35 Burst results for "Xerox"

Most Liberal Protestors Have Never Read the Roe or Casey Decision

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | Last week

Most Liberal Protestors Have Never Read the Roe or Casey Decision

"Most of the people today screaming outside most of the Democrats People like Murkowski and Collins Have actually never read the roe versus wade decision Or the Casey decision Most of the journalists haven't read either decision And on the spot analysis of the decision today was widespread and yet none of them had read today's decision When you read today's decisions the concurring opinions and the dissenting opinion they are about one inch thick of the average thickness of Xerox paper And well over a hundred pages or like a 125 or a 150 pages

Murkowski Collins Casey Xerox
More Corporate Ransomware Victims

Cyber Security Today

01:25 min | 1 year ago

More Corporate Ransomware Victims

"A canadian company that runs several medical clinics across the country may have been victimized by data theft the marchetto criminal marketplace one of the places where crooks sell stolen data is listing the company on its website. The company hasn't responded to my requests for comment. The website has posted copies of what it says is part of what was stolen as proof of the hack. A security researcher sent me one of the documents which looks like contact information between the healthcare chain and and alberta university as if the windows print spoiler vulnerability wasn't enough of a problem. Now there's news. Possibly millions of printers may by hp xerox and samsung have a printer driver vulnerability. That's been around for over fifteen years. Researchers at sentinel labs are urging it administrators and individuals with printers from these companies to make sure they have the latest printer drivers hp issued fixes in may. The report says three hundred and eighty hp and samsung printer models as well as at least a dozen xerox models are affected. The good news is researchers have seen no evidence yet that hackers know about and have exploited this problem to compromise computers

Alberta University Sentinel Labs Xerox HP Samsung
"xerox" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Hey everyone our guest. Today is ursula burns. Ursula is a business woman who most known for being e former ceo of xerox which she ran from two thousand nine to twenty sixteen when she took the top job at xerox decades. Working her way up at the company or stella became the first black woman ever to run a fortune. Five hundred company. She has also served on the board of some of the biggest companies in the world including uber. Exxon mobil and nestle her memoir. Where you are is not who you are is in stores now ursula. Thanks so much for joining us. Welcome to skimp from the couch. That you very much for having me Danielle and curly epi bigger. So you are a public leader your name that we grew up knowing and as we went on our own endeavor or somebody that we looked up to by. You're actually like a private person. And i'm curious what is a fun fact about you. You'd sound you found one. I am actually a very private person. I say this in the book in people who read it earlier in who were reading it now kind surprised by the fact that i'm an introvert and pretty much a loner in a very traditional sense of the word i kinda like silence. I like times that. I'm isolated in that sound so unusual. I have two children at crazy. Hours been newest How that fit into a life but it. It's i dunno. it's something. I've always thought about it but i like law.

america two today first day each week each one Garza i. Jen poo each the leading organizers storm
Interview With Ursula Burns, Former CEO, Xerox

Skimm'd from The Couch

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Ursula Burns, Former CEO, Xerox

"Hey everyone our guest. Today is ursula burns. Ursula is a business woman who most known for being e former ceo of xerox which she ran from two thousand nine to twenty sixteen when she took the top job at xerox decades. Working her way up at the company or stella became the first black woman ever to run a fortune. Five hundred company. She has also served on the board of some of the biggest companies in the world including uber. Exxon mobil and nestle her memoir. Where you are is not who you are is in stores now ursula. Thanks so much for joining us. Welcome to skimp from the couch. That you very much for having me Danielle and curly epi bigger. So you are a public leader your name that we grew up knowing and as we went on our own endeavor or somebody that we looked up to by. You're actually like a private person. And i'm curious what is a fun fact about you. You'd sound you found one. I am actually a very private person. I say this in the book in people who read it earlier in who were reading it now kind surprised by the fact that i'm an introvert and pretty much a loner in a very traditional sense of the word i kinda like silence. I like times that. I'm isolated in that sound so unusual. I have two children at crazy. Hours been newest How that fit into a life but it. It's i dunno. it's something. I've always thought about it but i like law.

Ursula Burns Xerox Ursula Exxon Mobil Stella Nestle Danielle
"xerox" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Ella seemed to be a real love or hate flick or more like a lukewarm dislike or confused enthusiasm based on reviews with titles like weird but i think i like it whatever the reaction the film seems to have been pretty far from what people were expecting mostly because it has almost nothing to do with the one hundred and one puppies that made guerrilla deville famous but sixty years before this any chaotic punk tinged origin story the world got its first film adaptation of dodie. Smith's nineteen fifty six children's novel the hundred and one donations and despite being positively obsessed with the movie as a toddler. I never knew that the canine cartoon marked a crucial turning points in the history of animation. And one which disney may not have ever made it to the other side of had. The movie not worked out. One hundred and one donations marked walt disney animation studios twenty second full length feature animation having been preceded by classics like snow white. Pinocchio fantasia and peter pan. It began development in the late fifties following the box office bomb of sleeping beauty which took six million dollars to make but only earned back five million sleeping. Beauty used the dominant animation technique of the time that required artists to hand trace drawings on transparent celluloid or sell sheets according to smithsonian magazine reported on this moment in animation history. Disney movies usually have one to two dozen cells per second so in total sleeping. Beauty had almost one million cells. That's one million drawings done and traced by hand a ton of work for a movie that ended up costing the studio a million dollars. And here's more on how animation worked back then quoting the smithsonian artists. I drew concept art to create a character. They sketched characters on animation paper or cheap newsprint and then assistance cleaned up the sketches. Making sure they were uniform. Consistency was key for characters as assistance had to follow every detail of a sketch down to the buttons on a jacket. Once the drawings were ready they moved to the inkers. The sketches on the front side of shiny sell sheets after drying the cell was then turned over for painters to paint the characters within those lines to get them as opaque possible. The line work grew even more complicated. Different colors weights. Thicknesses were vital forgiving animated characters. The realistic qualities viewers expected the color of the paint also demanded extreme attention. Disney mixed its own paints making their animations unlike any other in fact women in the ink and paint department took refuge from their compaq's applied to snow white's cheeks to give her a natural look in the nineteen thirty seven film and quotes unsurprisingly. The artists that disney animation studios were scrupulous in innovative but after the financial failure of sleeping beauty. There was serious discussion about closing up shop. By this time disney was making live action films and had opened the theme parks so he didn't have to keep doing animation..

five million six million dollars Disney Smith a million dollars first film twenty second disney late fifties hundred and one donations Ella One hundred and one donations one million drawings two dozen cells per second one hundred and one puppies nineteen thirty seven film sixty years before a ton of work one million cells nineteen fifty six children
"xerox" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"The new one hundred and one dull nations villain origin story crew ella seemed to be a real love or hate flick or more like a lukewarm dislike or confused enthusiasm based on reviews with titles like weird but i think i like it whatever the reaction the film seems to have been pretty far from what people were expecting mostly because it has almost nothing to do with the one hundred and one puppies that made guerrilla deville famous but sixty years before this any chaotic punk tinged origin story the world got its first film adaptation of dodie. Smith's nineteen fifty six children's novel the hundred and one donations and despite being positively obsessed with the movie as a toddler. I never knew that the canine cartoon marked a crucial turning points in the history of animation. And one which disney may not have ever made it to the other side of had. The movie not worked out. One hundred and one donations marked walt disney animation studios twenty second full length feature animation having been preceded by classics like snow white. Pinocchio fantasia and peter pan. It began development in the late fifties following the box office bomb of sleeping beauty which took six million dollars to make but only earned back five million sleeping. Beauty used the dominant animation technique of the time that required artists to hand trace drawings on transparent celluloid or sell sheets according to smithsonian magazine reported on this moment in animation history. Disney movies usually have one to two dozen cells per second so in total sleeping. Beauty had almost one million cells. That's one million drawings done and traced by hand a ton of work for a movie that ended up costing the studio a million dollars.

today first time Credit karm dot com credit karma karma dot
How Xerox & Some Dalmatians Saved Disney

Kottke Ride Home

01:50 min | 1 year ago

How Xerox & Some Dalmatians Saved Disney

"The new one hundred and one dull nations villain origin story crew ella seemed to be a real love or hate flick or more like a lukewarm dislike or confused enthusiasm based on reviews with titles like weird but i think i like it whatever the reaction the film seems to have been pretty far from what people were expecting mostly because it has almost nothing to do with the one hundred and one puppies that made guerrilla deville famous but sixty years before this any chaotic punk tinged origin story the world got its first film adaptation of dodie. Smith's nineteen fifty six children's novel the hundred and one donations and despite being positively obsessed with the movie as a toddler. I never knew that the canine cartoon marked a crucial turning points in the history of animation. And one which disney may not have ever made it to the other side of had. The movie not worked out. One hundred and one donations marked walt disney animation studios twenty second full length feature animation having been preceded by classics like snow white. Pinocchio fantasia and peter pan. It began development in the late fifties following the box office bomb of sleeping beauty which took six million dollars to make but only earned back five million sleeping. Beauty used the dominant animation technique of the time that required artists to hand trace drawings on transparent celluloid or sell sheets according to smithsonian magazine reported on this moment in animation history. Disney movies usually have one to two dozen cells per second so in total sleeping. Beauty had almost one million cells. That's one million drawings done and traced by hand a ton of work for a movie that ended up costing the studio a million dollars.

Dodie Walt Disney Animation Studios Ella Pinocchio Fantasia Disney Smith Peter Pan Smithsonian Magazine
"xerox" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"xerox" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Here & Now

"Requested access not to mention his release and this regime has yet to even reply to the request right michigan. Us representative and eleven has been working with the state department to get information and to get daniel released. What more do you want to see the. Us government do well. We know that this is being worked on at the highest levels. The government has our full support. We have full confidence in them. But we really just want to. We need to create the sense of urgency. So we're looking for public statements from our elected officials. We think that is going to go a long way and penetrating this regime. That seems to be very insulated. Only receiving information but they're incredibly slow to move. the information. danny has not done anything wrong. He was doing his job. His papers were legit has employment was legit where he's working frontier myanmar Only one of a handful of independently run publications. They are operating on a working visa. There's no issue there so we just we really want some answers. We want to make sure he's okay. We haven't talked to him. How long has your have been working in. Myanmar danny has been in myanmar since may third twenty nineteen which ironically was world press freedom day so he has been there just over two years. Let's talk a little bit more about your brother's job. The foreign correspondents club of thailand has estimated that more than seventy journalists have been detained in myanmar since february. Do you think that his work with this. Publication is why he is being detained. We only have our in suctions unfortunately it may be. This is a country that wants to Put a cloak over the truth. They don't want the world to know what is happening there. He is a journalist in country. Were the government and quotes wants to control a narrative. This is somebody who is at a desk. As an editor and making sure english translations were coherent inaccurate he was not inciting any violence. He was not on the grounded any protests he was not using his personal voice to express opinion. He was reporting the news. You and your family are basically working day in and day out to get answers and to try to find out what has happened to daniel just this week. Another american journalist who is being detained. There was released nathan maung Does his release give you hope for. Daniel's release soon while we were so happy to hear about nathan and we're just thrilled for him and his family cannot imagine what they have gone through Yeah it certainly gives us hope. But it's hard you know we're hopeful but we're preparing for a long haul. We hope it doesn't come to that because again. We don't know what these people are thinking. What their protocol is what their plan is. So it's we're we're cautiously optimistic.

danny nathan daniel february Daniel nathan maung over two years more than seventy journalists may third twenty nineteen this week michigan english Myanmar one thailand american press freedom day myanmar eleven
"xerox" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Here & Now

"Time. Simple ursula burns. His memoir is where you are is not who you are or thank you so much for this conversation. Thank you so much for having and to read an excerpt of versus burns book. Go to here now. Dot org An internal investigation found that a cop with the california highway patrol sexually harassed twenty one women but those findings were kept secret until a new state. Transparency law passed. We dug through hours of tapes to find out what happens to officers who crossed the line. Listen to on our watch a podcast from npr and kick u. e. d. We've spoken here before with people whose loved ones died because they were diabetic and rationing their insulin when it got too expensive they've been protests outside big pharma offices over the rising cost of this lifesaving drug and last week mississippi attorney general lynn fitch announced a first of its kind lawsuit against drugmakers and pharmaceutical executives. Alleging a widespread conspiracy to inflate the price of insulin to win placement on formularies. Those of the lists of medicines for which insurance is provided. Let's get a quick primer from ed silverman with our partners at stat the health and medicine publication and ed There was another lawsuit filed by county in taxes. This is the first forcing drugmakers and pharmacy benefit managers to defend themselves together. So what is a pharmacy benefit manager. And how does that fit in this so the pharmacy. Benefit manager will negotiate with the drug manufacturer for that formula replacement in that 'gate-keeping role. They hold a lot of power on decision. Making that affects every single person covered by whichever health plans they contract with. Wow so is there. We hear the word rebate thrown around. How does that fit in well to get the best placement possible. On a formula rate. The drug manufacturers will pay rebates sometimes called discounts but rebates to the pharmacy benefit managers for that favored placement. And we know there are three big insolent makers in this country so they are competing for formula replacement and again to get the best placement the pay rebate to the p. b. m. the. Pm's intern say that they pass on those rebates are almost all of them minus a small fee. They'll pass on almost everything to the health plans. Meanwhile the rebate those up each year because the competition is continually very intense well. Mississippi's attorney general. Lynn fitch says that the price of insulin has gone up over thousand percent. In the last decade i'm presuming. It's because of this. Inching up system of rebates that you talk about how manufacturers and the pharmaceutical companies defending this relationship they have all the manufacturers the drugmakers say they have to keep raising their wholesale or list prices each year to cover the increase rebates each year and in fact some drug makers have now released annual reports showing how in general the rebates are eating into their revenues more and more so they're net prices are falling but for consumers who pay at the pharmacy counter and don't have insurance. They're paying more because the way. Our system works their price at the pharmacy counter. Their out of pocket costs tied directly to the list price. So if the list price goes up to cover higher rebates that are paid the p. Vm's insured pay more out of pocket for those who are insured. They're still paying more. Because the health plans are comparably increasing. Their prices boy. We'll have you back again. Is this place out.

Lynn fitch last week each year percent twenty one women lynn fitch california last decade Mississippi three big insolent makers mississippi Dot org hours of tapes over thousand Transparency law single person first kick npr attorney general
G7 Finance Ministers to Meet in London

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:46 min | 1 year ago

G7 Finance Ministers to Meet in London

"Ministers from the g seven group of nations. Meet in person here in london. Later and britain's chancellor has ambitions to forge a joint path on one of the thorniest economic issues of all time business taxation. His plans for proposed a proposal earlier this week by the us to introduce global minimum corporation tax rate of fifteen percent while to assess what nations will want from plan and whether she soon equil- convince all of the g seven ministers to agree. I'm joined by rob cox global editor reuters breaking news breaking views and he joins us on the line from our xerox. Judy ever good morning to europe. Good morning how are you very well. Thank you good to have you with us on the globalist. This is the first meeting for some time. All these ministers isn't it not lethal logistical reasons. Yon i mean it is. I think their first face-to-face meeting of jesus just g seven finance ministers since the since the pandemic began so quite significant. They'll get to look each other in the eye and try to get to some consensus on what has been one of the thorniest as you pointed out issues among rich countries for for decade. Doing know what that plan is what the idea is at the moment. Well there is. There are various plans out there. But the main idea is the one being pulled together has been pulled together for for years now by the oecd. It involves something like one hundred and thirty seven countries and the idea is to basically come up with with a minimum corporate tax rate. The administration has well yellen. Ah janet yellen the treasury sectors ford fifteen percent joe conto seems to be holding out the idea that could be higher if we don't get my way i think he put forward originally twenty one percent That seems to be in line with what you're hearing from the uk from other members of the g. seven italy

G Seven Group Of Nations Rob Cox Britain Xerox Reuters Judy London Europe Yellen Janet Yellen United States Joe Conto Oecd Treasury Ford UK Italy
Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

"Rare for a scientific paper to fetch much on the black market. These days but i got the kisco was no ordinary psychiatrist. This is a book that has been made into many editions by cycads clinics. But if you go to latin america mimeograph versions are xerox versions on the market access for three hundred dollars like market for this book brazilians particularly loved so that in defiance of the even the the sim and that monograph he's talking about is currently selling for seven hundred to nine hundred dollars on amazon. It was an issue of the psychiatric clinics of north america. That gop guest edited in nineteen ninety nine and a paper that he wrote in that issue became one of his most influential and controversial in it he laid out a spectrum of bipolar disorders from the most manic psychotic extreme that schizo affective disorder two cases of bipolar that are only unleashed by substance abuse antidepressants or brain atrophy from dementia. Excuse me affective bipolar psychotic less than skis. Affective psychotic bipolar one bipolar to. There's something we call the half because there are psychosomatic less type. Which is medication associated Type for which is hyperthermic with depression. Because they people looking at the press is for the half which is substance used as five. Which is the knicks states. There's a pipe. Six which is in the context of dementia all but two of those categories have actually been absorbed into the dsm which now includes bipolar one disorder bipolar two disorder psychopathic disorder which views as the temperamental underpinning of borderline personality disorder and calls in his list bipolar two and a half when it occurs with the longer depressions of bipolar to then what about his bipolar three well antidepressant. Induced mania is now categorized as bipolar disorder in dsm five largely based on the research of gop and others who showed that over ninety percent of patients with antidepressant induce mania. Go on to develop full bipolar disorder with long term. Follow up a switching on the presence indicate by piloting. Now finally this and five is going to accept that then. He had bipolar four. That's hyperthermic the real charismatic. Hypo manic type temperament with depression. Okay this one didn't make it into the dsm actually and bipolar four and a half substance induced by polar disorder which is now categorized in the bipolar chapter india. Sem bipolar five depression with mixed features which was recognized for the first time in. Dsm five bipolar. Six mania in the context of dementia got believed that the brain atrophy of dementia could unleash a latent bipolar disorder in people with genetic or other risks for bipolar. But this category is not recognized in. Dsm unless you count as bipolar due to a general medical condition and yet you can hear in that court. That hookup is not satisfied. He's looking for a fight. He says his conceptualization was done in defiance of dsm that in defiance of the even the newly sm was a passionate man wore his heart on his sleeve. I am not very much of a political individual. Actually shy individual. Relatively speaking intellectuals tend to be. Yes oh you did do poetry and art. I saw on your cv you you. You were a poet and artist. Right of. I would say a young man. Everybody lies poetry. But some you fall in love with my wife. I always thought that way because When we were college students she said to me you one of those people who can bring science and art together and she said that's the ultimate aim of all our knowledge and i think that She she really saw something in me that time and predicted that my career would rise in methodic way bob Would only seventeen in college.

Bipolar Dementia Affective Psychotic Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Disorder Psychopathic Disorder GOP Depression Xerox Latin America North America Knicks Amazon Latent Bipolar Disorder Mania India Bob Would
"xerox" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on WTVN

"That's the rumor that I just made up marshal like But have you guys know nobody's having a holiday office parties? You know, clearly because of the corona situation this year, But, um, did you mean is that something that's still you guys do over there did Or is that like, kind of gone by the wayside? You know, Interestingly enough, it was. I don't know how many years ago now, but they say they moved it away from the holidays because this is a well Okay this year, maybe not as crazy as in most years. It's a little more subdued this year. But for a lot of you know, the holiday season. It's one party after another, and you got to go here and you go in there. You're trying to catch up to family or doing all these things, so they moved to the company Holiday party into January. So that it wasn't quite as surrounded by, you know the insanity of the holidays and more folks were able to just say, Ah, Let's take a Saturday evening and go so it was actually nice when they moved it into January, and they do entertainment. They do the whole thing. It's very fun, and they don't allow Xerox machines right Because of all the shenanigans. I could go on, right. I believe that's why would you take all of the fun out of it? You're one of us have something all right. Well, how about the White Christmas? Can we have that? I think we can probably do that for you this year. It's looking better and better for that. Usually we have about a one in four chance of white Christmas every year. So 25% chance. This is our year. Looks like it's.

Xerox
Google is facing the biggest antitrust case in a generation

The Daily Dive

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Google is facing the biggest antitrust case in a generation

"The Justice Department announced that they filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing them of monopolizing the online search and search advertising markets. It's no secret that Google is a major player in these areas. The Justice Department is alleging that about 80% of American search queries go through Google. Also, it's chrome browser controls about 70% of the global online browser market. 85% of smartphones globally run its Android operating system. This is just a first step in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle for moron with the DOJ is alleging, and what it could mean for consumers will speak to Kyle Daily Technology editor at Axios, this pretty indisputable stuff, right? I mean, when you think of search you think of Google. I mean, there is myself being there's some other alternatives, but you know they're pretty. Finley used. The DOJ points out in the suit that Google controls about 88% of what it called General search, which is, you know In the open Web, searching Google maps searching for general information That's not like, Hey, I'm on Amazon and I want to search this closed platform specific product. And the challenge with bringing antitrust cases against the big tech companies. Is that a lot of them like Google, now free to use there isn't really clear, clean, observable consumer harm where it's like prices went up. Because of your monopoly. That's bad. We're gonna crack down on you. You know there are no prices for the consumer, so they have to sort of do two things here. One is define a market that's being monopolized which can be kind of challenging itself. So you know what you first have to do is establish. Okay, Here's something where Google Clearly has the monopoly and that is, as you say, online search and then be causing harm. So what DOJ is saying the harm is is really to competition, or sort of would be competition that Google has used its position and that it uses agreements that it makes With Apple with wireless carriers with Samsung and other companies that actually makes phones at one android toe lock it in as the default search engine on your smarts on are sort of core your carrier around your Web browser, and then it uses that to achieve this market dominance and shore up its market dominance, And then that sort of this self fueling thing, where the more ubiquitous Google is, the better it's product become. Is because it can feed the engine with more data, and it just sort of breaks away from the competition is definitely there. You know, you think of things like Kleenex or Xerox. You know those air the brand names or whatever the things that they kind of represent, now, you don't Here. Somebody said, Hey, go being that people say go Google that I mean, it's a product that we know and everybody uses all the time. What is Google say in response to all of this Because I was just reading some of it. You know, they said, Well, our product is just so good that That's why people like to use it and they have the other options and they just don't Yeah. I mean, that's why this is such an interesting case. And that's why, you know, we kind of expected continue seeing antitrust cases possibly brought against some of these big tech companies, particularly Facebook, but also Amazon, possibly Apple that there's a high likelihood that regardless of which party is in power We're going to keep seeing this. So they say exactly what you said. In response. They say they put in use the word monopoly, but they sort of copped to monopolize the market. But they say that's just because we're that good. You know, the other options are out there. You are free as a consumer to choose them. You're free to change the default on your phones so that its searching being more Google or doctor go. You do the same thing on your browser. People stick with us. This is Google talking because We just have the best search engine and we're not deliberately taking any action to prevent competition. And they say he's the same arrangements that they make with Apple to be the default in safari. They say. You know, the other guys are totally free to do that. And if they had a better product, and maybe they would have more more. These agreements like we have

Google DOJ Apple Justice Department Amazon Finley Samsung Kyle Daily Technology Axios Editor Facebook Kleenex Xerox
"xerox" Discussed on Company of One with Dale Callahan

Company of One with Dale Callahan

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"xerox" Discussed on Company of One with Dale Callahan

"And and by the way, that's that's the way it always is you're always growing. You know, when I say take action to you and T. Once you start selling something some people, you know, there's the person that calls me and then appointed because they only made $8 last month and well this is not even worth my time. They don't you know, you gotta start somewhere then there's the other person who calls me and they made $8 last month and their life. Somebody actually bought something I made this is awesome, you know, and so it's it clicks something so I know a guy like that and he he got an order and thought that was it he was off and running that was the only encouragement he needed to build his business and now he's got a big giant business. So you just that's how things work, right? You're starts slow walk out there and do something. One of the things that that stuck with me from one of your classes and if you could just talk about just for a little while is I think your home schooling product you had mentioned during one of your classes when you first started it wasn't like a fancy booklet. I think it was just, you know more of a it didn't have like a polished look to it would just create a product in you know, people were buying the product not the the glossy image or they didn't have to spend a lot of money creating like a booklet wage. I think maybe you Xerox the page is on your first product if I remember correctly and I think people sometimes think they have to have are competing with some kind of, you know, a deal of some kind of um, you know product that's finely-tuned or finally made when they first start off doing, you know, like informational birth. X yes, well, yeah, I can do better. Let me let me show you. We actually have a post. It may have been a podcast episode that we did this. I am not sure I am sharing the spring..

Xerox
The Birth Of The Greenback

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:56 min | 1 year ago

The Birth Of The Greenback

"Stacey next. Jacob Feldstein. Planet money author of money the true story of amid up during a new book. Say I. brought props for us to do the indicator. I say. That's been months. It's been. That guy's been honking hall eight months. I have props came over so I could give you these troughs. Okay. Go ahead and look at them. All right. Okay. So, this is like a really high quality xerox of an old piece of money. THREE DOLLAR BILL RE dollar bill that's really a real thing. There's like a a lady standing next to in like a ball gown standing next to a cow to I chose a cow to pander to you I do love a cow keep going. Okay. The Orange Bank It's orange because this from the orange. Bank and this is a one dollar bill. So Stacey, these are reproductions of real paper money that was printed by private banks in the United States in the eighteen forties and fifties. This is one of the most interesting periods I found in the history of money when I was working on my book, it's this moment when the United States government did not print money, there was in fact, no single national paper currency but if you wanted to. Open Up Stacey's Bank of New York and print your own paper money. You could. I don't know if I would trust that dollar from that. Was a real problem that was a real problem we'll get to that. I. Mean they were just so many different kinds of money at one point the Chicago Tribune counted eight, thousand, three, hundred, and seventy different kinds of paper money in America. This sounds very confusing for everyone involved this indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and Jacob. Goldstein can we make eight, thousand, three, hundred and seventy, the indicator? Yes. Today on the show. How can you even have that many kinds of money and also just what does it tell us about money works? Let's just go. Let's just go a block away to get away from the horn. Yeah. Support for NPR and the following message come from fund. fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building you a portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So can we should set the scene here Jacob the nineteenth century America lots of is apparently also this was the era when gold and silver were money and Jacob say in the book that the government minted gold and silver coins, but it did not make paper money at that time. The exactly right. So the only paper money in America was printed by all of these different. Private banks people called paper money in fact banknotes, right. So they thought of it as like a piece of paper from a bank and they thought of paper money in particular as like a receipt or a coach ticket as as a thing that you could substitute for gold and silver, and in fact, if you look at at the bills I gave you all have this kind of. Writing like just grab a different one for fun. So we can say what it looks like. Okay. This is the stoning ten bank, a two dollar bill. There's a way. Moby Dick or something Wail Bell we've cow Bill Wail Bill So okay. So now look at the cursive writing see the cursive they're just blowers is stoning to. Two dollars to the bear on demand right and if you look all these different bills are different colors, they have different pictures on them, but they all say that will pay how ever many dollars to the on demand and so the second interest. Yeah it's an Iou because the interesting thing is it's telling you the paper money is not the real money. Right? They're saying we will give you two dollars in gold and silver for this paper money right? So the real money in this world is the underlying gold or silver the paper is just like. The Standard. So this is a time in history when there's not federal bank, there's not a national bank. There's like thousands of of little local banks and I guess all these banks can issue their own money. That's right and it's kind of evolving in this period at the beginning of this ehre the eighteen thirties. If you wanted to open a bank, typically you had to go to your state legislature and get special approval. Basically, they had to pass a special law that would let you open your bank and this was problematic because I was super corrupt essentially. Bank and print money. Then you're gonNA bribe whoever you have to. Say all the knee. All due respect to get them to let you open your bank. Right. So around eighteen forty, a little earlier, this new idea became popular. The new idea was called free banking. And the idea of free banking was anybody who is willing to follow a few basic rules could. Take and start printing money and literally start printing money and you know not surprisingly a lot of people wanted to print money. This is how we get eight thousand different kinds of money. Yes. How do you know if the bill that someone's handing you is real money or if it's literally just a piece of paper from the First Bank of Stacey Vanik Smith which might be real money. I wouldn't. Maybe. Add bribed senator so I love this so there arose in response to this problem these special periodicals Magazines that were privately published called banknote reporters. And what they were was these lists in tiny font of every kind of money. So I actually have a reproduction here another prop from a page. This one was called. Thomson's Bank note. Reporter. K.. So the people who subscribe to this merchants people who need to accept money. So so let's just say I'm running a bar and I got my thompsons bank note reporter and I come in I need a drink who thirsty I'm thirsty. So okay. So the page of the bank note reporter I printed out is for Orange Bank. Okay. Okay. So have that bill right here it is and it's a one dollar bill. So I find Orange Bank here in my Bengal reporter and it says Okay Orange Bank listed different bills and says ones and under wants it describes what the bill is supposed to look like says to horses check. Hey, Cart Jack Blacksmith shop male portrait Jack Girl. Check. So it's at least plausibly real. The reporter also tells me something else that's important and that explains a lot about how many works at this time. Typically would tell me whether I should accept that paper money at full face vowed I can buy my dollar whiskey with this whether you can get your dollar whiskey because remember what we care about is whether I can turn in that paper money for gold or silver, and so if the bank is shaky or even if it's just really far away. You know the reporter might say, just knock five cents off the dollar give Stacey Ninety five cents worth of whiskey instead of a dollar that took a really long time to buy that we ski. It does seem like it would have been absurdly inconvenient right and for a long time when people look back at this period, the basic story of free banking was just that was a horrible idea like that many kinds of money right but. Much, later, like in the nineteen seventies. This generation of economic historians started going back and looking more closely. At the banks and how money works in this period and what they saw when they really went through the numbers was basically like it wasn't that bad Bankston go bus that often people didn't usually lose much money when they used. We're you overall they would lose like a few percent which is. Kind of like what you pay today. So when you take money out of the weird off Brand ATM at. The corner store. which I always do. Yeah, I. Mean. That's basically like the the bartenders giving you ninety cents for your dollar when you do that, right? So. Obviously, we do not have eight thousand different kinds of money now this ended and it ended after the civil war. Yeah was the civil war. So during the civil war, that old American argument of can we have national banks or not came up again and Congress passed a few important banking laws. One of them basically taxed all those thousands of kind of state banknotes out of existence, and then the other one created these new national banks that printed much more reliable, much more uniform paper money. It's interesting because I mean, this was obviously after the civil war was the time when the United States went from like a collection of. To One Country, and it seems like the same thing happened with currency maybe not a coincidence. Your I mean, there is this idea at least in the modern world money is part of what makes a country a country and I think you do see that happening at this moment in the united. States when we go from thousands of kinds of money toward one uniform kind of paper money I'm just sad we lost the cow bills. Because you know Jacob I have a fever and the cure. This story in like a whole bunch of other like believable stories like this are in your new book money. The true story of a made up thing. This episode of the indicator was produced by Nick. Fountain fact check by Britney Cronin, the indicators edited by Patty hearst and is a production

Stacey Vanik Smith Jacob Feldstein Reporter Orange Bank Bank Of New York United States Okay Orange Bank America NPR Federal Bank Bill Wail Bill Microsoft First Bank Thompsons Bank Chicago Tribune Congress
Amazon to Buy Zoox, in a Move Toward Self-Driving Cars

Rush Limbaugh

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Amazon to Buy Zoox, in a Move Toward Self-Driving Cars

"Amazon is buying an autonomous driving company Amazon is buying self driving technology companies Xerox the deal is estimated to be worth more than a billion dollars those soups is working on self driving ride vehicles there's speculation the technology could help Amazon with its delivery service to in a joint statement the companies say Zuk started in two thousand fourteen with a vision of zero emissions vehicles designed for autonomous ride hailing and says it'll continue as a standalone business with Xerox executives running

Amazon Xerox ZUK
Sunny Skies Continue; Weekend Rain Approaching Chicago

Steve Cochran

00:59 min | 2 years ago

Sunny Skies Continue; Weekend Rain Approaching Chicago

"Somers common the a first official day of of summer summer I I guess guess will will be be Saturday Saturday right right that's that's that's that's the the longest longest day day summer summer solstice solstice four four forty forty four four PM PM on on Saturday Saturday and and still still gonna gonna feel feel like like summer Saturday although probably some rain moving in here for the weekend until then nope we've got what we used to call a carbon copy of yesterday's weather in the weather the day before only we've updated that let's see's not Xerox copy what are you calling it see a cut and paste cut and paste weather today yeah there you go it's gonna look a lot like yesterday and feel a lot like yesterday but a little bit warmer high near eighty nine mid to upper seventies today by the lake front clear skies tonight low down to sixty six in the tomorrow mostly sunny a twenty percent chance of afternoon showers and thunderstorms high near ninety two that continues into Saturday and Sunday and into Monday as well right now in Chicago some sunshine and here at sixty six degrees there sixty six admin way and sixty eight along the lakefront

Somers Chicago Official Xerox
"xerox" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Good morning Bob Xerox human alarm clock at seven oh nine good to be with you on this Thursday may twenty eight I'm a by you of that and my hair has really exploded now to the point where it's completely out of control it's perfect for radio that I guess you're gonna be able to get your hair cut pretty soon huh I have an appointment Tuesday they have yep boy oh boy now the city they'll please going to another state well no I live in they're busy they're busy yeah France will man has a good story today the sun times just sort of a round up of what's going to be open and she quotes Trish they would vice president and general counsel of the Illinois retail merchants association talking about salon safety being paramount because clients won't come back if they feel at risk she said the emphasis on wearing face masks is good that will be required for everyone but also not allowing services where you have to take that face mask off barber's won't be able to do beard trims mustache trims make up artist won't be able to do a whole face of make up the be able to do lashes something that doesn't interfere with the mask so you're not going to he completely cleaned up I guess I thought aren't aren't your eyes somewhat vulnerable to is yelling of entry for the virus absolutely so you would think with tears and everything else this VP of the merchants association said it was a tough conversation to have because it's all a challenge for the salon owners financially to not be able to offer all the services that they like but what was more important to them was that not only do people who work in the salons feel safe with that the clients feel safe as well so they were willing to give on certain things and they have recommended that when you're shampooing you have access to a face shield or goggles because you're in such close contact with the person's face the person giving you the the shampoo that day when you did your wife's shampoo did you wear the protective gear I know that that was that was coloring and now I'm who were quarantined together cell yeah you're right I'm thinking when I go back to get my hair cut and I might I might wear safety goggles and a mask do you think that would be weird yes he will be deeply while back Steve you did a great job yeah he looks good yeah yeah yeah no no maybe like a couple back properly there are and what about what about beards and mustaches and what about them merry what about not having access to your entire face for cosmetics well yeah I mean that's a problem not that I have somebody do my make up on a daily basis or anything like that but you know at least they could do eyebrow weavings that's involved with it at all people with the eyebrow problems you can delve into those but it's gonna be interesting yeah and the beer is needed the most they are looking nasty my sons both of them have these bushy beards now might do something Neil notes their wives they that way they like on I'm like I'm a mom I don't like them I don't count looks good and some people we have to check on maybe Steve grew sandwich has some information on the news about this because as you know I every weekend for a long time now than flying down to Tijuana for cosmetic surgery will touch up got to find out if I can still do that I have pride makes of unity and resilience strength and determination in the past few months we've seen pride echoed in our communities like never before from singing songs to banging pots and pans for essential workers are displaying uplifting messages and decorations in our windows in our lives just a few examples of how we've come together to support one another while staying apart and we.

Bob Xerox
WhatsApp Pay to Launch in India

Why It Matters

11:04 min | 2 years ago

WhatsApp Pay to Launch in India

"India a potentially decisive moment in digital freedom is going down right now. India's ruling party has put forward new rules that would allow it to trace and censor private communication. Standing in. Its way is what's up. An American made encrypted Messaging Platform. That's used by hundreds of millions of Indians and the outcome could have ripple effects across the globe. I'm Gabrielle Sierra. And this is why it matters today. India's government versus what's up and the looming threat of digital authoritarianism. India is the world's largest democracy if you can imagine nine hundred. Million PEOPLE VOTED. Alas national election last year out of a population of one point. Three billion people. It's just it's it's a massive exercise election. Yeah it's huge it's populace and that's what also makes it really fun and exciting to be on the ground. You certainly feel the energy especially in the city like Mumbai. Politicians routinely insult each other on the campaign trail criminals of every flavor. Run for office and win so do Bollywood movie. Stars Cricket Stars it just never ends has always been a fairly Jackie democracy. We talk a lot. We argue a lot that our culture. Okay so help me understand why. What's APP is such a big deal in India? How many people are actually using it? They're awfully four hundred million people. It is indeed this is Chinmaya ruined. She's a resident fellow at Yale. University and the founder of a research center at National Law University Delhi. She's also a leading legal expert on the intersection between freedom of speech and technology. And so why WHATSAPP wine? Not you know instagram or snapchat. The elite platforms are used by everyone. But what's happened? The one that really appeals to people if you have a phone that's not too fancy. If you don't speak English you don't read or you don't have access to inexpensive data connection. You can still use. What's APP so it started with? Hey you don't have to spend one rupee or two rupees per tax. You just save them up and then they send whenever you're in Wifi and saw a lot of people with not lot of money. Which is many many Indians decided that this works for them. And then what's up had these multimedia features which people started using it started liking and? I have mixed feelings about this because the good thing is that I get to talk to my grandma. And she finally has forgiven me for moving across cushy can look at my home and you know say things about my plants or whatever course but if you're sitting in an Indian airport and watching the number of people who do video calls subject you to their conversations mixed feelings what's up is really a messaging platform and that can be one messages like me sending a message to you. But it's also very commonly used in India for groups. I am do oil and I am a technology reporter for the New York Times based in Mumbai. India vindaloo also covers Indian economics and culture and has written extensively about free speech and misinformation under India's ruling party. We called him at his home in Mumbai on. What's up what's has become so embedded in life in India that people use it in their business transactions so you can order groceries from your corner grocery store over what's APP. I buy airline ticket from make trip. Which is one of the big online travel agencies? They send me a confirmation message on what's up with by e ticket details so for those of US based outside of India handling a basic transaction may require a few different platforms. You find out about a concert on instagram. Rsvp FOR IT ON FACEBOOK. Maybe share the notification on twitter buyer ticket on ticketmaster and received the confirmation on g mail but for Indians. What's APP is often the one stop shop for everything? In other words an application from Silicon Valley has become basic infrastructure for the second most populous nation honors. That's a pretty big deal and it helps. Illuminate why the government is pushing for greater control. What's up was founded in two thousand nine by two former employees of Yahoo? It's an American company. It was founded in Silicon Valley and they basically built a very simple messaging service became very popular. It caught the attention of Mark Zuckerberg the chief executive and founder of Facebook Zuckerberg beside it in two thousand fourteen to by what's APP and pay the still stock price of twenty two billion dollars for this message company so facebook is making a mobile push with steal the buy real time messaging service. What's APP? It's still a pretty incredible price to pay for a company that stress a few years old. It also makes tiny what's APP more valuable than some of the most established companies in the country including American Airlines Marriott hotels and Xerox and it came at a crucial moment for facebook when it really was trying to find ways to diversify its revenue base and also get in touch with more mobile users. I'm Seema mody global markets correspondent with CNBC business news and suddenly came this messaging platform. That was not only gaining prominence here in the US but around the world in fact I believe the average daily use a rate on WHATSAPP was much higher than Facebook Messenger. Facebook saw that and said this is such a strategic bet for us. Let's acquire it and find a way to really incorporated into our user base platform. But what's APP is free right. What's APP is free? And I think this is still a developing story to see how facebook is really trying to incorporate what's up into its business and you know will you one day see ads on what's that that's certainly been one of the big questions sucker. Berg was pressure in that. This technology of very simple messaging APP was going to become very popular today. Whatsapp has more than two billion users. Around the world it is by far the most popular messaging APP in the world and one of its biggest claims to fame. Is it emphasizes privacy. All messages on the service use. Something called end to end encryption. Okay so in most cases when you send an email or a text message it gets encrypted that means that the information inside is locked up in a code so that outsiders can't read it however the service providers that pass your message along can read it whether that's apple or G. Mail or facebook whoever they all have the keys to that code and that makes your message vulnerable enter end to end encryption with this technology none of the men have the keys. Only you and the person you're sending it to break the code. What's up can't read. Even if the government came knocking at the door of what's up what's up. What have nothing really to give up. And so your information is private and that makes it unique to other services messaging services like whether you're sending a text message or even facebook Messenger where that information does live somewhere. Yeah most other. Messaging Services in the world are not and encrypted and certainly none of the popular ones. But what's up has made it really easy. You don't think about corruption it just is encrypted Because so much of India's communication happens on WHATSAPP end to end. Encryption has made it very difficult for the government to investigate messages in the name of national security. People are not making phone calls anymore. They're not even walking over to their neighbor. Say This texting and where the speech there is harmful speech. It's not news that social media can bring out the worst in people the platforms. We use everyday are teeming with sexism. Racism misinformation and violent ideologies. It's the same. In India or social media has amplified problems that are a lot older than the internet rumors and lies spread like wildfire across the Internet including across chat and applications. Like WHATSAPP Many I. I'm used US India or live. Whatever comes in the woods his true the one that's really made the headlines is there was a lot of fishers. He'd speed circulating on what's APP so for example. The Muslim community is under quite a lot of pressure in India. Right now and it's really sad one of the ways in which they're discriminated against is that some upper caste. Hindus don't eat beef and so the rumors circulating on what's apple say things like X. has beef in his fridge are why is transporting COW CARCASS. And since it's already been sold to people as it stretched to their religion when a rumor like that reaches people that already feel threatened and feel like these people are out to get all the Hindus and they're trying to destroy religion by eating beef and Lynch mobs attacked them and their popularly called. What's APP lynchings? Early twenty eighteen. There was a wave of false messages. On whatsapp about child kidnappers prowling parts of India. Trying to steal people's children and this panicked a lot of people and mobs attacked strangers in various parts of India and killed them. Beat the Tied the mob hung them all kinds of terrible things. More than twenty people died in just the span of a few months because of these rumors and after these rumors started appearing the central government. When after what's happened said you need to find a way to trace these messages and stop these messages. And this set off a feud with what's out that has still not been resolved. The government says it doesn't WanNa read your messages. The government says they don't want to spy on the content of messages. They're not asking what's up to break the encryption of messages and show them what's in the messages but they are saying. Is You need to be able to trace back the pathway of a message. And you have to find a way to do that because if you have some message goes viral we WANNA find out who sent it and we'll see what happens. I mean what's up has said that to that would require significant changes to their service and they haven't said whether they'd be willing to make such changes to their

India Facebook Government Mumbai United States Gabrielle Sierra Founder Cnbc Yale Apple Silicon Valley Yahoo New York Times Chinmaya Whatsapp Twitter Mark Zuckerberg National Law University Delhi
Food For Thought: The Julia Child Episode

Radio Cherry Bombe

09:53 min | 2 years ago

Food For Thought: The Julia Child Episode

"Yes I taught English in history in Vista California for twenty two years damn near killed me but this young woman here Emily Myers. He came down here with me. Was My student fifteen years ago and I was a big grammar teacher because I went to Catholic school right. So we're doing this grammar exercising. It said Julia Child Comma the French Chef Comma and whatever else to sentence said and so I said to the students this is what two thousand four ish and I said so Julia. You all know who Julia. Child is the seventh grade. I got these blank. Looks let me tell you about Julia. Child told them the whole story about who she was and the French chef and how she was fifty years old when she first started. I was forty when I was became a teacher. And so this that and the other and then I told them the story about how nineteen eighty nine. I was a stay at home. Mom I had my two kids Cayden Matthew who were six and four. No six and two and Julia child came to town to the to Warwick's books to her book signing of the the way to cook her last book that she wrote on her own and I said I have to go see her. I have to meet her. I just have to do this. In the meantime as the stay at home mom was getting bored so I started making English muffins and if local but you know the Panikin isolating the Sh- muffins to the panicking because the guy who used to own the Panikin road motorcycles with my then husband and one day he came over for what they called the Prince of Norton Prints of darkness motorcycle. Ride and Chili Cook Up. You can tell which part I was in that and and I said Hey bob you wanNA try some English Muffins. And Hey say. He had one with my homemade strawberry jam on it. And he's these are great and I said good. Do you want to buy some because I need to do something out of the home and make some money and he said so to gross a week from my little kitchen when I was living by San Diego State. It was hilarious so this is when I was still doing that so I got the babysitter for the baby. Matthew because he was too he would never have known the difference and I took Kate with me now. Kate was six and so she'd been watching with videotapes at that point Julia. Did something called the way to cook. She did a series of videotapes. Kate and I would watch them. Kate's birthday cake. Every year was the classical. Jen was with the whip cream and the strawberries on it and so I took with me because I walked in Julia. I know by the way I made her a dozen English. Muffins packed them up in a box wrote her. A letter. Dear Julia. You are the one who taught me how to cook. My mother thought she did but she didn't. You're the one who really did with your show. Julia Child and company and Julia Child and more company. I've learned everything I've known from. You saw there. She is. She walks in. Cates going. Momma and I know I know she's here so we get in the line in the line and the you know they always have the helpers with them when they're big like that I don't mean in stature I mean you know and so the lady and I said I said here's a spock's English muffins in it. I made them pro. Have this little business so she. It's my turn. She hands the box. Julia is working out. She did this. She took her. She's she. I was looking in her eyes and she was sitting down because she really was too. She's banging on the box. Oh goody goody gumdrops homemade English muffins she's really did say that it was so funny and I said yes and she's and I told her that I was making them. Well I guess profession getting paid for it so I guess that makes it a profession right and she said I'm so she got very serious. I'm so glad you're doing this. We need more cottage industry like this. She said English muffins she said to me. How do you get them to cook so that they're cooked all the way through and not burn on the outside? I'm going Julia. Child is asking me how to do this. And then I remembered her recipe didn't work. This was not her recipe. This was from a jam book called Jam. Shame or something like that and I said Yeah. That is the secret. Isn't it and I told her how I did it. And it was all about rolling it around in a bowl of corn meal and I said like you had taught me on one of your shows about cornmeal being like a ball bearing and she said I never really thought about that and she was unbelievable. I couldn't believe it. So we're in the store and she signs the book and she didn't sign much of anything. Good luck or whatever and then. Kate neier lurking around the store watching her some more and she oh and you should have seen you know how mom's right so this kid of mine is six years old. She's just standing there looking at her and Julia said some things to. I can't remember what it was but it was really cute. So okay fast forward. It's two thousand ten. I'm on what I called my odyssey because I decided being teacher. I need to take some time off during the summer. Actually do something and not stand at the Xerox Machine. Getting Ready for the next school year. Merola grammar packets. Remember those and I took off. I went on this Odyssey. I went up to Portland just to go to Powell's books because I needed more cookbooks. Right to add to that four thousand collection and so I'm coming back. It's twenty in my little. Volkswagen Cabriolet with the top down and Bonnie Raitt blasting. Having a great time end. The car dies on the side on the side of the road. I got I two tires off the road. That was it and I'm talking about on this very near. Oh I was four miles north of point arena which is two hundred and fifty miles north of San Francisco on the one and not the one. Oh one the one the one the ones the one that goes like this and you can only drive twenty five miles an hour thankfully so I've got my two tires off on the side of the road and some guy comes turns around takes his truck and pushes me the rest of the way off the road and I was a little nervous about that. Call whoever the tow truck comes. I'm taking pictures of the tow truck. Taking my car away they take me down to point arena. I was on my way to that. Lighthouse also lighthouses and now. I'm stuck there for a week because I don't know if I can say this. But what does the industry in Humboldt county growing exactly so the town of point arena about five blocks long? The entire town is stoned. Looks like you can see smoke through the whole thing so he kept my car for a week. Never fixed it. Charge me a thousand dollars. Never fixed it he he had it towed to Healdsburg where his brother fixed it for another thousand dollars. That's another story anyway. So I put it up on facebook. The picture of my car being towed and one of my friends called and he said. I love point arena. You have to meet the Jam Lady. I said okay. Well I'll meet the family so I walk a mile down the road because I don't have a car turn right and there's a sign the Jam Lady. Her real name is Lisa Joa committees. She calls herself Jam Lady. She makes jam in point arena. Sends it all over the place? I went inches a full kitchen like that. One all stainless steel really professional. That we start talking Blah Blah Blah. She Says Yeah. I used to work for Barbara Tropic. China Moon Cafe and I said Oh my God I love her. She figured she'd Cook. My dinner sometime before I was like. Oh my God. This is amazing. She says I told her the Julia Child Story. Oh I forgot to tell you part of it. She wrote me a letter. She answered my little note that I had scrawled on a little tiny legal piece of paper. She wrote me a letter. Julia Child wrote Miller. I have evidence and so I read. I wrote back to her. She wrote me again. I still owe a letter. I don't know why I never finished that. So I'm telling this story to Lisa The lady. She says wait right here. Okay what's going on here? I mean this really weird place she disappeared. Disappears upstairs comes down with a box opens the box? She has a dozen flutes. Champagne flutes. Julius ninetieth birthday party she says you need. These gave me two of them. Doesn't that amazing I just went? I'm a total stranger and you she said we're not strangers. She said you have to have these. They have to be yours and size. Okay thank you thank you. We wrapped in very carefully. They got home even through the bumpy. Healdsburg thing and so then on her hundredth birthday. And I'm not sure what I think that was. I don't remember what year it was on her hundredth birthday. I was home from school that day. I think in August I was home legally and I cooked everything just all Julia Child and I called one of my friends. I said come on over. We use the Julia Child flutes. We had a little split of champagne. We toasted her. I put it all up on facebook. It was amazing and now it's so funny. I have those glasses there in my glass cabinet. But they're hidden in the back and my son in law was here in February and he went to reach for that to put for his champagne. I said Oh no look what that says on it. He says Julia Child's ninetieth birthday. I said you don't use those. You don't appreciate that. This is Julia Child. I mean come on so that is my Julia Child Story. I Love Her love her the day that she died. My daughter was about twenty. I think she called me just limit on her own. She called me says mom have really bad news. What does this in an accident? She says Julia died today and it was as if her her grandmother had. My mother had died. You know we were so cried on the phone and you know who's better than Julia Child

Julia Child Kate Neier Point Arena Facebook Matthew Catholic School Vista California San Diego State Emily Myers Healdsburg Warwick Xerox Portland Bonnie Raitt Volkswagen Cabriolet Cates Momma JEN Barbara Tropic
Coronavirus fears shouldn't stop you from investing in stocks and adding to your 401(k)

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus fears shouldn't stop you from investing in stocks and adding to your 401(k)

"Minute corona virus appears likely to keep investors cautious this week as the virus spreads far beyond China but Steve chaperone at federated global investment management is taking the long view he says the epidemic's impact will not be permanent way we think about it is similar to how we would think about a government shutdown or natural disaster it's in most cases demand delayed not demand destroyed it was a rough session for stocks back on Friday and now Berkshire Hathaway's operating earnings coming in lower than expected partly a weakness in insurance but Warren Buffett's conglomerate still sitting on about one hundred twenty eight billion dollars in cash at the end of the quarter and it purchased a record two point two billion dollars of its own shares and H. B. reports earnings today for its latest quarter with a company under siege from Xerox a takeover bid and with the corona virus threatening its supply chain H. B. as promised a full response to Xerox latest offer after strengthening its takeover defenses

China Steve Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett H. B. Xerox
Larry Tesler, the UI pioneer responsible for cut, copy, and paste, dies at 74

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Larry Tesler, the UI pioneer responsible for cut, copy, and paste, dies at 74

"The man who invented the cut copy and paste computer commands is dad Larry Tesler in early Silicon Valley computer pioneer died Monday at the age of seventy four Tessler was working at Xerox when Steve Jobs hired him to come work for apple we became the company's first chief scientist me copy and paste function arguably Tessler is most famous impact on computing first appeared in apple's software in nineteen eighty three and on the lease a computer in the original Macintosh released in nineteen

Larry Tesler Tessler Xerox Steve Jobs Apple Scientist
"xerox" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Burgers for you thank goodness for Xerox half of all about they are made online already I could teach anybody even people in this room so no offense intended to be a farmer do you dig a hole you put a seed and you put dirt on top add water of comes to court yeah that's all it is that's a piece a cake so the problem with with any time you hear of seven eight nine but I'm guilty of it all the time yet because of of the limitations of broadcast time but there's a lot of clips there are some please said just before and just after which changes the whole intent of it so I I'm a little leery about crucifying somebody for some perfect somebody found those and makes him sound really bad eight five five two nine five sixty six hundred Linda in Reno Highlander how are you I think a common fine and I'm having a ball I'll tell yeah yeah I was really not really not looking forward to the election here especially after New Hampshire last week because I know they were headed our direction right and yeah and what we were bombarded with commercials but it's just been so much fun I mean it's like they're self destructing they can't do anything right and with with mayor Mike in the mix now I mean if they try to take away the nomination for Bernie because it looks like he's really headed in that direction there's no way in heck pardon me is that the Democrats stand a chance of winning anything well and I and I enjoyed watching president trump come in the night before on airforce one yeah yeah one of the state I don't know what I'm going to do that top it on on super Tuesday because he can't be in ten places of one now no lot lot a lot of friends so I'm having I don't know why but I'm right there with you I I'm looking at this and I'm finding it to be I think I described as entertaining I are going crazy and they're snapping because Mike Bloomberg comes rolling in with his checkbook buys a bunch ads he's he's second place nationally according to NPR USA today Marist poll and now survey USA just released their poll that shows Mike Bloomberg has surged to second place among California voters ahead of super Tuesday so I don't know what it is about Bloomberg but all of a sudden people are going on a lot that god tell ya like that again and yet he that they're putting out these things obviously he can say whatever he wants to say you and I could probably run for office say whatever we want to say and it could be isn't saltiness become B. as can be and yet people still get elected doesn't matter access Hollywood tape Jennifer flowers I mean people don't seem to care they don't people don't seem to care and trump spaces so solid and he is gonna fail in injury at reelection this year it's just no doubt in my mind and like you said I think the debate tomorrow night is absolutely must he must see TV just to see if Mike gets his box to stand up yeah you know I think I heard all that I heard all these we're all these analisis more is it well you know it takes a while to get used to you know the debate stage and all that and first couple debate to kind of rough and then you get older you get your your debate feet and you do much better as you go along at all the people of their season debaters as if as if Mike Bloomberg is never stood up and done anything before cameras before of course he has so he has but they're lowering expectations you know how that goes when he gets trounced on by the other for and we can't stop your commercials going on out here for like weeks where they think he's hurting he's surging surging well here goes when the minute he would know he I've what poll was that we're all of a sudden he's like got ten percent or something like that I think it's the battle but on the Morrow he didn't make the cut anyway if that's right he didn't make the cut for the staging and so we'll see if he's still trying before the before the deadline tonight so we'll have fun Linda.

Xerox
"xerox" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Mean the the the freeze we can Xerox copy every minority child in these neighborhoods I think is is a very demoralizing thing it's not about the Paul my former says he's apologized for it on me said that he's it kind of backed by ninety five percent before he left but that this is an issue and to make it that he's talking to his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity so he's he's kind of owning it you think I haven't been are you worried about my bloomers but no one's ever seen as to the campaign and after that for the first time in history has to deal with something we've never seen before like this much money from a candidate that is not even been a year and I just think everything money can buy president trump by deleting a tweet calling Bloomberg a total racist after his comments on stop and frisk surfaced after Bloomberg comments other trump administration is hosting the first well it hosted the first of two public hearings on a proposal to scale back landmark environmental law representatives of oil and gas say the laws multi year environmental reviews of pipelines coal mines in renewable energy kills jobs increases cost and often outlasts the projects economic feasibility activists held a rally and other events outside of that hearing at the regional headquarters of the environmental protection agency in Denver a judge in New York Tuesday rejected a challenge by a group of states to T. mobiles takeover of sprint softbank owns sprint that deal had been two years in the making the latest development appears to clear the way for the twenty six and a half billion dollar takeover it already has U. S. regulatory approval and the go ahead from public utility commissions T. mobile now expects to close that deal as early as April fools top Democrats say the president's four point eight trillion dollar election year budget that recycles previously rejected cuts to domestic programs stand little chance of the budget seeks a balanced budget in fifteen years while boosting the military in leading social security and Medicare benefits on touched still house speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling it an insult to the American people this is very important that we have clarity on this subject because we're talking about America's working families were talking about Medicare which is essential to the nunnery the health but the financial security we are also talking about Medicaid which is a middle income benefit although people think of it being for poor people for children yes but as a mention number two is about two thirds of it being of long term care being covered by Medicaid which is now being cut by almost a trillion nine huh one nine hundred billion dollars but also to put this into perspective about what that means to America's working families why are they doing this they're doing this so that they can give advantages to the high end we want to see balance in all of this we want to see where we can find savings that subject everything we spend the harsh who me so that the results for the American people are the best that they can day but don't get in front of an audience and say I'm here to protect Medicare social security and people attend and we say Medicaid to and then put a budget like this sport and then try to say we did something on the healthcare bill which we did not now the fiscal twenty twenty one plan promises the government's deficit will crest above a trillion dollars only for the current budget year before steadily decreasing the more manageable levels president trump says the plan quote sets the course for a future of continued American dominance and prosperity Pacific gas and electric plan to emerge from bankruptcy is facing another threat from California's governor as the two head toward a dramatic showdown Newsome's attorneys telling a bankruptcy judge on Tuesday they want to grill PGA any about the company's plans to borrow billions and sell more stock to help pay the thirteen and a half billion owed to more than seventy five thousand victims of catastrophic wildfires the judge reaffirming the terms of the settlement Tuesday P. Jeannie also needs to raise money to cover twelve billion dollars to insurers and government agencies and to see the the the standard poodle this is a standard poodle has won best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club with the crowd at MSG chanting for Daniel the popular golden retriever judge bobsleigh instead pick the perfectly prepped and poised black poodle poodles come in three sizes this was the tenth time one of them's become America's top dog Bourbon the whip it finished second also in the best of us seven final ring Bondo will will know the boxer Conrad the shot Shetland sheepdog say three times quickly carefully and Vinnie the wire fox terrier more behind the scenes look at America's first news you can head on over to a F. and now dot com you can always reach out to me on social media anytime I met Matt ray talk across the board there you can use the hashtag AFN fed reserve chair Jerome houses the economy appears durable steady growth low unemployment so what about the threat the coronavirus out might pose we will hear from Powell coming up also we will hear from the doctor who treated the first coronavirus patient in the U. S. this as China reports an increase in fatalities and we'll tell you who president trump's nominated dead to be the next U. S. ambassador to Canada all of that and more on the way.

Xerox
"xerox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops they're males they're minorities in New York and in virtually every city I'm joined now by W. N. Y. C.'s elections editor Matthew Sherman Matthew hello hi Jamie yeah you an African American podcaster Benjamin Dickson surface this tape short clip of it on Twitter has gotten at least six million place so far what else is mayor Bloomberg saying and he says a lot of offensive arguably racist things at one point for example he says that young black men think it's a joke to own a gun and that the ones mixed up in crime don't have families and have no long term focus the clip you just played sounds particularly bad in part because of that word Xerox it suggests that Bloomberg sees one young black man just like any other if you listen to the whole tape you see that Bloomberg was saying something a little different he was explaining how New York City employed stop in for us to get illegal guns off the street and that the way to save lives including young black and Latino men's lives was to scare these young man from having guns in the first place here's an excerpt the way that our kids is broadcast all at first the Vietnamese army general Adama only get caught so they don't yeah based on having all the tape quality is not very good there so let me let me clarify he seen the police in New York with throw the young man against the wall and frisked them and that by doing that they were deterring kids from carrying guns now as we've seen since then crime including gun related crime has continued to fall even those stops and Frist's have continued to go way down under mayor de Blasio so it's questionable whether there was really any truth to this theory when he started his campaign Matthew he knew this was going to be an issue for ham he went on and apology tour of sorts he said stop and frisk which was found by a judge by the way to be unconstitutional Bloomberg admitted it was wrong he apologized for it but Matthew this is a whole nother level right yes it's pretty stark language in cavalier towards the civil rights of the young men who were being thrown up against the wall so to speak for another last fall he said that he realizes stop and frisk was wrong while he was still mayor and reduce the number of stops now it's true that stops went down to the same time the city was being pressured by a federal lawsuit to reduce stops and then you get this tape from one after Bloomberg left office and he's still convinced that stop and frisk was the right thing to do so clearly Bloomberg is contradicting himself is trying to distance himself from what's clearly a bad mark on his mayoral record but he can't seem to get his story straight when did he say these things and and what was the reaction at the time the tape was from a speech blooper gave at the Aspen Institute in February of twenty fifteen Bloomberg's advisors right after he gave that speech ask the Aspen Institute not to distribute the video in the way that they do with all the speeches that are held there there was some coverage of the time by Newsday in AM York but not much the strongest reaction came from the national rifle association because of Bloomberg's financial support of pro gun control congressional candidates the NRA called the comments racist and condescending to think that the only way to protect young black man was to strip them of their rights is the NRA's sought of owning a handgun what is Bloomberg saying about this Bloomberg's campaign sent out a statement today but most of it was about president trump who had this morning tweeted wow Bloomberg is a total racist exclamation point in all caps in response the recording the president later took that's we down there was just one sentence in the campaigns of response on this on this tape about the Aspen Institute comments the campaign said they do not reflect his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity is there any analysis yet on how the tape recording will affect Bloomberg's presidential chances what's interesting is Bloomberg support among African Americans has been growing the latest Quinnipiac poll showed he had the second highest level of support among black voters compared to other democratic candidates second of former vice president Joe Biden in third place is Bernie Sanders it should be noted that the podcaster behind this tape Benjamin Dickson is a self professed Bernie Sanders supporter and that may have played into his decision to publicize the comments so those three are really fighting over this section of the electorate and this tape certainly won't help Bloomberg standing but it's hard to say how much it will hurt W. N. Y. C.'s Matthew Sherman our elections editor thanks so much Matthew thanks Jamie the monuments museums of Washington DC are adorned with in grave stone lettering some of the most prominent engraving it's been done by members of one family for generations Mikaela frack of member station to be a muse folk to master stone carver Nick Bensen as he worked inside the National Gallery of art Nick Bensen updates a list of the galleries trustees by carving names into the lime stone wall so what are you working on I'm coming in Hannah and you have to really really carefully massage the thing into existence the Rhode Island east craftsman is a legendary in the stone carving universe he received a macarthur genius grant in twenty ten for keeping his ancient craft alive traditional tools and all it takes about an hour to card two letters.

Xerox New York
In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

"Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg launched his democratic presidential bid with an apology for his support for New York stop and frisk policy now he's apologizing for comments he made it a twenty fifteen appearance at the Aspen Institute in which she defended the practice saying the way to bring down murder rates is to quote but a lot of cops in minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime is in the audio Bloomberg says that you can't quote just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops in a statement Bloomberg says he inherited the policy and that his remarks don't reflect his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity he says he cut back on the policy but quote I should have done it faster and sooner president trump sent out and then deleted a tweet highlighting the audio declaring Bloomberg's a total racist trump has himself been a vocal supporter of stop and frisk policies Jennifer king Washington

Mike Bloomberg Aspen Institute Xerox Donald Trump New York Murder President Trump Jennifer King Washington
"xerox" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

13:07 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Wanna you can Xerox mail online already with the orchestra yeah that was a real man you got it yeah and no you don't make a lot of hot but we had a runner binary data so one hundred and what is that all my god you are resting on our on our all my heart yes that's true wire roller in order that's true I would go to the best online and on the way down the broadcast all the reason I don't wanna I don't make a car you don't based on all they just keep saying it's a disproportionate percentage of a particular ethnic group that may be but it's not a disproportionate percentage of those who witnesses and victims described as committee nor in that case instantly I think we disproportionately stopped whites too much and minorities too little and our crime strategies and tools including stop question frisk have made New York City the safest big city in America the fact that stops match up with crime statistics and the fact that our police officers on patrol the majority of whom are black Hispanic or members of other ethnic or racial minorities make an average about less than one stop a week victims and perpetrators of crime are disproportionately young minority man that's just a fact you can look at the victims you can look at who we arrest you can ask witnesses and victims with descriptions since a couple of one newspaper one news service they just keep saying it's a disproportionate percentage of a particular ethnic group that may be but it's not a disproportionate percentage of those who witnesses and victims described as committee member in that case instantly I think we disproportionately stop whites too much and minorities too little all right as we start our to Sean Hannity show eight hundred nine four one Shawn is a number you want to be a part of the program to stunning developments as we continue broadcasting from New Hampshire the primary on going even as we speak and that is Joe Biden is gone out of the state he's done he's packed these leave and another expected dismal performance by him here probably fourth maybe even when all the votes well if they learn how to count votes in the Democratic Party that would be a big start you here now then mayor Bloomberg now you got to remember here he made a big deal once he decided to get into this presidential race at all and teary eyed crocodile tears and I was so wrong and he's mayor twelve years and I would argue a caretaker mayor how may need basically didn't very little except annoyed new Yorkers are telling us how big our drinks can be and whether or not they can be solved on the table and restaurants short of that he be kept in place and defended in ways Rudy guiliani never did stop and frisk and when you hear that montage that we just played for you there where he goes on and on it's it's not disproportionate percentage your witnesses and victims describing described as committing the crime and I think we disproportionately stop whites too much and minorities too little and meanwhile then he goes on to say that yeah we should we put everyone of our cops in minority communities and is bragging about it now the White House has reacted to this brand Pascal the president in old head of his campaign tweeting out yeah I hash tag Bloomberg's are racist that's how big this is gone viral the there was only eleven percent of stops last year were based on suspicion of the individuals committed any crime whatsoever and you know so you got bear Bloomberg defending this madness again and again throw a month all those minorities up against the wall as he said yeah we target minority kids absolutely and cops most roll them up against the wall and then he goes on saying yeah I've by one hundred percent of our cops and a minority neighborhoods one hundred percent unbelievable anyway here to help break all of this down what impact this is going to have on the race and one of Donald Trump ever said this we have her all the repair of fox news legal analyst with us pass to Darrell Scott chairman of the urban revitalization coalition vents Alison conservative calmness lecturer author of the book the iron triangle guys thank you both for being with us let's start with you Geraldo I'm pretty I'm pretty stunned when you hear it I'm Mike it it kind of takes my breath away and I guarantee you that this was lit by the Democrats not any Republican well you know what IDC Bloomberg past and its history differently than most people in I was on the air radio in New York during those years and I thought I mean to my eyes a New York City born and almost all of my years spent there they stop and frisk work to take guns off the street and back when I moved here to Cleveland to be pastors got neighbor I was wistfully wishing that they had stop and frisk here in Cleveland where the murder rate is it disproportional under what you're what you're what you're saying I don't know what you're saying is very different and your description then what he's saying the way he's saying it and his description you know you can hear the tone the arrogance and I'll be honest although if any Republican ever said it I don't think they'd survive as a candidate would day well he said it's just the way he said well when he really never was a Republican he did it to avoid a a crowded democratic field let's be honest that is that is true but you and I together I remember were in favor of all of the police activism to get the squeegee windshield wiper guys and that I'm not talking about I'm not talking about that reason we're not talking about like we're talking about what do you remember what talking about what he said and how we set it it I I'm I'm disappointed that he's so ashamed that this path that is running away from it but it's not going to work because you know the thing about tape is it's in its indelible you can't get rid of it is that he's the elected okay and yet that's why you got a tickling seventeen years now we only brings this up vin so Ellison it only brings it up now because seventeen years later all want to run for president and you know both the democratic Republican Party a coalition parties and he's playing identity politics and he knows that it's some popular and with African American voters so let me say that I am so sorry that I really did all of this and believe this for seventeen years because I think when he said that he was lying and I thought those were crocodile tears well this is what you dream because of this election but about fifty years with the difficult problems with this look at like losing dangerous and always wants to disarm them ever since the end of slavery of the right to defend oneself in keeping their own arms is another there is a right to do not transferable gives you back up cannot be trickling down main is absolute and whenever you see a long black people come together and then the Democrats get in power the first thing you want to do it just on black coffee and they want to control them and if you want to talk to Colin left the mall defend themselves the police won't do it you know you have bills yeah when will the welfare of the police to come near that what are we have a company here in the black it's called the one on top of the research without losing their solution for this all all the black man in the middle of register and global and kill them with an internal who are usually with very little promotion so what is the we are going to be on all the criminals he looked on then when the people on the legal because the wheel camper custom when they start there are right to defend themselves thank you all they get a call in a different machine no one ever right to tell me how to defend myself a little bit more about what you got I am free no one told me how to defend myself the government if it twice what will go through with this mold that's what they're doing looking right now well let me go to let me know label don't let it let me bring up past the Scott because at one point he says home my god you're resting kids for marijuana that are all minorities Bloomberg says yes that's true yes he says yeah we're only going after minority kids for marijuana then he goes further you know why you said because we put all not half not ninety five we put all the cops in minority neighborhoods and he said because that's where the crime is wow imagine if Donald Trump said that first what Bloomberg merit serious candidate anyway but you can stick a fork in him now because he's done this is a script in the Bible to talk about to attend finding you up his name is found him out not a thing about Bloomberg is this he has this very old typical racist mindset against blacks and Browns it is that they are the source of the crime in the communities that they are the the the dregs of society and the thing about stop and frisk is that you know I I'm not anti stop and like a lot of set up my **** has to be indiscriminate stop with that does indeed save lives but you cannot target certain rate excuse me very point let me black and you know what hang on a second there are kids in every race committing crimes now if it's a neighborhood disproportionate amount of violence or crime is certainly going to add more police resources that's not what he's saying here no we only target we only target minority kids and that he got actually you talk about a broad sweeping generalization that is where all the crime is use meat that's total B. S. there are anywhere it raise some background that are are troubled kids in in trouble there is usually we're gonna be honest here I transcends race that has to do more with socio economics it has to do with poverty and has you know plenty of people from every race and poverty in America our pastor you know what it's like I don't know what you've done you you you are in your church and in Cleveland you've done a lot for the people of of Cleveland of all races you're helping anybody that's a need to help also a song warm up against the wall you know basically mass these thoughts out of their cars we don't know what these people you know just he's he's he's doing abroad breasts me for all of the talk about the car and I'm up against the wall and and you know that was the way he wants them to be handled and so we want to get a Donald Trump said something like this if a tape of trump think something like that service there would be a national outrage CNN it and done don lemon head and all of the rate bigger than race try to break up with would be having a field day with this but they're all being kind of sit there not all right out ways like that over over Bloomberg state stay right there this is too important discussion to have I think this is now I I think I think you're all right I think this is a game changer and I will tell you that we have other factors involved in that is Donald Trump he's the guy that is created one economic record after another for minority Americans he's the guy that got rid of the spirit sentencing and criminal justice reform wasn't any Democrat they promised that they never got it done all right this is really especially for her although but now it's actually for every guy all right in three days is Valentine's day.

Wan Xerox
Xerox sweetens offer for HP

Sean Hannity

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Xerox sweetens offer for HP

"Now it hasn't formally launched its takeover bid as yet but Xerox confirm that it has raised its offer to buy HP incorporated to twenty four dollars a share up from the twenty two dollars a share offered made last November if the deal gets done Xerox's indicated it would nominate eleven independent candidates to replace HP's board at the computer and printer makers annual shareholder meeting this summer shares of HP are up one point four percent today while Xerox stock is up nearly one

HP Xerox
"xerox" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Design solutions and you'll go to market motion from a experience point of view and that in itself Uh is an art and a science and we tend to do very little to focus in those areas in the industry and I think that is paramount because it is is always critical in engaging with customers and partners to get points of view and and what they find. Is that if you can run a lot of the modeling work from an expense point of view. You can very quickly thread to what really matters. And then what really matters is then focus I mean how do you get to the minimal set of capabilities that they're looking for. And how do we create a great experience around those capabilities so some trading it to The minimum viable product that matters and then growing and scaling capabilities as needed needed of over. Time is something that you know. That's something blue which is very much of a startup mentality rind and stuff small mall you know deliver good experience and then joined scale rapidly and And so that's something that I've learned in terms of what customers come to expect in how we look at that taking up products to market the second thing is in the warm hug you make a really simple and easy for them to conceal and and And and that is really a complete digital native experience of and so that's also really really important so and that's the second aspect of it the third aspect of it is around operational. Excellence and You know a lot of these companies. You know a very very focused around. What is the greatest accelerator value? I can get with the minimal. Spend which means it's it's really working smart and What smart is real the other thing I loved from as a weapon looking with these companies and advising them as getting rapidly? It's not the fact that you have a problem. It's how rapidly you're able to resolve. I saw the problem. And how quickly can you get to route causing corrective actions and how operationally sounded discipline is the team and And and how did the value of spend the returns they get in their execution so the other aspect of it is actually this whole notion of a cost accounting AH capability accounting in terms of what it takes to actually deployed capabilities and And so a lot of a lot about costing and deploying capability and and having a lot more transparency invisibly into So really into these costs components. So it's really interesting working working with some of these startups and advising them because you get much more detail than people into The transparency around. What makes these companies pick and what levels do you have That you need to go focus on to really drive the greatest value so I found that An intriguing in terms of He's thinking of how do you design in products more holistically. And how do you take them to market more effectively and Have a much more You know Thought process around speed or unfocused focussed around accountability So we can drive the right behaviors and also seem kind of the right speed to market and speed devalued rivals. I believe in all execution. So so it's it's much more fascinating operating in the Lord of these startups and advising them because so you can move the needle fairly rapidly but the challenge. Now how you bring that thought process into Heritage Company. That's so you know rapidly looking to you know grow scale and operate like a startup right and so that always is the the challenge and the exciting part about designing and bridging these capabilities. So that we can be much more effective as we. You bring a lot of these learnings into you know Especially on new companies. So that's that's been hopefully gives you some sense in terms of what What what I really enjoyed learning and being those learnings here well Shankar? I appreciate you bringing these learnings to to this conversation as well what it would agree conversation conversation. It has been talking to a bit about your career path The remarkable things. You've done at multiple stops of course most specifically in the most recent one xerox. Your board work. You sharing your insights today. Thank you Beata. Exciting is always and it's great to catch up. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me next week when I guess we'll be Scott Adams the creator of Dilbert..

Beata Scott Adams xerox Shankar Heritage Company
"xerox" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

15:26 min | 2 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"The Palo Alto Research Center park from its commercialization phases rush originally joined Xerox as the chief digital officer and he has over twenty five years of experience experience in the IT industry. He's held chief information officer roles at Hewlett Packard and a palm before joining Xerox in. This interview Naresh discusses the three key elements elements to a successful transformation. He cites bowl. Leadership that has grits as the most important ingredient for transformation second scribes the importance of culture in preparing for the future as the pace of change accelerates he notes it's critical to bridge the established culture that sustains companies at scale with the next generation culture that that has the mental muscle of a startup. Lastly we discussed the need for a team that his passion and his driven and energize exceedingly mission focused. We also discuss discuss the outside in and inside out approach xerox his using to make its digital transformation. How the company uses artificial intelligence in the internet or things in Russia's experiences this is a board level CIO and CTO and a variety of other topics Shankar? Welcome to tech nations great to speak with you Becky Beta looking Russia. I thought we'd begin with your current post. A lot has changed since the last time you and I caught up you you are now the chief technology officer of Xerox with a remarkable purview that includes rnd as well as running the technology function more. Generally speaking at that company and what an interesting time to be Xerox eight organization that is going through quite a renaissance at present isn't and I thought maybe you could take a moment and describe. What was it about this opportunity that attracted you to make the move over to Xerox? Yeah Thanks Peter so one I mean Xerox has had a very a very richer I'd say in its hundred year history history of both in invention and innovation It's it's really amazing. Run and What really intrigued me me about? The opportunity was I have the unique opportunity to transform and revitalize the Brandon Business from and a business model and Also you know digital transformation perspective So that is number one fundamentally transforming business so that it's easy for customers to engage And also consumer technology as a company. So that's point number one. The second aspect of the role also exciting was actually the the opportunity to actually transform the the product portfolio across The Workplace Solution Landscape the graphics landscape and All of the new sciences That will help us. Transcend the print franchise and so the opportunity to also launch new lines of business business and create a value Is really a huge opportunity. That I thought was quite exciting so on many different levels food this role and opportunities quite unique so So I don't you know I have to give this a shot because it's Really of very unique opportunity and an exciting opportunity and Off The brand is a monkey brand highly respected in the industry and so wiped out You know Why not and so? That's what brought me here and And I'm looking forward to the run because I see the Mike Three five three and five years being really really exciting to transform the brand at many different levels. Why I'd love to get digging a little deeper in a rush Ashton transformation and you've alluded to some of the areas in which you're hoping to your for example transcended print franchise use your your words to Get into workplace Klay Solutions Graphics New Leverage New Sciences. I wonder if you can tak- maybe a couple of those examples and he'll back the onion a little bit further and describes describes what you see in terms of the pathway with some of those whereas whereas what will be the sources of innovation and what complexion do they take. Okay so when you look at the the print franchise which is our CO business and workplace solutions and graphics We now see ourselves moving moving into a whole new range of sciences to take advantage of close to. I'd say a fifth approximate fifty five plus billion dollar market opportunity That is ahead of us in all of these new sciences so if I look at Beyond the CO business in the areas of packaging In the areas of packaging of you know there are new sciences around direct object printing in line marking All of these new areas areas that potentially are adjacent seas and also moving into the packaging. Cite Ah the digital printing packaging side of business so automobiles will be adjacent agencies to the core business of the next set as an example and then the next set of businesses that launched As an example is it was basically a starting with treaty. The treaty additive manufacturing business predominantly focused on liquid metal That is a very very Interesting technology it's highly disruptive and What's unique about the technology it's fundamentally revolutionizes manufacturing and and Both around speed around speed cost and reliability of what we've done in the liquid metal space is We both technology Where we can actually absorb the low cost and put in take off metal aloys that are commodities and Begin produce high-quality production pots that that have tremendous integrity and density in terms of the materials that we print of low cost reliability and also the speed and so it's a huge value proposition and So that's that's a classic example in terms of Directionally How you meet? This is in the additive space. And you couple that with the treaty software. That now aroused us to design predictive models And also pest invalidate the composition and the quality of those models before they even get printed so the treaty. Ai Software that's going to be coupled with the hardware and creates a very unique value. Did you proposition so so we able to print not just parts that are denso The fast and CHEAPO and and in compared to those made from metal powders right which typically has been where most of the industry has been investing it and and And so what we've been able to Actually mitigate is a lot of the other technologies around metal. Powders you know have long again. The Post production processes Procuring and be powdery. Well we don't. We don't have that complexity. Actually that comes with a post production process and so big knowledge again in the faster cheaper and Much Mo- so What I call it? Preserves the integrity and the density of the the materials have been used So it's a very very exciting play In the three D. space and to produce a complete three sixty experience of to really address what I call the on demand nature chill of manufacturing since we live in an on-demand instrument economy right You pay for what you consume and you'll pay when you consume Emmett and so we think the whole factoring is going to move them into what I call an on demand economy and and and I believe that we will be From the center of leading the charge in the space so that's exciting and that's an example in the three D. space In the IOT space of which is the the next hour We are building a range of sensors. And you're going to hear more about the technology In the sense of space up predominantly around what we've done which is You know detection of hazardous gases and also food and drug spoilage. Things as well as the spectral cameras with developed which can actually do a composition of you know that detects Again the changes in materials or the changes in preservatives or things of that sort so I think not and sensors. There's GonNa be another range of technology that you're going to hear more about the categories a May I an artificial intelligence which is predominantly in an area that is focused on the intelligent knowledge worker. So we are looking to launch off a set of products they're starting in twenty nineteen gene and Into twenty twenty. We'll have a roadmap as well but between three and we're looking to launch products in two thousand twenty which is is going to be an exciting play so we've got some of the areas of science that we're also focused on but you're gonNA hear more about a lot of these new Sciences that we're launching in twenty twenty. That's beyond the print franchise so that gives us some insight and examples into a lot of the new sciences. We're working on what's really important about why we believe strongly that we are well positioned to introduce new science to market and commercialize this as is because R&B Ecosystem starting with pock and research centers you in Palo Alto Extra CC. The research centers in Canada The RND senators and the web accelerate the web stacks ration- centers that we have in UPSTATE NEW YORK In the Rochester area. You know you come all of the power and the army Engineering Research and development institutions. We have we've got a long history That goes from fifty history from par to one hundred of his tip xerox that has produced a tremendous portfolio patents and All of these white spaces of signs and so we think we are. Well positioned to move the science into participation and commercialization and and then so this is really really exciting for us to broaden up for you beyond the print franchise into all of the new sciences That we think we can effectively get to market and Starting twenty twenty remarkable. What a what a portfolio things to work on to say the least and and the rest you highlight that this organization that has innovation in its DNA in so many different places Given the number of of new innovative areas is you anticipate the organization getting involved in coming weeks months year ahead I can only imagine that from from it perspective. There's been some change necessary zero whether it's retooling the way in which some people work within the technology function to bring in people that have a new set of skills or a new orientation to the way in which they work can. Can you talk a bit about some of the cultural attributes. That have Brad's been in need of refreshment or rethink Here and there as you've begun your tenure Xerox Walks. Yeah so I think what's exciting at Xerox In in the last twelve eighteen months of the the notable changes that we've got an amazing Leadership team and the leadership team comes from Tremendous Mendes collected experience across many domains of the industry and Very diverse experiences of both on the private equity side of the world as well as from a I'd say industry perspective as well so people that got a significant amount of breadth and depth in experience across many different industries. And that's she'll I mean So it starts the leadership. I mean we've got a very strong compelling Ling very driven leadership team and that makes it exciting The second thing is the culture. I mean we've got a very very strong culture of invention and innovation and so when you look at the The powers Iraq's trillion very intriguing and exciting. Reading is that we bring the big company feel in terms of being able to rapidly scaled tomorrow and go to market rapidly. Okay so so we bring that and we couple that with the mental muscle of a startup. And that's what we brought together and so we've designed to build out. They ecosystems around operating models and all models that basically couple both the ability for the Xerox a AH Corporation in capabilities to scale rapidly and fast with the the models models of a startup in terms of agility and speed and focus right and so we brought back together in the culture. And what that means is that been had to take a lot of the learnings of what we've had historically and bring together a lot of the learnings from the outside in terms of Berlin the franchise in a manner where we can actually meet the objectives of not just the core portfolio of products that we want to bring democracy but also ooh all of the new science that we want to accelerate and go to market with. So it'd be bringing these worlds together and what that also means that we've got of bring together you know people process and technology Together as well. So if you beat back the onion what have we done in the IT organization foundationally we've built a new organization it's called Xerox digital experience right and and and the focus is how do we actually design fine. The capability Around an instant on demand economy. Okay so what customers expect on the outside What customers the partners expect of us on the outside our employees expect of us on the inside?.

Xerox Palo Alto Research Center park chief information officer Hewlett Packard chief technology officer Naresh CIO and CTO officer denso Russia Peter Ashton NEW YORK army Engineering Research Palo Alto Emmett Klay Solutions Shankar Tremendous Mendes
Xerox CTO Naresh Shanker

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:23 min | 2 years ago

Xerox CTO Naresh Shanker

"Shankar? Welcome to tech nations great to speak with you Becky Beta looking Russia. I thought we'd begin with your current post. A lot has changed since the last time you and I caught up you you are now the chief technology officer of Xerox with a remarkable purview that includes rnd as well as running the technology function more. Generally speaking at that company and what an interesting time to be Xerox eight organization that is going through quite a renaissance at present isn't and I thought maybe you could take a moment and describe. What was it about this opportunity that attracted you to make the move over to Xerox? Yeah Thanks Peter so one I mean Xerox has had a very a very richer I'd say in its hundred year history history of both in invention and innovation It's it's really amazing. Run and What really intrigued me me about? The opportunity was I have the unique opportunity to transform and revitalize the Brandon Business from and a business model and Also you know digital transformation perspective So that is number one fundamentally transforming business so that it's easy for customers to engage And also consumer technology as a company. So that's point number one. The second aspect of the role also exciting was actually the the opportunity to actually transform the the product portfolio across The Workplace Solution Landscape the graphics landscape and All of the new sciences That will help us. Transcend the print franchise and so the opportunity to also launch new lines of business business and create a value Is really a huge opportunity. That I thought was quite exciting so on many different levels food this role and opportunities quite unique so So I don't you know I have to give this a shot because it's Really of very unique opportunity and an exciting opportunity and Off The brand is a monkey brand highly respected in the industry and so wiped out You know Why not and so? That's what brought me here and And I'm looking forward to the run because I see the Mike Three five three and five years being really really exciting to transform the brand at many different levels. Why I'd love to get digging a little deeper in a rush Ashton transformation and you've alluded to some of the areas in which you're hoping to your for example transcended print franchise use your your words to Get into workplace Klay Solutions Graphics New Leverage New Sciences. I wonder if you can tak- maybe a couple of those examples and he'll back the onion a little bit further and describes describes what you see in terms of the pathway with some of those whereas whereas what will be the sources of innovation and what complexion do they take. Okay so when you look at the the print franchise which is our CO business and workplace solutions and graphics We now see ourselves moving moving into a whole new range of sciences to take advantage of close to. I'd say a fifth approximate fifty five plus billion dollar market opportunity That is ahead of us in all of these new sciences so if I look at Beyond the CO business in the areas of packaging In the areas of packaging of you know there are new sciences around direct object printing in line marking All of these new areas areas that potentially are adjacent seas and also moving into the packaging. Cite Ah the digital printing packaging side of business so automobiles will be adjacent agencies to the core business of the next set as an example and then the next set of businesses that launched As an example is it was basically a starting with treaty. The treaty additive manufacturing business predominantly focused on liquid metal That is a very very Interesting technology it's highly disruptive and What's unique about the technology it's fundamentally revolutionizes manufacturing and and Both around speed around speed cost and reliability of what we've done in the liquid metal space is We both technology Where we can actually absorb the low cost and put in take off metal aloys that are commodities and Begin produce high-quality production pots that that have tremendous integrity and density in terms of the materials that we print of low cost reliability and also the speed and so it's a huge value proposition and So that's that's a classic example in terms of Directionally How you meet? This is in the additive space. And you couple that with the treaty software. That now aroused us to design predictive models And also pest invalidate the composition and the quality of those models before they even get printed so the treaty. Ai Software that's going to be coupled with the hardware and creates a very unique value. Did you proposition so so we able to print not just parts that are denso The fast and CHEAPO and and in compared to those made from metal powders right which typically has been where most of the industry has been investing it and and And so what we've been able to Actually mitigate is a lot of the other technologies around metal. Powders you know have long again. The Post production processes Procuring and be powdery. Well we don't. We don't have that complexity. Actually that comes with a post production process and so big knowledge again in the faster cheaper and Much Mo- so What I call it? Preserves the integrity and the density of the the materials have been used So it's a very very exciting play In the three D. space and to produce a complete three sixty experience of to really address what I call the on demand nature chill of manufacturing since we live in an on-demand instrument economy right You pay for what you consume and you'll pay when you consume Emmett

Xerox Chief Technology Officer Shankar Russia Denso Peter Emmett Klay Solutions Ashton
Are You Prepared For Sponsorship?  The Career Big Game!

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Are You Prepared For Sponsorship? The Career Big Game!

"This week because it is the first week of black history. three-month I thought it would be a fitting time to highlight the first black woman. CEO of a fortune. Five hundred hundred company. I talk about her all time. She is one of the reasons for starting this podcast Ursula Burns. She has been the only black woman. The only there's only Orne just who and I don't even know how she dated. But let me tell you about Ursula. Woah Ursula Burns was appointed chairman and CEO of Veon in December. Two thousand eighteen. Now that is a company headquartered recorded in Amsterdam that focuses on telecommunications services so just think mobile phones fouling a period as executive -secutive chairman and previously chairman of the Board of directors. So she'd been in this thing for minute. Ursula has extensive international experience of large companies confronting technology change in their industries. She was chairman of the Board of of the Xerox Corporation from two thousand ten to two thousand seventeen and chief executive officer from two thousand nine to two thousand sixteen you up. So she was chairman of the board and the a former. US President Barack Obama are forever president and appointed her to help lead the White House national program on Science Technology Engineering and math and she served served as chair of the President's Export Council Ursula is the director of the Board of Exxon Mobil. Nestle and Uber Uber huge companies. She also counsels other community educational and nonprofit organizations including the Ford Foundation and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation. Mit She is a member of of the US. National Academy of Engineers and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Ursula holes a master's degree in mechanical engineering. I'm from Columbia University and a Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering From Polytechnic Institute of New York University. If you ever hear this I just want you to know that is a lot of us trying. We are here. Charm figured out. And we're trying not to let you be the only one that has been the CEO of a fortune five hundred company. Thank you for all of your contributions. Abusive fans thank you for being the first and letting US know that it is possible to hold the top spot at a fortune. Five hundred

Ursula Burns Chairman Chairman And Ceo CEO United States Ursula Mechanical Engineering From Po Barack Obama Orne President Trump Exxon Mobil Nestle Xerox Corporation American Academy Of Arts And S Chief Executive Officer Science Technology Engineering National Academy Of Engineers Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Columbia University Amsterdam
"xerox" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Connecticut. You don't go to dare to by the stuff. But it just that's the mentality of in terms of value and being empathetic to what that customer goes through. And that's a very strong point. And then you go through an explorer like how can we differentiate ourselves to the consumer audiences? We're going after and certainly there's a there's a graphic explore what his logo look what is the name of the company or what's the name of the brand. Was it stand for it stays world transparencies a big deal? You can't fake it. So if you're Xerox am not pointing Xerox out and you make paper, but you're bringing down the Brazilian tree forest. You're going to be toast to a lot of people that find out we live in a voyeuristic that you you can't hide or can't hide for that long. People want to have more of a belief system in terms of the proxy by the. Support which is more of a millennial thing. But it spread much much deeper than that. It's a long process that involves strategy in terms of who were targeting, look and feel what is it brand identity? Look like color schemes. There's deep meanings behind every color like yellow is a is a clerk for creativity. Read. Did you see that a lot of global brands because red is a powerful especially in China, red Zaveri powerful, pretty neutral color in that side. And so we go from every from strategy to picking colors in this stuff. But to do everything in a three sixty level from the values of the company to the mission to what the ads like twit partners. You should have you shouldn't I can give examples and we can go back forth in that about different different ones. What brands mean and then pick across colors, but it's more deeper than people think it's certainly deeper than NATs. What has changed most in terms of its relative importance when building one of these plants, so what would pop to mind for me would be the role of social right like Instagram all these kind of things everyone talks about our key channels to distribute a marketing message, but I don't know assume that that's the answer. Is the answer of just love to hear more about like how you think about that? So what what has changed the most the rapid ascent of what can be successful and equally the decline. We did something in our last investor letter where we found the data point that from nineteen twenty three to nineteen Eighty-three in the top twenty five c PG categories twenty maintain number one share the entire time from that point on only like four have market share leadership and most have lost that since two thousand three the one area golden medal flower has just owned that market. It's amazing. And part of that is modes of distributions have changed the internet choice. Whole foods wasn't really big deal. Costco's where we get our food isn't just like the one place in the store corner. There's so many different places we think on some level and food specifically just immigration in the amount of like between Hispanic populations Asian populations to go down. Of course, she stores now versus ten years ago. There's a lot more spicy flavor in almost like daresay like exotic stu-. Stuff when he go through the seltzer. I'll or different elm there. It just really interesting so people's tastes have change. And they've widened out even private label has become cool instead of just something that's black and white, and whatever it's like private labels become a brand. If you live in upstate New York w pop the Wegmans brand is something three sixty five by whole foods three sixty five is a separate brand and something that they use. So it's really interesting points of distribution the internet and a top of that with internet Instagram. It just we get sick and tired of things quicker, and this goes into the consumer side too. Which is weird. We're not noticing the consumer side we're seeing with iphones and smartphones. We're seeing people have midlife crisis sees at twenty eight or twenty nine and and it sounds silly. And I'm old school now that, but it's like the amount of talent that we've seen that like Redwood school worked for six or seven years at like, you know, I got a year off and just do that..

Xerox Connecticut. Instagram Costco Redwood school China New York Wegmans seven years ten years
"xerox" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Connecticut. You don't go to dare to by the stuff. But it just that's the mentality of in terms of value and being empathetic to what that customer goes through. And that's a very strong point. And then you go through an explorer like how can we differentiate ourselves to the consumer audiences? We're going after and certainly there's a there's a graphic explore what his logo look what is the name of the company or what's the name of the brand. Was it stand for it stays world transparencies a big deal? You can't fake it. So if you're Xerox am not pointing Xerox out and you make paper, but you're bringing down the Brazilian tree forest. You're going to be toast to a lot of people that find out we live in a voyeuristic that you you can't hide or can't hide for that long. People want to have more of a belief system in terms of the proxy by the. Support which is more of a millennial thing. But it spread much much deeper than that. It's a long process that involves strategy in terms of who were targeting, look and feel what is it brand identity? Look like color schemes. There's deep meanings behind every color like yellow is a is a clerk for creativity. Read. Did you see that a lot of global brands because red is a powerful especially in China, red Zaveri powerful, pretty neutral color in that side. And so we go from every from strategy to picking colors in this stuff. But to do everything in a three sixty level from the values of the company to the mission to what the ads like twit partners. You should have you shouldn't I can give examples and we can go back forth in that about different different ones. What brands mean and then pick across colors, but it's more deeper than people think it's certainly deeper than NATs. What has changed most in terms of its relative importance when building one of these plants, so what would pop to mind for me would be the role of social right like Instagram all these kind of things everyone talks about our key channels to distribute a marketing message, but I don't know assume that that's the answer. Is the answer of just love to hear more about like how you think about that? So what what has changed the most the rapid ascent of what can be successful and equally the decline. We did something in our last investor letter where we found the data point that from nineteen twenty three to nineteen Eighty-three in the top twenty five c PG categories twenty maintain number one share the entire time from that point on only like four have market share leadership and most have lost that since two thousand three the one area golden medal flower has just owned that market. It's amazing. And part of that is modes of distributions have changed the internet choice. Whole foods wasn't really big deal. Costco's where we get our food isn't just like the one place in the store corner. There's so many different places we think on some level and food specifically just immigration in the amount of like between Hispanic populations Asian populations to go down. Of course, she stores now versus ten years ago. There's a lot more spicy flavor in almost like daresay like exotic stu-. Stuff when he go through the seltzer. I'll or different elm there. It just really interesting so people's tastes have change. And they've widened out even private label has become cool instead of just something that's black and white, and whatever it's like private labels become a brand. If you live in upstate New York w pop the Wegmans brand is something three sixty five by whole foods three sixty five is a separate brand and something that they use. So it's really interesting points of distribution the internet and a top of that with internet Instagram. It just we get sick and tired of things quicker, and this goes into the consumer side too. Which is weird. We're not noticing the consumer side we're seeing with iphones and smartphones. We're seeing people have midlife crisis sees at twenty eight or twenty nine and and it sounds silly. And I'm old school now that, but it's like the amount of talent that we've seen that like Redwood school worked for six or seven years at like, you know, I got a year off and just do that..

Xerox Connecticut. Instagram Costco Redwood school China New York Wegmans seven years ten years