38 Burst results for "Xerox"

Fresh update on "xerox" discussed on Walton And Johnson

Walton And Johnson

00:16 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "xerox" discussed on Walton And Johnson

"Know, remain close, but I was just so blessed. Have a guy that had such a strong ethical background too. And the safety background and he he taught me firearms shape. He thought me how to reload taught me hunting ethics. We later all became Um, firearm safety instructors and 100 safeties instructors, So I kind of went all in on it. And Lo and behold, after Xerox and Unisys got a job, but the Safari Club International Cool. Alright, folks. Well, that is the way to get into it. Thank goodness for mentors out there in the hunting world. We're going to take a quick break. We're talking to Greythorne, the president, CEO of the Wall Sheet Foundation will be right back.

Xerox Wall Sheet Foundation Unisys Greythorne 100 Safeties Safari Club International
How Xerox & Some Dalmatians Saved Disney

Kottke Ride Home

01:50 min | 2 d ago

How Xerox & Some Dalmatians Saved Disney

"The new one hundred and one dull nations villain origin story crew ella seemed to be a real love or hate flick or more like a lukewarm dislike or confused enthusiasm based on reviews with titles like weird but i think i like it whatever the reaction the film seems to have been pretty far from what people were expecting mostly because it has almost nothing to do with the one hundred and one puppies that made guerrilla deville famous but sixty years before this any chaotic punk tinged origin story the world got its first film adaptation of dodie. Smith's nineteen fifty six children's novel the hundred and one donations and despite being positively obsessed with the movie as a toddler. I never knew that the canine cartoon marked a crucial turning points in the history of animation. And one which disney may not have ever made it to the other side of had. The movie not worked out. One hundred and one donations marked walt disney animation studios twenty second full length feature animation having been preceded by classics like snow white. Pinocchio fantasia and peter pan. It began development in the late fifties following the box office bomb of sleeping beauty which took six million dollars to make but only earned back five million sleeping. Beauty used the dominant animation technique of the time that required artists to hand trace drawings on transparent celluloid or sell sheets according to smithsonian magazine reported on this moment in animation history. Disney movies usually have one to two dozen cells per second so in total sleeping. Beauty had almost one million cells. That's one million drawings done and traced by hand a ton of work for a movie that ended up costing the studio a million dollars.

Dodie Walt Disney Animation Studios Ella Pinocchio Fantasia Disney Smith Peter Pan Smithsonian Magazine
Fresh "Xerox" from Walton And Johnson

Walton And Johnson

00:45 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "Xerox" from Walton And Johnson

"Your host job eater. I'm Ramon Rob us and we are back at it again. Remote early. Yeah, too early. He got any mischief planned for the weekend. No, just to survive the heat, really stay indoors and hopefully we don't get any tropical storms Keep my A C at 82. Is that what are caught, uh, suggested that ain't happening in my house. Believe that. No, I mean, it's one thing to say Keep your A C. You know up a little bit, but to say 82 Yeah. 82 is tough, man. I mean, I'll do 80. I'll do 78. Maybe maybe I do 76 when we're not at the house. Really? Yeah. Well, you have young Children there. Yeah, we got dogs. And it's just me and the wife at home now, so Okay, So you're I guess you're more cold nature since you're older. I am that That's a problem. I don't want to say that. But thank you for pointing that out. I appreciate it because you're so old, I am old. I am old. Oh, man. Hey, Speaking of being hot you ever had the meat sweats? Oh, yeah. So I got a bad case of the meat sweats last weekend because I decided it was hot outside. You know, it's pretty pretty pretty nice day. I'm like me and I could use a big rib eye, so I smoked. Mm. Some rabbis for about 30 minutes, then threw them on the Sear grill and sear them up and I'm a baked potatoes and I smoked fresh corn. Big beef steak tomatoes with blue cheese dressing and crumbles on them. About 20 minutes after we finished eating on Sunday night, I clicked my wife. She goes You okay? I said, yeah, I think so. Why? Because you're sweating. I said, Oh, yeah. Meat sweats. Yep. Haven't had those in a long time. But for you, it was worth it. Yeah, I love a good rib. I love a good rib. Uh, what's happening? Hey, let's start with a fun fact. Okay. What's the most common taxidermy in animal in the United States? To say, dear? Nope, Not even close. Wow. Okay, I think the other end of spectrum. Bear. Snow goose. Oh, the snow goose is the most taxidermy and am I would never say as far as quantity of animals done. Yeah, Okay, That makes sense now. Yeah, a lot of birds. Do you have a snow goose taxidermy? Nope. Do you have any kind of taxidermy animal? Yeah, I've got lots of most man's big game. Okay, most of us big game. My wife's favorite is my buffalo, and she likes the New Zealand stuff. Is it a buffalo or bison? This one's I'm gonna say it's a bison. Okay? I mean, I think there's only one pure bred her in the United States now, Okay in North America. But probably can't shoot those. Don't quote me on that. But, yeah. Um, yeah, It's probably buffalo, actually, but it she likes it looks cool reminds her of the old West. It's it's I'm an old guy. And hopefully over there. Yep. What's happening? Houston Sparkle Foundation. Um are young professionals group? The stagnant of society had an archery event this week. That was well attended, Um We got it still count on you to show up for this When we got a doe field on the opening day of Dove season coming up in September, we're planning a long range shooting event with gun works, and I know what's going to get you there, Not the guns. But Garrison brothers coming out Dan garrisons coming out. You gotta lead with that, and they happened to spill the beans and the fact that they they're going to probably have a few bottles of cowboy bourbon available. Yeah, they're bringing that and then Lucio's cigars is coming out. So it's going to cool cool firearms, bourbon and cigars out of the American shooting centers here in Houston, Texas, uh, our annual sporting Clays tournaments coming up in October, and that is to raise funds for our youth programs in our scholarship programs. And there's a lot of the cool stuff more announcements to come so anyway. I digress, Uh, with us this week is a guy have known for quite a while, Um, in the outdoor industry, their various capacities. This is great. Thornton Grey is the president and the CEO of the Wild Sheep Foundation. Great. Thank you. So much for joining us. Hey, Joey Ramone. Good to be on the program, and I got to tell you, I'm sitting here in Montana. Uh huh. I'm listening to you Talk about good old Texas Grilli and meat sweats and I'm getting hungry. And then and then, and then I'm now listening about, you know, three of my favorite things alcohol, tobacco and firearms, right? I mean, what? What more could be better, so I'm just I'm just glad to be on the program. Good morning to you appreciate you being here. So you just go ahead and book your ticket for September. I know you've got some business in Texas probably coming over that time, and, uh, It will partake of all three It sounds like a heck of a good time. I'd take you up on that. I'm a proud Houston Safari club members so I should attend. Cool. That'd be fun, Man. Be good to see you again. I know we played phone tag and email tag and stuff and With the pandemic lockdown. We hadn't hadn't got to see each other over the past year year and a half as usual, so it's good. It's good to connect with you on the program. Yeah. You bet. Glad to be here so great. Um We're going to talk about your organization and all the great things you guys do. But I want to go back a ways you weren't always involved in the outdoor world. What did you do before you before you got into your dream dream roles. You know, interested, Joe? I don't come from a hunting family. And I've always tried to figure out how the heck and I, then I get this passion and I, You know, I guess the story is, you know, Well as a young kid, I mean, I just I just had this interest in the outdoors. I started fishing, you know, early early on and shoot. I picked up my first fly right at age nine. And I think I think it came from reading outdoor live field of strings. Sports field. I mean, I've read them cover to cover mode lines. You know, like all kids back then, you know, we we washed cars with most long with pick weeds. We we moved rocks. We did whatever we could to make a little cash to buy a bicycle or in this case, you know I was buying fishing gear, but I was reading and, you know, reading about my heroes. And for whatever reason I I got you know this this bug to go, honey. Well, I couldn't do it. I didn't have anyone to to take me. Um, an and so it was until after I graduated from college and I went went to school got a business degree at President State University. And then went to work for Xerox. And one of my Xerox clients was a hunter and a shooter. And you know, I'd bought guns. I'm an addict Guide of 30. 30 had 3 57 22, you know, so I had firearms and I was shooting. I hadn't really hunted yet. I think I'd gone on one says it. Hunt on a kind of a putting takes isn't deal out in Central California with a with a college buddy, but it was actually a hunting mentor and a guy named Daryl Amble. And he was a banker and American National Bank in Bakersfield, California in and he had just kind of dropped a hint. While we were chatting about some hunt, he was going on. It Turns out, he Annually, went up to Wyoming and did a pronghorn hunt and I I was bold and I like the guy had sold him a couple of pieces equipment, and I said, you know, can I take you to lunch and I'll tell you what Joe and Ramona. I can remember the the Red Robin in Bakersfield took Daryl the lunch bottom of Burger. You know the Coke and I said, Would you teach me to hunt? And he did. So you know, it was a kind of a crazy story, you know, remain close, but I was just so blessed. Have a guy that had such a strong ethical background too. And the safety background and he he.

North America Xerox Daryl Amble Montana Ramona Daryl New Zealand Houston Sparkle Foundation October September Central California Joey Ramone Bakersfield American National Bank United States Thornton Grey Wild Sheep Foundation Wyoming Sunday Night JOE
G7 Finance Ministers to Meet in London

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:46 min | 2 weeks ago

G7 Finance Ministers to Meet in London

"Ministers from the g seven group of nations. Meet in person here in london. Later and britain's chancellor has ambitions to forge a joint path on one of the thorniest economic issues of all time business taxation. His plans for proposed a proposal earlier this week by the us to introduce global minimum corporation tax rate of fifteen percent while to assess what nations will want from plan and whether she soon equil- convince all of the g seven ministers to agree. I'm joined by rob cox global editor reuters breaking news breaking views and he joins us on the line from our xerox. Judy ever good morning to europe. Good morning how are you very well. Thank you good to have you with us on the globalist. This is the first meeting for some time. All these ministers isn't it not lethal logistical reasons. Yon i mean it is. I think their first face-to-face meeting of jesus just g seven finance ministers since the since the pandemic began so quite significant. They'll get to look each other in the eye and try to get to some consensus on what has been one of the thorniest as you pointed out issues among rich countries for for decade. Doing know what that plan is what the idea is at the moment. Well there is. There are various plans out there. But the main idea is the one being pulled together has been pulled together for for years now by the oecd. It involves something like one hundred and thirty seven countries and the idea is to basically come up with with a minimum corporate tax rate. The administration has well yellen. Ah janet yellen the treasury sectors ford fifteen percent joe conto seems to be holding out the idea that could be higher if we don't get my way i think he put forward originally twenty one percent That seems to be in line with what you're hearing from the uk from other members of the g. seven italy

G Seven Group Of Nations Rob Cox Britain Xerox Reuters Judy London Europe Yellen Janet Yellen United States Joe Conto Oecd Treasury Ford UK Italy
Fresh update on "xerox" discussed on Mark Blazor

Mark Blazor

01:05 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "xerox" discussed on Mark Blazor

"Year and a half ago, I began working on a podcast with George ST Egland and Gil phase on the whole thing fell apart about halfway through when they had a falling out and abandon the project. Also, they never paid me for any of the work. I did and said it was quote my fault for trusting them, just like they're dumb daughters. But then, a few days ago, I received a Xerox copy of effects asking me to read the following statement. Oh, Hello. It's George and Gil your favorite guys in the world and also New York, which is an awesome city, but not as good as it used to be. Because of Mayor de Blasio and the Knicks, who stink. We are in mandatory self quarantine right now. But we think that what the world needs is a podcast from us. George and Gil call in The bad boys of broadcast. It's time we finish and air this podcast. The very fact that we have content bank means we are miles ahead of the competition. Even a half finished podcast that almost ruined. Our friendship is more than you dances have out there and nobody will We're going to win the quarantine and one last thing you're welcome. End of statement. This is Oh, hello the podcast. Listen and follow this podcast for free on the I heart radio at number one for music, radio and podcasts, all in one ports at the top in 30 minutes Path breaking news at once. NewsRadio 6 10 W. T V s So yesterday we had a parents are concerned parent who's going to attempt to affect change in Olen Tangie City schools..

New York George GIL 30 Minutes Xerox Yesterday George St Egland Year And A Half Ago Mayor De Blasio Olen Tangie City Knicks ONE Few Days Ago One Ports Newsradio 6 Heart
Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:46 min | 3 months ago

Hagop Akiskal And The Bipolar Spectrum

"Rare for a scientific paper to fetch much on the black market. These days but i got the kisco was no ordinary psychiatrist. This is a book that has been made into many editions by cycads clinics. But if you go to latin america mimeograph versions are xerox versions on the market access for three hundred dollars like market for this book brazilians particularly loved so that in defiance of the even the the sim and that monograph he's talking about is currently selling for seven hundred to nine hundred dollars on amazon. It was an issue of the psychiatric clinics of north america. That gop guest edited in nineteen ninety nine and a paper that he wrote in that issue became one of his most influential and controversial in it he laid out a spectrum of bipolar disorders from the most manic psychotic extreme that schizo affective disorder two cases of bipolar that are only unleashed by substance abuse antidepressants or brain atrophy from dementia. Excuse me affective bipolar psychotic less than skis. Affective psychotic bipolar one bipolar to. There's something we call the half because there are psychosomatic less type. Which is medication associated Type for which is hyperthermic with depression. Because they people looking at the press is for the half which is substance used as five. Which is the knicks states. There's a pipe. Six which is in the context of dementia all but two of those categories have actually been absorbed into the dsm which now includes bipolar one disorder bipolar two disorder psychopathic disorder which views as the temperamental underpinning of borderline personality disorder and calls in his list bipolar two and a half when it occurs with the longer depressions of bipolar to then what about his bipolar three well antidepressant. Induced mania is now categorized as bipolar disorder in dsm five largely based on the research of gop and others who showed that over ninety percent of patients with antidepressant induce mania. Go on to develop full bipolar disorder with long term. Follow up a switching on the presence indicate by piloting. Now finally this and five is going to accept that then. He had bipolar four. That's hyperthermic the real charismatic. Hypo manic type temperament with depression. Okay this one didn't make it into the dsm actually and bipolar four and a half substance induced by polar disorder which is now categorized in the bipolar chapter india. Sem bipolar five depression with mixed features which was recognized for the first time in. Dsm five bipolar. Six mania in the context of dementia got believed that the brain atrophy of dementia could unleash a latent bipolar disorder in people with genetic or other risks for bipolar. But this category is not recognized in. Dsm unless you count as bipolar due to a general medical condition and yet you can hear in that court. That hookup is not satisfied. He's looking for a fight. He says his conceptualization was done in defiance of dsm that in defiance of the even the newly sm was a passionate man wore his heart on his sleeve. I am not very much of a political individual. Actually shy individual. Relatively speaking intellectuals tend to be. Yes oh you did do poetry and art. I saw on your cv you you. You were a poet and artist. Right of. I would say a young man. Everybody lies poetry. But some you fall in love with my wife. I always thought that way because When we were college students she said to me you one of those people who can bring science and art together and she said that's the ultimate aim of all our knowledge and i think that She she really saw something in me that time and predicted that my career would rise in methodic way bob Would only seventeen in college.

Bipolar Dementia Affective Psychotic Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Disorder Psychopathic Disorder GOP Depression Xerox Latin America North America Knicks Amazon Latent Bipolar Disorder Mania India Bob Would
Google is facing the biggest antitrust case in a generation

The Daily Dive

04:25 min | 8 months ago

Google is facing the biggest antitrust case in a generation

"The Justice Department announced that they filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing them of monopolizing the online search and search advertising markets. It's no secret that Google is a major player in these areas. The Justice Department is alleging that about 80% of American search queries go through Google. Also, it's chrome browser controls about 70% of the global online browser market. 85% of smartphones globally run its Android operating system. This is just a first step in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle for moron with the DOJ is alleging, and what it could mean for consumers will speak to Kyle Daily Technology editor at Axios, this pretty indisputable stuff, right? I mean, when you think of search you think of Google. I mean, there is myself being there's some other alternatives, but you know they're pretty. Finley used. The DOJ points out in the suit that Google controls about 88% of what it called General search, which is, you know In the open Web, searching Google maps searching for general information That's not like, Hey, I'm on Amazon and I want to search this closed platform specific product. And the challenge with bringing antitrust cases against the big tech companies. Is that a lot of them like Google, now free to use there isn't really clear, clean, observable consumer harm where it's like prices went up. Because of your monopoly. That's bad. We're gonna crack down on you. You know there are no prices for the consumer, so they have to sort of do two things here. One is define a market that's being monopolized which can be kind of challenging itself. So you know what you first have to do is establish. Okay, Here's something where Google Clearly has the monopoly and that is, as you say, online search and then be causing harm. So what DOJ is saying the harm is is really to competition, or sort of would be competition that Google has used its position and that it uses agreements that it makes With Apple with wireless carriers with Samsung and other companies that actually makes phones at one android toe lock it in as the default search engine on your smarts on are sort of core your carrier around your Web browser, and then it uses that to achieve this market dominance and shore up its market dominance, And then that sort of this self fueling thing, where the more ubiquitous Google is, the better it's product become. Is because it can feed the engine with more data, and it just sort of breaks away from the competition is definitely there. You know, you think of things like Kleenex or Xerox. You know those air the brand names or whatever the things that they kind of represent, now, you don't Here. Somebody said, Hey, go being that people say go Google that I mean, it's a product that we know and everybody uses all the time. What is Google say in response to all of this Because I was just reading some of it. You know, they said, Well, our product is just so good that That's why people like to use it and they have the other options and they just don't Yeah. I mean, that's why this is such an interesting case. And that's why, you know, we kind of expected continue seeing antitrust cases possibly brought against some of these big tech companies, particularly Facebook, but also Amazon, possibly Apple that there's a high likelihood that regardless of which party is in power We're going to keep seeing this. So they say exactly what you said. In response. They say they put in use the word monopoly, but they sort of copped to monopolize the market. But they say that's just because we're that good. You know, the other options are out there. You are free as a consumer to choose them. You're free to change the default on your phones so that its searching being more Google or doctor go. You do the same thing on your browser. People stick with us. This is Google talking because We just have the best search engine and we're not deliberately taking any action to prevent competition. And they say he's the same arrangements that they make with Apple to be the default in safari. They say. You know, the other guys are totally free to do that. And if they had a better product, and maybe they would have more more. These agreements like we have

Google DOJ Apple Justice Department Amazon Finley Samsung Kyle Daily Technology Axios Editor Facebook Kleenex Xerox
The Birth Of The Greenback

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:56 min | 9 months ago

The Birth Of The Greenback

"Stacey next. Jacob Feldstein. Planet money author of money the true story of amid up during a new book. Say I. brought props for us to do the indicator. I say. That's been months. It's been. That guy's been honking hall eight months. I have props came over so I could give you these troughs. Okay. Go ahead and look at them. All right. Okay. So, this is like a really high quality xerox of an old piece of money. THREE DOLLAR BILL RE dollar bill that's really a real thing. There's like a a lady standing next to in like a ball gown standing next to a cow to I chose a cow to pander to you I do love a cow keep going. Okay. The Orange Bank It's orange because this from the orange. Bank and this is a one dollar bill. So Stacey, these are reproductions of real paper money that was printed by private banks in the United States in the eighteen forties and fifties. This is one of the most interesting periods I found in the history of money when I was working on my book, it's this moment when the United States government did not print money, there was in fact, no single national paper currency but if you wanted to. Open Up Stacey's Bank of New York and print your own paper money. You could. I don't know if I would trust that dollar from that. Was a real problem that was a real problem we'll get to that. I. Mean they were just so many different kinds of money at one point the Chicago Tribune counted eight, thousand, three, hundred, and seventy different kinds of paper money in America. This sounds very confusing for everyone involved this indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and Jacob. Goldstein can we make eight, thousand, three, hundred and seventy, the indicator? Yes. Today on the show. How can you even have that many kinds of money and also just what does it tell us about money works? Let's just go. Let's just go a block away to get away from the horn. Yeah. Support for NPR and the following message come from fund. fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building you a portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So can we should set the scene here Jacob the nineteenth century America lots of is apparently also this was the era when gold and silver were money and Jacob say in the book that the government minted gold and silver coins, but it did not make paper money at that time. The exactly right. So the only paper money in America was printed by all of these different. Private banks people called paper money in fact banknotes, right. So they thought of it as like a piece of paper from a bank and they thought of paper money in particular as like a receipt or a coach ticket as as a thing that you could substitute for gold and silver, and in fact, if you look at at the bills I gave you all have this kind of. Writing like just grab a different one for fun. So we can say what it looks like. Okay. This is the stoning ten bank, a two dollar bill. There's a way. Moby Dick or something Wail Bell we've cow Bill Wail Bill So okay. So now look at the cursive writing see the cursive they're just blowers is stoning to. Two dollars to the bear on demand right and if you look all these different bills are different colors, they have different pictures on them, but they all say that will pay how ever many dollars to the on demand and so the second interest. Yeah it's an Iou because the interesting thing is it's telling you the paper money is not the real money. Right? They're saying we will give you two dollars in gold and silver for this paper money right? So the real money in this world is the underlying gold or silver the paper is just like. The Standard. So this is a time in history when there's not federal bank, there's not a national bank. There's like thousands of of little local banks and I guess all these banks can issue their own money. That's right and it's kind of evolving in this period at the beginning of this ehre the eighteen thirties. If you wanted to open a bank, typically you had to go to your state legislature and get special approval. Basically, they had to pass a special law that would let you open your bank and this was problematic because I was super corrupt essentially. Bank and print money. Then you're gonNA bribe whoever you have to. Say all the knee. All due respect to get them to let you open your bank. Right. So around eighteen forty, a little earlier, this new idea became popular. The new idea was called free banking. And the idea of free banking was anybody who is willing to follow a few basic rules could. Take and start printing money and literally start printing money and you know not surprisingly a lot of people wanted to print money. This is how we get eight thousand different kinds of money. Yes. How do you know if the bill that someone's handing you is real money or if it's literally just a piece of paper from the First Bank of Stacey Vanik Smith which might be real money. I wouldn't. Maybe. Add bribed senator so I love this so there arose in response to this problem these special periodicals Magazines that were privately published called banknote reporters. And what they were was these lists in tiny font of every kind of money. So I actually have a reproduction here another prop from a page. This one was called. Thomson's Bank note. Reporter. K.. So the people who subscribe to this merchants people who need to accept money. So so let's just say I'm running a bar and I got my thompsons bank note reporter and I come in I need a drink who thirsty I'm thirsty. So okay. So the page of the bank note reporter I printed out is for Orange Bank. Okay. Okay. So have that bill right here it is and it's a one dollar bill. So I find Orange Bank here in my Bengal reporter and it says Okay Orange Bank listed different bills and says ones and under wants it describes what the bill is supposed to look like says to horses check. Hey, Cart Jack Blacksmith shop male portrait Jack Girl. Check. So it's at least plausibly real. The reporter also tells me something else that's important and that explains a lot about how many works at this time. Typically would tell me whether I should accept that paper money at full face vowed I can buy my dollar whiskey with this whether you can get your dollar whiskey because remember what we care about is whether I can turn in that paper money for gold or silver, and so if the bank is shaky or even if it's just really far away. You know the reporter might say, just knock five cents off the dollar give Stacey Ninety five cents worth of whiskey instead of a dollar that took a really long time to buy that we ski. It does seem like it would have been absurdly inconvenient right and for a long time when people look back at this period, the basic story of free banking was just that was a horrible idea like that many kinds of money right but. Much, later, like in the nineteen seventies. This generation of economic historians started going back and looking more closely. At the banks and how money works in this period and what they saw when they really went through the numbers was basically like it wasn't that bad Bankston go bus that often people didn't usually lose much money when they used. We're you overall they would lose like a few percent which is. Kind of like what you pay today. So when you take money out of the weird off Brand ATM at. The corner store. which I always do. Yeah, I. Mean. That's basically like the the bartenders giving you ninety cents for your dollar when you do that, right? So. Obviously, we do not have eight thousand different kinds of money now this ended and it ended after the civil war. Yeah was the civil war. So during the civil war, that old American argument of can we have national banks or not came up again and Congress passed a few important banking laws. One of them basically taxed all those thousands of kind of state banknotes out of existence, and then the other one created these new national banks that printed much more reliable, much more uniform paper money. It's interesting because I mean, this was obviously after the civil war was the time when the United States went from like a collection of. To One Country, and it seems like the same thing happened with currency maybe not a coincidence. Your I mean, there is this idea at least in the modern world money is part of what makes a country a country and I think you do see that happening at this moment in the united. States when we go from thousands of kinds of money toward one uniform kind of paper money I'm just sad we lost the cow bills. Because you know Jacob I have a fever and the cure. This story in like a whole bunch of other like believable stories like this are in your new book money. The true story of a made up thing. This episode of the indicator was produced by Nick. Fountain fact check by Britney Cronin, the indicators edited by Patty hearst and is a production

Stacey Vanik Smith Jacob Feldstein Reporter Orange Bank Bank Of New York United States Okay Orange Bank America NPR Federal Bank Bill Wail Bill Microsoft First Bank Thompsons Bank Chicago Tribune Congress
Amazon to Buy Zoox, in a Move Toward Self-Driving Cars

Rush Limbaugh

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon to Buy Zoox, in a Move Toward Self-Driving Cars

"Amazon is buying an autonomous driving company Amazon is buying self driving technology companies Xerox the deal is estimated to be worth more than a billion dollars those soups is working on self driving ride vehicles there's speculation the technology could help Amazon with its delivery service to in a joint statement the companies say Zuk started in two thousand fourteen with a vision of zero emissions vehicles designed for autonomous ride hailing and says it'll continue as a standalone business with Xerox executives running

Amazon Xerox ZUK
Sunny Skies Continue; Weekend Rain Approaching Chicago

Steve Cochran

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Sunny Skies Continue; Weekend Rain Approaching Chicago

"Somers common the a first official day of of summer summer I I guess guess will will be be Saturday Saturday right right that's that's that's that's the the longest longest day day summer summer solstice solstice four four forty forty four four PM PM on on Saturday Saturday and and still still gonna gonna feel feel like like summer Saturday although probably some rain moving in here for the weekend until then nope we've got what we used to call a carbon copy of yesterday's weather in the weather the day before only we've updated that let's see's not Xerox copy what are you calling it see a cut and paste cut and paste weather today yeah there you go it's gonna look a lot like yesterday and feel a lot like yesterday but a little bit warmer high near eighty nine mid to upper seventies today by the lake front clear skies tonight low down to sixty six in the tomorrow mostly sunny a twenty percent chance of afternoon showers and thunderstorms high near ninety two that continues into Saturday and Sunday and into Monday as well right now in Chicago some sunshine and here at sixty six degrees there sixty six admin way and sixty eight along the lakefront

Somers Chicago Official Xerox
WhatsApp Pay to Launch in India

Why It Matters

11:04 min | 1 year ago

WhatsApp Pay to Launch in India

"India a potentially decisive moment in digital freedom is going down right now. India's ruling party has put forward new rules that would allow it to trace and censor private communication. Standing in. Its way is what's up. An American made encrypted Messaging Platform. That's used by hundreds of millions of Indians and the outcome could have ripple effects across the globe. I'm Gabrielle Sierra. And this is why it matters today. India's government versus what's up and the looming threat of digital authoritarianism. India is the world's largest democracy if you can imagine nine hundred. Million PEOPLE VOTED. Alas national election last year out of a population of one point. Three billion people. It's just it's it's a massive exercise election. Yeah it's huge it's populace and that's what also makes it really fun and exciting to be on the ground. You certainly feel the energy especially in the city like Mumbai. Politicians routinely insult each other on the campaign trail criminals of every flavor. Run for office and win so do Bollywood movie. Stars Cricket Stars it just never ends has always been a fairly Jackie democracy. We talk a lot. We argue a lot that our culture. Okay so help me understand why. What's APP is such a big deal in India? How many people are actually using it? They're awfully four hundred million people. It is indeed this is Chinmaya ruined. She's a resident fellow at Yale. University and the founder of a research center at National Law University Delhi. She's also a leading legal expert on the intersection between freedom of speech and technology. And so why WHATSAPP wine? Not you know instagram or snapchat. The elite platforms are used by everyone. But what's happened? The one that really appeals to people if you have a phone that's not too fancy. If you don't speak English you don't read or you don't have access to inexpensive data connection. You can still use. What's APP so it started with? Hey you don't have to spend one rupee or two rupees per tax. You just save them up and then they send whenever you're in Wifi and saw a lot of people with not lot of money. Which is many many Indians decided that this works for them. And then what's up had these multimedia features which people started using it started liking and? I have mixed feelings about this because the good thing is that I get to talk to my grandma. And she finally has forgiven me for moving across cushy can look at my home and you know say things about my plants or whatever course but if you're sitting in an Indian airport and watching the number of people who do video calls subject you to their conversations mixed feelings what's up is really a messaging platform and that can be one messages like me sending a message to you. But it's also very commonly used in India for groups. I am do oil and I am a technology reporter for the New York Times based in Mumbai. India vindaloo also covers Indian economics and culture and has written extensively about free speech and misinformation under India's ruling party. We called him at his home in Mumbai on. What's up what's has become so embedded in life in India that people use it in their business transactions so you can order groceries from your corner grocery store over what's APP. I buy airline ticket from make trip. Which is one of the big online travel agencies? They send me a confirmation message on what's up with by e ticket details so for those of US based outside of India handling a basic transaction may require a few different platforms. You find out about a concert on instagram. Rsvp FOR IT ON FACEBOOK. Maybe share the notification on twitter buyer ticket on ticketmaster and received the confirmation on g mail but for Indians. What's APP is often the one stop shop for everything? In other words an application from Silicon Valley has become basic infrastructure for the second most populous nation honors. That's a pretty big deal and it helps. Illuminate why the government is pushing for greater control. What's up was founded in two thousand nine by two former employees of Yahoo? It's an American company. It was founded in Silicon Valley and they basically built a very simple messaging service became very popular. It caught the attention of Mark Zuckerberg the chief executive and founder of Facebook Zuckerberg beside it in two thousand fourteen to by what's APP and pay the still stock price of twenty two billion dollars for this message company so facebook is making a mobile push with steal the buy real time messaging service. What's APP? It's still a pretty incredible price to pay for a company that stress a few years old. It also makes tiny what's APP more valuable than some of the most established companies in the country including American Airlines Marriott hotels and Xerox and it came at a crucial moment for facebook when it really was trying to find ways to diversify its revenue base and also get in touch with more mobile users. I'm Seema mody global markets correspondent with CNBC business news and suddenly came this messaging platform. That was not only gaining prominence here in the US but around the world in fact I believe the average daily use a rate on WHATSAPP was much higher than Facebook Messenger. Facebook saw that and said this is such a strategic bet for us. Let's acquire it and find a way to really incorporated into our user base platform. But what's APP is free right. What's APP is free? And I think this is still a developing story to see how facebook is really trying to incorporate what's up into its business and you know will you one day see ads on what's that that's certainly been one of the big questions sucker. Berg was pressure in that. This technology of very simple messaging APP was going to become very popular today. Whatsapp has more than two billion users. Around the world it is by far the most popular messaging APP in the world and one of its biggest claims to fame. Is it emphasizes privacy. All messages on the service use. Something called end to end encryption. Okay so in most cases when you send an email or a text message it gets encrypted that means that the information inside is locked up in a code so that outsiders can't read it however the service providers that pass your message along can read it whether that's apple or G. Mail or facebook whoever they all have the keys to that code and that makes your message vulnerable enter end to end encryption with this technology none of the men have the keys. Only you and the person you're sending it to break the code. What's up can't read. Even if the government came knocking at the door of what's up what's up. What have nothing really to give up. And so your information is private and that makes it unique to other services messaging services like whether you're sending a text message or even facebook Messenger where that information does live somewhere. Yeah most other. Messaging Services in the world are not and encrypted and certainly none of the popular ones. But what's up has made it really easy. You don't think about corruption it just is encrypted Because so much of India's communication happens on WHATSAPP end to end. Encryption has made it very difficult for the government to investigate messages in the name of national security. People are not making phone calls anymore. They're not even walking over to their neighbor. Say This texting and where the speech there is harmful speech. It's not news that social media can bring out the worst in people the platforms. We use everyday are teeming with sexism. Racism misinformation and violent ideologies. It's the same. In India or social media has amplified problems that are a lot older than the internet rumors and lies spread like wildfire across the Internet including across chat and applications. Like WHATSAPP Many I. I'm used US India or live. Whatever comes in the woods his true the one that's really made the headlines is there was a lot of fishers. He'd speed circulating on what's APP so for example. The Muslim community is under quite a lot of pressure in India. Right now and it's really sad one of the ways in which they're discriminated against is that some upper caste. Hindus don't eat beef and so the rumors circulating on what's apple say things like X. has beef in his fridge are why is transporting COW CARCASS. And since it's already been sold to people as it stretched to their religion when a rumor like that reaches people that already feel threatened and feel like these people are out to get all the Hindus and they're trying to destroy religion by eating beef and Lynch mobs attacked them and their popularly called. What's APP lynchings? Early twenty eighteen. There was a wave of false messages. On whatsapp about child kidnappers prowling parts of India. Trying to steal people's children and this panicked a lot of people and mobs attacked strangers in various parts of India and killed them. Beat the Tied the mob hung them all kinds of terrible things. More than twenty people died in just the span of a few months because of these rumors and after these rumors started appearing the central government. When after what's happened said you need to find a way to trace these messages and stop these messages. And this set off a feud with what's out that has still not been resolved. The government says it doesn't WanNa read your messages. The government says they don't want to spy on the content of messages. They're not asking what's up to break the encryption of messages and show them what's in the messages but they are saying. Is You need to be able to trace back the pathway of a message. And you have to find a way to do that because if you have some message goes viral we WANNA find out who sent it and we'll see what happens. I mean what's up has said that to that would require significant changes to their service and they haven't said whether they'd be willing to make such changes to their

India Facebook Government Mumbai United States Gabrielle Sierra Founder Cnbc Yale Apple Silicon Valley Yahoo New York Times Chinmaya Whatsapp Twitter Mark Zuckerberg National Law University Delhi
Food For Thought: The Julia Child Episode

Radio Cherry Bombe

09:53 min | 1 year ago

Food For Thought: The Julia Child Episode

"Yes I taught English in history in Vista California for twenty two years damn near killed me but this young woman here Emily Myers. He came down here with me. Was My student fifteen years ago and I was a big grammar teacher because I went to Catholic school right. So we're doing this grammar exercising. It said Julia Child Comma the French Chef Comma and whatever else to sentence said and so I said to the students this is what two thousand four ish and I said so Julia. You all know who Julia. Child is the seventh grade. I got these blank. Looks let me tell you about Julia. Child told them the whole story about who she was and the French chef and how she was fifty years old when she first started. I was forty when I was became a teacher. And so this that and the other and then I told them the story about how nineteen eighty nine. I was a stay at home. Mom I had my two kids Cayden Matthew who were six and four. No six and two and Julia child came to town to the to Warwick's books to her book signing of the the way to cook her last book that she wrote on her own and I said I have to go see her. I have to meet her. I just have to do this. In the meantime as the stay at home mom was getting bored so I started making English muffins and if local but you know the Panikin isolating the Sh- muffins to the panicking because the guy who used to own the Panikin road motorcycles with my then husband and one day he came over for what they called the Prince of Norton Prints of darkness motorcycle. Ride and Chili Cook Up. You can tell which part I was in that and and I said Hey bob you wanNA try some English Muffins. And Hey say. He had one with my homemade strawberry jam on it. And he's these are great and I said good. Do you want to buy some because I need to do something out of the home and make some money and he said so to gross a week from my little kitchen when I was living by San Diego State. It was hilarious so this is when I was still doing that so I got the babysitter for the baby. Matthew because he was too he would never have known the difference and I took Kate with me now. Kate was six and so she'd been watching with videotapes at that point Julia. Did something called the way to cook. She did a series of videotapes. Kate and I would watch them. Kate's birthday cake. Every year was the classical. Jen was with the whip cream and the strawberries on it and so I took with me because I walked in Julia. I know by the way I made her a dozen English. Muffins packed them up in a box wrote her. A letter. Dear Julia. You are the one who taught me how to cook. My mother thought she did but she didn't. You're the one who really did with your show. Julia Child and company and Julia Child and more company. I've learned everything I've known from. You saw there. She is. She walks in. Cates going. Momma and I know I know she's here so we get in the line in the line and the you know they always have the helpers with them when they're big like that I don't mean in stature I mean you know and so the lady and I said I said here's a spock's English muffins in it. I made them pro. Have this little business so she. It's my turn. She hands the box. Julia is working out. She did this. She took her. She's she. I was looking in her eyes and she was sitting down because she really was too. She's banging on the box. Oh goody goody gumdrops homemade English muffins she's really did say that it was so funny and I said yes and she's and I told her that I was making them. Well I guess profession getting paid for it so I guess that makes it a profession right and she said I'm so she got very serious. I'm so glad you're doing this. We need more cottage industry like this. She said English muffins she said to me. How do you get them to cook so that they're cooked all the way through and not burn on the outside? I'm going Julia. Child is asking me how to do this. And then I remembered her recipe didn't work. This was not her recipe. This was from a jam book called Jam. Shame or something like that and I said Yeah. That is the secret. Isn't it and I told her how I did it. And it was all about rolling it around in a bowl of corn meal and I said like you had taught me on one of your shows about cornmeal being like a ball bearing and she said I never really thought about that and she was unbelievable. I couldn't believe it. So we're in the store and she signs the book and she didn't sign much of anything. Good luck or whatever and then. Kate neier lurking around the store watching her some more and she oh and you should have seen you know how mom's right so this kid of mine is six years old. She's just standing there looking at her and Julia said some things to. I can't remember what it was but it was really cute. So okay fast forward. It's two thousand ten. I'm on what I called my odyssey because I decided being teacher. I need to take some time off during the summer. Actually do something and not stand at the Xerox Machine. Getting Ready for the next school year. Merola grammar packets. Remember those and I took off. I went on this Odyssey. I went up to Portland just to go to Powell's books because I needed more cookbooks. Right to add to that four thousand collection and so I'm coming back. It's twenty in my little. Volkswagen Cabriolet with the top down and Bonnie Raitt blasting. Having a great time end. The car dies on the side on the side of the road. I got I two tires off the road. That was it and I'm talking about on this very near. Oh I was four miles north of point arena which is two hundred and fifty miles north of San Francisco on the one and not the one. Oh one the one the one the ones the one that goes like this and you can only drive twenty five miles an hour thankfully so I've got my two tires off on the side of the road and some guy comes turns around takes his truck and pushes me the rest of the way off the road and I was a little nervous about that. Call whoever the tow truck comes. I'm taking pictures of the tow truck. Taking my car away they take me down to point arena. I was on my way to that. Lighthouse also lighthouses and now. I'm stuck there for a week because I don't know if I can say this. But what does the industry in Humboldt county growing exactly so the town of point arena about five blocks long? The entire town is stoned. Looks like you can see smoke through the whole thing so he kept my car for a week. Never fixed it. Charge me a thousand dollars. Never fixed it he he had it towed to Healdsburg where his brother fixed it for another thousand dollars. That's another story anyway. So I put it up on facebook. The picture of my car being towed and one of my friends called and he said. I love point arena. You have to meet the Jam Lady. I said okay. Well I'll meet the family so I walk a mile down the road because I don't have a car turn right and there's a sign the Jam Lady. Her real name is Lisa Joa committees. She calls herself Jam Lady. She makes jam in point arena. Sends it all over the place? I went inches a full kitchen like that. One all stainless steel really professional. That we start talking Blah Blah Blah. She Says Yeah. I used to work for Barbara Tropic. China Moon Cafe and I said Oh my God I love her. She figured she'd Cook. My dinner sometime before I was like. Oh my God. This is amazing. She says I told her the Julia Child Story. Oh I forgot to tell you part of it. She wrote me a letter. She answered my little note that I had scrawled on a little tiny legal piece of paper. She wrote me a letter. Julia Child wrote Miller. I have evidence and so I read. I wrote back to her. She wrote me again. I still owe a letter. I don't know why I never finished that. So I'm telling this story to Lisa The lady. She says wait right here. Okay what's going on here? I mean this really weird place she disappeared. Disappears upstairs comes down with a box opens the box? She has a dozen flutes. Champagne flutes. Julius ninetieth birthday party she says you need. These gave me two of them. Doesn't that amazing I just went? I'm a total stranger and you she said we're not strangers. She said you have to have these. They have to be yours and size. Okay thank you thank you. We wrapped in very carefully. They got home even through the bumpy. Healdsburg thing and so then on her hundredth birthday. And I'm not sure what I think that was. I don't remember what year it was on her hundredth birthday. I was home from school that day. I think in August I was home legally and I cooked everything just all Julia Child and I called one of my friends. I said come on over. We use the Julia Child flutes. We had a little split of champagne. We toasted her. I put it all up on facebook. It was amazing and now it's so funny. I have those glasses there in my glass cabinet. But they're hidden in the back and my son in law was here in February and he went to reach for that to put for his champagne. I said Oh no look what that says on it. He says Julia Child's ninetieth birthday. I said you don't use those. You don't appreciate that. This is Julia Child. I mean come on so that is my Julia Child Story. I Love Her love her the day that she died. My daughter was about twenty. I think she called me just limit on her own. She called me says mom have really bad news. What does this in an accident? She says Julia died today and it was as if her her grandmother had. My mother had died. You know we were so cried on the phone and you know who's better than Julia Child

Julia Child Kate Neier Point Arena Facebook Matthew Catholic School Vista California San Diego State Emily Myers Healdsburg Warwick Xerox Portland Bonnie Raitt Volkswagen Cabriolet Cates Momma JEN Barbara Tropic
Coronavirus fears shouldn't stop you from investing in stocks and adding to your 401(k)

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus fears shouldn't stop you from investing in stocks and adding to your 401(k)

"Minute corona virus appears likely to keep investors cautious this week as the virus spreads far beyond China but Steve chaperone at federated global investment management is taking the long view he says the epidemic's impact will not be permanent way we think about it is similar to how we would think about a government shutdown or natural disaster it's in most cases demand delayed not demand destroyed it was a rough session for stocks back on Friday and now Berkshire Hathaway's operating earnings coming in lower than expected partly a weakness in insurance but Warren Buffett's conglomerate still sitting on about one hundred twenty eight billion dollars in cash at the end of the quarter and it purchased a record two point two billion dollars of its own shares and H. B. reports earnings today for its latest quarter with a company under siege from Xerox a takeover bid and with the corona virus threatening its supply chain H. B. as promised a full response to Xerox latest offer after strengthening its takeover defenses

China Steve Berkshire Hathaway Warren Buffett H. B. Xerox
Larry Tesler, the UI pioneer responsible for cut, copy, and paste, dies at 74

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Larry Tesler, the UI pioneer responsible for cut, copy, and paste, dies at 74

"The man who invented the cut copy and paste computer commands is dad Larry Tesler in early Silicon Valley computer pioneer died Monday at the age of seventy four Tessler was working at Xerox when Steve Jobs hired him to come work for apple we became the company's first chief scientist me copy and paste function arguably Tessler is most famous impact on computing first appeared in apple's software in nineteen eighty three and on the lease a computer in the original Macintosh released in nineteen

Larry Tesler Tessler Xerox Steve Jobs Apple Scientist
In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

In 2015 audio, Bloomberg advocates targeting minorities

"Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg launched his democratic presidential bid with an apology for his support for New York stop and frisk policy now he's apologizing for comments he made it a twenty fifteen appearance at the Aspen Institute in which she defended the practice saying the way to bring down murder rates is to quote but a lot of cops in minority neighborhoods because that's where all the crime is in the audio Bloomberg says that you can't quote just take the description Xerox it and pass it out to all the cops in a statement Bloomberg says he inherited the policy and that his remarks don't reflect his commitment to criminal justice reform and racial equity he says he cut back on the policy but quote I should have done it faster and sooner president trump sent out and then deleted a tweet highlighting the audio declaring Bloomberg's a total racist trump has himself been a vocal supporter of stop and frisk policies Jennifer king Washington

Mike Bloomberg Aspen Institute Xerox Donald Trump New York Murder President Trump Jennifer King Washington
Xerox sweetens offer for HP

Sean Hannity

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Xerox sweetens offer for HP

"Now it hasn't formally launched its takeover bid as yet but Xerox confirm that it has raised its offer to buy HP incorporated to twenty four dollars a share up from the twenty two dollars a share offered made last November if the deal gets done Xerox's indicated it would nominate eleven independent candidates to replace HP's board at the computer and printer makers annual shareholder meeting this summer shares of HP are up one point four percent today while Xerox stock is up nearly one

HP Xerox
Xerox CTO Naresh Shanker

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:23 min | 1 year ago

Xerox CTO Naresh Shanker

"Shankar? Welcome to tech nations great to speak with you Becky Beta looking Russia. I thought we'd begin with your current post. A lot has changed since the last time you and I caught up you you are now the chief technology officer of Xerox with a remarkable purview that includes rnd as well as running the technology function more. Generally speaking at that company and what an interesting time to be Xerox eight organization that is going through quite a renaissance at present isn't and I thought maybe you could take a moment and describe. What was it about this opportunity that attracted you to make the move over to Xerox? Yeah Thanks Peter so one I mean Xerox has had a very a very richer I'd say in its hundred year history history of both in invention and innovation It's it's really amazing. Run and What really intrigued me me about? The opportunity was I have the unique opportunity to transform and revitalize the Brandon Business from and a business model and Also you know digital transformation perspective So that is number one fundamentally transforming business so that it's easy for customers to engage And also consumer technology as a company. So that's point number one. The second aspect of the role also exciting was actually the the opportunity to actually transform the the product portfolio across The Workplace Solution Landscape the graphics landscape and All of the new sciences That will help us. Transcend the print franchise and so the opportunity to also launch new lines of business business and create a value Is really a huge opportunity. That I thought was quite exciting so on many different levels food this role and opportunities quite unique so So I don't you know I have to give this a shot because it's Really of very unique opportunity and an exciting opportunity and Off The brand is a monkey brand highly respected in the industry and so wiped out You know Why not and so? That's what brought me here and And I'm looking forward to the run because I see the Mike Three five three and five years being really really exciting to transform the brand at many different levels. Why I'd love to get digging a little deeper in a rush Ashton transformation and you've alluded to some of the areas in which you're hoping to your for example transcended print franchise use your your words to Get into workplace Klay Solutions Graphics New Leverage New Sciences. I wonder if you can tak- maybe a couple of those examples and he'll back the onion a little bit further and describes describes what you see in terms of the pathway with some of those whereas whereas what will be the sources of innovation and what complexion do they take. Okay so when you look at the the print franchise which is our CO business and workplace solutions and graphics We now see ourselves moving moving into a whole new range of sciences to take advantage of close to. I'd say a fifth approximate fifty five plus billion dollar market opportunity That is ahead of us in all of these new sciences so if I look at Beyond the CO business in the areas of packaging In the areas of packaging of you know there are new sciences around direct object printing in line marking All of these new areas areas that potentially are adjacent seas and also moving into the packaging. Cite Ah the digital printing packaging side of business so automobiles will be adjacent agencies to the core business of the next set as an example and then the next set of businesses that launched As an example is it was basically a starting with treaty. The treaty additive manufacturing business predominantly focused on liquid metal That is a very very Interesting technology it's highly disruptive and What's unique about the technology it's fundamentally revolutionizes manufacturing and and Both around speed around speed cost and reliability of what we've done in the liquid metal space is We both technology Where we can actually absorb the low cost and put in take off metal aloys that are commodities and Begin produce high-quality production pots that that have tremendous integrity and density in terms of the materials that we print of low cost reliability and also the speed and so it's a huge value proposition and So that's that's a classic example in terms of Directionally How you meet? This is in the additive space. And you couple that with the treaty software. That now aroused us to design predictive models And also pest invalidate the composition and the quality of those models before they even get printed so the treaty. Ai Software that's going to be coupled with the hardware and creates a very unique value. Did you proposition so so we able to print not just parts that are denso The fast and CHEAPO and and in compared to those made from metal powders right which typically has been where most of the industry has been investing it and and And so what we've been able to Actually mitigate is a lot of the other technologies around metal. Powders you know have long again. The Post production processes Procuring and be powdery. Well we don't. We don't have that complexity. Actually that comes with a post production process and so big knowledge again in the faster cheaper and Much Mo- so What I call it? Preserves the integrity and the density of the the materials have been used So it's a very very exciting play In the three D. space and to produce a complete three sixty experience of to really address what I call the on demand nature chill of manufacturing since we live in an on-demand instrument economy right You pay for what you consume and you'll pay when you consume Emmett

Xerox Chief Technology Officer Shankar Russia Denso Peter Emmett Klay Solutions Ashton
Are You Prepared For Sponsorship?  The Career Big Game!

Trill MBA Show - For Black Women Surviving Corporate America

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Are You Prepared For Sponsorship? The Career Big Game!

"This week because it is the first week of black history. three-month I thought it would be a fitting time to highlight the first black woman. CEO of a fortune. Five hundred hundred company. I talk about her all time. She is one of the reasons for starting this podcast Ursula Burns. She has been the only black woman. The only there's only Orne just who and I don't even know how she dated. But let me tell you about Ursula. Woah Ursula Burns was appointed chairman and CEO of Veon in December. Two thousand eighteen. Now that is a company headquartered recorded in Amsterdam that focuses on telecommunications services so just think mobile phones fouling a period as executive -secutive chairman and previously chairman of the Board of directors. So she'd been in this thing for minute. Ursula has extensive international experience of large companies confronting technology change in their industries. She was chairman of the Board of of the Xerox Corporation from two thousand ten to two thousand seventeen and chief executive officer from two thousand nine to two thousand sixteen you up. So she was chairman of the board and the a former. US President Barack Obama are forever president and appointed her to help lead the White House national program on Science Technology Engineering and math and she served served as chair of the President's Export Council Ursula is the director of the Board of Exxon Mobil. Nestle and Uber Uber huge companies. She also counsels other community educational and nonprofit organizations including the Ford Foundation and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation. Mit She is a member of of the US. National Academy of Engineers and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Ursula holes a master's degree in mechanical engineering. I'm from Columbia University and a Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering From Polytechnic Institute of New York University. If you ever hear this I just want you to know that is a lot of us trying. We are here. Charm figured out. And we're trying not to let you be the only one that has been the CEO of a fortune five hundred company. Thank you for all of your contributions. Abusive fans thank you for being the first and letting US know that it is possible to hold the top spot at a fortune. Five hundred

Ursula Burns Chairman Chairman And Ceo CEO United States Ursula Mechanical Engineering From Po Barack Obama Orne President Trump Exxon Mobil Nestle Xerox Corporation American Academy Of Arts And S Chief Executive Officer Science Technology Engineering National Academy Of Engineers Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Columbia University Amsterdam
Dr. Mary Claire Haver, Creator of The Galveston Diet, Designed for Women in Menopause

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Mary Claire Haver, Creator of The Galveston Diet, Designed for Women in Menopause

"Meet Dr Dr Mary Clare. Hey welcome to extraordinary women radio. Mary Clare Thank you for having me. Yeah this is. I'm so excited to talk to you. Learn in about your Galveston Diet and this is at a time of year when so many of us are thinking about eating clean and healthy. I know myself I've been really Kicking awesome really a good healthy eating habits this last week and I went to the grocery store and did all my good shopping and I prepared all my foods on on on Sunday and I and I just felt really good this week so exciting. I'm excited to hear what your work is. All about. So I love stores transformation and I think we're really. I'd like to start this. Is You left behind a full-time. OBGYN the paycheck. All the good stuff that comes along with that and became an entrepreneur to start the GALVESTON. John Diet. Tell us what was the what was a pivotal moment. That helped you decide that you were going to take this leap. And how did that all unfold for you. Though once I develop the program I basically developed it I for myself because despite hundreds of patients complaining complaining to me about Midlife weight gain than me internally taking a deep breath maybe a tiny bit of an Iro and patting them on the leg and telling them to go back to the Jim to count calories and then swearing they were doing all of it and it wasn't working. It wasn't until I actually I. I can relate. I have been so unfair to these poor women who came to me for advice and to be kind minded myself. I was never trained in nutrition at all. I was in medical school. It's a you know when you see it right. Whatever that so often as there's no I mean that's just amazing to me that there's no nutrition's training in medical school? I better than others. It's definitely getting better but my goodness twenty five years ago ago when I went through and other than you know people needing trans parental nutrition because they couldn't swallow you know that kind of TBN beanstalk very very high tech but as far as sitting down with a patient and discussing just the basics of nutrition. In what they're eating. What's helping what's not helping with? No training and I realized that calories in calories out hitting the gym is really difficult to me contain midlife and there was nothing else going on That may be all these calories equality and we were missing something so marched over to the Battle Institution Department at the University of employed at the time and said hey guys was going on. This isn't working for me. It's not working when my patients and they're like look. We only do studies on the elderly and twenty five year old male athletes in a few astronauts like there's no one's paying for research on middle aged women. Wow so here's what we know. Here's some anecdotal. Like we were studying other things and we happen to look at what they were eating so I just. I got a stack of things and started reading reading reading reading on my own looking at the fads and looking at new woods. What is this about Halio? What's going on what you know? All the facts that people were trying and having limited success but not really good hells Dell's and I started seeing this recurrent theme of inflammation coming out onto something here. So the the derive doug the more that I found out about why we have increased inflammation with age especially in women especially with the changes and just blowing my mind with all the nutritional things that we could do to change that so I came up with a plan for myself. Super Selfish. Just wanted to fix me. He said all right. I know that there's definite nutritional changes that I can make that will combat inflammation. I can add in all these things that are anti inflammatory and I can remove these things that we know inflammatory. Nothing I was taught. I really did a deep dive into the intermittent fasting data came out absolutely blown away. It's fascinating this was three years ago. You know before Classes cool and also looked at the high addiction of of Americans to add sugar inseparable carbohydrates also. I said all right. Let me let me put these three together and see how they work. They work like magic on the center. Justic played literary accomplishments that twenty pounds just melted off. I was just blown away. Of course they my girlfriend's like what are you doing. Hey share so I'm a little xerox copies of my program. Mike Program Very Much N.. Handed it out to my friends. And they started giving me feedback be back and they were trying it and then I reached out on facebook to a few friends who live downtown. Hey do you wanna try this. In the nature of difference on all of a sudden my facebook group just blew up. Yeah and so many people were interested in it so that was kind of a catalyst for this is a thing I gave it away for free for a year and a half had these little test groups I thought about doing like a protocol study on it to treat menopause symptoms and because so many of the of the students were only have harsher. You better sleeping better all the things that were kinda coming along with. Menopause seem to be better outside of the scale. You know and so it was. Then I had some savvy your business friends who are physicians who who were entrepreneurs who set cleric. This is a thing like you can make this business knows me me you know and I got some advice. I tried any book. It failed miserably and meanwhile I'm still working and then I said did you know I need more time. I need to release figure this out at the same time. The administrative burdens at my job were becoming more and more unbearable and a a lot of people in medicine will tell you that the paperwork cart was just completely overwhelming. And I wasn't having enough time for patients I've heard that many times end getting older older in the hours. It'll be our task when you're delivering. Babies they come remain calm right. I'm not the girl who was cutting who was performing Caesarians at five o'clock in the afternoon. Exhume wanted to get home. I did all the right things so my I was getting tired of less resilient. My husband was working away. A lot of kids were being raised by nanny. I I just felt like they were teenagers in that. This was the right time. So when my last press Ganey scores came through on patient satisfaction. It was It was like a four point six five which I thought was great. My job is not to make everyone happy. Sometimes I have to tell them bad news or share things that are uncomfortable or whatever Ito I had a twenty five year old. NBA Yelling at me. Telling me that I had to have a perfect score and I just thought you know this is probably the right time for me to as you pull back from this. I told my husband. Let me get a year year to work on this and see if I can make this business and I can always go back you. You know. That's always a steady paycheck. My husband has a nice job. We paid off you know. The kids caught kids. College funds were set. We were in a good financial place as a family. You know basically you had some receive money and so you decided you were going to give it a try right so I decided I had some money put away and to help helped start the business and got some other advice to maybe considering online course. Fortunately we knew an online course. It's it's not very expensive to set up in its intellectual property. I didn't have a brick and mortar. I didn't you know I'm just selling service rather than a product so so it ended up being very economical and I watched the course my raving fans and it exploded from

Facebook Menopause Mary Clare Dr Dr Mary Clare Galveston John Diet JIM Dell NBA Doug Justic Mike Program Battle Institution Department Exhume Caesarians University Of Employed
Xerox threatens hostile bid unless HP opens its books

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Xerox threatens hostile bid unless HP opens its books

"Am the Xerox today's sale was threatening to go hostile with its thirty three and a half billion dollar buyout bid for H. P. if the personal computer maker did not agree to waive friendly discussion before November twenty five on Sunday H. P. rejected Xerox offer of twenty two dollars per share saying it undervalued the company of but it was open to exploring a bid for the US printer

H. P. Xerox United States Twenty Two Dollars Billion Dollar
Former Head of SBA Shares an Inside Look into Small Business Lending

The Small Business Radio Show

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Former Head of SBA Shares an Inside Look into Small Business Lending

"I've always thought that one of my dream jobs would be the head administrator at the SBA because they can have incredible impact on small business owners here joining us for look inside is Karen Mills. She's the former head administrator at the. US Small Business Administration. She's also the author of a great new book. It's called Syntech small businesses and the American Dream Karen so glad you could join us here. Bead Embi Global Conference I am delighted to join you hear Barry and and I will say you're right to want to have that job because it is absolutely the best job in the world so tell us what you love about that job. Well I loved that job. Bob was that I was the person in President Obama's cabinet who was responsible for all of America's small businesses and entrepreneurs what could be better and and flying on Air Force One. That was good to best seems like a huge responsibility. Saying I'm responsible for like twenty seven million small businesses and basically the economy. Well let's thirty million thirty million businesses and half the people who work in this country owner work for small business. So it really is half half of America's jobs I would say you know I went to sleep at night worrying about all these small business owners but in some ways the most important the thing was to have a seat at the table because everybody loves small business but not everybody does they think about it and it was my responsibility ability to pound the table in the White House and make sure that people paid attention to this critical part of the economy. It seems to me reading the news that there's a lot of politicians that talk about. They do have sports small business. When it comes down to brass tacks nothing really happens? So what what. What were some of your biggest accomplishments when you were at the SBA well? I went into a my job running the SBA. In the first quarter of two thousand nine. And I don't know if quarter that was a bad time my my first few months on the job lost one point eight million small business jobs and I could see that this was a disaster because small all businesses depend on banks for their loans. Banks had gotten overextended with all those bad mortgages and they just cut off small business lending and and even good businesses were getting their credit lines. Poll I came to the job. Actually venture capitalists so. I was a risk taker and I didn't know any better. I decided we should should solve this problem. That was my job so I went to the White House and I was able to convince Larry Summers. Who is the head of the National Economic Council and President Obama to let me do something really bold and that was to raise the SBA guarantee rate now the SBA doesn't make loans guaranteed bank loans? And they it allowed me to raise that SBA loan rate to ninety percent so we would guarantee ninety percent of any loan that a bank would make and it worked and we were able to get a thousand banks back to SBA lending. In six months. I would go around the country after that and talked to small businesses. It was the the most amazing thing. 'cause they would say you know you save my business. We were running out of money. We couldn't get anybody to pay attention and when we did that we turn the spigot back on for lending that taught me small. Businesses important to the economy and access to capital from banks is important to small businesses. And what kind of risk is that to the government. I know the banks are glad to do that. If the government is taking the risk do a lot of small business do they not recover the money from a lot of small business owners. What's the rate of non recovery but the SBA even though we're taking on more risk ninety five percent of those small businesses paid back? Wow so it was a pretty great deal for the government. Got One hundred billion dollars more capital out the economy and the net cost to the taxpayer was Ciro because we would charge iffy fifty and that paid for all the losses. So I think it's just a critical jewel that the US government has taxpayers. Taxpayers Really. Aren't out any money for it and we do a lot for small businesses. Now there's been a lot of small business owners I think by in general don't like banks right. They say bank is a four letter word because it's kind of like they give you an umbrella where it's not raining than take it away when it is raining. Banks are not really in the business of taking that much risk. Give them what they charge the industry. The industry has changed a lot since that time. Tell us about what the current state of small business owners getting capital. What the best way to do what is now? I wrote this book which has Fintech Small Business in the American dream. Because I believe that we are about to see a transformation in small business lending as you point out small business lending has been a painful process for maybe fifteen hundred years. This hasn't changed. Xerox a whole pile of paperwork right sock down down to the bank. You wait three months for an answer. Then they say well I you know what I can't really tell if your business is making any money just give me a personal guarantee today. We're about to see a change. In the reason is small business lending is hard because of these two problems. The first this one is it's hard to tell what's going on inside a small business we call in Economists call that information opacity. You know you just don't even even know if the small businesses making money. The second problem is that all small businesses are different. One day you're lending to a funeral home the next day day to a dry cleaner next to a parts company and it's not transferable knowledge now technology and big data. An artificial intelligence has the power to take away those frictions and barriers. That have been making small business lending so difficult. I see that we could have a transformative moment. Things could change. And that's what some of these lenders like cabbage. That's actually what they do right. They don't they get ah the feeds from the small business analyzed the data before they make the loan exactly and cabbage is a great example. They were an early innovator here and they kind woke up the banks because they suck all the data out of your quickbooks account in your bank account and they can look inside and see in your cash flow really. Looks like well what happened is they started to get a lot of customers because you could get your loan in a minute and sandbank was taking weeks months but then the banks woke up and it turned out. They have a big advantage actually to one they have customers reported. Trust them and to have low costs money from your deposits so they can make the loan cheaper. So now it's my prediction. Shen that banks will come back in this game figure out how to give better technology. Intestinal spirits us all of this new each day. And then you're much more affordable because they're gonNA see it was credit worthy and who's not it could be a virtual virtuous cycle because maybe they'd have fewer losses and give you your home even more cheaply. I hope so because while I think that folks like fun box and cabbage they really provide immediate. Answer it's easy to get that capital of course pay pal. All these people are doing this. It is quite expensive money and I think for for small business owners don't have good cash flow. It almost becomes a vicious cycle for them and they can't get out of these loans. I worry a lot about how expensive loans and that's why. I really hope that the playing field will open up now and banks will come back in because imagined the community nitty banker. Who knows you really well? Now they could have a small business dashboard. which has all of your cash flow projections uh-huh and oh by the way you could have the same dashboard yourself? And he would say to you you know or she would say to you. You are preapproved for seven thousand dollars. Absolutely because I can see you could pay but look how the discussion about whether you should take fourteen thousand and maybe open up next door and now you're having a conversation but the relationship banker and it's almost back to the olden days when you really got advice as well as money so maybe I'm an optimist but that would be my vision of what I call small business. Utopia you'd have a dashboard with pre-approved button in a relationship with your banker that allows you to manage

SBA Fintech Small Business Banks Barack Obama America United States Administrator President Trump Syntech Karen Mills BOB Us Government Barry White House Larry Summers Xerox
"xerox" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on 1947: The Meet the Press Podcast

"Mysterious interesting the gee whiz right yeah the gee whiz thing at the point where it just becomes another technology another tool in other protocol that we use to help us in our day to day lives that were not fascinated by anymore that's when i think it will actually sort of start reaching his potential and when do you think bitcoin becomes something investors want to own a piece of that it truly is sort of like oh you know what i wanted to you know sort of where my grandparents generation you gotta hold at and t after by xerox you have to buy code good amar it what point does somebody say this the elderly version of you and i when we're in our seventies and eighties say you know what we own a some bitcoin if you wanna have a well rounded investment portfolio when does it get to that i'd like to think my seventies and eighties a really really for way four ways they used to know they're not you know it's funny i think you have people selling that right now trying to make that case trying to say oh bitcoin is something you should have any portfolio like saving saving digital gold it's your hedge against inflation i think i think you i in fact i know you have people selling that case right now i think it's too early though to conclusively make that case now we don't know what's going to happen with the coin we don't know how big or small it's going to be how wide spread how used it's going to be right now bitcoin i would say and i i'm literally just guessing because no one really can break down what percentage of the transactions are going to what but i would say i i would comfortably say the vast majority of bitcoin transactions are purely people trading back and forth for speculative reasons it is nothing but a speculative investment right now is that something that you.

xerox
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Um if you're trademark becomes invalid you have no real legal protection tear expression and anyone can jump on it potentially confusing the market as a result uh you could always try and take someone to court but it depends on again if you haven't been very good about defending your trademark at it's not it's not great news for you from the courts perspective one thing you definitely do not want is a genera sized trademark now that's a brand name the become so synonymous with a type of product or service that people just use it for any instance of that product or service even if it came from another companies products which can obviously devalues the trademarked intellectual property so if you were to say i'm gonna go xerox this document instead of i'm going to photocopy this document or scan this document or whatever you're using xerox's trademark name in a way that's more generic and you might be using a copying machine that isn't even made by xerox for crying out loud you could say on need to go xerox this and you're using a canon copier xerox is actually run awareness campaigns asking people not to use the word xerox in this way the company tried to appeal to the sympathy of the masses in these pieces which are a little funny to read something that was not universally accepted as a series message among all readers have raw me what is the average person care of a billiondollar company name becomes synonymous with the technology that at one time that same company had a monopoly over right once upon a time you could probably college xerox thing because xerox was more or less the only game in town and if there is no one can beating there's not really much danger of the trademark being infringed upon.

xerox canon billiondollar
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Ursula burns would step down as ceo after the split happened although she remained chairman of xerox jeff jacobsen would join xerox to become the new ceo rather he would become the new ceo he was already part of xerox he was a former lawyer who joins eareckson 2012 at the officer level so it's not like he worked his way up from the lowest levels two executive he came in as an officer he became the chief operating officer of xerox technology 2014 so just two years after joining the company and then two years after that he became the ceo xerox is still very much in business in 2017 the company announced a massive production launch of twenty nine new products the biggest in its history the company has focused more on network document management including solutions allow you to send print jobs for mobile devices and massive documents centers also i should point out that there's still a lot of uncertainty about what's going to happen with xerox over the next few months there's some worry that there will be a lot of cost cutting measures which often result in people losing their jobs their entire towns there are really worried about what could happen in the future because xerox is the major employer at those uh those towns and some cases you're talking about people who are now working for a totally different company in conduit so there's a lot of uncertainty at the time being and before i conclude this series about xerox i need to talk a little bit about this idea of genera sized trademarks so trademark is a type of design leica logo or a representation of a provider of goods and services that sets it apart from others in that same field a trademark indicates that a particular product or asset belongs to a specific company that's an official version of that asset it means consumers know from whom their products originated you can licensed trademarks to others if you want to and let's say for example you create a popular character on a television showing dick children it's a puppet of some sort.

Ursula burns ceo chairman jeff jacobsen executive officer chief operating officer mobile devices xerox leica official two years
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Molki led the company until two thousand nine and that's when ursula burns would step in as ceo she became the first african american woman to lead a company the scale of xerox that same year xerox announced its intent to acquire a company called affiliated computer services since two thousand nine keep that in mind this deal was massive is about six point four billion dollars in both cash and stocks the acquisition became official in february two thousand ten and xerox would later sell off part of affiliate computer services namely the icty outsourcing business to ato's for more than one billion dollars but they held onto the rest of it so they split off like a division of this company they acquired and sold it off because it was not it was not progressing as quickly as some of the other business units and they didn't want to divide their attention too much now the following years were pretty tough ones for the company in january 2016 xerox issued a press release announcing that the company would split into two entities now this was largely because carl icahn one of the major investors in xerox have been urging xerox to split into two publicly traded companies one would become the document management business and would retain the name zero ox the second business which focused on business services and was mostly the businesses xerox acquired when it bought affiliated computer services back in two thousand nine became known as khandu went.

Molki ursula burns xerox icty press release carl icahn khandu ceo official ato four billion dollars one billion dollars
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Now lehrer and several career eggs xerox employees felt the thomon was really trying to change too much too quickly at the company and that he wasn't taking the time to form the right relationships at work tomen for his part was frustrated at running into resistance and at the thought of having to behave in a way that wasn't aligned with his leadership style he also said later that he should have insisted allaire stepped down from xerox rather than stay on as chairman according to tom and he in a layer had reached an agreement by which allaire could attend top management meetings but only if he remained quiet so allaire did attend those meanings any did remained quiet he didn't speak at them unless at all but was presence alone was undermining tomen's authority or at least seem to at any rate with toplevel executives at xerox often looking at lair in response to questions rather than to thoman who was the one who is actually supposedly leading the company one month after tomen joint xerox the company stock price hit a historic high of nearly sixty four dollars per share in the third quarter of 1999 the company posted an eleven percent drop in income and investors sold off tons of shares cutting the value of the company by nearly twenty five percent imagined the value of your company goes down an entire quarter it's one fourth of the value of your company has gone is very sobering by two thousand one the price of the stock dropped down to seven dollars per share and the amount of money that that represented collectively if you multiplied all the different shares he looked at the price meant that the company lost thirty eight billion dollars there was actually talk for a while the possibility that xerox might inter inter chapter eleven bankruptcy as it turned out that didn't become necessary but it was flirting with that possibility for a wild now part of the loss was due to xerox his international operations the company had significant holdings in brazil and brazil was suffering from a catastrophic economic crisis in 1999 in two thousand and due to brazil's weak currency it led to xerox losing about a billion dollars of its net worth some people said that it was like xerox was playing a game in anna in converting currency from one form to the other and it was losing.

lehrer xerox chairman tom allaire tomen brazil economic crisis thoman thirty eight billion dollars twenty five percent sixty four dollars billion dollars eleven percent seven dollars one month
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"In 1993 severe tired damage performs they live streaming show at xerox park using the multi cast backbone to send the performance over the internet actually covered this in an episode of text of not too long ago i cannot for the life of me remember what the topic was better member talking about severe tire damaged doing their live cast and i just wanted to take a moment to acknowledge the fact that i've got to talk about severe tire damaged twice in the same few months it always seems like it was like a couple of weeks ago but i know is longer than that in 1994 xerox underwent a little rebranding the company would do this several times over the next couple of decades they changed their corporate symbol from blue to read it had been a blue xerox no it was red and the simple itself was turned to a partially digitized x the company also began to refer to itself as the document company dash xerox in nineteen 96 kodak got out of the copier business that helped little bit xerox revenue hit seventeen point four billion and in 1997 xerox release the document centered digital copier products on june 30th of 1997 g richard thoman left ibm to join xerox now comment was tapped to become the successor to paul allaire and would become president and c o o in 1997 this marked the first time someone from outside xerox assume the role of president on april first 1999 he would be named ceo and allaire would resign for being ceo remembers xerox had this policy that when you hit sixty it was time for you to resign as ceo it didn't matter what kind of job you were doing that was the tradition that had been established so if you hit sixty it was time for you to get out now allaire would step down as ceo but he remained at the chairman of the board of directors.

xerox kodak ibm president ceo chairman g richard thoman paul allaire 1997 g
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"So when you look at the top level domains xerox was the seventh one and if you're wondering about that last statement about the department of defense you need to listen up on the old arpanet podcast episodes i dead the department of defense is advanced research projects agency or arpaio which would eventually evolve into darpa was responsible for designing the foundation for what would become the internet so all the protocols they really got their start both in arpanet and over at xerox park xerox park they did a lot of work that would end up being incorporated into the fundamental design of the internet before the department of defense essentially backed away from being the caretaker of the internet all registration ultimately went to the department of defense so think about that if you wanted to register at top level domain you had the send that information to the department of defense has timid eating at all but xerox got an early well before any domain squatters could come along and mess things up xerox produced its two millionth copier in 1988 the company was really starting to faced fierce competition in the space at this point the xerox's main concentration remained in the enterprise business they kept on focusing on those big corporate clients as opposed to training really break into the consumer marketplace in 1990s xerox introduced doc utech that's a product that allowed for scanning editing filing and printing jobs all for one product so kind of like gave a photocopier on steroids right it's the machine that just can do anything the swiss army photocopier that's also the year that paul allaire would become these xerox ceo now lehrer had been with the company since 1966 and it would be 1991 he become ceo of the company his first moves seo were to divest xerox of several of the financial services departments the company had formed an effort to diversify like those insurance companies i was talking about.

xerox arpaio arpanet enterprise business paul allaire lehrer financial services insurance companies department of defense
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"But at the time xerox's computer was was pretty advance from a software perspective hardware it was kind of lacking in 1982 makola stepped down as the ceo at david cairns became ceo of xerox at one thing cairns did was to guide xerox into some acquisitions to expand the company into financial services including insurance eventually this would become huge burden to the company as it found itself financially obligates result billions of dollars in insurance liabilities so it became kind of an albatross around the metaphorical neck of xerox at this point the revenues the company were eight point five billion dollars xerox would continue to experiment with new products including new copiers ahead microcomputers incorporate directly into the product that of course has continued up to presentday and it also had a low bandwidth ethernet as a communications interface built into these new copiers which is kind of cool xerox also introduced a fax machine in 1983 that could be linked by network to other office equipment so again they were producing some stuff that was ahead of the curve up but around this time xerox also pioneered a practice that you might not be aware of it's kind of creepy so laser printing was becoming more commonplace in the early 1980's and that included the capability to print in full color with certain types of printers one concern that arose from this development of technology was the possibility of using that kind of printer to produce counterfeit documents and currency.

xerox ceo david cairns financial services fax machine ceo of xerox presentday five billion dollars
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Nineteen 75 was also the year xerox launched an incredibly popular advertising campaign this was called the brother domenic campaign a featured a monk creating an illustrated manuscript by hand so he's writing out in calligraphy this manuscript only to be told by superiors that they need hundreds more copies so the monk takes his illustrated page to the copy center in the monastery since we all know that monasteries have these right and he then goes in makes five hundred copies using a big xerox machine and when he returns to his superiors shortly after he was asked to make the copies in the first place they look at the amount of work he has accomplished so quickly and reply it's a miracle now this campaign will include several more variations on this theme i would make a return just a couple of years ago with an updated technology founded xerox documents centers so as a very popular awardwinning ad campaign and again not just a couple of years ago they did an update that was kinda cute about how you could use xerox technologies to do things like translate documents it could have automatic detection of language and then translated into other languages and printed in those other languages which is pretty cool thing actually seems kinda magical dummy i guess it is a miracle in nineteen 76 kodak remember that was zero oxes old competitive from the old old days when it was the how loyd corporation kodak was the big boy in town and how loyd was the teeny tiny little competitor while now kodak switches the the the scales and becomes the smaller competitor in the copier game that add more pressure on to xerox this was also the last year that xerox sold a nine fourteen copier w be teams 76 they phased it out of sales from that point forward although they did still provide fields service for nine fourteen copiers that had already been sold to customers.

xerox advertising campaign loyd domenic kodak loyd corporation
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Now nineteen 75 xerox agree to licensed copier patents to other companies which seems really bigger them right like they were they had all these these different patents that kept them in this effective monopoly things really generous two agreed to extend licenses to various companies of finch in exchange for a fee seems really nice well it wasn't an ally of the kindness of xerox executives hearts xerox had actually become the target for an antitrust lawsuit and the government was essentially demanding that the company offer up licensing agreements for their patents so this was kind of the company's way of soothing things over within a short amount of time the move did exactly what the people at xerox were afraid would happen it allowed competitors to leverage xerox's technologies and so copiers for much lower prices xerox's near one hundred percent market share would drop below twenty percent in just a couple of years that's dramatic when you go from one hundred percent market domination to less than twenty percent of the market in some cases i've seen estimates between thirteen fourteen percent that's crazy it is however something that we've seen in other technologies like smartphone operating systems ios dominated shortly for a while and then android caught up and then now android dominates just by sheer numbers 8035 was also the year that xerox stopped trying to make mainframe style computers they got out that business they had bought into in a few years earlier and it turned out they just could not make that business work.

xerox finch android one hundred percent twenty percent thirteen fourteen percent
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"But uh it just didn't work out and why well the reasons are a little complicated first of all xerox alto was years ahead of other products like the apple too because it actually did have a graphic user interface it was essentially a windows style machine though microsoft windows did not exist yet but it was that same sort of user interface that microsoft windows would be now the fact that xerox didn't see the opportunity in consumer personal computers led a lotta people after the fact to say that they really were lacking foresight an initiative and that they weren't embracing that spirit of innovation the way xerox had earlier in its in its existence that's a lot easier to say in hindsight at the time it might have seemed weird to go into a consumer technology which by definition tends to have much lower profit margins than doing these business the business deals which had made the company bouqs of monies xerox ended up creating their first color copier this xerox sixty five hundred around this time so there was some still some innovation going on in their main business and in 1974 xerox opened a new facility in mississauga ontario canada and i know i know canadians i know i misprint i i realized that i feel shame a deep sense of shame and despair but i'm just a simple man reading notes off by computer screen so give me some slack this was these xerox research center of canada also known as the x r c c initially the purpose of this research facility was to engineer new chemical processes and products for use xerox's businesses today the ex rcc bills itself as quote canada's leading materials research center and home to a worldclass team of scientists and engineers with broad expertise and materials chemistry formulation design prototyping testing and chemical process engineering end quote they work both with xerox and external customers which typically would be other big companies.

apple user interface microsoft windows xerox mississauga canada windows ontario engineer rcc
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"The 70s started to get a little more challenging for xerox first of all you add other companies like cannon and various copier companies in japan entering the marketplace with competing products xerox still made up the majority of copiers the marketplace they were effectively a monopoly for little for several years but they soon had to contend with these newcomers later still ibm would get into the copier business which was also a little bit foreboding to xerox and a few others also started to kinda dip their toe intuit meanwhile companies like hp were working on technologies that would bring them into competition with xerox in ways the copier company clinton anticipate at the time like in inkjet printing inkjet printing while it's not the same thing as photocopying did allow people to make copies of stuff by printing extra copies as opposed to printing one copy and than taking that to the photocopier to make more copies uh hp took some of the need away from offices from having these giant photocopiers so it was a level of competition that xerox had not anticipated xerox began to see that incredible domination in the market start to lose ground in fact it began to lose ground pretty dramatically over the next several years now and the last episode i mentioned that xerox park was hard at work on several innovations one of the biggest being the alto thou this could have been the first personal computer on the market this xerox alto could have been the ubiquitous early personal computer it could have been there instead of the apple too.

ibm hp xerox clinton personal computer alto apple japan
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"Which is more than one hundred years old it was founded a nineteen oh sex and originally i thought it was going to be a twoparter uh i was certain begs as long as it was going to need to be because i thought even though there is a lot of stuff that xerox has contributed to technology i could price it up into parts but the interesting origin of xbox ended up taking a xbox xerox took up a lot of time and the xerox origin having so little to do with what xerox does today i mean it was about photographic paper uh and if it it would it would not even evolve into photocopiers until decades after its founding but it was really interesting to hear about the different values that were and still is part of the corporate uh character of xerox then all that stuff about the palo alto research center or xerox park was also incredibly fascinating xerox park is where a lot of development happened on things that are now standard in personal computers but at the time it was all very much cutting edge technology i mean at the parc started nineteen seventy and they started working on things that graphic user interface is computer mouse bit mapped icons lots of stuff that would find its way into standard computeruse more than a decade later was happening at xerox at the time and finally as i was looking into more recent years at xerox i realize.

xerox palo alto research center user interface one hundred years
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"So it could have pivoted to aim at consumers but why would you unless you happen to have enough foresight to say things are not going to stay the same forever and i thought this was really going to be a twoparter like i said the beginning but it turns out the stories just too big sooner next episode i'm going to finish up xerox story and they're so complicated things that happened in that time line that we are going to need to look into for example will learn what happened to the company as a result of it focusing on those high price commercial machines and the troubled organization got into with serious competition that market popped up here's a bit of a spoiler for that you had a lot of companies in japan that were starting to make photocopiers there were other big competitors that uh that the the xerox company was looking at including kodak ibm cannon but the real problem were these smaller japanese companies there were able to make photocopiers and seldom at much lower prices than xerox they were undercutting the xerox sales xerox went from having a ninety five percent share in the market near a nearmonopoly it was practically a monopoly in photocopiers to going down to below fifteen percent in just a few years now how did that happen why the precipitous fall that's going to be the focus of part three of the xerox story what exactly happened to make the company have such a rough time and what is the raise the power struggle that happened at the very top levels of xerox and why did it come about why did xerox higher a c o and then fire that ceo just a year later.

japan kodak xerox ceo ibm ninety five percent fifteen percent
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"By this time the company was making one billion dollars in revenue and had been list as one of the one hundred largest corporations in the united states makola was looking into the future and was imagining a world in which the offices of tomorrow wouldn't need paper at all everything would be stored in some other medium and this probably sounds familiar to anyone who has gone through one of those big technological rollout said a company where people are talking a big game early on saying odds going to eliminate the need of ever having a printout or piece of paper you'll never have to touch it i'm still waiting for that day of the way for the paperless office but xerox's approach to this initially at least was to invest in existing companies so to that end xerox made an enormous deal some would say a truly disastrous one with a computer company called scientific data systems in nineteen sixty nine and that acquisition deal caused xerox nearly a billion dollars in stocks unfortunately for xerox that particular deal would not work out for the company uh the computers which were not meant for the general public were difficult to sell they were meant for scientific research and government organisations by 19 75 xerox executives realized that this division wasn't going anywhere and they shut at all down but that wouldn't be the only contribution xerox would make to the world of computing when we come back we'll look at the rd branch xerox form that is responsible for how we interact with technology today.

makola paperless office xerox united states one billion dollars billion dollars
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"That same year xerox acquired university microfilms at this was a small company founded by eugene power a gutted start preserving works from the british museum and it woods preserving them obviously on microfilm as you would imagine based on the name the company changed names a few times while it was under xerox's ownership but ultimately the company would sell off university microfilms to another company called bell and howell in the 1980s and today university microfilms is better known as pro quest so if you ever heard a pro quest it started off as university microfilms in for a while it was owned by xerox in 1963 xerox acquired electrooptical systems and that same year xerox released the first desktop copier called these xerox eight thirteen unlike like the nine fourteen this was named by be dimensions of paper you could use in it unlike that larger nine fourteen this one didn't sell nearly as well and eventually the company would discontinue at decide that it would really just focus on developing those larger highcapacity copiers and leave the desktop market to other companies for the most part this would eventually come back to haunt them xerox also formed a joint venture with the rank organisation which was not a group of smelly people but instead the rank organisation was a company out of the united kingdom it was a film company is an entertainment conglomerate and in the late 1940's the rank organisation had hit on hard times the leadership of the rank organisation looked for ways to diversify their businesses a purchased a radio station in 1949 in they entered into this venture with the how loyd slash xerox company in nineteen fifty six nine years later nineteen 65 rank slash xerox opening manufacturing plant in venray the netherlands and businesses so weird you guys as a lot of interesting an odd joint ventures in xerox's past.

eugene power british museum xerox electrooptical systems united kingdom venray howell loyd nineteen fifty six nine years
"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"xerox" Discussed on TechStuff

"As pretty neat to look into if you wanna learn more about it you go to how stuff works dot com others of an article called hell photocopiers work and you can read it it's great of got right in front of me right here it's a really helpful piece of information if you want to see in more detail on that even has illustrations than animation's to show you what that processes like so i'm glad i had the opportunity to actually talk about how that technology works in this episode because sometimes on tech stuff we don't really get to talk about tech stuff that much not from a how it works angle and this was a particularly interesting one now in our next episode we're going to look at how xerox evolved passed this initial approach obviously they made a huge impact in the business world with the advent of these copiers and we'll talk more about that too about how xerox grew as a company uh but i can't wait to go into the next episode and talk about xerox park because that's a really interesting organization that again contributed ideas that were fundamentally important to the way we interact with technology today and we'll talk more about that and our next episode if you guys have any topics that you want me to cover in future episodes whether it's a company or technology or person maybe there someone you want me to interview let me know simeon message my email address is tech stuff at how stuff works dot com you can also dropped me a line on facebook or twitter the handle both of those this tech stuff h s w and remember you can watch we record these episodes live at twitch dot tv slash tech stuff i also chat with people who are in the chat room in between recording sessions and we have a grand old time talking about classic television series that only jaw hunter members so if you ought to listen to an old man talk about bad sitcoms.

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