35 Burst results for "Yale"

David Swenson, Head of Yale's Massive Endowment Fund, Has Died

Equity

01:05 min | 2 d ago

David Swenson, Head of Yale's Massive Endowment Fund, Has Died

"Danny who is david swinson. And why does his death impact the show yes. We're recording on this thursday. We learned that david swinson. The longtime head of sales endowment passed away from cancer. At the age of sixty seven. Swinson pioneered for endowments the alternative investment approach of investing outside of stocks and bonds to hedge funds and private equity and venture capital. Obviously that really revolutionized basically asset management across the world it invented the modern dowman. That really built up the universities. You're no stanford. harvard princeton. All sort of used this to really buttress their financial powers of the last couple of decades and his losses a huge tragedy thing for the entire industry. I was just going to add one nine to yale's endowment to give listeners perspective my friend taneja pora put it out a graph showing swenson's impact on yale's endowment and says that he grew the endowment from one billion in nineteen eighty-five to over thirty billion and created eight billion in value through its performance alone. So this guy had a huge huge impact from a financial perspective and as you mentioned just culture and how we think about venture

David Swinson Swinson Harvard Princeton Danny Taneja Pora Cancer Stanford Swenson
Wet Notes  5-6-2021

Scuba Shack Radio

07:50 min | 3 d ago

Wet Notes 5-6-2021

"This is wet. Notes here on scooby. Shock radio for may six two thousand and twenty one. I want to start off today with a story. That is a bit of personal meaning to me. And that's a story about what some recreational divers found while diving out in hawaii. Awful and i. Now i have quite a few dives out there. Awful and i and these divers found some unexploded world war two era ordinance. They found two bombs. One was at seventy four feet and the other one was at ninety four feet. The divers immediately notified to hawaii division of aquatic research. Who went out to investigate it and confirmed it was unexploded ordinance the report indicated that the munitions were about three hundred yards offshore. The exact location wasn't disclosed when but it may be in the area of the first and second cathedrals again personal for me. Because i have probably about at least twenty. Five dives onto cathedrals as of now. There aren't any more updates and there was no mention on the divers website and they run many charters out to the site. Let's see where this goes. I recently checked out the four ocean blog to see if there was anything of interest will there was a lot but one thing did pique. My interest for ocean occasionally does a blog on plastics around the world. And that's where they identify articles or stories that talk about the plastic crisis facing the world. Now one article was from interesting engineering and it was written by deora as deamer and this was about plastic eating mushrooms. Yes certain types of fungi can ingest and eat plastic apparently in two thousand eleven some yale researchers discovered rare mushroom in the amazon forest and it was able to digest and break down plastics. One of the scenarios suggest that these plastic eating mushrooms could be placed at the bottom of landfills interesting over the years. There have been various successful experiments. So what's the holdup perhaps speed. It takes times for the mushrooms to eat and digest the plastic and there's also competition for other investment now. Here's a bit of disturbing news that i saw from dima apparently there's going to be a virtual meeting of the florida fish and wildlife conservation commission or dfw see on may twelfth and thirteenth one of the topics on may twelfth. I think it is a two. Our discussion is to review and update the goliath grouper. Now this review is to look at if they should allow a limited highly. Regulated harvest of the goliath grouper. Why well that's a really good question now if you go out to the f. w. website you'll be able to find a detailed Presentation on this review. Even if the science holds up and supports the harvest. I would have to ask if the enforcement is of a regulated harvest. Dean feels that. The economic value of the goliath grouper are better served without any harvest and continue the protection they currently have. Sos thousand island. Well what's that all about. Well for those of you are familiar with the saint lawrence seaway in the thousand island region. Sos stands for save ontario shipwreck thousand island chapter now. This was reported in scuba news. Sos thousand island wants to create an artificial reef off of brockville in canada. Why are they making such a bold proposal. Were there are three main objectives. I an artificial reef will reduce the pressure on the local historic wooden shipwrecks and then second. An artificial reef can preserve the maritime history of ships that had been destined for scrap and finally this effort will assist the local aquarium in promoting maritime heritage and discovery. This is still a long way off but there is some good news in that day of identified a ship that could be used and it is the former canadian coast. Guard vessel the c. c. g. s. mont. Mandy now this ship was built in one thousand nine hundred sixty three and it was decommissioned and sold in nineteen ninety nine. Let's see where this one goes. Well here's something that. I just saw from patty. I think it was on the patty pro blog. Patty women's dive day. Two thousand and twenty one is coming and the tagline on the blog was celebrate the connection between mandy and the ocean. This year's patty women's dive day is july seventeenth 2021. This event started six years ago in two thousand and fifteen and it was started as a way to encourage more female participation in sport scuba diving to date there have been over four thousand patty women's dive day events in over one hundred countries. I'm sure last year was a little tough to get events planned and executed safely this year. More places are opening and travel is picking up. Everyone can participate be on the lookout for patty women's dive day event in your local area or maybe even travel to a nice destination to participate and finally today. I thought i'd give everyone and update on traveling. To the bahamas. As of may first the bahamas ministry of health has released new guidelines for entry departure. I if you are fully vaccinated for covid nineteen that's two weeks from your final. Does you don't need a covid. Nineteen tests prior to entry. Nor do you need to fill out the daily health questionnaire or get a covert test. After your fifth day on the island. You'll still need to apply for the bahamas. Health visa prior to entry. And you still need to get a covert test before travelling back to the united states. Now we're heading to nassau a may twenty six th so these changes make things a whole lot simpler. Hopefully more countries will open up. Like the bahamas. Well that's it for wet notes on may six two thousand and twenty one here on scuba shack radio

Hawaii Division Of Aquatic Res Deora Saint Lawrence Seaway Amazon Forest Sos Thousand Island Florida Fish And Wildlife Cons Dima Hawaii DFW Thousand Island Patty Women Brockville Dean Ontario Mont Mandy Patty
The Movement Behind "Period. End of Sentence."

Here's Something Good

02:01 min | Last month

The Movement Behind "Period. End of Sentence."

"When soviet time was just nineteen. She did something remarkable person of any age. She won an oscar for executive producing the documentary period. End of sentence. The short film tackles what many consider an unmentionable topic menstruation and specifically period poverty. The film bills that far too many women and girls lack access to clean menstrual supplies and that affects their ability to get an education or earn a living. The film shows how one village india installed a machine that makes low cost biodegradable sanitary pads. Which women sell to other women at an affordable price. Sophie won the oscar in two thousand nineteen and helped ignite a movement that has gone global now in her junior year at yale she also co founded the pad project a nonprofit dedicated to ending period. Inequity she started it when she was just sixteen years old. We asked sophie about how the pad project is making a difference for women and girls. Here's what she had to say so fi. Thanks so much for joining us. And he's not avenida daycare. The sophie you and a few colleagues launched a nonprofit called the pad project. Can you tell us what that is and what it does. Yes so the pad project is a certified five. Oh one c. Three non profit and we are focused on roddick heating period already Which is basically a fundamental issue when people menstruate access to care products on his stomach level and why that is such problem Because most of the time young girls will lack access to period care products routinely And then they will behind in school because they'll stay home one or two days a week. They have their period and eventually also behind in school drop-out entirely And this often happens. In developing countries and this just continues to add to the gender gap in education and so really just learning about period poverty at all was a huge opener for us in high school

Oscar Sophie India
Be Less Apologetic With Kimberly Blackwell

Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

05:18 min | Last month

Be Less Apologetic With Kimberly Blackwell

"Kim welcome to to professional troublemaker. Oh my god. It's also thrilled to be here. This is a long time coming long time coming too long to low. Always start off by asking my guess. What did you wanna be when you were growing up. fun fact. I actually wanted to be a sports medicine doctor really so i have a passion for sports. Okay and really for me. was very curious about medicine. And actually my undergraduate degree i went to syracuse made and so everything by way of my preparation was to go to medical school so sports medicine. So how old were you when you realize that. That's something that you wanted to be. So here's what i'll tell you. I think i feel like. I thought i wanted to be a doctor. Probably as early as junior high. Not quite as young as elementary. But i think i'd junior high. I kinda develop that curiosity around medicine and then i played sports in high school so i played volleyball and basketball when i got to syracuse. They ask them okay so listen. This had a scholarship for basketball to yale. Oh did not go to your obviously to this day. My father does not let me live that down. Okay i'm gonna bring you way back because this is fascinating okay. So five year old. kim. How was she. Okay let's back that up okay. So kim started school at three years. Old ooh okay. And so for. Kim went to montessori school. I started early. Kim was also advanced a great. So i tell folks. Nothing i do or have done has ever been conventional started school early advanced. The great graduated fairly young. I pledged in my teens. Alpha kappa alpha. Oh yeah it's like so but going back to your question. I think five year old cam actually still has a lot of the characteristics of forty something year old count. I think i always was a people person. Okay i think i was always operating from a position of excellence. I put pressure on myself. And i remember this even as a child i wanted to beat you in everything that we play like kick ball. I want to win. Like and i want to win. Not by you know two kicks but by ten So i was very competitive. i think as I looked to areas sort of where i tried to kind of position myself. As a team player. I think even the end and having played soccer as a toddler to montessori school so i was kinda raised in that environment of like you know we have. We didn't sit desk with chairs we were taught to be. Free are thinking won'- the room with blocks and all that good stuff. We call it our teachers by their first name. Gianna oh no i'm burn. No i will never forget him. John berno and it was. It was really cool. My my parents like you know my mother's educator. So you know grew up. In the fact where my mother started as a schoolteacher and so you know we will come home to kids. We didn't know sitting in a diner on the table because my mother really kind of operated like you know it takes a village and though our who is it you know but i think i develop that sense of community and responsibility to community by saying my mother embodied that early age and so she was an educator teacher there became an administrator retired as the superintendent on my father was in public service I grew up where he had been on the council city council but even before that school board So we would have kids. We were sasha malia without knowing way bag win do on parades my were you oldest oldest of three. I'm the oldest. Three pitchers like my dad was the mayor you know. And so they're big plaques with you know his name and we're sitting on his lap and council chamber. My dad is pretty well traveled. He you know has served as an ambassador. Un ambassador he served as undersecretary hoods all. That's where i got a lot of my service responsibilities.

KIM Syracuse Basketball Montessori School Volleyball John Berno Gianna Soccer Council City Council Sasha Malia UN
Managing Finances When the Flow of Income is Inconsistent  With Jeff Fishman

Dead Celebrity

05:10 min | Last month

Managing Finances When the Flow of Income is Inconsistent With Jeff Fishman

"Hello. Everyone and welcome to the latest episode of wealth management dot coms celebrity estates wills of the rich and famous for anyone new to the and each instalment myself in a guest on a different celebrities. State attempt to extract some key lessons planners can apply to their more traditional clients. The idea being that celebrity estate planning stories although often ridiculous in their details generally have at their course basic issues that can just as easily apply to non famous or fabulously wealthy clients. Our guest this week is jeff fishman. Jeff is the founder and managing number of jsf financial in los angeles. Thanks for joining us jeff. It's great to be here so normally. This is the part where i introduced the celebrity subject of this week's episode and then run my mouth for about five minutes telling story about their state. We're gonna throw a curveball this week though no celeb- instead we're gonna flip our mission statement a bit and talk with jeff specifically about advising high profile clients in those in the entertainment industry which is a topic a number of our listeners of interest in hearing tackle so jeff. Before we get into the real nitty gritty. Do you mind telling our audience a bit about yourself. And your sure david ed. So i'm born and bred in los angeles and went to college and law school in new york so i basically spent my life here on both coasts and after having this law a couple of years i've gone through. Ucla financial planning program and decided to start my own fee based financial planning practice which i began twenty five years ago and being in the middle of los angeles having grown up here inevitably. I have a lot of friends from childhood in other people that i've met who works throughout the entertainment industry and our whole practice has been built upon referrals. And as you can imagine. Those young producers young writer suddenly become showrunner has become directors They introduce you to others and it's basically just been word of mouth progression throughout the industry which is taken us to where we are today interesting so i know a lot of for a lot of our listeners and a lot of advisors on working with sort of you know entertainment clients in high profile clients. Like this is sort of an aspirational thing. So a very popular question we get is. How do i break into this industry. How do i start having these clients. It seems like you started collecting your client during childhood. It's funny it is it all goes down to relationships like anything else on the one hand On the other hand. I mean it's interesting. It's type of an industry that you could get started if you wanna start at the bottom. And we've all heard the stories of people working at the agencies in the mailrooms coming from harvard yale and literally going ahead and working melrose at creative artists agency or one of the others. And it's pretty much the same if you wanna go and start working in the industry. You've got to start with those kind of people because the way the industry works is those people to bottom inevitably one of them move up to somebody's desk ultimately become the agent or somebody young writer's room to become a writer himself a lead writer or producer. And it's really just starting early with certain people in their career like any other industry and hopefully growing with them and that's really interesting point. I'm glad you brought up here. Is that. I think for a lot of people. Entertainment equals celebrity. So if someone's in the entertainment industry automatically high profile person and it's just this leap but in reality there was an entire ecosystem that makes up the entertainment industry. And so you can enjoy working with everyone. Among the legal system much like working with clients has said and other industries is an important part of eventually working your way up to those higher up people completely completely and again once you start forging relationships in people forget entertainment industry is. I mean you've got invented the camera and you've got all the people who are behind the camera and there's a lot more people who work behind the camera than in front of the camera and that whole industry behind the camera. They tend to be much with all call more More consistent type of income situations they tend to be far more stable and so make sure business standpoint while the people in front of the camera or a lot. More appealing maybe sexy. The other side is actually a lot more attractively. Think about it. From an overall business perspective you mentioned consistency of income. Can you expound on that at concept a little bit in sort of what that means with with this sort of segment clientele sure so if you are in executive studio you're going to typically be under contract for multiple years if you are a writer on a show as long as the show's coming back and it's doing well. You're typically going to come back season after season Alternatively if your talent on a show and even if the show or if you wanna move movie to movie if you're on a show only subject to renewal but more than that if all of a sudden the show starts doing well but typically will happen. We'll be the talent is looking to earn more money per episode

Jeff Fishman Jsf Financial Jeff Los Angeles David Ed Harvard Yale Ucla New York
Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:40 min | 2 months ago

Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

"Okay. So we've all seen greenhouses interviewed domino olen for example who runs the greenhouse at george mason university in virginia about how her facilities providing food and even spices to the university's food service and see greenhouses with just flowers like it were states and other properties and now we see cannabis plants being grown in greenhouses. But what about greenhouses on a commercial scale and ones that recycle water do not use toxic. Fertilizers or get more out of the acreage than tenting and outdoor farm would right. Well that's what my guest today says there novel. Indoor farm will actually do so. Let's find out how it works. I'd like you to meet jackie. Roberts chief sustainability officer at ap harvest. Jackie has been in the sustainability spaces. I said for probably twenty five years including in the same role chief sustainability officer at the carlisle group which is investment company and as senior director of the environmental defense fund. Or where. I first met her probably about ten years ago. I think it was right. She earned all her degrees from yale. Smart cookie that she is including a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering and to help them manage degrees one from the yale. School of management and the other from the school of the environment without further ado welcomed green captions radio jackie. And thank you for joining us. I'm so excited. Thank you down. It's great to be here. Oh you're welcome. you're welcome. Congratulations on your new role at app harvest. Give us an overview of the indoor farms. How does app harvest actually work. Where they you know. where is it located. I chance in appalachia but give us a little more details. You know kind of what you're growing give us give us the proverbial thirty thousand foot view app harvest. I think is a really unique company in that are core product which is healthy vegetables is combined with a very sustainable climate. Resilient way of growing those vegetables and we're doing it in appalachia where the opportunity for job growth and economic development is really appreciate The the core product is a chemical pesticide free In in our first large greenhouse which you can see a picture of in my background but at sixty acres for those who can't see it Is a growing tomatoes and chemical pesticide free. Gmo free because the way we can grow in a closed system enables us to use biological pest approaches to control pests and disease and also a lot of trained workers and other interventions that can prevent outbreak. So we you know as a mother with three children knowing that what's coming out of our greenhouses is zero. Residue is a real attribute that i value. But how we grow it in your introduction spoke to it is we are very climate resilient in their storms that the that recently hit we had some employees that had trouble getting to work other people had to pitch in. We had one employee show up on their tractor to make sure they could get to work But you know we really did incredibly well in terms of being resilient. We had all the things we needed. We were harvesting on time stuff was getting out to the markets and it was a real testament to this strategy as an important part of the mix of different types of agriculture and When when we're growing We are able to use one hundred percent rainwater. We have a system of irrigation. That is set up where the rainwater is captured on the top of our sixty roofs it stored in a retention pond. And then we bring it into the greenhouse with a little bit of filtration through sand and you'd be late and that water re circulates. We don't ever a released anything into the atmosphere. The nutrients are put into the water and stay in the water until we need to add more. We can measure very precisely. It's a space where a has really enabled us to do very precise measurements and the plants. Exactly what they need. We do Nanotechnology with the water. Because bringing more oxygen into the water enables the plans to absorb the nutrients even better but all of that is is a closed system. And you know when when. I started in chemical engineering. The reason i went into chemical engineering is a wonderful professor. Who said if you care about environmental problems you should study chemical engineering because you learn how system works and where all the pollution comes from and how it's released to the environment

Domino Olen Carlisle Group Environmental Defense Fund Jackie Appalachia George Mason University School Of Management Roberts AP Virginia
An FTC Commissioner To Make Silicon Valley Cower?

Techmeme Ride Home

01:41 min | 2 months ago

An FTC Commissioner To Make Silicon Valley Cower?

"I said what was it friday with the news of the tim. Wu higher. That who president biden was hiring to staff the various agencies that would oversee the tech industry with telegraphing a lot in terms of his administration's intentions towards the tech industry. Well this news is just as suggestive of where things are be going. Sources are telling ryan lisera at playbook that president biden has decided to nominate lena con a legal scholar championed by anti big tech activists to actual seat on the federal trade commission. That's the commission that okay as things like tech mergers quoting playbook con would be one of three democratic commissioners at the agency which oversees privacy data security and some antitrust enforcement at a time when it's faced sharp criticism for not doing enough to police major tech firms like google and facebook over their privacy practices and pass mergers at age. Thirty two con would also be the youngest ftc. Commissioner khan served as an aide to the house judiciary antitrust committees probe into antitrust and major tech platforms including amazon apple. Google and facebook as part of the sixteen month investigation con honed in on google's conduct in the online search market before that she was a fellow at the ftc and argued for the agency to adopt rules. That would more clearly spell out win. Companies violate competition law while a law student at yale con authored. A groundbreaking paper amazon's antitrust paradox. Exploring the online retail giants conduct particularly its pricing practices could violate antitrust law and quote.

Ryan Lisera President Biden Lena Con FTC WU Biden Commissioner Khan House Judiciary Antitrust Comm TIM Google Facebook Amazon Apple
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 2 months ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
Arrest Warrant Issued For Boston MIT Grad Student Qinxuan Pan In Slaying Of Yale Student

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Arrest Warrant Issued For Boston MIT Grad Student Qinxuan Pan In Slaying Of Yale Student

"New developments in the murder of yale college student kevin shang authorities issuing an arrest warrant as the manhunt intensifies for an mit grad. Student out charged with the shooting. Here's abc's janai norman. Tonight the manhunt growing more urgent for an accused killer believed to be armed and dangerous police in connecticut today issuing an arrest warrant charging mit grad. Student king's swan pond for the murder of twenty six year. Old yale student kevin zhang jiang was found shot multiple times near the yale campus. Later dying at the scene just days after proposing to his girlfriend twenty twenty was year of blessings. Because i met my dear heaven i will always love him with the love of christ on was already facing charges for allegedly stealing. Suv he test drove in massachusetts. The same day zhang was killed. That was later found by police in north haven connecticut. Investigator say pond was last seen by family members in the atlanta area february eleventh carrying a backpack and reportedly acting strange in the days following the murder and us marshals raining confident that they will catch up with pawn but tonight he remains on the run facing that murder charge and a five million dollar bond. When he's captured

Kevin Shang Janai Norman Kevin Zhang Jiang Yale College Connecticut ABC North Haven Zhang Massachusetts Pond Atlanta United States
Man Sought In Murder Of Yale Graduate May Be In Metro Atlanta

WBZ Afternoon News

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Man Sought In Murder Of Yale Graduate May Be In Metro Atlanta

"For a suspect in the slaying of a Yale graduate students, authorities say 29 year old Keane's one paan Is wanted in the February 6 killing of Kevin John was found lying outside his car on a new Haven street with gunshot wounds upon is believed to be staying in the Atlanta area and should be considered armed and dangerous. It's also believed that Keane's one pond stole a car from a Mansfield dealership when he was fleeing. The cover.

Kevin John Keane Atlanta Mansfield
Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online

The Book Review

04:20 min | 2 months ago

Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online

"Lauren. Oiler joins us now. From ithaca new york. Her first novel is just out. It's called a fake accounts. Lauren thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having me alright. So people know your name even before this novel moseley probably as credit. You've written book reviews for the new york times booker view but also for many other places. Talk a little bit if you would about your reviewing. And how did you get into this well. I started reviewing as elliptical writer. As i think. Many increasingly many writers wrench generation will have to sort of similar background. Just about the millennial generation yes. I'm eleni on thirty years old. So i consider myself a true millennial smack in the middle and i said in english and college and when i graduated i moved to berlin and part because it was really cheap to live there and i wanted to work on my writing and the first sort of opportunity i got with to write liberals about books so every week i think for over a year i would write like a top ten list about top ten bucks three when you're sad and second your house or or whatever and you just made these like did you just come up with all by yourself or did you sort of pull friends. How did you compile them. Sometimes they would suggest something so if there was some event or you know if there was a holiday. Do something related to that. But it was really like. I could do whatever i wanted. And i think i was being paid. Twenty five pounds per article. Which means that. I had a lot of freedom to sort of cover the kind of books that i wanted to cover and do sort of weirder things and in the process of researching this column. I read a lot of criticism. I read a lot of weird sort of book websites. And i learned a lot about what was going to contemporary literature. Learned a lot about what i liked. Agent like in criticism as well. I want to hear everything you learned in all of those areas. I mean i. I guess what. What were the weird book websites. Well at the time we were living through a period which is now referred to as it right so the author but maybe many listeners will know from this movement is tau win. But there was a large group of sort of internet inflicted writers and poets and novelists who are doing sort of experimental literature. That was very much inflicted by the internet. And what kind of book criticism did you read. Where did you turn to other than us. Oh of course. I was reading really widely. But the thing that the way that i really got into it in the way that i sort of developed my style was by reading. Lots of old issues of el arbi wonder review of books online. And i just found that that you know. They're sort of signature combination of of very sort of cheeky. It's not cheeky. But it's it's very indepth in a along review. In which many sort of the books. The books are viewed for many different angles but ultimately there's a real perspective that's gone into those pieces that i really connected west. We should say at this point because it doesn't necessarily show up in your voice that you grew up in west virginia so this is like a very presumably big cultural shift going to berlin and reading the l. r. Did you grow up exposed to a lot of books and to criticism as as a as a kid or a teenager. No absolutely not. Don't overstate might rural upbringing raw. Basically not in a suburb but but something like a suburb But there wasn't you know there wasn't a lot of there weren't a lot of magazines around like i wasn't reading the new yorker. My family was reading the new yorker and my family our readers but they're reading sort of marshawn nra Stuff which is fine. And i should have to do my customary disclosure. Which is that. I did go to jail so that is really where. I got my my hose. Anything you can see the semi writing as well which is a real combination of of colloquial like mainstream kind of slang and the higher register that could be interpreted as literary or more serious. And i think that it really does come from this kind of normal upbringing in west virginia combined with suddenly. I'm at yale. And then i moved to europe.

Moseley Ithaca Lauren Berlin The New York Times El Arbi New York West Virginia Europe
[TEST] COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

Climate Connections

01:29 min | 2 months ago

[TEST] COVID recovery should include climate solutions, researcher says

"Dr anthony leiserowitz and this is climate connections. The covid nineteen pandemic has changed the world and the work of rebuilding will take more than a vaccine. There's going to have to be an economic recovery from covert you know. There's been a worldwide economic recession. That's robert dubrow of the yale center. Climate change and health. He says his country's rebuild they have an opportunity to accelerate the transition to clean renewable energy. And that would help solve another public health crisis. Climate change warmer temperatures will increase deadly heat waves food. Shortages natural disasters and disease and burning fossil fuels creates toxic. Air pollution that harms people's lungs and can cause heart disease apart from the climate change benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions really tremendous public health benefits. That are more immediate so do bro recommends that has countries past their covid recovery packages. They prioritize climate solutions such as clean energy and green transit. We could make a tremendous kind of down payment on the transition that we need to renewable energy if we're going to avoid catastrophic climate change and therefore catastrophic public health consequences climate connections is produced by the for environmental communication to hear more stories like this visit climate connections dot org.

Dr Anthony Leiserowitz Robert Dubrow Yale Center Heart Disease
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 2 months ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:45 min | 2 months ago

'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

"So nomad land is based on a nonfiction book of the same name by jessica bruder. It's about these folks who are in many cases older they're sort of battered by economic changes particularly the Economic meltdown of two thousand eight. They are left with very few options. And this fictional story about fern was written by khloe. jiao is also the director as we mentioned fern. This lifestyle is connected to her grief over her husband staff and it it leaves her at really the mercy of the weather and other people. She has no access to health. Care any kind of security. But there's also. I think it's safe to say a freedom in it that she appreciates at times She has a chance to see new things and be independent. There are a lot of kind of sweeping vistas of the western great plains and she starts to develop a relationship with a guy named dave. Who's played by david straight there and and obviously that complicates her wanderings somewhat. Glenn what did you think about nomad. Land. i mean this is pretty great right. I mean fair warning. It is unhurried. It is discursive it's also as you mentioned. It's in love with the natural environment which is very Khloe zhao thing. It's smartly a film that teaches you how to watch it because in those opening minutes we the audience are that woman that fern meets at the store. Were worried about her. Where the manager that gas station. We want her to find a shelter for the night. Because it's going to be cold She's been dealt a couple serious blows and the story of the film is her finding an equilibrium. It's not perfect and it's fragile and take some work to maintain we see the work it takes to maintain but he's got the strength and resolve to maintain it finds a community Found family which is something queer folk no little something about That said you take frances. Mcdormand out of the equation. I'm not sure. I'm still as invested. Because that actor is just an empathy engine. It just radiates from her Even when the role she's playing is more comedic as it is in fargo or even when it's a completely underwritten and onenote like it wasn't three billboards. There's not a trace of condescension in any role. She plays humankind essential or socioeconomic condescension. No actually remove no sense of judgment because francis. Mcdermott is a woman who graduated from the yale school of drama. She's married to a kohen brother. And what do the coen brothers love to do. More than make fun of a yokels. There's nothing about her holding fern at a remove when she's packing amazon boxes. That's fern packing amazon boxes. Even though it's france clearly packing boxes the scene where she goes on quite a bit about how she got more counter space in her van. E you play that wrong and that is a hollywood actor doing a ride along. That's fake but i mean there's something about are you just fall in love with firm. The way she smiles without opening her mouth There's such pain in it but there's joy now did i need fern to quote shakespeare at me. Nope did. I need the scene with her sister where she tells firm. That firm has always been strong in special and smart. Smells nice in this kind of puppies. I didn't need that either. Those moments felt like that was the film. Not trusting itself. Kind of putting on some training wheels So in the end. I think i was more taken by this amazing performance then by the movie itself. Interesting stephen i was taken by the amazing performance. And the film itself I think this is a wonderful piece of really subtle storytelling. It is so thoughtful. It is so respectful and careful and clever. You can tell that this movie. And it's makers spent time with its subjects and really got invested in their lives. This movie could have so easily tilted into mawkishness could so easily tilted into cynicism. It's so easily could've tilted into kind of capital. I issues based thundering and it never ever does. I mean it's funny. Glenn mentioned francis mcdormand's performance in three billboards outside ebbing missouri. The kind of purported to be about the real america kind of the real underbelly of america and it did so by throwing grotesques at us and this movie does the exact. It is a really human and lovely movie and its surrounds. Frances mcdormand and david strathern with nomads. With people who actually live this lifestyle and lets them tell their stories albeit fictionalised versions of their stories. And i just think that works beautifully. Well you can tell in spots when this movie is working with non-professional actors and you can kind of feel that but for the most part i just got totally lost in it. It is as glenn's had its unhurried. But i didn't find it slow at all. I loved this movie.

Jessica Bruder Khloe Zhao Jiao Khloe Fern Glenn Mcdormand Yale School Of Drama Amazon Dave Frances Mcdermott Fargo David Francis Francis Mcdormand Shakespeare France Hollywood Stephen
Chicago Fraternal Order Of Police President Served With Administrative Misconduct Charges

Bob Sirott

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago Fraternal Order Of Police President Served With Administrative Misconduct Charges

"With administrative misconduct charges. WGN Steve Ruxton. His charges mean Captain Zara won't be paid for at least the next 30 days as a Chicago police board decides his fate. Last month, CPD Superintendent David Brown recommended Captain Zara be fired for multiple rules violations. Those violations allegedly include filing a false police report in posting violent and racist content on social media sites. Steve Broxton, WGN NEWS Police in New Haven, Connecticut, may have a break in a murder of a Yale student

Captain Zara Steve Ruxton WGN David Brown CPD Chicago Steve Broxton Wgn News Police New Haven Connecticut
Justice Dept Drops Lawsuit Claiming Yale Discriminated in Admissions

Bloomberg Law

05:15 min | 3 months ago

Justice Dept Drops Lawsuit Claiming Yale Discriminated in Admissions

"Talking to Audrey Anderson, who had the higher education practice of Bass, Berry and Simms about President Joe Biden's Johnson's Department dropping and Trump Administration lawsuit accusing Yale University of discriminating against whites and Asian Americans while favoring black and Hispanic applicants for admission. Move marks a swift shift in priorities for Biden's Justice Department, signaling its abandonment of the previous administration's efforts to reverse college diversity efforts. But the battle over race conscious admissions is far from over. After losing a similar Harvard case over discrimination in November, students were fair admission, said it would ask the U. S. Supreme Court to reverse the ruling and toss out decades of president. High court, which now has a 6 to 3 Conservative majority has yet to say if it will take up the appeal. The group has similar cases pending against the University of Texas and the University of North Carolina, alleging discrimination against Asian, American and white students and says it will file another lawsuit against Yale. Tell us what the strategy of students for fair admissions is what it's lawsuits across the country. Your students for fair admission. Will they bring cases? Challenging You'd admissions plans that have race as a factor. In admissions and say that those plans discriminate on the basis of race. Their plainness lately have been all Asian American. Do them. They say that when colleges consider race in admissions and the discriminated against Asians based on waste, that's what their complaints say they always in all of their cases. They have also Included a claim that Any consideration of race violates the Constitution. Even though that argument is We're closed by current law. The current Supreme Court lost, says the colleges may consider race An admission. If they show they other compelling interest in considering race that their use of races narrowly tailored Students repair admissions always make an argument that hey, we think that's wrong. We think the Supreme Court Current case law is wrong, and if we ever get a chance to argue this before the Supreme Court, we're going to tell the Supreme Court that we think that's wrong and they should overturn that law. So it seems prepared missions is where was doing by filing cases all across the country. They are trying to improve their chances that the Supreme Court Will at some point Decide to read you one of these lower court decisions and eventually rule. And prepared missions favor on that. Argument that the Constitution does not allow the consideration of race. And higher education admissions. So we know that the Harvard case went up to the circuit court, and that's as we discussed awaiting perhaps Supreme Court review. What about the other cases that they filed? Yeah. So the University of North Carolina, they filed a case against the University of North Carolina. They had a trial in that case in November. And, um, the Mr Court is waiting for the parties to file finding the facts and conclusions of law. Later this month. And so we are then awaiting a written decision from the judge in that case, and that's just the district court. The trial level. So it could be anywhere from You know 3 to 6 months. No longer before we get a decision. In that case from the trial court. You know what's happening with the Texas case? I believe. Yeah, So there's a case pending in Texas. And they're really at the very early stages of that case. I just checked and they Have a scheduling order that was just entered that has trial scheduled for September of 2022. It was gonna be a long time before there's any decision in that case on the merits. The strange thing about that case is that they're gonna be doing some briefing in the next few months. On some legal questions about whether the court should go forward with this decision at all, based on the fact that just a few years ago Of course, including the Supreme Court. Revered the admission process at the University of Texas Austin and found it to be constitutional. They're going to do some breaking the next few months about Hey, as if afraid. You get to litigate this all again now. Or have we already decided that so the case might go away on those grounds within the next, you know, six months. But if that doesn't happen, then it will be a long time before we get a decision in that case, so

Supreme Court Audrey Anderson President Joe Biden Johnson's Department Trump Administration Yale University Of Discriminat Biden's Justice Department U. S. Supreme Court University Of North Carolina Simms Harvard Berry High Court University Of Texas Bass Yale Mr Court Texas University Of Texas Austin
Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 3 months ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 3 months ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
"yale" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

03:57 min | 7 months ago

"yale" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"With them. They're able to use your money. thereby. they are investing it and using it. And you get the money if you don't use it for long term care and the air them putting more money into the bucket. But you're using your money I for long term care that way the premiums don't get increased, and so that was a part of that book along with the other strategies that spoken about crisis, player strategies, government benefits, and such at led to that book. This is such a content rich coal because it's Dave this is David Ward feud isn't this is disappointing out to me. I guess somebody who doesn't know a thing about this that there is a lot to understand and in that pointing process having somebody like helping out man to be there to help you is this going to reduce so much stress and give me that confidence that we're going to be able to be in a better position. Afterwards, I looked at your website you have a great deal of of not only testimonials. You've got a lot of other educational material what what are the educational material are people going to find on your website and get? Will we we really pride ourselves on providing educational content and material because we really feel that you sort of have to know what you don't know, and that's you know such a an important concept and away. So on our website we have. Numerous guides we special needs guy we have a nursing home. And assisted living guide for people in our area we have. Medicaid guides we an guide about. Benefits are available paper long-term k. We these guys at happy to guide to people that go on our website, which is ww Dot Hauptmann Ha U. P. as in Peter, T. as in Tom M. A. N. AS IN NANCY LAW L A W dot com, and we feel that there's lots of video content about explaining what happens when your child turns eighteen for example, and need special needs..

Dave Medicaid Peter David Ward Tom M. A. N.
"yale" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:12 min | 9 months ago

"yale" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Help you unlock your best life right now and, you know That's why it's been difficult because I veered off that topic and talk about something that I believe is pertinent. Needs to be talked about, and that is covert 19. And more specifically our response to covert 19. I want to continue that conversation because there's been Mohr I would say development since our last two conversations about our response. Our reaction to mandates. Two shutdowns. To censorship. And most recently, we will have to navigate. How to respond to the upcoming messaging about the cove in 19 vaccine. So on the show, we're going to talk about A Yale study that is currently going on along with the U. S government. That they're doing clinical trials to develop messaging to persuade Americans to take the covert 19 vaccine. We're gonna talk about Our response to that, but also the messaging that you will hear soon about how effective the vaccine is. How that if you don't get it that you will be putting Your household and your neighbors at risk. You going to hear about the shame, the guilt, the embarrassment that anger you're going to hear about all the different ways they are just right now. Just experimenting. With messaging to see what works. To see how to best influence the general public to get the cove in 19 vaccine. Now, here's why this matters to you because if I asked you right now, Will you get the Corona virus vaccine? There's going to be three camps. There's going to be one that says absolutely. Give me another says. Maybe there's going to be another one that says absolutely not. And here's Why this matters because the Yale study is The goal is to convince Americans to get Corona vaccine. Is 4000 participants they found online and right now who is the Leader in the race when it comes to developing this vaccine and bring it to markets, Moderna No gates is. AH is a funder. Valachi with an H is a supporter. Remember that Moderna has never brought a drug all the way through the FDA to market and yet they are the ones leading the way currently. So it's 4000 person study. They tried messaging with 12 different groups in the study attempts different messaging against participants to find out which is the most effective and influencing the general public to get the vaccine when it comes to market. So they compared the willingness to get the covert 19 vaccine at three and six months, and they're goingto compare the effective willingness to get the cove it 19 vaccine..

Moderna No Yale Mohr FDA U. S
"yale" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

07:24 min | 11 months ago

"yale" Discussed on Mom Brain

"You start doing it for the external reward. In Our podcast we talked to someone who is like obsessed with their fit bit Usta like going running on their own, but then it became about lake, getting the little dings on the Fitbit, and then stops being about running. You become obsessed with this external reward, and I think just of you said we've like actually created a culture where our whole education system is based on these external awards whether that's again like. Like, a gold star grade or getting into a school like Yale like in the data suggests that what's that's done is exactly what happened to you like a Princeton which is like you're working to get into. Princeton. You're working for like what you think is going to give you this external validation, but then when you stop and think you're like wait. What do I actually really want? What do I WANNA learn what? What do I need to do as an adult? We've Kinda miss that so I think for parents thinking about this. I think it's really important to think you. When have you kind of push things off on external rewards whether that's your degrees. Your kids are getting in school. Even if it's like first grade or kindergarten or something like that, whether that's external rewards, you use to kind of motivate behavior. Those things kind. Kind of work in the short term the problems they work too well right, and then they can kinda steal the joy that underlies certain things you sit, you talk about the fitbit and I I realize for myself when I started using APPs to run I love to run that I was holding myself to a higher standard, well Iran slower today and I was one minute lesson this new start you it. It's so. Out of the body and what I learned was are I'm GonNa give myself a second time. I'm going to do thirty minutes and I'M GONNA run my best knows thirty minutes, and if it's not the same, that's okay, but literally having to have a conversation with myself without and now I'm almost seven months pregnant and I'm using now were in quarantine, and I can't run as well. I mean not just because the Indian, but because I'm very pregnant, and I'm using Peleton and they have all of these you know. You can compete against this one and that one and I'm like I'm going to do twenty minutes. I'm going to do whatever I want for those twenty minutes. Okay because I, need to listen to my body, which is just so smart i. mean I think the the problem? It's in everything, right? You know it's in fitness. APPS when we used to love running and exercising, it's in meditation. APPs right. You know like some of the meditation Apps I use or scoring me right whereas like we shouldn't get scored like literally. Literally on meditation on like being President Right, but that's but that's the thing. Is that really what it comes down to is that we're not capable of being with ourselves, and we're not capable of knowing if we're honest or not. Because so much is about this sort of appreciation from the outside. How many likes do I get on this? How much it has stars did I get on this APP this. Did I get on that? You know what's my grade on this constantly having to prove ourselves in this culture. I mean as a as a question I mean it feels right now. This is so there were at such a time of of of learning about how we can be better in Daphne are very. Active on our INSTAGRAM's, and we have relatively big followings, and what are what are certain things that you find can help people through instagram because I feel like both of us have of this positive outlook would like to share positive things. We'd like to get involved with different things that are going on at the moment. Try to help people reach out help MOMS. That was the whole idea of our podcast. Through our podcasts into our own instagram's and through the people who are listening who are also MOMS trying to reach out to other moms. What are things that you find to be helpful to ourselves into others? And what do you think are things that we're putting out there? That might be harmful to ourselves into others. Yeah I, think the key here is really trying to be mindful about what you're consuming and kind of pay attention. Attention to sort of what's nutritious often like to use these analogies with like eating exercise when I think about happiness, because I get works a lot the same way by as you're paying attention to your own instagram. Use as you're paying attention to what you WANNA post so on. You need to think about like what's nutritious for you right? And that's going to vary from person to person like some people are just GonNa like. Like love instagram and not get obsessed with the lakes and just recognize the value that they're having sharing this good content from that's one thing, but you might also start noticing like. Oh, I posted that and not as many people look the as last time, and like so so he is to kind of pay attention to what's working for you, and if it stops working if it starts to feel not nutritious like you're getting obsessed. Obsessed or you're paying attention to the wrong things or just feels gross like notice that and try to shift your behavior around it right? That might mean like forcing yourself not to look at the lakes, or that might mean doing it only a certain amount, and not getting obsessed with it, or trying to kind of interact with certain like certain feeds, and not others right I, think part of being nutritious for me has meant. Getting off of some of the lake, twitter followers that look at right 'cause it. I noticed like whenever I'm reading this stuff I'm not feeling nutritious I'm feeling gross feeling bad about myself or something like that and so paying attention to what's working for you and being kind of non judgmental about it. You know they're. They're like certain like accounts that we feel like we're supposed to follow. Follow, but it make it makes us feel bad. It's like you know it's. It's supposed to work for you like if it's not working for you, just switch it up. I love that what about helping other people because I know that something that Daphne and I are also very focused on is helping people and putting content out there. That's GonNa make people feel good and whether you. You have three people flying you or you have three million people falling. You have an effect on other people, and so, what for for all of listening to you? What kinds of stuff can we put out there and not put out there? That is nutritious for the world. Yeah, well I think one of the big things to remember scientifically is that our emotions aren't just like emotions that. That are in our body that are affected by what we're thinking. We're going through. We catch the emotions of other people, and there's some lovely data that have come out of Japan Cox suggesting that that's true on social media to you. Did this famous study where he had? He worked with facebook to get them to just switch their algorithm a little bit, so your feet had slightly. Slightly more negative content or slightly more positive content, and he found that that affected people's emotions and then affected what they themselves posted so i. think the biggest way we can help. Other people with our feeds is making sure that we're putting stuff out that we are proud of right that that would make us feel good. That wouldn't make us feel bad about ourselves if we were looking. Looking at it in someone, else's feed and I think that can be. That can be lots of different things that can be regulating emotions so like you know twenty twenty rough enough already like we have to face the news and we have to face what's going on, but there are different spins. We could have on that bad information, and is there a way to get a more positive? Positive spinner, a more optimistic spin I'm hopeful spent like that matters a lot The other thing is to realize what we're putting out and trying to think about. Can this make someone feel bad about themselves? You know maybe I might really love the photos of my vacation, but is that GONNA make everybody in my feed. Feel crappy because they didn't get to go to. I don't know. Know Barbados last week or something like that like I. Think it's a matter of realizing that the content you put out is going to affect other people's emotions, and that's cool. It means we have this responsibility in what we put in our feed to like other people positively like we can be the change. We want to see on these platforms because we're the ones posting stuff, right. Around mom off. This past handful of months has been some of the most distressful in our lives.

INSTAGRAM Princeton Yale Daphne President Peleton Iran facebook Barbados Japan
"yale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Hank Burien wrote a great piece yesterday with the headline three female students, sue, Yale and fraternities. So that the fraternities would be forced to admit women. So you have female students at Yale University who are suing the university to force fraternities to accept women. Why why were they? Fraternity except a woman. And if a fraternity accepts a woman is it still a fraternity, and does this means sororities must be forced to accept men. Yesterday. Three female students at Yale University. They filed the lawsuit against the university and against nine fraternities to force these I turn it is to accept women as members to the students were juniors. One of the student was a sophomore. The the lawsuit states that when these three females arrived on campus as first year students, they encountered a thriving all male fraternities seem Yale had a drastic shortage of university runs social spaces. And the fraternities were the de facto social environment students male students routinely controlled the admission. Alcohol lighting and music for many Yale social gal gatherings. This dynamic created dangerous environments in which sexual conduct misconduct thrived. The lawsuit claims that these three women were groped at fraternity parties during their first semester at Yale..

Yale University Hank Burien
"yale" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"I believe we I investigation on Brett cavern on now has more to work with tonight than it did last night, including this statement tonight by Brett Cavanaugh's Yale roommate, Chad leading ten. Roommate said he never saw him blackout. He. He was with him when he got home at night and saw when he woke up your response to that. I unfortunately believe that my my probably now is is lying. Brad Kavanagh was questioned under oath last week about his drinking because he was accused of an attempted rape with his friend Mark judge while he was drunk stumbling drunk according to Dr Christine blassie Ford. And in the Senate confirmation hearing brick Kevin was questioned under oath about his drinking in college because Dever Ramirez has accused Brad Kavanagh of aggressively exposing himself to her while he was drunk stumbling drunk at a party in a Yale dormitory. Deborah Ramirez says that when she had to push cavenaugh away, she was forced to touch him in a way that disgusted and horrified her and so- descriptions of Brett Cavanaugh being belligerent and aggressive while being drunk at Yale are now highly relevant to the FBI background investigation of Brett Cavanaugh Brett Kevin under oath answers to last week. Last week's questions about drinking Dow the basis of this week's questions about perjury, the New York Times. Times is now reporting according to unnamed White House sources that the f. b. i. will actually be allowed to interview anyone the FBI deems necessary in the cavenaugh investigation. After initial order from the White House limited the FBI investigation do interviewing only four people in those four people did not include Brett Kavanagh or Dr Christine blessing Ford, but did include Deborah Ramirez Friday on this program to women who were roommates of Deborah Ramirez at Yale said that Brett Kevin are frequently got very drunk and they believe that his Senate testimony minimizing his drinking was a lie because they themselves both drank with Brett cavenaugh while in college. Both of the women said that they believe Deborah Ramirez, Deborah Ramirez, accusations against Brett Kevin on yesterday Cheddington that Yale classmate of birth Kevin was issued a written statement saying that he was deeply troubled by Brett Kavanagh's description of his. Is drinking at Yale. Cheddington is now a professor at North Carolina State university. He was a varsity basketball player at Yale. Brick Cavanaugh was not on the varsity team, but he enjoyed socializing with the varsity players according to Chad leading him in his written statement, professor leading ten said quote, Brett was a frequent drinker and a heavy drinker. I know because especially in our first two years of college, I often drank with him on many occasions. I heard Brett slurring his words and saw him staggering from alcohol consumption, not all of which was beer when Bret got drunk. He was often belligerent and aggressive on on one of the last occasions. I purposely socialized with Brett. I witnessed him respond to a semi hostile remark, not by diffusing the situation, but by throwing his beer in the man's face and starting a fight that ended with one of our mutual friends in jail..

Brett Cavanaugh Brett Kevin Brett Deborah Ramirez Brett cavern Brett Kavanagh Yale Roommate Brad Kavanagh Brett cavenaugh FBI Cheddington Yale dormitory Senate Dr Christine blassie Ford Chad White House Bret professor New York Times
"yale" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"yale" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I have rarely been ripped off is a testament to their honesty or my charm at think it's probably both, but I cannot help but protests the perpetual necessity for either. How does that feel to have to rely on other people? Yeah, yeah, that was that was part of a movement that was ultimately successful led by the American Council, the blind to make our US currency accessible. We're the only industrialized country where you can't tell other than visually the difference between a five dollar Bill and a twenty dollar Bill. And so I got involved with that movement in and it's true that that's one of the that's one of the areas where you know, unfortunately, because those bills are not distinguishable right now, they will be soon. A person who's blind or low vision even can can be vulnerable and the, I think the important thing there is it's not just a lack of independence when it comes to like a consumer, but it's also the idea that someone who's blind ought to be able to work at a Starbucks. I had to plug a Seattle company or another coffee shop. They ought to be able to do that and be able to make change for people. You raise the issue of employment for people who are blind. The overall unemployment rate in the country is a, you know, historical lows, but tell folks what the unemployment rate is among blind people in the United States. Yeah. Well, as as recently as a few years ago, the unemployment rate for blind Americans was about seventy percent and since that and I would also say of those who are employed, many are under employed, and so we've got a long ways to go. Oh, so you, you know, you have sort of mediocre academic career, Columbia, Oxford Yale after which at some point you decided to get into politics. Why on earth would you do that? Mainly so that I could use the expression. I went from braille to Yale on podcasts like this and get lattes, believe that is going to be the title of the episode. Thank thank you. All right. You know, without teachers without social services without the the person taught me how to use a cane or read braille or use software on the computer that reads, what's on the screen without any of those things. I wouldn't have been able to travel the road from braille to Yale. So as I graduated law school and came back and entered into private practice in Seattle, you know, I heard about all these attacks on social services. One of the things you would hear often times would be education being pitted against social services. And I knew first hand that you need both. You need good schools.

Oxford Yale Seattle United States Starbucks American Council Columbia private practice seventy percent twenty dollar five dollar
"yale" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Think, free. Speech prevents the government from preventing speech you the. Right to, stand on the sidewalk and rant and rave. Yeah absolutely nobody can. Put you in jail already can arrest you know that's probably. The greatest thing about this country. This is James Kirk he's a visiting fellow at Brookings and about. Fifteen years ago James was a student at. Yale I was a freshman Yale in the spring of two thousand. Three and that semester James was cut off guard when someone he strongly disagreed with, was invited to speak on campus The African. American cultural center on campus had. Invited a poet by the name of Amiri Baraka who passed away. Several years ago and he was notorious at. The time for having published a poem called somebody blew up America And in this poem that he had written he alleged that the government of Israel, had warned all Israelis in Manhattan not to go to work at the twin towers that day And he was invited, to basically read this poem at Yale to read that yes Somebody blew up America they say as some terrorism Barak Arab in Afghanistan. And It was a fairly traumatic experience, for me and I grew up in a fairly well to do Boston suburb but never experienced real anti-semitism in my life before and then to come to Gale's freshman and see something like. This happen was disturbing and my instinct was, not to shout. Mr. Baraka down I was a columnist for the elderly news the school newspaper so.

Amiri Baraka Yale James visiting fellow Barak Arab America Boston Gale Israel Afghanistan Manhattan Fifteen years
"yale" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"For a while logan call appearance sang one day rotor he sing i should've asked him just now that's how this whole thing started he came up and he he'll probably tweet me in two seconds and he belted something on the really good job and that was how we got to know him and he was like come to come to my wedding so a couple years i went to his wedding and it was super far away alexa alexa i got into harvard yale this spring you get into harvard and yale i which one are you going to wow we have a listener who goes to harvard what are you gonna study you guys love you to what are you going to study studying government wow i just want to i'm gonna give you a hundred bucks just now today and then like in thirty years when you're worth a billion dollars i'm gonna call and say i gave you one hundred bucks now gimme whatever you give me some money i'm gonna i'm gonna invest in you i'm going to buy your books or something i don't know just so i can say that i invested in a harvard grad don't forget about me when you invent the next brilliant medical cures solution or something alexa thank you for calling god harvard and yale amazing jesus hey tiffany good morning hi tiffany what's your claim to fame well growing up i played football and i was the only girl football team when i was in high school kicker thing.

logan harvard football yale billion dollars thirty years two seconds one day
"yale" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Commencement addresses on disagreement day to somebody disagree with me that most commencement addresses are disappointing boring meaningless repetitive full of platitudes and cliches you remember the i think it was at penn jodi foster gave a particularly awful commencement address at penn and then i think it was also at penn that elizabeth warren was trying to sing some taylor swift and somehow it's just not the same when senator warren delivers it but in any event hillary clinton who graduated from yale law school she she was in her class because she was a class of sixty nine at wellesley college so she was not eligible at that time to go to yale as an undergraduate but she spoke to yell undergraduates at yale college on class day just a couple of weeks ago and offered profound advice on how to handle moments when you're feeling down listen everyone everyone gets knocked down what matters is whether you get back up and keep going this may be hard for a group of yale soon to be graduates to accept but yes you will make mistakes in life you will even fail it happens to all of us no matter how qualified or capable we are take it from me i remember those first months after that two thousand sixteen election we're not easy we all had our own methods of coping i went for long walks in the woods yell students went for long walks and east rock park i spent hours going down at twitter rabbit hole you spend hours in the yale memes group i had my fair share of chardonnay practice yoga and alternate nostril breathing you took psych and the good life.

penn elizabeth warren hillary clinton yale law school wellesley college yale yale college jodi foster twitter
"yale" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Drugaddicted mother and i had no idea who i my father and my mother was unable to care for me so i spend a lot of my childhood in and out of foster homes and later adopted actually by a man and woman is sort of nuclear family but then they divorced shortly after adopting me and my adopted stepfather every ties with me and stop talking to me after the divorce and my adopted mother in love with a woman and they raised me together throughout a lesson plan on this woman who who sort of raised me alongside my adopted mother she was shot when i was fourteen high school and so it was just a series of you know chaotic and turbulence on all throughout my bringing and then i after graduating high school join the airforce and recently graduated from yale i mean to say that's a tough road is incredible understatement you know and the headline of the pieces why being a foster child made me a conservative which by the headline i'm like okay i i want to hear this story and after the air force you go to yale and that's the first time that you hear someone say that you're a victim yeah yeah that's right i never heard that before you know i knew that i sort of had this unusual and you know not a great upbringing but i never thought of myself as a victim so you know i always thought that i could change the circumstances you know based on decisions i made in the piece i talk a little bit about a teacher who told me in sixth grade if you apply yourself and make certain kinds of decisions you know you can change what tomorrow looks like so everything we do matters every decision you make changes what your future looks like even the decision to make no decisions on everything we do matters and i always believed that and then i come gale and people are telling me that it's not really about individual responsibility or you know your own ability to to decide what to do about your future about the structural forces and to stem and quality and so on and i'm not denying thing you know that exists perhaps they do but i also think that individual choice also on matters you know robbed a fascinating thing to me is.

yale
"yale" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And on and on i mean it was just a very chaotic very turbulent upbringing and then later joined the air force kinda found my own success and you make the case that that that experience everything that you went through was actually what made you a conservative sort of formed your ideology so lay that out because that's counter intuitive to what we learn in the mainstream media or what we what we often in pop culture yeah well i feel a lot of my peers who came from the same background is in the end they're not so successful and then when i arrived at a place like yale i you know have people where they came from with their upbringing was like and so on and a lot of almost all of them came from manhattan families their parents focus on family and education they waited till they were lit up to get married they waited until they found some success and whereas someone with my background i mean you almost never see someone with divorced parents or single parents or from lower income communities at yale because in my opinion is because people who raise their children books on then upper middle class liberal people in particular are very reluctant to share the the tips or the the the the the knowing but they follow to raise their own children and essentially be done inside and there was a to the political they don't preach what they practice pay attention to their kids on education but they won't really sort of share the secret with people in other communities i don't really agree with that i think that that families are important i think personal responsibility is grandpa and this this is the suffering by unusual experiences led me to to these concluding he'd sounds to me though that you were led to you let yourself to these conclusions i think this is what so many of us would would love to be able to sort of influence children especially children who are going through the hardships that that you endured and be able to sort of inject some of these values and principles that you're articulating here but but you weren't inspired by someone you weren't let there right i mean what what can we do to actually help multiply the rob henderson affect.

yale rob henderson manhattan
"yale" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Miracle in a panic and carey's running over there ran in a panic and you know macron was a planned deal but you know what was number one on the list don't kill this deal exposed to many people now they're talking about if you if you pull out it'll cause world war three inside your country maybe people in your country going to jail because you guys lied to euro people mirko you lied macron you weren't there at the time but helen's lonzo big trouble i think theresa may and the people that put her office behind her they're going to be in trouble at the uk and you know obama and kerry and jared and everybody else obama administration is going to be in trouble yeah well she was she was working on that before she could give her that as a pass because he wasn't there when this deal went down but she was there with the uranium one deal went down and did some of that uranium which was never supposed to leave the country that some of that uranium end up in what syria or or iran or did some that uranium end up in in hands of people that could drop it on us later in a c b m know what left the united states through canada we know that that is been documented even though we know retz right many people will tell us to this day the out that it's not as bad as you think 'cause iranian never left the country i saw yale rail saying well you know daddy til yale yale law school yale the imbeciles at yale that traders at yale tackling with it but they never mentioned it wasn't side so let me get this straight you imbecile imbecilic idiot yell to a hundred and fifty billion dollar deal and not get a signature you're in basilic you put but they are the home now greg they are the home of the skull and bones the yeah yeah coup stupid to be still which harry which john kerry with john kerry was a members going bone dave.

theresa harry greg yale canada iran syria uranium one jared panic euro carey john kerry united states obama uk helen fifty billion dollar
"yale" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"The word together we can change the world well hello my friends there is so much talk to you about so students all over the country left classes to demonstrate for gun control the democrats are jubilant totally understandably the ability to identify the threat of being killed with republicans is just too great a cause not to be allowed students in many instances were not marked as absent or truant because the teachers and the principal support the idea that they go out and march remember yale just announced i read this to you l announced the assistant head of admissions at yale said you have a better chance of being admitted to yale if you were an activist and by that it is man it was clear what it was it was for social justice i mean the word social justice reuse in other words if you're a left wing activists in high school you have a better chance of getting into the left wing yale university so those are moments by the way where in i at least admire the honesty it's when youtube claims to be neutral and then put prager you videos on a restricted list that's when you really understand that this moral compromise here aside from from the desire to indoctrinate that you're not even honest enough to admit we we put you on restricted list because we don't like your content so students are all out there marching and i always ask the question what law and i i don't ask it as a challenge by the way i'm totally open to challenging people i don't ask it as a challenge i ask it because i i wanna make up my own mind i am open to more laws believe it or not i just want you for the record i just want you to know that i hope it doesn't disappoint too many of you i am open to more laws i have to be convinced that they honor the second amendment and that they also are effective but if they do and i don't think the second amendment is completely elastic nobody does nobody thinks you're you can own a bazooka or or a surface to wear missile so obviously there are limitations but i wanna know what laws would if they had been emplaced would have stopped any of the school massacres that's what i want to.

yale wing yale university youtube prager principal
"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"I decided to attend yale because i an actor and i've always really liked politics and at yale they do both of and they've got a lot of people who've done very well in both i also get a kick out of being a conservative very lefty place you know yale produced buckley in the bushes and there's this kind of a much maligned conservative movement that keeps coming out of jail i actually didn't really apply to other colleges i applied early and then i started applications and a couple of other places i received an email i started my favorite application i got an email from the admissions office with typo in it they used a comma wrong so they didn't and i took that as a sign from god that i shouldn't go there i i pulled my application and my interviewer there told me that i was making the stupidest decision my life and yelled at me and everything but very glad i did it's really sad to see fall into total pit of despair right now but on this as a broader point to people who are going to college looking at colleges for themselves at their kids i highly recommend going to a leftwing school it will make you smarter it will make you know what you think it will make you think through what you think iron sharpens iron or whatever they say you know you really do want to be around very smart lefties you will have the intellectual advantage over them because you'll constantly have to defend your ideas and you will you will just figure yourself more figure out what it is you have a right throughout which ones are wrong disregard those and get a deeper education i really recommend it even though it's kinda counterintuitive from andy.

yale buckley andy
"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"I decided to attend yale because i an actor and i've always really liked politics and at yale they do both of and they've got a lot of people who've done very well in both i also get a kick out of being a conservative very lefty place you know yale produced buckley in the bushes and there's this kind of a much maligned conservative movement that keeps coming out of jail i actually didn't really apply to other colleges i applied early and then i started applications and a couple of other places i received an email i started my favorite application i got an email from the admissions office with typo in it they used a comma wrong so they didn't and i took that as a sign from god that i shouldn't go there i i pulled my application and my interviewer there told me that i was making the stupidest decision my life and yelled at me and everything but very glad i did it's really sad to see fall into total pit of despair right now but on this as a broader point to people who are going to college looking at colleges for themselves at their kids i highly recommend going to a leftwing school it will make you smarter it will make you know what you think it will make you think through what you think iron sharpens iron or whatever they say you know you really do want to be around very smart lefties you will have the intellectual advantage over them because you'll constantly have to defend your ideas and you will you will just figure yourself more figure out what it is you have a right throughout which ones are wrong disregard those and get a deeper education i really recommend it even though it's kinda counterintuitive from andy.

yale buckley andy
"yale" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WCTC

"The road in new haven at yale university yale played dartmouth like i said was last weekend and in football and they were celebrating the anniversary of the dartmouth yale football game which is always a big rivalry and they put on the program old programme covers the nature showed what it look like in forty fifty years ago and one of the programs was from the image of the program on the cover of the new programme was from 1944 and it showed a yield player setting fire to an american indians clothing i mean it was a cart is a cartoon image of because we were the dartmouth indians and the executive director of yale indigenous performing arts program you can't make this up called the images dehumanizing e l athletic director tom beckett acknowledged to the new haven register that the cover was offensive i'm offended by their fecklessness n wimpish nece that's what i i am so offended that now athletic directors' or whipped into this politically correct frenzy it's dehumanizing cartoon this is a cartoon this is all it isn't it from 1944 when what nn people then get so wound up about the indian name and by the way most indian chiefs as the washington post confirmed which confirmed my old poll of indian chiefs from back when i was at dartmouth that like eighty five percent of indians have no problem with the indian symbol actually think was nine out of ten i was nine out of ten will was 83 percent when i did it 1985 or whatever what i did the poll with the gallup bug gallup organisation so indians don't care it's liberal arenas on college campuses who care about the indian symbol they are so offended by the indian symbol but they're fine if i remember that you t story with those those young women university of texas walked around with those uh those you know male anatomy member they were they were protesting something at you t where they protesting can't remember what they're protesting but they walked around all day with their you know what i want to say the word but assists gross is disgusting what was it through they were protesting remember the gun laws because now you have the right to carry so they were all up and out of these expects toys they had a bunch of dealers said rodionov out anywhere that's what the.

yale university yale football dartmouth indians executive director tom beckett washington post rodionov director women university of texas eighty five percent forty fifty years 83 percent
"yale" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"yale" Discussed on WDRC

"To seventeen three one eight eight eight five seven four to seven to three thanks so much for joining us one thing i wanted also bring up of we start windings down here uh regarding uh uh you know the fall of western society as i see it i'm kind of being tongueincheek give it some of this stuff is just bizarre to read about this this broke late last week in it made a few of the mainstream sources but this is fries snubbing enshrining yale now we have a new word here i know we we we we we have we've had microaggressions macro aggressions we've had safe spaces we've had uh what's not will trigger triggers like what he said trigger mees undergone the corner and cry you know things like this ready for this now ain't write this number in this new one you'll have the quiz on this tomorrow the weren't is the password is d colonize cheer about this one ah this is a new one d column ice ual yale university new haven bulldogs bulldogs bowao ally yale he aol decolonized says the english department after complaints that studying white authors actively harms students a folks you can't here's the problem with this though and i'll get into the details in a minute when you do stuff like this and i don't care whether it has to do with race relations sexually shoes um issues of gender issues of nationality issues of disability when you put stuff like this forward that is so active and patently idiotic eight dole's perhaps the message of legitimate issues you may have it's like the nfl kneeling thing it's come to the point now where so much of it is focused on the kneeling and almost none of it is focused on okay it players now you have have our attention what are you going to do about fostering better understanding of what should be done meaner city janica.

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