this before and I will talk about that in some other issues Stewart Rhodes our special guest will take calls within the next hour here on coast to coast is website linked up it coast to coast AM dot com it is called oath keepers dot org we will be back.

Stewart Rhodes president Ron Paul Yale Law School instructor founder U. S. army congressman Washington
Author 'Rodham' imagines a different `Hillary'

Weekend Edition Sunday

07:03 min | 1 year ago

Author 'Rodham' imagines a different `Hillary'

"A young Hillary Rodham madly in love with the man she met at Yale Law School abandons her own path and heads to Arkansas slowly she starts to uncover bill Clinton's many infidelities and makes a choice what would have happened if Hillary Rodham had never married Bill Clinton a new novel by Curtis Sittenfeld imagines it just that and she joins me now to talk about it hello hello your book starts out in a familiar way but then your book takes a very different attacks from the historical timeline what what happens so in real life Bill Clinton proposed to Hillary Rodham twice and she said no both times and then he proposed a third time and she said yes and in my version she says no the third time two and she goes her own way then she initially becomes a law professor and Chicago at northwestern and then she kind of goes on from there and the book follows her over the next forty years I want to ask you before we go much further in this you know so much has been said about Hillary Clinton why did you want to write speculative fiction about her doesn't everyone is in a totally natural impulse and possibly so actually it's funny because I agree with you that so much has been written about Hillary and it was sort of in reaction to that that I think I wrote this book so in the lead up to the two thousand sixteen election I was invited to write essays about Hillary and I would decline because I felt like every possible thing there was to say about Hillary had been said she had been analyzed from every angle and then an editor at esquire magazine invited me to write a short story from Hillary's perspective and I accepted and writing that story was this kind of strange exercise where I realize that the question was not what to the American people think of Hillary Clinton but what does Hillary Clinton think of the American people and it turned out that that I had four hundred pages worth of thought to say on that so it was actually trying to sort of slipped the narrative and and instead of making her the one who's scrutinize lake giving her voice which of course is totally fictionalized voice likes she did not write this book I wrote this book and so she says no to Bill Clinton she becomes as you mention a law professor she then becomes a politician was it inevitable that she'd become a politician how did you come up with this path for her I think that in real life if she had not married Bill Clinton I'm not sure she would have led the life that I created for her in the novel and I think with a novel like this you know that the reader is bringing some opinions or expectations and I as the writer I'm kind of toying with those expectations and sometimes for filling them and sometimes defying them and I felt like it was the most interesting version and to have her enter politics but you know have no pulp click association with Bill Clinton yes except to quite a few meetings along the way I want to ask you about writing Bill Clinton the character because like the real life Bill Clinton your fictionalized bill also has a swirl of sexual misconduct allegations around him and he's also accused of sexual assault so one of the reasons that I love fiction is that I feel like getting knowledge is that people are very complex and that the same person can have very appealing qualities and very troubling qualities and I think that the plan is like the embodiment of that where I would never pretend that I can't understand his his appeal I would never you know sort of say that I can look at him with admiration and you know without feeling any sense of sort of discomfort and so and I think that a novel allows for knowledge in that like this is in an essay that's trying to either celebrate him or take him down they're both the very intertwined in our consciousness are you trying to suggest that we might consider them differently if we had to think of them as individuals yes so actually I think that one of the reasons I wrote this book is that around the time even after the two thousand and sixteen election I had this realization that school children who knew Hillary was running for president often literally didn't know that Bill Clinton existed and that kind of blew my mind where I thought you know what is what if adults saw Hillary as completely separate from dell the way that kids do and you think that that would change fundamentally the way that she's you yes I do I think I mean I'm not I'm not saying that it would sort of solve all the problems of sexism but I think it would make her have an identity much more like that of Elizabeth Warren or any clothes are I wonder if it isn't insulting to suggest that a man held Hillary Clinton back maybe this story and their story is one of a hugely successful partnership that is arguably one of the most successful in American political history it's totally possible that you're right like I'm not even sure it's either or I think it may be though Clinton held her back in some ways and probably helped her and others and the same for I think maybe she held him back in some ways or maybe didn't always do things that were in is personal or professional best interest and then in other ways she was hugely helpful like I don't I don't think it's an either or it's sort of situation for for either of them did your opinion of either bill or Hillary Clinton change after giving them the fictional treatment you know being intimately involved in sort of creating this alternate narrative for them so I was already an admirer of Hilary before I began working on the book if anything I definitely have more admiration for her in terms of toughness her perseverance her hard work there's also there's all these stories I think they are sort of in the public but they don't get that much attention about what a loyal thoughtful friend she is like often over many decades or you know like she's she's very funny which is not really part of her public image so I am fully pro

Hillary Rodham Yale Law School Arkansas Bill Clinton
"yale law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Another legal story where watching the Supreme Court ruling the federal government must pay insurers twelve billion dollars to cover losses they incurred providing risky policies under the affordable Care Act for more on the eight to one decision Bloomberg June Grasso speaks to Abbe Gluck a professor at Yale Law School what's the significance of this decision by the court well Jennifer really exciting because there are a couple of reasons one you've got eight jumped the fence and really nine confessed that the leader of the pack was on different procedural ground holding the legitimacy of the affordable Care Act and telling Congress that it stands by its promises Hey the many private implementer has passed implement the law it's an acknowledgement of how much the affordable Care Act will ride on the insurance industry and the importance of keeping its promises in what it seems that this is a pretty clear case for the insurance yet the federal circuit rule that Congress has the right not to appropriate the funds how did they come to that ruling what part of Baghdad and you indicated whether Congress could expressly or impliedly with an obligation that I made very explicitly in the text of the statute I wanted to bring course work no you can't use an appropriations rider certified ways approached him quietly repeal eight clear tactical combat men are working hard but the storyline the other thing I would empathize unit twelve billion dollar king the former president general of the United States Qualcomm Manchu argued on the earlier point about therapy that interestingly enough on the other side several times that you don't see a lot of twelve billion dollar cases at all and here we are with the affordable Care Act back in the spring court and it just shows you how much money you take in the lock and how important it is because of the economy N. as yellow.

federal government Bloomberg June Grasso Abbe Gluck professor Yale Law School Jennifer Congress Baghdad Supreme Court president United States Qualcomm
"yale law school" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on American Scandal

"I st voicemail again where are hey. Why are we even here personally? I'm here for the mini mart. Do twitter the eighteen or thirty two dollar Bacardi and the twelve dollar coke Mhm Guardian Cook. Better make a double okay. So Mom said she sent me this email. But I didn't get anything I feel like I feel like they have something to tell us or go. Bottles were dad. It's almost seven. PM Champions been sitting out for two hours besides sites acquire lady said it was for Dr Richland and I am Dr Richland. Oh God that is lovely totally. I call listen. dammit landed yet. If they haven't landed yet then we're going to have to spend the the holidays listening to our father. Go on about lending the Cessna in a storm except he's going to call it a hurricane. I talked to mom when they are in the air. They were twenty he minutes out and that was three hours ago coming on on my phone to kids. Something's happening the she says something about is these must be from earlier finke. She's called mom. Mom Are you OK. Hello a Michael. What Guy Apple? Let's what's going on. Okay thank and what is it. The plane crashed. I think there so he said they're dead. They've if they fail mom they're They're still looking for DAD's body and coming up on the season of blood ties. Bear refund plane went missing yesterday with Dr Richland and had wife Array of Org Chart. Yes Connie back with calling I reporter for the time. Listen I can talk to you for the obituary or whatever ever another time for an obituary. I had intermission damaging and formation. About your father. Let's just assume soon we know everything about everything. Okay the last thing. My mom ever sent me a text message. It said something's wrong. Your Dad is my my dad is what exactly mom. Why is he? We need to find out what the hell is happening. That was just a preview of blood ties to listen to the rest of this episode and the series listening subscribe on Apple podcasts. spotify or wherever. You're listening listening right now. Hey I'm Rufus Chris I'm the host of wondering show the next big idea each week on the podcast. We bring you ideas that might just just have the power to change the way you see the world this week. We're talking about meritocracy. It's the idea that society rewards talent and hard work that that may sound fair but Yale Law school professor. Daniel markovits says it's not leveling the playing field instead. It's concentrating privilege and intensifying inequality he tells us why we need to transform our schools and businesses and reimagined meritocracy to listen to our conversation. Subscribe to the next big idea from wondering..

Dr Richland Rufus Chris Bacardi twitter Yale Law school Daniel markovits Connie Michael Apple professor reporter spotify
"yale law school" Discussed on Inside Jaws

Inside Jaws

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Inside Jaws

"Coming up on the season blood ties. Career richland plane went missing yesterday with Dr Richmond and his wife Marie aboard our guests. Connie beckwith calling I love reporter for the time. Listen I can talk to you for the obituary. Whatever another time for an obituary I adoration and about your father? Let's just assume we know everything about everything. Okay the last thing my mom ever sent me the text message. It said something's wrong. Your Dad is my dad is what exactly mom. Why is he? We need to find out. What the hell is happening? That was just a preview of blood ties to listen to the rest of this episode. The series listening subscribe on Apple podcasts. spotify or wherever. You're listening right now. Hey I'm Rufus Chris Kim the host of wondering show the next big idea each week on the podcast. We bring you ideas that might just have the power to change the way you see the world world this week. We're talking about meritocracy. It's the idea that society rewards talent and hard work. That may sound fair but Yale Law school professor. Daniel markovits says it's not leveling the playing field. Instead it's concentrating privilege an intensifying inequality he tells us why we need to transform our schools and businesses and reimagined meritocracy to listen to our conversation. Subscribe to the next big idea from wondering..

Rufus Chris Kim Connie beckwith Yale Law school richland Daniel markovits Dr Richmond reporter Marie professor Apple spotify
"yale law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To it all the time at Yale Law School and when he was asked about the Reagan administration which he joined in nineteen eighty one and about the racism of the Reagan ministration he said they don't lie to you and also they don't smile at jail this is a very resonant notion for him and I should say it also echoes a lot of sentiments and believes in the black nationalist tradition MalcolmX spoke about the wolves versus the fox and we don't think that it is any worse to be beaten with a smile and just be beaten with a graph earned his first prolonged confrontation with smiling faces would probably have been at Holy Cross in Massachusetts I was out here rioting in nineteen seventy because I was mad at the world that was cynicism and negativism eating me up hatred animosity and I felt justified because of all the race issues I was really upset Thomas comes there in nineteen sixty eight he's a part of a cohort of eighteen black men one of the poorest of the cohort recruited by a very liberal Jesuit who seeking to integrate Holy Cross the differential treatment of white and black students becomes very apparent white students are are sent letters in the summer before asking them would you mind having a black roommate the black students don't get any such letter at all the experience of being in almost all white classrooms of reading all white authors of having mostly white music played at a campus events not having black professors spurs them to form the black student union and this is a very deliberate decision and nomenclature they choose the word black at this time is a kind of more militant affirmation that you hear more on the west coast and the east coast they have a statement of demands and then the issue a manifesto of their own internal rules many of which involve you know that black men should respect black women black men should not be involved with white women and so it's a whole statement and coherent platform that's very familiar among radicalized black students across America is this when he first encounters Sir first makes use of the ideas of mathematics yes he reads the autobiography of Malcolm X. in nineteen sixty eight starts listening to the records of Malcolm X. speeches it is better for us to go to our own schools and after we have a thorough knowledge of ourselves of our own kind and racial dignity has been instilled within us then we can go to anyone school and will still retain our race pride and we will be able to avoid this observing an inferiority complex that is instilled within most negroes who receive this sort of integrated education nearly twenty years later when he's giving these used to collect one Williams Thomas can recite from memory various passages from the autobiography and from those records is this when he comes to the conclusion the crucial conclusion that racism is not really addressable through the courts or through legislation yes we have to remember at this time there's all kinds of political efforts to deal with racism some of it is electoral some of it is legislative it some of it is judicial and some of it is much more militant radical action in the streets and when he comes to buy the sort of early to mid nineteen seventies as a belief that white racism is permanent pervasive and in erratic couple in the United States it has roots that cannot truly be fastened and because they cannot be fastened we can't pull them up and that once you come to terms with that several conclusions follow the first in the big important one is that the political process whether it be voting or protest or organizing that all of this is a misbegotten enterprise that black people should get themselves out of this explains in part why he almost always comes down against voting rights he believes that this is a fool's errand the second conclusion is that capitalism the market place while it tends to be geared towards a white interests nevertheless offers new shows where black people can achieve some kind of measure of autonomy specifically black man Thomas arrives this in part from his reading of MalcolmX I should say a selective reading because MalcolmX had a complicated view on this Thomas also derives this from reading a black economist by the name of Thomas soul very prominent conservative and insole Thomas finds a vision for black people not of emancipation but if the kind of autonomous space where black people can create their own world apart from white people so that's the second conclusion that follows from this bedrock principle of the in erotic ability of white racism he may have been more receptive to this idea because of the examples set by the most powerful male figure in his life his stern humorless but successful grandfather Myers Anderson my wife had a blast of my grandfather made right after I was confirmed and I put it up on a bookshelf where it looks down on me these that brooding omnipresence and he's looking down on me with one of his favorite sayings inscribed on oh man camp is dead I helped bury and here's what I wonder on the days when self pity is consuming me I look up at him how can I complain to him no education no father raised in part by freed slaves and Jim crow south he never complained my grandmother never complain how can I tell him that as a member of the United States Supreme Court I can't complain part of Myers Anderson's hold dished alt was a refusal to look to any kind of benevolence help or aid from white society through that kind of self reliance that very stern iron discipline he created a world for his family that was relatively safe and spread that protection and largess to other parts of the black community and so this spirit of what in the tradition is called do for self a kind of collective self reliance looking inward to the community and particularly to very strong powerful black male figures is something that Thomas learns very early on and of course in his college years what you can create employment.

Yale Law School Reagan twenty years
"yale law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The used to listen to it all the time at Yale Law School and when he was asked about the Reagan administration which he joined in nineteen eighty one and about the racism of the Reagan ministration he said they don't live you and also they don't smile at jail this is a very resonant notion for ham and I should say it also echoes a lot of sentiments and believes in the black nationalist tradition MalcolmX spoke about the wolves versus the fox and we don't think that it is any worse to be beaten with a smile then just be beaten with a graph earned his first prolonged confrontation with smiling faces would probably have been at Holy Cross in Massachusetts I was out here rioting in nineteen seventy because I was mad at the world that was cynicism and negativism eating me up hatred animosity and I felt justified because of all the race issues I was really upset Thomas comes there in nineteen sixty eight he's a part of a cohort of eighteen black men one of the poorest of the cohort recruited by a very liberal Jesuit who seeking to integrate Holy Cross the differential treatment of white and black students becomes very apparent white students are are sent letters in the summer before asking them would you mind having a black roommate the black students don't get any such letter at all the experience of being in almost all white classrooms of reading all white authors of having mostly white music played at a campus events not having black professors spurs them to form the black student union and this is a very deliberate decision and nomenclature they choose the word black at this time is a kind of more militant affirmation that you hear more on the west coast and the east coast they have a statement of demands and then the issue a manifesto of their own internal rules many of which involve you know that black men should respect black women black men should not be involved with white women and so it's a whole statement and coherent platform that's very familiar among radicalized black students across America is this when he first encounters Sir first makes use of the ideas of mathematics yes he reads the autobiography of Malcolm X. in nineteen sixty eight starts listening to the records of Malcolm X. speeches it is better for us to go to our own schools and after we have a thorough knowledge of ourselves of our own kind and racial dignity has been instilled within us then we can go to anyone school and will still retain our race pride and we will be able to avoid the subservient inferiority complex that is instilled within most negroes who receive this sort of integrated education nearly twenty years later when he's giving these refused to people like Juan Williams Thomas can recite from memory various passages from the autobiography and from those records is this when he comes to the conclusion the crucial conclusion that racism is not really addressable through the courts or through legislation yes we have to remember at this time there's all kinds of political efforts to deal with racism some of it is electoral some of it is legislative and some of it is judicial and some of it is much more militant radical action in the streets and when he comes to buy the sort of early to mid nineteen seventies as a belief that white racism is permanent pervasive and in Iraq a couple in the United States it has roots that cannot truly be fastened and because they cannot be fastened we can't pull them up and that once you come to terms with that several conclusions follow the first in the big important one is that the political process whether it be voting or protest or organizing that all of this is a misbegotten enterprise that black people should get themselves out of this explains in part why he almost always comes down against voting rights he believes that this is a fool's errand the second conclusion is that capitalism the market place while it tends to be geared towards a white interests nevertheless offers new shows where black people can achieve some kind of measure of autonomy specifically black man Thomas arrives this in part from his reading of Malcolm Max I should say a selective reading because MalcolmX had a complicated view on this Thomas also derives this from reading a black economist by the name of Thomas soul very prominent conservative and insole Thomas finds a vision for black people not of emancipation but if the kind of autonomous space where black people can create their own world apart from white people so that's the second conclusion that follows from this bedrock principle of the in erotic ability of white racism he may have been more receptive to this idea because of the examples set by the most powerful male figure in his life his stern humorless but successful grandfather Myers Anderson my wife had a blast of my grandfather made right after I was confirmed and I put it up on a bookshelf where it looks down on me these that brooding omnipresence and he's looking down on me with one of his favorite sayings inscribed on old man can't is dead I help Barry and here's what I wonder on the days someone self pity is consuming me I look up at him how can I complain to him no education no father raised in part by freed slaves and Jim crow south he never complains my grandmother never complain how can I tell him that as a member of the United States Supreme Court I can't complain part of Myers Anderson's hold dished alt was a refusal to look to any kind of benevolence help or aid from white society through that kind of self reliance that very stern iron discipline he created a world for his family that was relatively safe and spread that protection and largess to other parts of the black community and so this spirit of what in the tradition is called do for self a kind of collective self reliance looking inward to the community and particularly to very strong powerful black male figures is something that Thomas learns very early on and of course in his college years what you can create from what I read in.

Yale Law School twenty years
"yale law school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"This is the greatest reporting from the now, again, this is just something that came in over the transom, I guess the Chinese or the Russians came to the New York Times because Hillary Quested with tax information and the New York Times typed up a lengthy democrat party press release, which Jeffrey Toobin, who's not a journalist. But a creepy lawyer says is the greatest reporting. Anybody's ever seen? It's Donna Shing wonderful reporting by the New York Times. It's great that they got these documents. They they they answer a lot of questions, but especially about his presidency. No again, the records that we're talking about here. Go from nineteen eighty five to nineteen ninety four. It's an illegal leak. That's okay. Again, you remember when mcgilla gorilla on CNN said that normal people couldn't look at the leaked emails because it would be legal for us to look at leaked emails. They Hillary, but that he could because he's a journalist. So he's got his card and his Dakota ring that allow him to look at things that it would be illegal for an American citizen to look at. But because he's special and his father was Papa Doc and his brother as Baby Doc, and the the Cuomo organized crime family this guy he went to Yale Law School because his dad got him in it. And learn a damn thing to remember. It's legal to possess, the stolen documents. It's different for the media, everything you learn about this. You're learning from us. We've got a guerilla for sale. Wow. That's a it's everything. They say is lie is not legal. It's right there where reading in the paper that's their right there online. There's nothing illegal, and you're not special special in some ways, but just to be patted on the head and say, your special just like your mom always did as well know, no work for him in the family business. I guess we'll give them work, but nothing in the family business Frago. That's why he got the job in media because he's not so bright and poor fella. Just wasn't. There was he had that cough. When he was a kid, and he was never the same. After that. They put the glass on his chest with the burning paper. Hey.

New York Times Hillary Quested Papa Doc Jeffrey Toobin Donna Shing cough democrat party CNN Dakota Yale Law School Cuomo
Top U.S. Law Schools Now Teaching AI Courses

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:13 min | 2 years ago

Top U.S. Law Schools Now Teaching AI Courses

"The top law schools around the country, new A I courses schools, like Columbia, Harvard and Stanford have already introduced courses utilizing AI, how artificial intelligence meets the law after these tech headlines. Tesla CEO Elon Musk made his case for an on-demand robot taxi fleet that he says would begin next year in a presentation to investors early this week in Palo Alto, California. Mr. musk said by the middle of next year, more than one million tesla cars on the road will be able to operate without a human driver. He also expects regulatory approval in at least one market that would enable a robot taxi service by the end of twenty twenty the plan is for tesla owners to push a button on a smartphone app to put their cars into commercial service and pick up riders on the company's network a startup that helps freight carriers manage their fleets is the latest tech company valued by investors at more than one billion dollars. San Francisco based keep truck in has raised one hundred forty nine million dollars to build out its digital freight services offering things like electronic logging devices to reduce fuel usage and monitor how much time truckers spend behind the wheel. Keep trucking also says. It is developing artificial intelligence applications to analyze footage and driving events in real time and the journal says credit card pitches are moving from the mailbox to the social media feed. Several big card issuers recently increased spending on Facebook ads and never to attract new borrowers case in point capital. One and American Express spent an estimated eighteen point six million and thirteen point five million in twenty eighteen capital. One for its part has been paying Instagram and Twitter users with one hundred thousand to one million followers to post photos, manly of restaurant settings. And while growing the ad money is still significantly smaller than what several issuers spent on traditional male pitches Capital One and discover spent three hundred seventy seven million and one hundred ninety six million respectively coming up how students are getting ready to confront emerging legal issues with a I support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Deloitte, a global leader in digital transformation, helping clients apply technologies. Like, cloud, an AI to their unique business challenges Deloitte, God com slash look again. US law schools are adding artificial intelligence courses to their curricula in an effort to get students ready to confront the emerging legal issues around artificial intelligence. The Wall Street Journal's JR Waylon has more as official intelligence permeates. Our devices are workplace in society. It's inevitable that the legal responsibility of AI is going to be a growing concern and US law schools have recognized that and they're adding a are related coursework Wall Street Journal reporter Jared council is here with some details. So Jared, Columbia, Stanford and Harvard law schools are among those who have added courses that touch on topics. Yes. Those law schools as well as the law school at the university of Chicago and women Mary university. Somebody schools have already had technology focus kind of courses, you know, touching on internet privacy and things like that. But we started to. Notice that more of these schools are introducing a I focus courses for for their their students who ultimately will be the lawyers and judges and regulators of the future. What's the sort of training that the coursework aims to give these law students? These courses are designed to give these law students exposure to some of the current and potential issues around artificial intelligence and just get them associated with you know, questions that that that might arise like, you know, what what happens when an algorithm violate someone's civil rights or who should be at fault win an autonomous vehicle is involved in an accident with someone and even beyond those types of questions. Artificial intelligence is increasingly being used by regulators for enforcing a law that US patent and technology office and the social security administration. They're all using AI to address. Some of the the the workload and paperwork that they have. And it's raising questions like we'll how come a computer gets a decide which case is seeing and isn't seeing and so these lawyers again, they're not here to answer these questions or come up with with solutions, but just to start exploring some of the the potential issues that might arise this is part of a brave new world that we're in it's possible as you put it in your story that someday a party in a lawsuit could be represented by machine. Yeah. Speaking with professor at the university of Chicago and Anthony, Casey. And he he he mentioned that it's it's not far fetched that we could have systems that that that one day will automatically create contracts, and you know, potentially represent parties in a lawsuit and even be parties to a lawsuit there. There's already algorithms today that are that are creating music, and who has the copyrights to that music who gets paid. From the world tease. You know, all of these questions are starting to come about. And Yale Law School was one of the pioneers in this area. They offered AI related courses as far back as two thousand fourteen and a Stanford law. Professor you spoke with said, it's important to get future lawyers technologists in the same room because there's a lot for them to discuss there's been this divide. If you will where the the lawyers don't really understand the underlying technology, and how it works, and you know, what is a machine learning algorithm. And on the flip side, the the computer scientists aren't really thinking about some of the legal implications of the way, they design their their system. So the idea Stanford and even some other schools is to get them in the same room. So they can start discussing these issues, and and maybe come up with ideas at the other of their group. Didn't think of couldn't think of

AI Tesla The Wall Street Journal Stanford Elon Musk United States Columbia Capital One Professor University Of Chicago Yale Law School Deloitte San Francisco Palo Alto California Facebook Jared Council
"yale law school" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"A Republican Senator from Duri is calling on on his his alumni alumni at at Yale Yale Law Law School School to to stop stop religious religious discrimination discrimination or or lose lose federal federal funding funding with with more. more. Here's Here's USA USA radio radio networks networks temper. temper. Erg Erg Republican Republican was was re Senator Josh Holly said during an appearance on FOX and friends that he wants Yale university's funding be taken away. If the school doesn't treat religious students fairly. We've heard these kind of complaints before they don't like the radical left doesn't like the position that religious organizations take on abortion or on traditional marriage or range of other issues. All of it's really about is Yale has been looking for an opportunity to discriminate against religious organizations that provide many his free legal services to people in need and to discriminate against students faith, they're not permitted to do that under federal law. So if they want federal funding, they need to stop discriminating, Yale did put out a statement that says if an employer refuses to hire students at our Christian gay black or veterans they will not fund that position to which Holly says it sounds like Yale now has been exposed for what they're doing. And now they're trying to backtrack. But there's still a lot of trust is trust us. We'll get it. Right. So we're not going to trust anything. I want to see the details of their. Policy. I wanna see that they are treating religious students and religious organizations in the same way, they treat every other legal organization and every other student, and if he doesn't do that if they don't treat religious students fairly fish should have their federal funding strip

WI Facebook Youtube three hours
So Yale Law School endorses anti-religious bigotry now?

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

01:26 min | 2 years ago

So Yale Law School endorses anti-religious bigotry now?

"A Republican Senator from Duri is calling on on his his alumni alumni at at Yale Yale Law Law School School to to stop stop religious religious discrimination discrimination or or lose lose federal federal funding funding with with more. more. Here's Here's USA USA radio radio networks networks temper. temper. Erg Erg Republican Republican was was re Senator Josh Holly said during an appearance on FOX and friends that he wants Yale university's funding be taken away. If the school doesn't treat religious students fairly. We've heard these kind of complaints before they don't like the radical left doesn't like the position that religious organizations take on abortion or on traditional marriage or range of other issues. All of it's really about is Yale has been looking for an opportunity to discriminate against religious organizations that provide many his free legal services to people in need and to discriminate against students faith, they're not permitted to do that under federal law. So if they want federal funding, they need to stop discriminating, Yale did put out a statement that says if an employer refuses to hire students at our Christian gay black or veterans they will not fund that position to which Holly says it sounds like Yale now has been exposed for what they're doing. And now they're trying to backtrack. But there's still a lot of trust is trust us. We'll get it. Right. So we're not going to trust anything. I want to see the details of their. Policy. I wanna see that they are treating religious students and religious organizations in the same way, they treat every other legal organization and every other student, and if he doesn't do that if they don't treat religious students fairly fish should have their federal funding strip

Yale Yale Law Law School Schoo Yale University Senator Josh Holly Senator USA Duri FOX
"yale law school" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"And if you want to this is your program. That's right. A little fun fact, I'm an so my brother who went to Yale Law School would tells you how far from the tree Mike corn is. But my brother has a patriot him in. Yeah. He was noodling for catfish has a picture. I'm holding the giant calf issue barefoot in a river with a Yale Law t shirt on. So there you go. Skew get into Harvard and Yale you can probably get in. If you got your damn arm all the way, dente the butt of a catfish. And who knows maybe he was in on that deal. Maybe maybe he sent in his application and said if y'all got any yellow noodle and scholarships than maybe he got lower Laughlin to help him out. Wouldn't surprise me. If Yale didn't take gut noodling because it's obvious ain't playing the more basketball this year. That's a good point turned on TV say more than the sell your show for the first time. Okay. And and unsurprised the you guys even wear shoes to work, they make us otherwise in the summertime who knows maybe we can get away with without worse us seriously. I was sitting in Washington program and has kinda listened y'all was one banjo player away from the country. Boy, eighty weather report. That's the show you sign now. No, you actually had tune in our show because that was that's the perfect description, actually is it's very interesting show. I get up early in the morning about five o'clock nitric pot of coffee. So I have a lot of nicotine and caffeine THC built up for the Friday night or saying tonight or whatever night and in when. Yeah was on. I was impressed man, this great show opposite that you should call in because I think most of our audience is also jacked up on nicotine and caffeine. Whatever that third thing was you said Colorado brands. Rama key senior writer have great day. Preset eagle. I didn't tell him. About my album pick is overdoing auburn's hanging in Auburn Auburn it was tight for a little bit. But they're extending their lead against the Mexico state right now should have mentioned that go. Now, I know Fisher back impulse chair 'cause I'm an called in. We've had one complaint already had one compliment and you can call in do either. One of those things not gonna hurt my feelings. Eight five five seven two. Two two two five. That's Paul with you Ryan McGee sitting poets five ball show..

Yale Law School Laughlin Auburn Auburn nicotine caffeine Yale Mike corn basketball Ryan McGee Washington Mexico Harvard writer Colorado Fisher Paul
"yale law school" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on 710 WOR

"They hit a created a rudimentary quantum computer it consisted chew bits that made time go reverse just only for a few fractions of a second. He thinks if they'll ever get the scientific community will ever get their research right to create a time machine. Well, so that's okay. Well, we don't want to talk about that for too long. But you know. There's a funny thing that the laws of physics are reversible in time. So they go the same laws going backwards in time or forwards and yet in life. You can see there's an era of time. Right because you see smoke coming out of a chimney, and you know, that it's not if you saw smokes gathering down into the chimney that would be weird. Right. So that's the second loss. Turbo dynamics. It says statistical basis things are getting more disordered, and that's because presumably the universe started out in the very ordered state. And it's it's now and the loss six tell you tend toward disorder. So what these researchers did was they they did took a quantum version of that. And and they tried to set it up things in a way that that that the a quantum particle like an electron would would seem to go in a more ordered state rather than the other way around. So that's kind of like backwards in time. We'll we'll physicist ever. Do that, you know, Steven did some work, and and his friend Kip store and a good friend of his who lives here in L A, a former Caltech or Caltech America's professor prize for the for the gravitational waves. He did some papers on that. And they postulated they seem to study showed that perhaps if you get near a wormhole something could, you know, take you back. It seems in physics. You. Learn never to say if something's not impossible. I it's not good to say it won't happen because time and time again people have said that they were wrong. Let's just say that maybe a thousand years from now, I it's beyond my powers of my imagination to see to see that, you know, happening maybe except on a, you know, particle level where it's a little different. But but at the same thing with teleportation they've done teleportation of individual particles. But teleport you and be us seems unimaginably far into the. Future. President Bill Clinton died the way attended Georgetown University University College part of Oxford. So he did go there and then Yale Law School, but he had a he went there on a he had a fellowship there. A oh my God..

Bill Clinton Caltech America Georgetown University Universi Yale Law School physicist President Oxford Steven Kip professor thousand years
"yale law school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding, ding, ding. Yeah. I know nothing about vaping. But. In your lungs. Aren't that big have that much? Favor come out of your two little ones. Got us. Reprise me you're used to seeing like a Cigarette's worth or cigars worth. But this stuff is unbelievable. Unbelievable. I'm telling you, what do we have people cheating and get their kids into college. Was it really important to you to go to a named university. I think if anything it's probably important to your parents, we've always been Harvard. Ben, the family of Harvard, Ben your grandfather, great grandfather went to Harvard. You're going to Harvard among that crowd. Maybe. But. I don't know does the elite -ness of the university really pay a dividend to you. Certainly if you go to Yale or Harvard, it seems like you can end up on the supreme court. If you go to their law school because that's still. Prestige that aspect of prestigious schools still bothers me. I mean, a lot of bright people go to Harvard and Yale Law schools, but there are a lot of other law schools in the country probably stacked with a lot smarter people than the ones that went to Harvard and Yale because you're talking about whatever hundreds of other law schools as compared to those two. How come everybody on the supreme court goes to Harvard or Yale? So anyway, if you're a lawyer, and you want your kid to be on the supreme court, then you should see to it to go to Harvard or Yale. And you know, maybe pay a lot of money to get them in the school. But this whole idea I'd I have not seen who the guy or family is who paid six and a half million dollars to get their kid in the side door of school. When I don't what's what school was that. I mean, certainly could go up to the president of the university and say, I will donate six and a half million dollars to your school. If my son or daughter is accepted as a freshman. I guarantee you they'll take because that's legal that's legal bribery that six and a half million dollars that when you pay it to a middleman to pay a coach to say that your excellent rower or something. That's illegal. Quite obviously, and people are going to jail over this. It's just. Every once in a while people get busted for a crime that it never dawned on me existed if ever dawned on me that people would pay an inter intermediary to pay a coach to pretend your kids in athlete pretend that the scholarship offer came from him. Well, it does come from him. And then he gets paid whatever fifty grand or a hundred grand to recruit your kid, then I guess cut them from the team it never dawned on me that that crime even existed. So this in some cases coaches actually agreed to pretend the students were highly recruited athletes, highly recruited elsewhere to like, it was a coup that they got them into that school for that particular sport. Prosecutors said some individuals could be charged multi-state investigations evolve. Two hundred federal agents, it took on the codename operation varsity blues by law enforcement Wake Forest, they suspended their volleyball coach Bill Ferguson. He's been placed on administrative leave after being accused of accepting a hundred grand to recruit a student who had been on North Carolina, the northbound at schools, wait list, and you got to admit I think as a coach that's kind of attractive. Now you'd like a kid who at least played volleyball in one kid one case. There was a kid. Who had not played soccer at all in high school, and was recruited to be on the college level soccer team that particular coach has gone by the wayside to three people who organized the scans or two ACC SAT exam administrators. I don't know how you find them and one exam Proctor and one college administrator appearance face conspiracy charges include heads of private and public companies securities real estate investors, a famous fashion designer and the chairman of a global law firm. So I mean, you're putting a lot on the line here, you you have a really good job, and you feel compelled debris someone to get your kid into a school and risk. The whole idea of going to prison for a long span of time. And that's exactly what they did. That's exactly what's going to happen. Then you have the two were actresses the one from desperate. How well I don't know you considered an actress of you're on a reality show. I wouldn't think so TV stars will call them that. So and of course, they make the line. There could be no separate admission system for colleges and universities just as there, isn't and. In the criminal Justice system. But there is like I said you can you can pay to get around it. I gotta get a break in here. Then what Dave stands by daughters were recruited. We'll get to Dave minute or two or three or four. We've got to check our traffic. I that's job one.

Harvard Ding Yale supreme court Yale Law schools soccer Dave Ben bribery Bill Ferguson North Carolina president Wake Forest Proctor chairman administrator
"yale law school" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Triangulation

"And they make the policy for the entire world. And there needs to be kind of more kind of -bility Bilton there. Right. So to what sort of structures? Do you think they're putting in place other than trying to just put out fires in react? Do do you? See something promising on the horizon here. Yeah. I mean, I think that they're written about this. There is a my did I rodent op-ed in. I think it was late November for the for the near times with my co author Thomas cadre who's also at Yale Law School with me. Or was it? You'll also with me, and it was kind of talking about this new idea, this tribunal or council that the the Facebook has has announced that they're going to do. And they made a big splash announcement. So I think it's actually going to happen. But the idea would be that they create like a tribunal of people to make decisions on not only big policy changes. But on kind of decisions of newsworthiness when there is an exception for something for. Policy that goes against policy something like the terror were video something like Donald Trump, something like Alex Jones. And I think that this has a lot of benefits this is a huge benefit for for Facebook right now Facebook is I kind of wrote about in Facebook Sullivan is the executive the legislature the courts and the press and like this separates the powers. This kind of like takes the courts away, one of the benefits of separating powers is that if you're the other branches you can point at the court or the whatever the tribunal and say, listen, we we're we're like we're like, we're this wasn't us. Like, we created the rule, but like this tribunal like they like, these are your people people. This is like how you this. These are representatives. They decided that this wasn't the right policy. If you're upset about this policy. Don't come to us talk to the tribunal. And I think that this is kind of I think this is brilliant right now, it's a giant bag like a leaking bag of liability for Facebook to continue making these decisions. It's just. They're never gonna get it. Right. You can never make everyone happy. And like, this is brilliant. This is a great move. And I think it's a great move for us to like, I think it's a great move for end users. I think the we end up getting a lot more say, and like what are speech platform looks like that's becoming kind of one of our fundamental rights. You know in this day and age, so I'm I'm really optimistic about it. And I'm you know, I should also say that I'm a been asked to consult to like see what it looks like to help them kind of plan to to organize it. I'm not being paid, obviously. But like, I I'm, you know, I'm hoping that I can help make it promising and make sure that they kind of follow through on some of this stuff because I do think that there's a lot of potential there to finally kind of fix something the people on on the academic, and like civil society side if things had been doing this forever have been like chanting accountability. Like, I feel like every paper ends with and there should be more accountability. And it's like, okay. Well, maybe this. Will actually kind of start to create that. We'll just have to see. Yeah. And I for one very glad you're in the mix. So. Yeah. That's great news for all of us. Listening today. Let's talk about your Facebook vs Sullivan piece in more detail because I find it really really fascinating. You have hit on something that once you read it through seems really obvious that it's happening. But until I saw you formulated it didn't it hadn't occurred to me at all. And that is the fact that what Facebook is doing you've already. Begun to describe how they're straddling this role as both judge and publisher and enforcer of the law on the site, but how their internal policies are sort of slouching toward emulating actual legal precedent in the United States..

Facebook Thomas cadre Yale Law School Donald Trump executive United States Sullivan publisher Alex Jones
"yale law school" Discussed on Crooked Conversations

Crooked Conversations

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Crooked Conversations

"Komo. Thank you so much for for joining us. I I've wanted to do this conversation specifically around Dhaka and the potential for renewed dream act efforts because I want to bring back the issue of Dhaka to center stage because there's so many attacks on the immigrant community that the national attention tends to move on to the latest and most cruel policies coming out of this administration. But the fact of the matter is that the threats to Dhaka haven't gone away. In fact, the potential for the end of Dhaka was exceleron even more. So when the administration back in November as a supreme court to sink convert the court of appeals and take the issue on sooner. So can we just back up for for a second? Can you can you provide us with some background on the brief history of of Dhaka and then take us through its termination by. The Trump administration back in September of two thousand seventeen. Sure, sure. So in June of twenty twelve the administration within the Obama administration decided that didn't make much sense to deport immigrant youth. Kids who grew up here back the countries, they didn't know, and then also didn't make much sense to leave them here in the United States in a in a state of limbo. So what was created that point is something called the DACA program deferred action for childhood arrivals. And with the program did was was create a process through which immigrant youth people who came here before the age of sixteen who've lived here for certain number of years who could show that they are in school or the been in school impasse background. Check. They would get a piece of paper that would allow them to work for for two years and would protect them from the partition and they can renew it on on an ongoing basis. This administration came in this president came in and in September twenty seventeen issued a directive to end the DACA program. And you know, we know that following the law is not a strong suit for this administration. So not surprisingly we had a couple of court challenges that that have succeeded. Judges have said, you know, we're not sure your decision to end this program is legal. And so what that has meant is that, you know, as these challenges court challenges have continued the program has remained in place. So so you know, these eligible you've have been able to apply and renew their their work permits in their protection from deportation. And now, we're we're at a point where the administration is. Continues to to to fight those decisions in court. And we may see this issue taken up by the supreme court in this coming from. So I mean, you you you sort of set it, right? That this administration is is not very good about following the law as we see almost every day was new things coming out, but the the so the DACA program, though, when it was implemented was like a very successful program. Right people eight hundred thousand people applied, and they it allow them to live their best lives like truly they could finally do things that they weren't able to do before they could get things like driver's licenses and go to college and even chief one of the pillars of the American dream, which is buying a home. And it's Terminator two munition the DACA program like many other things in the Trump administration was pure chaos like Docker recipients never received an official notice in the mail. There were tons of. Fusion around who could renew they were given a short timeframe to come up with the money for the application and to come up with dozens of documents to renew their their their permits. And as you mentioned there were lawsuits that ensued to try to stop the end of Dhaka. So can you tell us about the three different lawsuits that are making their way through the court system? And what were they able to really do to save the program? Yeah, we'll there. There have been multiple lawsuits. Like, I said, you know, around the country that have, you know, tried to stop, you know, the end of of this program. One of those lawsuits was filed by us at the national immigration Law Center, along with co counsel make the road and Yale Law School, and and then another lawsuit filed by you know, various entities in in California. And both of those lawsuits have tried to to stop this administrations. And the program the.

Obama administration Dhaka DACA United States Yale Law School national immigration Law Cente Docker president California official two years
"yale law school" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"yale law school" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Loans, where do her energy and courage come from. As it turns out, the answer is suburbia. My dad was a cardiologists. My parents are both still using past tense just because they're retired not because anything tragic happened. It was a cardiologist, and my mom taught public school where I grew up in the bay area. How many siblings have one younger brother, and what's he doing? He's not solving the immigration problem is I think he's data trading is how you that's cool. Someone's gotta do that. We're gonna take the money that you have in your budget invested somewhere. Not trading our budget, helping your budget. He's not even helping me personally. I've asked him what I should do with my money. And he's he doesn't want to be responsible. If I lose it all I had a dear friend of mine the same thing to be. I what should I do in terms of a business manager to invest my money? He goes what he was. What would I do? What do I think you should different? I would never tell you to do what I did. I don't want that responsibility soup in the bay area and through high school where you and activists what were you doing? I was like a wannabe activist. Like, I had all these ideas for things all the time, and I felt sort of very empathic toward homelessness is a very visible manifestations. Yeah. In the bay area because the weather's good, right? Tolerant community to like, there's a there's a level of homeless. You just don't see on Park Avenue in the seventies. And I live in the village you see quite a bit of it. Because that community there's a lot more tolerant, and we'll see if tech changes that for better for. But I think you know, that was so visible, and I remember always being like really worked up by that. And having these big ideas of when I was ten I was like, I'm gonna do a blanket drive. And then just not doing it. Because I think I I don't know if I felt this empowered or I just felt scared. I didn't know my own passion. But you didn't follow through. Yeah. Pretty like, many people. I think and And then you then go. you go to Dartmouth y. They're say Dartmouth of all the ivy's. It's like the most animal house of the ivy's. Is that is that fair? You can't roll with animal, nor is I'm closing my eyes. I'm thinking about you like having a blanket drive up there in in in the thing. I never did the blanket drive, right? I'm the person who wanted to and then went to Dartmouth. And no, I actually I don't amazing time at Dartmouth Dartmouth. I messed up applying to college the first time around I applied to two schools early and one of them found out and told the other and they both rescinded my offer of admission, and I took a year off, and I did AmeriCorps which I would pinpoint as sort of like the turning point of when I realized that do I need to receive that because I dropped it on the table. And it made a weird echoing people can tell right away. This can be a very bumpy interview. Merrick car the kind of domestic peace corps, knowing Where'd you go. I stayed at home because they don't pay very much. So I lived with my folks, and I was working at an elementary school in Berkeley on sort of broadly, equal opportunity education stuff, and they just gave us big budget, and they were like do programming to help fight institutional oppression. And I was like I don't know what that means. I don't know how to do that. But I'm gonna give it a shot. And then I think much to my surprise at turned out. There was a lot of things that that we could do collectively. And now, a will you leave school when you leave? Dartmouth you go to Yale Law School, you go right one to the other take another gap. Now, I took I took two years during that two years in Malawi for a year on a Fulbright, and then actually went to Vermont for a year, partly for a boy, partly for a job..

Dartmouth Dartmouth ivy business manager Yale Law School Malawi Merrick Vermont Berkeley two years
Singapore fines Grab and Uber, imposes measures to open up market

AP News

00:38 sec | 3 years ago

Singapore fines Grab and Uber, imposes measures to open up market

"Job status. I made Donahue with an AP news minute. President Trump spoke by phone with embattled deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein, the AP saga megani. Reports Rosenstein still has his job for now. The president's in New York for the UN general assembly. His spokeswoman says he'll meet with Rosenstein when he's back Thursday. She says the two men had an extended talk today at Rosenstein for west following reports last week that he'd suggested secretly recording the president and the using the constitution to remove him from office Rosenstein, went to the White House today expecting to be fired Yale Law School students are protesting nomination of bread

Rod Rosenstein President Trump AP Deputy Attorney General Donahue Yale Law School UN White House New York
Brett Kavanaugh is Trump's Supreme Court nominee

Hugh Hewitt

02:02 min | 3 years ago

Brett Kavanaugh is Trump's Supreme Court nominee

"Our problem townhall dot com president trump announced his nominee for the us supreme court monday died saying there is no one in the country more qualified to serve on the supreme court judge brad cavanaugh cavanaugh has impeccable credentials unsurpassed qualifications and a proven commitment to equal justice under the law a graduate of yale college and yale law school judge cavin currently teaches at harvard yale and george they call them the senate to quickly confirm judge cavanaugh this incredibly qualified nominee deserves a swift confirmation and robust bipartisan support the rule of law is our nation's proud heritage it is the cornerstone of our freedom is what guarantees equal justice league landless mets davor philosophy cavanaugh announced and what he is articulated in the past is one that is appearing to be original language constitutions dave or head of the christian league liberty counsel believes cavenaugh will be confirmed federal judge is allowing to california sanctuary the offs estate effect a federal judge is allowing to california laws intended to protect immigrants who are in the us illegally to stay in place us district judge john mendez has dismissed the us government's argument that the us constitution gives the federal government preeminent power to regulate immigration the trump administration argued the state of california's obstructing federal immigration enforcement in a seven page decision mendez wrote california's law limiting the sharing of information with federal agents does not directly conflict with us law i mike rossier divers have begun the third pays for the rescue of a us soccer team trapped for more than two weeks in the flooded cave and northern thailand at aim to bring out the last four boys and their coach later today more of these stories at townhall dot com this is michael medved for townhall dot com.

President Trump Michael Medved Thailand Soccer John Mendez Christian League George Donald Trump California Cavenaugh Cavanaugh Senate Harvard Yale Yale College Brad Cavanaugh Cavanaugh United States Two Weeks
George H.W. Bush arrives in Maine for summer

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

01:15 min | 3 years ago

George H.W. Bush arrives in Maine for summer

"Begins and milwaukee's river west neighborhood over the weekend police say thieves hit up vice cars on booth street then smashed the windows of at least six more those coming on the heels of whitefish bay in shorewood police encouraging people there to remove valuables into wok their doors after a dozen or so vehicle break ins in the past week the president demanding answers from the justice department after reports that an alleged informant was sent to spy on the two thousand sixteen campaigns today president trump is expected to officially follow through on his stunning order tweeting i hereby demand that the department of justice look into whether or not the fbi doj infiltrated or savell the trump campaign for political purposes sunday the justice department said it would investigate deputy attorney general rod rosenstein sane and a statement quote if anyone did infiltrate or savell participants and our presidential campaign for inappropriate purposes we need to know about it and take appropriate action kenneth moton abc news washington north korea displays the closure of its nuclear test site this week foreign journalists will be allowed to a journey deep into the country's mountains to witness it the closing on mount mandera much taty display of goodwill before leader kim jong un's planes summit with president trump next month the closure will also mark an end to the world's last active underground testing site sconsin native in marquette graduate will be in court in washington dc today bryce benson was commander of the navy's uss fitzgerald when it crashed last summer near japan hearing is the first time the exact charges against benson will be heard so far the navy has declined to specify some three thousand uw milwaukee students got their diplomas sunday during their commencement ceremonies loved ones watch from the stands of panther arenas graduate celebrated their years of study with bugs president peter fagin the featured speaker meanwhile out east a former white house contender the keynote speaker at yale's graduation hillary clinton went back to yale university a former presidential candidate warned graduating seniors america is facing a fullfledged crisis in our democracy i say this not as a democrat who lost an election but as an american afraid of losing a country nineteen seventythree yale law school grad also addressed the school shooting tragedy in texas enough is enough we need to come together and we certainly need commonsense.

Uss Fitzgerald Texas Yale Law School Peter Fagin Japan Washington Marquette Mount Mandera Rod Rosenstein Deputy Attorney General Shorewood America Hillary Clinton Yale Milwaukee Navy Commander Bryce Benson Kim Jong Un North Korea