31 Burst results for "Writers Guild"

Union agreement at Gimlet, The Ringer

podnews

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

Union agreement at Gimlet, The Ringer

"The writers and producers at specifies gimblett media and specifies the ringer to the first podcast production companies to unionize with the writers guild of america east both ratified their first collective bargaining agreements agreements mean among other things increases for salary minimums and limit to the use of contract is and should set a template for others.

Gimblett Media Writers Guild Of America East
'Borat,' 'Promising Young Woman' Win at Writers Guild Awards

WBZ Morning News

00:18 sec | 9 months ago

'Borat,' 'Promising Young Woman' Win at Writers Guild Awards

"Entertainment News now bore at subsequent movie film and promising young woman tape top Take top honors at last night's Writers Guild Awards. Promising young woman wins for best original screenplay while Sasha Baron Cohen accepted the best original screenplay for Borat to both films are up for Oscars as

Writers Guild Awards Entertainment News Sasha Baron Cohen Oscars
'Borat,' 'Promising Young Woman' Win at Writers Guild Awards

WBZ Morning News

00:16 sec | 9 months ago

'Borat,' 'Promising Young Woman' Win at Writers Guild Awards

"Borat subsequent movie film and promising young Woman take top honors that last night's Writers Guild awards promising young woman wins for best original screenplay. Sasha Baron Cohen accepted the best original screenplay for Borat, too. Both films are up for Oscars as

Writers Guild Awards Sasha Baron Cohen Oscars
What's the deal with Framing Britney Spears on HBO?

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

06:55 min | 10 months ago

What's the deal with Framing Britney Spears on HBO?

"Framing britney. This documentary had everyone above this weekend. I watched it last night. Kind of inbetween. Basically i'll be honest. I started watching it after the halftime show During the superbowl. 'cause i didn't really care at us home with my family and i wasn't like at a party or betting or anything but i'll get super bowl too but first of all Of course we've all heard about free brittany. Which has been this movement that her fans kinda started. There's been you know articles podcast and everybody talking about it. Of course. I follow her along with twenty seven other million people on instagram. And it's been weird. It's been weird watching her this last year. You gotta watch it. It's on lure fx. But it's just really they kind of just go through her whole career with in two hours which could have been. You know an eight part series. I think and we all remember when she came up. It was the mickey mouse club. And then all of a sudden she was really sexy. I remember when Shawn and marlon wayans were hosting the mtv awards and she came out and she did her sexy that goes with the snake and their joke which they came off came up with on the spot which is a great story is from minnie mouse club to the strip club and it was one of the funniest lines ever but now in watching that you're like wow you know this. This girl was suffering We made her suffer because we did jokes like this. We are obsessed with her sexuality. Diane sawyer was you look back at that interview which they featured and really putting her in the hot seat you know. Jay leno Doing jokes about her. We did jokes better. When chelsea lately started we. It was a great time for late night. Television also. Because right around that time the writers guild strike happened and we weren't writers guild so we were the only Late night show that got to stay on air. Every day was britney spears story. And it i. It just seemed like she was going. You know kinda fun crazy like she disliked to gas stations a lot and walk around barefoot and the paparazzi. Were there at the time. Because at that time there was no instagram. And that is how paparazzi and magazines made money is to get the shots of brittany. Brittany was the highest paid celebrity photos and then of course she married Kevin federal line but it was all just email. I just remember being doing chelsea lately and there was talk. We'll her kids taken away. And i remember sitting there going. There's no way she's going to lose custody of her kids. Come on i mean very few mothers do and she's she's going through a little struggling time but it's mostly because these paparazzi's are falling everywhere. Well you guys probably know this then. The dad got a conservative ship. And a lot of people after watching this special. This documentary said where was the mom. Why wouldn't the mom because parents divorced at that time. Try to get the conservative ship. Jamie her father was in and out of jobs Former drug addict. I believe maybe not drug out excessively alchoholic and So why would he be the person in charge. The thing is is. I think he was the first one to go to lawyers and try to get this into the works. And she was in a fifty one fifty at a mental institution when all this paperwork was done and the judge signed it. And now it's been you know fifteen years or something that this has been going on for and right away after this was done she started doing sitcoms again. Of course shortly after that she got her residency and she was making three hundred and fifty thousand dollars a night doing that show and then she left planet hollywood. And she now she's gonna do another huge residency at this new stage that they built her at the mgm and they do this big livestream thing and she comes up and then she just like and walks off talking to talk to reporters. She's not going to say anything. She's not going to do a song and shortly after that. She did it announcement saying my father is sick. And i'm not going to be performing. I'm going to put this residency off and that was really bizarre. People like is he sick. And i really don't know what the now looking back. I'm like i really don't know if he was sick of that was just her way out because now it looks like she in fact knew that the only way to get out of this conservatorship get her freedom back from her father was to stop working and stop making money and i. I would love to see what happened the day she was like you know what what the hell am i doing. Aren't going to sign up for another two or three year contract with them performing every night making all this money which. I don't get to choose how i want to spend the money. I don't get to get in the car and drive. I don't get to make a reservation and stay in hawaii on a whim without checking with twelve other people. Screw this you know. And she goes to her place in malibu during covert or wherever she is. Jesus been doing these weird instagram posts. Where her voice has changed. It's not the same voice. You're seeing these interviews on the documentary. And she's like ok guys. I've heard that a lot of been wondering what i'm going to do for the new year one. I'm gonna try to finish a pilates class to. I'm gonna try to meditate three. I'm going to try to eat better. And for i'm going to try that ice cream diet. And when she's doing it she's like it. Looks like she's definitely reading it whether it's a cue card but somebody else's there and the fact that she said i heard you guys not having reading your comments and one thing in the new year you guys asked me was Of course photos are weird. The makeup soy's like various mudgee. She's always wearing these crop tops. Sometimes she's dancing and you know i just really hope that I hope the mother gets involved. I hope that that the judge is able to watch this. Because i think when the judge granted this he was watching all the crazy news everyday. Let's just like the rest of us and this weird sam. Lufti was after an eye at the time. I was four the conservative ship. I'm like gosh. I don't want other people to take advantage of it this way. You know the data's there the other people are there to make sure that she stays healthy. No weirdos get around her. She's able to have visitation with her boys. But now after all these years it does seem really wrong and I think that this is going to be the catalyst to make whatever judges involved to open his eyes and maybe reconsider This conservative ship for

Mtv Awards Minnie Mouse Club Marlon Wayans Mickey Mouse Club Diane Sawyer Strip Club Britney Jay Leno Super Bowl Shawn Britney Spears Chelsea Brittany Kevin Jamie MGM Hollywood Malibu
Hollywood's Black List

Planet Money

11:33 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood's Black List

"Every year, fifty thousand movie scripts Tele plays other pieces of writer Lee stuff get registered with the Writers Guild of America fifty thousand most of which sucks, but a handful of which will become the movies that change our lives today on the show how a math! Loving movie nerd used a spreadsheet and an anonymous hotmail address to solve one of Hollywood's most fundamental problems, picking winners from a sea of garbage, and he may just have reinvented the power structure of Hollywood along the way. Support for this podcast and the following message come from OCTA A leader in identity driven security as the world shifts to a more remote work approach. Your employees need to securely access all your company data as well as connected thousands of applications, OCTA does just that empowering your employees to work remotely while also working smart, keeping their data, APPS and identity secure from anywhere learn more at O., K., T. A. dot com slash NPR. We're only months away from election day and every week or even every few hours. There's a new twist that could affect who will win the White House to keep up with the latest tune into the NPR. Politics podcast every to find out what happened and what it means for the election. It's two thousand and five Franklin Leonard a junior executive at Leonardo. DiCaprio's production company which sounds glamorous, but arguably he is a glorified script reader. WHO's boss's boss? Is Leonardo DiCaprio. Franklin's job is to help that boss. Find The next great movie for Leo, which means he is constantly reading movie scripts. Every junior executive lives in constant fear of the trade story that breaks about some exciting new script that they didn't know about that. Their bosses like. Like why didn't you know about this? Franklin is supposed to know about everything which is tough because there's this famous old saying in Hollywood. Nobody knows anything as in. It's really hard to know what movies are going to work. So if you do find something any piece of information that can help you gauge. What might work that information? Franklin is learning. That is Hollywood gold one of the things that drilled into your head. Is that information? Information is the most valuable thing. Yeah, and that information is to be protected and kept in house and exploitation of that information is how we in power and leverage like what little information you can manage, and then if it's kind of good, put up a wall as quickly as possible. That's exactly right. Movie scripts are a kind of information like the fundamental piece of information for a movie, and so Franklin's job is go out into the world. World and find undiscovered scripts before anybody else finding those scripts, though amongst the thousands and thousands being written every year it's a bit like walking into like the largest bookstore in the world, and every book has the exact same color. There's no cover art. There's no like publishers weekly. There's no reviews available to you, but your job is to walk into that sort of hyper anonymous bookstore and come out with the best books available That seems impossible. And Franklin says you can see how a problem emerges quickly in Hollywood people deal with this overwhelming amount of information by assuming they should reach for the same shelves of that anonymous bookstores they always do. They assume they should make the same kinds of movies written by the same kinds of people starring the same kinds of people. Yes, we are generally talking about white men people you soon because this has been the case for you thus far that are white writer who went to Dartmouth is better than a black writer who went to? To Clark Atlanta or Spelman, the conventional wisdom that you assume as wisdom is more often than not convention, and that is especially true in Hollywood where the convention has been created by people who are in no way, shape or form representative of the audience and consumer that they are trying to sell to Franklin. decided it was going to be part of his job. Try and find scripts outside of the conventions, well of course, also keeping an eye open for the next conventional blockbuster, which yeah was gonNA mean lots more reading the normal. Look. I've always been bit of a grind. My Competitive Advantage was my capacity to work, and so every weekend I would take home a banker's box full of scripts, but literally twenty five thirty screenplays, and try to read them all every Saturday afternoon. There is Franklin sitting on his couch. It is black sweatpants flipping through page after page after page hoping he's about to read a life changing story imagine if Christmas was every Saturday, but every Saturday. You ran downstairs and opened the box that you're most excited about, and it was socks. Because there is the possibility of getting everything that you ever wanted yeah. But there is the probability that it's. Socks most Saturdays and Sundays go like this Franklin tears into his Christmas scripts seven hours later. Frankland sitting in a pile of socks and the worst thing is when he goes into the office on Monday. His boss says you read anything good. And Franklin has to say no. It was as if he didn't do any work that weekend. Because most scripts are so bad, the Franklin would be in trouble for recommending them, and even if he is lucky enough to find a scripted, he loves he's really got to think about whether. Whether it is the right kind of thing for Leo's company like there was a script going around that year about a guy dealing with his interpersonal trauma by buying and dating a sex doll. It's easy to imagine reading that in saying Oh this is a really well observed human story, but imagine going into your boss's office and saying you should read this and when they ask you what it's about saying. This is what it's about Leonardo DiCaprio. I think you should play this role where you date of a doll like that's. That's a tough sell for the most confident among us. Franklin's breaking point came late one night. Do you remember his? He was in the office. It was dark outside, and he was supposed to go on vacation, and he just kept thinking about how he was inevitably going to end up drowning in bad scripts on vacation, and all of that work would generate nothing of actual value for his job and I remember, looking up and thinking. I. Don't know that this is sustainable and I need to come up with a solution. How is there not a better system for finding good screenplays? If you do the Friends of friends method, you end up with the Friends of friends scripts, and if you try this brute force thing, you're going to ruin your weekends, Andrew Vacation, plus you would need fifty more Franklin's to see all of the script anyway. And that's when it dawns on Franklin. There are more than fifty Franklin's in Hollywood got on. My desktop fired up my calendar and went through and looked at every single person who had a job similar to mine. Who I had had breakfast lunch, dinner or drinks with. If you had eavesdropped on those breakfasts and drinks, Franklin says you would have heard the junior executives ask each other this same question. Have you read anything good lately? Yes, these junior. Our competitors and yes, information is power and companies would probably not be jazzed about them sharing that information, but you know these are low level producers. They're doing each other favors, and it's all off the record anyway. Who is going to know about this and so Franklin figures? Let's see if anyone's read anything good lately. He opens up an email and he BBC's about seventy. Five of his fellow junior exacts, and so know hey. Similar of your ten favorite scripts in exchange I will send you the combined. Responses back. Did you say who you were like? I am a I am a mysterious junior executive. Say anything else, I do not believe that I did. I created an anonymous hotmail address. I believe it was blacklist. Two thousand five at Hotmail DOT com, he called it the blacklist partly to honor the blacklisted writers during the McCarthy era, and partly because he always hated the idea that the word black gets used to mean bad, so this blacklist was going to mean great screenplays. People would respond, but surprisingly responses started coming back. Maybe these other junior executives felt as stuck as Franklin. Maybe it was just this information bargain was was a good deal. I sure transcripts I get a whole list back there around ninety responses and every time somebody mentioned the same script Franklin treated that like a vote for that script, and he starts logging all of this into spreadsheet. Twenty five people voted for things. We lost in the fire by Allan Loeb Twenty. Four people mentioned Juno by cody. Fifteen votes Larson the real girl by Nancy Oliver Fourteen votes, Lars and the real girl that is the script about the guy and the sex. If, you were a junior executive. Thinking this is good, but is this good? I'm not important enough to risk bringing this to my boss. The blacklist was a way of saying you were right. It was good and here is a number. Instead of just your instincts fourteen votes, only living boy in New, York, by Allan, Loeb Charlie Wilson's war by earned Sorkin, Fan Burke and by the way a big deal in two thousand five. This wasn't just about finding undiscovered writers. It was any script that was great and not made. In a script called peacock by riders named Michael Lender and Ryan Roy the top ten of the very first blacklist thubten of the very first blacklist. Point the blacklist was just a spreadsheet that only Franklin could see, and he's about to send it back to all those other junior executives who contributed and he looks at it for a moment all of this normally off the record insider Hollywood Intel now written in a single place. He takes a deep breath. And he hit send. And then he packs up and heads off for vacation in Mexico and about a weekend vacation I went to the hotel of business center to check my email on like the public computer. And this lists have been forwarded back to me several dozen times. and everyone's like Oh my word of this team. Come from a lot of descriptions of sister. Good. Where where did this come from? What's your? What's your thought? It was terrifying. My thought is is that my career in Hollywood has a clock on it and the doomsday clock has just sped up. This anonymous list of the best unmade screenplays was blowing up. It had gone way beyond the small circle. It was initially sent to it even ended up covered the industry press, and so Franklin kept his down. He stayed anonymous and one day. He gets this call from an agent. Saying that his client has written this amazing script. It's perfect for Leo. It's like the usual call, except then the agent says hey. Don't tell anybody, but I have it on good authority that this ripped is going to be the number one script on next year's blacklist. I immediately thought to myself. That's interesting because I made the blacklist and I'm not making another one because I. DON'T WANNA get run out of town on rails. But I'm fascinated that you think that the speculative notion of your client scripting on the list is a sales tool for you. That must mean that this list that I created has

Franklin Hollywood Executive Franklin Leonard Leonardo Dicaprio LEO Writer Octa White House Writers Guild Of America Allan Loeb Leonardo NPR LEE BBC Andrew Vacation
Octavia E. Butler born - June 22, 1947

This Day in History Class

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Octavia E. Butler born - June 22, 1947

"June twenty, second, nineteen, forty seven. Science fiction author Octavia e Butler was born in Pasadena California. Butler addressed themes of gender sexuality and race through her speculative fiction over the course of her writing career. She received several awards, including the Hugo and Nebula awards. Butler's mother was a domestic worker in growing up Butler recognised racism and economic inequity that affected her family. By the time she was ten. She was already writing her own stories anti. She was interested in science, fiction, magazines and stories. As a young adult Butler pursuit pass besides writing and work temporary jobs, but she wrote when she wasn't working. Through the open door program at the writers guild. Butler was able to attend a class taught by science fiction author Harlan Ellison. He encouraged her to pursue writing further by attending clearing and science fiction writers workshop in Pennsylvania. Though Ellison had offered to publish one of her stories in an anthology. That anthology was never published. When she left Clarion, she began working on the novels that became part of the pattern EST series. The book in this series published by Doubleday. Nineteen, seventy six was patterned master in the book. telepathic people known as pattern EST are dominant over mute spor, non telepathic humans as well as over mutated humans call Clark's. The next two books in the series mind of my mind and survivor or published, nineteen, seventy, seven and nineteen, seventy eight. The books sold will, but she took a break from the series to right kindred. In the novel, a Black Woman named Dana travels back in time to slavery era Maryland there she meets a white ancestor, whom she has to repeatedly rescue to make sure that he survives. But her trouble, placing the book with the publisher, because it didn't fit neatly into the science fiction category, but in one thousand, nine, hundred ninety nine doubleday published kindred as fiction. The book was received well when it was published, and it became a text that students read in high schools across the US. After kindred Butler continued to publish books in the pattern master series, including wild seed and clay's Ark. Many of her characters were black women, and she explored themes like control and post colonialism in dystopia settings. In one, thousand, nine, hundred four, she won a Hugo Award for the short story speech sounds and blood child when the Nebula Hugo and locus awards. But worked on Zeno. Genesis trilogy in the late Nineteen Eighties and in the one thousand, nine, hundred ninety, she published parable of the sower and parable of the talents, which followed the protagonist Lauren Amina as she escapes a walled community in Fouls Inoue. Butler once said quote I don't write utopia science fiction because I don't believe that imperfect humans can form a perfect society. Fledgling a science fiction vampire novel published in Two Thousand Five. Was Butler's last publication. She died of a stroke in two thousand and six.

Octavia E Butler Harlan Ellison Nineteen Eighties Hugo Award Lauren Amina Hugo Pasadena Writers Guild California United States Clarion Clark Fouls Inoue Zeno Dana Publisher Maryland Pennsylvania
Hollywood Studios Halt Film And TV Production

The Frame

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood Studios Halt Film And TV Production

"All production shutdown in Hollywood so for the people who are supposed to be working including those with contracts. The question now is will they get paid agents? Managers and lawyers are trying to figure that out but as the global pandemic continues to take us into uncharted territory. Answers might be difficult brin. Sandberg is a senior writer at the Hollywood reporter and she's been looking into what the covert nineteen shutdown means for people who work in the entertainment Industry Bryn. Welcome back to the show. Hi John Thanks for having me so. Let's first talk about a legal term. It's called force majeure and as I understand it. It essentially relates to unforeseeable circumstances that prevent a contract from being enforced. How might it apply here? Well John that definitely applies here when we typically see force majeure events. It's it's in relation to Labor strikes. Which is what happened in the two thousand seven to two thousand eight writers strike or is related to a natural disaster like a wild fire or an earthquake but those are usually local so the fact that this is a a global pandemic. It means that it's triggering simultaneous industry-wide shutdowns that kind of force majeure event is sort of without precedent in Hollywood. So a couple of weeks ago. Was that something that companies were really thinking about that. It gave them the option of shutting down a production and not having to worry about being on the hook to pay people. Yeah I think these studios of course know that they have this power if you will In in an event like this and there was a period of time where You know I think people didn't know was it? Was it safe to be around people? Could we stay in production and so and then when it became increasingly clear that that wasn't going to be safe that's of course when when the studios started taking these steps to suspend and again they? A lot of them will reassess. I know Netflix. For example there shutdowns where they said for two weeks before though you know reconsider and so when that when that two week. Marquette's will we'll start to see what some of these two years are going to do with their major projects. How long they can keep them on. Hold and how we all move forward. Does that mean that for some companies. During that two week window they are continuing to pay their cast and crew. And then they'll reassess that decision right so this is this is the interesting question. And this is what of course many actors writers directors producers. You know they all want to know. Okay what about my pay? My still going to get paid during this time. And that's really a big question mark. I spoke with a lot of these. These wraps managers agents lawyers and it seems like in a force majeure event like this. The studio's really like I said they have a tremendous amount of latitude and they do not necessarily have to fulfil contracts but that being said it doesn't mean that That certain companies are not still paying people. So you know. Nbc suspended SNL for the next three shows but they've still committed to paying their employees for those three weeks as though they were working Netflix as well on NBC Universal. You know I heard where we're continuing to pay some of their crew that we're going to be working on those shows for these two weeks during the shutdown so once that period of time is up and these companies do reassess And should they hold these productions indefinitely then it becomes much less likely that they will continue pay people and hold people in their contracts. We're talking with Brin Sandberg a senior writer at the Hollywood reporter about pay during production shutdowns. One of the things that's critical. I think to a lot of people. In the business they are essentially freelancers. Their GIG WORKERS. They have sporadic work. And if they're laid off for a long period of time they might not qualify for unemployment or health insurance. Have there been conversations about how those people might be protected. Even on a federal level there have been calls for you know the government to step in and help given how unprecedented this you know. The situation is I do not know that there's been any resolution yet or any consensus about what is going to happen. I think we're in this murky period of time where we're waiting to see what does happen on top of all of this. There are labor negotiations and contracts. That were happening before. The Corona Virus Pandemic the alliance of Motion Picture and television producers was starting talks with the Writers Guild of America. How might collective bargaining be affected by all of this and might actually benefit one side on the bargaining table? That's a great question. This is a this is a subject that came up a lot when I was talking to these wraps because you know this has been their life for really the past year because the writers have fired their their agents. And then we're about to enter these contract negotiations with the studios. One lawyer told me that you know it now feels like all the time that we spent talking about the wgn in the in the potential strike issues was just rearranging deckchairs on the titanic. You know it's now put into this This whole other perspective and and really it's depending on who you talk to. You will hear different things about who might benefit from this. The most in terms of those those negotiations some managers lawyers and agents will say you know. The writers have less leverage now. Because what are they gonNA go on on strike about and then you have talked to writers you said? I think this helps us. Because any plans that studios had to rush development script production you know before the May deadline which is what they were doing to prepare themselves. If a writer strike were to happen you know those. Those plans have been shattered and now they need writers. You know working more than ever to to create content and so In terms of you know win the actual contract negotiations will happen now That's another big question mark because they were supposed to kick off those talks officially on March twenty third Which is Monday and it seems unlikely that that's going to to move forward on that date now.

Hollywood Writer Brin Sandberg Netflix Alliance Of Motion Picture And Reporter John Writers Guild Of America NBC WGN Marquette SNL
"writers guild" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"writers guild" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Packaging fees and talent agencies owning production companies or loses his clients still no agreement so ninety five percent of the guild membership voted to authorize the nuclear option to fire their agents all at once if they didn't comply like many screen writers for David Simon threatening to fire his agent was complicated get a personal relationship in my experience he's an honest broker he's been very astute at how to thread projects through studios about what's happening in the industry he's got his ear to the ground his is a smart guy would you describe yourself as friends yeah it's friend we've been down there for twenty years so personal and I'm not mad at him for being on the other side of it it's systemic it's not about whether I'm friends with my agent it's about the future my industry in the status of writers within that industry the deadline came to sign the new code of conduct in April and when it came the agency's asked to delay citing they got a week long extension and even on the real last day April twelfth of this year he thought maybe just maybe the agencies would agree to the terms in the final hours so we waited I believe until midnight to see if there was any word and finally via email a word from the guilt and the word came back that the agencies did not take us seriously and that as of midnight tonight we will ask all of our members to fire anybody who has not signed the code of conduct and sure enough that week the writers guild began collecting the signatures of seven thousand screen writers signatures on letters of termination one week later they hand delivered those letters involved to the agencies writers had chosen the nuclear okay so the first wave of.

David Simon writers guild
WGA Film Awards Analysis: 'Parasite' and 'Jojo Rabbit' Could Repeat at the Oscars

AP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

WGA Film Awards Analysis: 'Parasite' and 'Jojo Rabbit' Could Repeat at the Oscars

"Parasite has continued its March through Hollywood's awards season by winning the best original screenplay honor at the writers guild awards the **** satire Jo Jo rabbit took home the Best Adapted Screenplay honor the Oscars are less than a week away where both films will compete in the Best Picture category

Hollywood Jo Jo
#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

The Frame

06:44 min | 2 years ago

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

"Assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid and and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave for the day. That's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance. It was released this this week by the grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood. The campaign started as a twitter Hashtag back in October and has been gaining momentum since then Katie kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the Hashtag grew out of an episode of script notes. A podcast asked about screenwriting. A assistant wrote in saying you know I think one of the big issues. That's going to be coming forward in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna I have to talk about the low pay. That assistance are facing in how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from near the hosts which cacus Craig Mason. Who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood? Read that note and ask for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant in Los Angeles they just got an overwhelming matic. Email and a writer named Alber who is on the board at the Writers Guild of America started Hashtag called Hashtag Champ. Hollywood so a couple of days before Thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues. And here's what one woman who didn't provide. Her name had to say about burnout. We almost have like three jobs at once. Like not only. Are we working our day. The job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then therefore doing work on the side like babysitting driving etc but we also have the work of our own careers. I and I think that is what leads that burnout. Because we're not only expected to have this day job that puts all these things in place for us to move forward and then on top of that we're expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to fund their own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just like impossible. I think impossible's inaccurate word word for what she's describing. What some of the other issues that came up around the Hashtag and around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access? Hollywood has been talking talking a lot about its diversity issues wanting to get more folks into the pipeline of diverse backgrounds. But what we're looking at. Here's the situation where you have to to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first leg up in the industry and so Paige Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand thousand five hundred fifty one assistance and they found that seventy percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial -sential aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood. So I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible or economically manically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking thing about this sort of demeaning conditions that were expected of them. Hollywood has pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember at its in difficult conditions when they or assistance and so sort of expect. There is a lot to go through that as well. But in the survey it showed that one hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace. So I think that we're looking at conditions assistance or not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing conditions that are pretty rough. We're talking with Katie kilkenny at the Hollywood reporter about pay up. Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me. One is that almost ninety three percent of those. The people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and hero's something that was really troubling. Almost almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse. So it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely. I mean I think these numbers sort of show something that assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks. We'd been vocal on twitter with their support and basically found out talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that they're currently developing and these are Adam conifer who Folks might know true. TV's Adam Ruins everything. David H Steinberg. who was a CO show runner? Netflix is no good nick. And the writer producer producer Creator Ayelet Waldman who was an executive producer on Netflix. Unbelievable Waldman in particular told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and hover was saying that he was trying to just various aspects of the job to make it more. Tenable you said in your story Lori that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back. have any of them. Had anything anything to say. One Agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for the story. But you know I heard via sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke John August who helped movement as well as Liz Alpert who coined. The HASHTAG has conducted in anonymous pace survey of their assistance. And and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the pay up Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they our remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible. The working conditions aren't great. A lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard hard to get into the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely. They're extremely competitive jobs and often a line that is used with assistance to speak up about work. Conditions is that you know there were thousands. That will take place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases That's what we're hearing from. These stories while the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed. And so these assistance missiles argument is that the situation is untenable at the slain. Katie Kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter. Katie thanks so much for coming on the show as much for having me

Hollywood Katie Kilkenny Paige Hollywood Los Angeles Reporter Writer Twitter Associate Editor Writers Guild Of America Unbelievable Waldman Netflix Craig Mason John August Alber Lori David H Steinberg. Adam Liz Alpert Executive Producer
Endeavor goes public, rocks Hollywood

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:37 min | 2 years ago

Endeavor goes public, rocks Hollywood

"I'm Kim masters. And this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of Hollywood reporter, and Matt, this is news. We have been awaiting. It's big. Big deal, literally, a big deal endeavor, which is, of course, the parent company of William Morris endeavor, the agency, as well as many, many other business. I mean these guys are in music festivals, and they have TV shows in the ultimate fighting championship and several of the world, most of the world's highest paid models. They they've, they've diversified as the entertainment business has become increasingly a challenge. And they've looked to the future, they've, they've borrowed a lot of money. Now, they're looking to raise about five hundred million dollars in an IPO a public offering stock they're valuing themselves more than six billion dollars, and that's going to resonate through the industry. This has been expected for a while. But still it is a game changer if a talent agency much larger than that now but an owner of a talent agency goes public, the gates are open. In and all bets are off to mix metaphors this will absolutely change. Everything about the representation industry from, you know, the fact that a lot of agents are about to get very rich to the fact that, you know, these diversified companies will have quarterly earnings. So it creates a very different value proposition for the people who work at this company are there representing clients, but they're also managing to a quarterly bottom line and that just changes the way you operate. There's also implications for the various talent guild's obviously the agents are fighting right now with the writers guild over this practice of packaging fees, which is where a an agency put together a bunch of pieces of talent into a show and gets a percentage of that show. And the WJ is probably looking at this endeavour IPO and saying what you built this company on the backs of our members and now you're going public and gonna make yourself hundreds of millions of dollars. Whereas our. Money. Yeah. I mean the old thing about agencies was you can't go public because the assets go home at night. You know, you have these agents, it's not like you're making something, or you own something other than the people who can all quick. So that was always what people said and the agencies were looking for money. And at this point, they most of them have taken on major investors. Who are, you know, kind of hedge fund people in looking for profit, with always with that thought, maybe eventually, we go public, and we make a lot of money. However, as you note, this is in the middle of this fight with the writers guild. Now the day before endeavor filed for this public offering J service from UTA, another agency, actually, sort of went to the writers guild publicly and said shouldn't. We sit back down again and talk. Because this fight is really just so destructive. I mean, I love the way he framed it like he said, you know, I know you guys really want to get back to the table. This is not us blinking. I just find the timing also interest. I mean if endeavour wants to go public, they note in the filing for the public offering that this fight with the writers guild is potentially a problem. And of course, we know it because if the writers prevail, the snowballing effect of what could come next with other aspects other people in this business. I it's a wildcard. I, I am not surprised that it's the agents would like to put this to bed. Yeah, this is a drag on our Emmanuel's big plans for this IPO, but jumping off, what you noted is that endeavor is much bigger than just representing clients. At this point you talked about how the assets go home at night. I mean now endeavor owns the UFC it owns professional bull riding tour. It owns a lot of licensing businesses. They have these packaging fees that are essentially like owning a piece of these shows and these are assets that are going to deliver revenue streams going forward. And that's become the basis of this IPO not the clients or the agents who go home at night. That's where our Emanuel has been very. Shrewd in creating what is an asset based company, rather than a service based company? Well, I will just say that, that may be, but we know that Hollywood's value is not always counted in hard dollars on the movie stars are what might attract investors. So I'm saying, maybe no disrespect to the bull riders or whatever. But I think keeping the peace with the entertainment world, the conventional movie, and TV business might be a priority. Thank you, Matt. Thank you. That's Matt felony editorial director of the Hollywood reporter he joins me this Monday at one thirty on the business. I'm Kim masters. And this is the Hollywood breakdown.

Hollywood Matt Bellamy Writers Guild Kim Masters Reporter William Morris UFC UTA Emmanuel Emanuel Editorial Director Five Hundred Million Dollars Six Billion Dollars
"writers guild" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on KCRW

"Pentagon. Correspondent Tom Bowman Tom. Thanks for your reporting. You're welcome. Writers in Hollywood and their agents have been locked in a fight for the last several weeks. They disagreed over longstanding industry practices that have to do with fees. Rider say they feel ripped off television say this is how been done for decades, and neither side is caving. So where are we now after the writers guild called on their members to fire their agents about a month ago? Jonathan handle is an entertainment reporter at Troy Gould and contributing editor at the Hollywood reporter. He wrote recently about how writers and also actors are facing the end of their contracts next summer, and what that might mean for the entertainment industry, and he joins me now. Hey, Jonathan pleasure to be with you good to have you. So what leverage do writers have at this point? Well, that's an interesting question. They have fired their agents and interestingly the agencies that seem to be potentially suffering. The most are the ones that are sort of medium and smaller, whereas the real targets that the writers guild as their their aim against is the is the four. Largest agencies. So it's it's a very odd situation. Practically is that what you write that they might go on strike. I think that the potential strategy here is that the guild having mobilize. The membership really will will go to the studios next year. When the as the contracts expire mid-year the writers guild contract and also the the Screen Actors Guild contract expires about the same time. And that the riders will say, look, you're not paying packaging fees anymore. We want those fees in the form of extra large increases were rank and file members. So if the writers don't get what they want. I mean could both the writers guild and sag after go on strike. Well, they could it seems to me that the legacy companies the traditional media companies, especially Disney our uniquely vulnerable this time around because they're trying to catch up with that flakes, topple Netflix. So they're investing billions of dollars. In new scripted content. But without writers or actors, you don't have that content. Now in the past strikes were papered over with reality, TV news, and sports and things like that. But it's hard to imagine that those would really draw people away from net flicks. As you mentioned, we're in the midst of kind of a major seachange now in entertainment, and we have been for several years streaming services or making quality television big studios. Maybe a lot less nimble than streamers light Netflixing, Hulu, for example. How important is this for writers tried to negotiate a better or different contract? Well, it's critical because it gives the writers potential leverage writers get slapped around a lot in this town. But the the reality is that without a good script. There's there's nothing. Yeah. You mentioned this in a recent article about potential side deals is there a chance the the writers guild might make side deals with three Ming services and open up jobs in that way, that would be a way of using their leverage against the traditional media companies. Now, there are potential roadblocks to a side deal. Namely, one of the biggest issues for the both writers guild and the Screen Actors Guild sag after is the short seasons that are really a specialty of these digital companies, you know, eight and ten episodes rather than twenty two episodes in a season that creates pressure on writers and actors because they get held exclusive for year round, but they have less work to do than they would've on a traditional twenty two series. So there may or may not be side deals, but it it certainly would be strategic. If there were. All right. Let's talk about agents for a second at least publicly. They don't seem to be sweating a whole lot. If these ideals happen are. Agents still necessary. There's a very scorched earth take no prisoners point of view on either side on that agents, and many writers are are quite adamant that agents have, you know, have done wonderful things for writers careers. But they're also many writers who say, you know, my agent didn't get me. My last job. I got it through networking, and we really don't know. And this is a sort of a dramatic experiment to see whether agents are going to continue to play a role in the professional lives of writers going forward. Jonathan handle isn't entertainment attorney, Troy Gould and a contributing editor at the Hollywood reporter..

writers guild Screen Actors Guild reporter Hollywood Troy Gould contributing editor Tom Bowman Jonathan Pentagon. Hulu Netflix Disney
"writers guild" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. This is rob long with MARTINI shot on KCRW. So the members of the writers guild, which includes me as a today anyway, have decided to take collective action against the large town and literary agencies that guilt and its leadership have been wrangling for months over our new basic agreement between the two parties. The current one is decades out of date focusing mostly on the practice of what is called with typical entertainment industry style packaging, which is this essentially rather than take ten percent out of a lot of paychecks for writers on TV show agents prefer take percentage and some back end points out of the budget of the entire show in exchange. They don't take the ten percent out of the writers paycheck and for a long time. This was a happy arrangement writers didn't have to pay commission and ages didn't have tell the writers. Just exactly how much more money they were making by packaging, and everyone was happy. And then the future happened as it does always sooner than anyone expects and the explosion of places to put on TV shows created more opportunity for writers, but also more of a margin. Squeeze and writer started. Feel the pinch and their paychecks episodic fees went down and residuals dried up an episodic orders went from twenty two to twelve ten to six in some cases, and the business evolved into something even more medieval than it was to start with in which most writers on the staff of a show. We're getting paid a lot less sorta like serfs, but some show runners fellow writers, if you wanna dot that I are getting bigger deals to put on multiple shows barons and lords and the agents, they're like vizier is I think and the studios are there kings for sure and the writers. Okay. This isn't working the point. Is it often seems like to the writers that everyone is getting rich that entertainment content is valuable and that they major figures in the creation of that content, and that value are getting paid last and the least and not wrong. So when the writers looked at their only real friends in the business, the only people who traditionally on a good day are in their corner as partners the agents, it looks to them like the agents have been quietly rating the grain silo. So that's why the. Writers guild is battling with the agents to put a stop to the business of packaging. And that's why writers all over town are calling their agents and firing them as ordered by the guild leadership. If you didn't want to be represented by packaging agent say packaging agents could have fired as years ago. But no writer should have to do. That response. The writers guild which has just ordered its members to fire their agents. I've never felt so loved actually agent said to me after getting about a dozen calls from clients some of them in tears. I didn't know my clients. Love me that much the agent said despite having just been fired by every client. It feels nice, and, you know, not nice the agent said which pretty much sums up the entire entertainment industry. When you think about it? My agent for the record was philosophical, you can fire your agent he said, but I guess you can't fire union. Now, I genuinely don't know where this will all lead a strange new kind of labor action, which the union is demanding that one party, not the union ceased collecting a fee from another party. Also, not the union sort of like telling the host of a party. You're not throwing that they can't invite someone you don't like. But the real question is this who can hold out longer in a traditional strike, which is probably coming in a year. So by the way, it's mostly about money who can last the longest without a paycheck. But here the writers are still working. They're still. Getting paid they're helping each other get jobs. It's the agents who are going to feel the financial pinch. And as one writer told me this week becoming a licensed talent agent in the state of California. It's not all that complicated. It's a two page form. Apparently, he's thinking about filling it out and becoming an agent part time, how hard could it be? He asked. I think we're all about to find out. And that's it for this week next week. This won't be over for KCRW. This is rob long. Never really is rob long, by the way, we have an update to this story coming up next hour in about thirty minutes or so the plot thickened today between this back and forth between talent agents and their Hollywood screenwriters. Now, the WJ filing suit.

writer writers guild KCRW rob long NPR guild WJ California ten percent thirty minutes
Writers' Guild Agrees to Six-Day Delay for Tightened Agency Rules

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:05 min | 2 years ago

Writers' Guild Agrees to Six-Day Delay for Tightened Agency Rules

"And by extension, the entertainment consuming public that is all the rest of us have avoided at least for now a disruption to our nevarez content consumption habit. We're talking to you about writers and their agents. There had been a Saturday night deadline for the members of the writers guild of America to fire their agents, amass that has been pushed back a week to Friday midnight. But the core issue still hold writers pay and who the agents are actually working for and as marketplace's Scott Tong reports, the very business model of modern Hollywood might be hanging in the balance a long time ago Hollywood writer. Had it simple. They got an agent who got him a deal on a movie or a show in the agent took ten percent. Well, that's changed. These days the beginning take the writers producers and actors package them together and sell the whole bundle in the agents. Get big paydays. Jesse stern has written for TV shows like NCIS and bull scary to believe that your agency might be set up in a way where they have a conflict of interest where their agents are not capable of being directly devoted to your interests above all else. The fifteen thousand member writers guild has voted to fire agents who won't end packaging, and that could deliver a blow to the biggest talent houses like William Morris endeavor and see a show biz historian and writer, Alex, Ben block, there's four or five really large agencies who control by far the most important talent. If the agencies refused to give up the lucrative packaging. These members would go to other ages the. Agency's argue that packaging is writers and producers leverage, and for now these agencies are negotiating with the writers guilds, but should midnight Friday come with no deal. The industry could turn up side down says Dominic pattern. He senior editor for deadline. Hollywood clearly the nuclear option is now on the table, and there can be a process in which you will see scripted television on cable screaming and network stop. So he says be ready for even more reality TV, if the writers exit or some are calling it rigs it,

Writers Guild Of America Hollywood Writer Dominic Pattern Jesse Stern Scott Tong Senior Editor William Morris Ben Block Alex Ten Percent
"writers guild" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More like twelve I'm Megan McCarthy Carino for marketplace Hollywood, and by extension, the entertainment consuming public that is all the rest of us have avoided at least for now a disruption to our nevarez content consumption habit. We're talking here about writers and their agents. There had been a Saturday night deadline for the members of the writers guild of America to fire their agents mass that has been pushed back a week to Friday midnight. But the core issue still hold writers pay and who the agents are actually working for and as marketplace's Scott Tong reports, the very business model of modern Hollywood might be hanging in the balance a long time ago. Hollywood writers had it simple. They've got an agent who got him a deal on a movie or a show in the agent took ten percent. Well, that's changed. These days the to take the writers Purdue. Users in actors package them together and sell the whole bundle in the agents. Get big paydays. Jesse stern has written for TV shows like NCIS in bowl scary to believe that your agency might be set up in a way where they have a conflict of interest agents are not capable of being directly devoted to your interests above all else fifteen thousand member writers guild is voted to fire agents who won't end packaging, and that could deliver a blow to the biggest talent houses like William Morris endeavor NCAA show, biz historian and writer, Alex, Ben block, there's four or five really large agencies who control by far the most important talent. If the agencies refused to give up the lucrative packaging. These members would go to other ages. The agency's argue that packaging is writers and producers leverage and for now these agencies are negotiating with the writers guild, but should midnight Friday come with no deal the industry. Could turn up side down says Dominic Penton. He senior editor for deadline. Hollywood clearly the nuclear option is now on the table, and there can be a process in which you will see scripted television on cable screaming and network. So he says be ready for even more reality TV, if the writers exit or some are calling it regs it, I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. Brexit get it Brexit Brexit Wall Street on this Monday down, but not a whole lot of enthusiasm about that direction. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. The latest round that I'm pretty sure it's the.

Hollywood writers guild writers guild of America writer Scott Tong Dominic Penton Megan McCarthy Jesse stern Purdue senior editor NCAA William Morris Ben block Alex ten percent
"writers guild" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:06 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on KCRW

"You're listening to KCRW. This is morning edition. The clock is ticking on a real life showdown in Hollywood between TV writers and their own agents. Members of the writers guild of America are concerned among other things about packaging fees. That's money earned by talent agencies. When they bring together writers actors and directors in a deal to make his show. The WGN says the kind those kinds of big buck payments make talent agents more concerned about pleasing studios networks rather than working the best interests of their writing clients the guild is saying its members will fire their agents this weekend. If the talent agencies don't agree to a new code of conduct. There are reports of backroom efforts to try to work out a deal, but Jonathan handle a contributing editor for the Hollywood reporter says relations between the two sides have gotten kinda rocky. It's really become a scorcher fight between the writers guild on the one hand and the talent agencies. Especially the largest agencies on the other the fight centers on two issues packaging fees and affiliate production. And both of those have in common really is in essence that to some extent agents at like producers, they put shows together and they get compensated in some cases by the studios themselves or in the case of affiliate production. They actually had -ffiliated companies that act as many studios, the writers guild says that those two practices are conflict of interest and take the agent's incentive away from acting in the best interest of the client, the agencies, disagree and also argue that they need to bulk up and become bigger. Heavier companies in order to stand up to the mega media conglomerates of the Disney. Fox's the AT and T Time Warner's the net flex of the world. Now, we talked to David Goodman, the president of the WG last week. We were looking to get sort of the town. Talent agency side of the story. But so far have not found anyone to go on tape talent agency say that package deals are good for riders and good for the industry. Why do they argue that how do they back that up? Well, toned agencies, and I'm not taking sides here. But to explain what the talent agency position is they argued that if they get paid by studios in the form of packaging fees. They don't commission the clients. And so that's an immediate ten percent savings for the writers. And also the actors and directors on package television show, you know, or commission rather that is not taken from the clients in that instance, the writers guild also says that except for writers at the very top the business people who are really well known that many writers aren't seeing their pay go up as fast as it used to or aren't seeing any pay increases at all. Well, the talent agencies argue that the haystack nation that the middle and lower levels of television writing business is due to the studios, and especially the digital streamers instead of twenty two episode season as was traditional broadcast, you're looking at eight and ten episodes and so- writers are getting hired onto series, but they get paid they'll get paid less. The writers guild is not with field the data behind their statistics. And so it's difficult to to know in any detail, you know, of where the pressure points are and where they where the truth is on this the agents say, look, we're your allies we represent the writers also just as the guild does. And you the guild are going to be in to go. She next year with the studios. Why are you fighting with scorched-earth kind of approach when in fact, we should be allied on? On the same side. How about the timing of this dispute? This is coming at a point when many shows are staffing up for the new season. Right. That's right. So broadcast shows on ABC CBS NBC and FOX are starting their their staffing where they hire the mid and low level writers. This is very difficult time for writers to told as they probably will be fired their agents. What happens if the two sides can reach some kind of agreement in the next couple of weeks. I mean does that have the potential to bring at least network production grinding to a halt not grinding to a halt. But it'll be more difficult to staff writers rooms, you'll be more difficult to make deals it's not like a strike where production, you know. We saw the ten twelve years ago where we're production comes to a halt. It is a situation where the riders gold has has set up an online. Submission system for writers to submit themselves to shows that they might want to work for and the writers guild believes that a patchwork of this online system and writer to writer networking and managers attorneys and so forth, and at least to some extent make up for for agents. The agents are very skeptical of that, you know, agents are people who know who the buyers are and the personalities of the show hunters and the needs of show and and try to match writers to the requirement to the buyers. It's a person to person kind of business not something that's presumably easily automated Jonathan handle is an entertainment attorney at Troy Gould, and you are listening to morning edition on KCRW. Tennessee has a new tuition free community college program for people over the age of twenty five some students are facing challenges going back to school. They have not been in the learning atmosphere for. Ten years, maybe twenty the technology is different even instructional methods or different. I'm Ari Shapiro. A closer look at that program this afternoon on all.

writers guild writers guild of America writer Hollywood Jonathan WGN Ari Shapiro Disney AT Fox Tennessee David Goodman contributing editor Time Warner WG Troy Gould reporter president attorney
"writers guild" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on The Watch

"Jesus. He was just really he's really exposing himself out there. It's so meeting last night's veep unless seasons too I guess featured my number one in my number two LA data eastside daddy's. Yes. Tim and Paul Scheer. Great see them their best selves on. Tim dims on one. Yeah. It's it's it's just insane. It's insane. To me. You have Gary Cole and Kevin Dunn who to the greatest maybe just great his actor. Yeah. They're just like middle relievers. We're using a lot of baseball. It's like having them in those roles on the shows like batting Michael Franko, a that's right where he's just hitting home run after run. Let's talk about Barry than okay. Barry Beck barriers back. Talk to me about berry. I think any show that's on each be. Oh, I gets a different level of interrogation than almost any other still to this day that almost any other show. So even like sharp objects. It's like it's put under like much more of a microscope than than if it had been just like on FX, or or Netflix or something like that. So it's interesting the narrative around berry being what are they gonna do next? How are they gonna count for this character being a bad guy? An Allison wrote about this, really. Well, I read a really good Washington Post piece about both veep. N berry deck sort of interrogated this idea. But I did feel like an hater talked about this with Simmons that he was like the first season finished at people were like, it's really great. I hope that you won't make any more of it. Yes. And he was like it was a really weird thing to be like. Oh, okay. But the thing I love about barriers that it kind of exists outside of that like the there are some shows that you can feel. Feel them taking notes from yes. From the wider public and from the audience and berry does not end. I just want to say that it's was wild. Because the guy who replaced berry as a hitman for for folks in the Fuchs Fuchs in the funks. You have love it. Dr funks. Berry. As the hitman in early seeking the amazing Cleveland Zia. I think it was a bartender in LA. I think I've had him as. Yeah. I think so d did you tip him? Well, yeah, always. Yeah. Just check. I always like where he's coming for you. I love that guy. There is a criminal lack of buybacks in Los Angeles. Interesting. Did you know that I guess you probably don't hit. Before they you know, because like in Brooklyn 'oughts, oh, man, you buy three get one free. Yeah. Sometimes less sometimes they would just get give them to. Yeah. It's amazing. What you go behind the stick? Dispenser poor injuries for working men. Yeah. So if you went back to end, the attitude in Brooklyn bars was if you wanna see Dumbo seed dumb. Goes really be governing ethos. Yeah. Was always a guy on the quarterback the want to see done something to never never initiate as he done boat in New York. I like how berry seems to outside of the commentary about berry and last night's episode could've come on five minutes after the finale of last season ended hero. Mariah directed. It. Expertly. I thought that the way in which he does sort of bitter patter dialogue between characters that or Rupp's into these sort of, you know, absolutely eyeball searing moments of violence were really really really like gripping. He's an amazing director. I mean, it is so beautifully lit the show even in the most humble locations like the north Hollywood parking lot where the acting studio like when he meets hang for the second time. It's an incredible scene..

berry Los Angeles Tim Barry Beck Brooklyn Simmons Dr funks director Michael Franko Paul Scheer baseball Washington Post Fuchs Fuchs Netflix Cleveland Zia New York Kevin Dunn Gary Cole Allison Mariah
"writers guild" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on The Watch

"And he's got two computer screens at inst-, basically like the chances that somebody will get tired of Dumbo are lower than the chances of somebody who doesn't understand the movie of the alternative title. Of something where it's like. Okay. Well, we it's so hard to explain to someone what I don't know like the that chain black movie from a few years ago, the nice guys and you had to like be like, well, it's like seventies kind of like hard boiled -tective thing. But it's funny. And it's about like this and like they're chasing down this porn king. Like you. You have to like explain the plot. Now, I don't know whether or not that insults. The intelligence of most people to be like, you guys just it just takes too long to explain a movies that were just gonna make Dumbo over ten years. I think that it's you can look at it that way and from our perspective of the kind of stories we'd want told I think that's accurate. But I also think you know, now that I'm a corporate stooge, I think that. On some level. It's a rational response to changing facts on the ground and the window to get information to people is so tiny. Yeah. We'll also the two experiences are different. I mean, I think that going to the theater people look at as not a chore, but like they wanted investment, it's an investment and people expect an ally. And if you just turned something on return on investment, oh, I thought you were saying the French word for king now. Flos was not you expect a return on your investment. It's like this is Steve corporate agent. I've never heard that before ROI never are you serious. What's SRO mean? Standing-room-only? What's the thing about search results? Oh, yeah. What's that? Search engine optimization. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know. That is either. You just said what it is. You don't know what that means? When I said that means the differences, basically, like member grantland were every headline was like a cryptic pun that referred to Cormac McCarthy novel. It was great. And then now it's more like what this thing tells you about something you already know about. That's why that's why there's no place for me on the internet anymore. But I I just I just mean the, but but for you that might not be effective for ninety eight percent of the people who might come across great. Okay. They didn't they didn't like mood Meridian. I'm just trying to come up with the corporate curfew pond. That's a really good guy. Steele that. Yes. Offer not furthering or though because that would Diop Dema. What was I talking about our ally? Oh, yeah. It will cause for Netflix though. Like, if you we've talked about this the ease of use for net flicks makes it so that I think people give more things more chances we have. But you know, it's funny. We were sitting here. Classic classic. Watch bit classic. Meet dogging on movies bit. Everyone loves. Uh-huh. Especially Sean fantasy. But it while I was saying it the first thing that popped into my mind in terms of this small window to get people's attention is the net. Flicks. Auto play is an ethics like you can't even I mean, everyone has not everyone many people have different app or integration with it. But my apple TV when I go to net flix, and I'm browsing, which is what I spend ninety thousand years..

Dumbo Cormac McCarthy Diop Dema Steve corporate Flos Netflix Sean apple Steele ninety thousand years ninety eight percent ten years
"writers guild" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on The Watch

"I'm not really sure. Good job. Yeah. Yeah. On a on a dime. I said speaking of Bill famous for many things, but among others showing his children, inappropriate popular culture is wild to me. When do you think you're going to start throwing on? I don't know. Let's start with goonies like what Wendy net. Never. I saw goonies in the theater, and I'm not over it. Like that freaked me the fuck out. You're still shook one of Chester copper pot chunk. Right. That's goonies. Right chunks. Just a kid the guy. Who's the scary faced guy? Slog sloth sloth. Yeah. I think so this is my level of understanding of anyway, never next next question. Never. You're never going to. My one could be like dog tooth. My wife showed my older daughter west side story last year and a half ago. She was afraid of rumbles for two weeks. She thought rumbles were things that happened out in the world still. Yes. She was scared of rumble. But she must be exciting Spielberg version is coming. Why would she know that you think she gets a deadline push alert honor Fisher Price phones. Daddy. What's packaging, guys? This is the thing. I have not seen the cartoon Dumbo in my parents, come to town, grandma and grandpa come and they're like are you excited a live action Dumbo? What do those words mean in that order? We just talked to Colin Farrell about the guys. Thanks. I need mention it. Why just casually mentioned it? You mean the podcast guest? I had I. Yeah. Congratulations. I saw did that interview Colin Farrell for Bill Simmons podcast it. That's coming soon. I did it and Andy's response wasn't like, I know. That's your favorite actor. Yeah. Really happy for you. It was like how was he? He's such a magical guy. Yeah. Yeah. Like because he were like is. I had I talk to him for did. I mentioned what did you talk to? I can't remember what it was like, you you mostly what was the what was the hook. Like, what was he promoting the lobster dumb? That's not. That'd be talks. Is that? Are you? Sure, you're to recall that was the groundskeeper from last night season from your veep. Talking about his favourite your goes limp. We talked to. I mean, you know, so many things and it was a rainy day in Manhattan. I think the conversation continued after the Mike swirled about Yates. We talked about did you it felt like I think it was more fright night. But it was. Oh, yeah. I know we know we talked about the lobster. We talked about you know, just as career is. He's a lovely lovely guy. I remember the pies. Can't remember how did you? How did you find him dynamite? Do you talk about Miami? Vice? DC stuff much. Does he have good memories of that time? No does he have any memories of that time? No. I didn't think. So he does not mazing. All right. Well, let's take a quick break here from our sponsors. I'm happy for you. I know you have your always happy for me. I just wanted to let me know it wasn't that. It was that superfan. During whom you might. Yes. Who said, yes. Like, I'm so jealous now it's like it's not such Allen nuts. No, look, I wouldn't have tweeted if I wasn't a little low bit jealous for some jealous. He was great. That pot should be. I hope I think this week. So he's it's Dumbo related. Did you watch them bone? The whole reason I said this was at the end of the pot not to give anything lay. You Bill says to Colin Farrell, are you going to give this away? I'm so excited. It's because it's like the end of like a fifty minute bug as he goes. In one sentence. Tell people there she see Dumbo and Convair is like I don't really think Dumbo needs like a explanation the Olympics alive. People are like either in or out on though and goes, no, see Dumbo if you wanna see Dumbo for smoking. Debono come into the I also I I can't I can't get into what happens on the podcast. But someone asks I just feel like there is soon as the photo emerged of longtime Phillies fan..

Dumbo Colin Farrell Bill Simmons Mike Wendy net Fisher Price Phillies Chester Spielberg Andy Convair Manhattan Olympics Miami Allen Yates fifty minute two weeks
"writers guild" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on KPCC

"You're going to be wrapping sideshow freaks characters. Like entourage's are a gold created an image of the talent agent as a ruthless pursuer of money and defender of their clients interests. And that their main rivals are probably other talent agencies. But there's one place where talent agencies are working together. And that's in a contract dispute with the writers guild of America, the screenwriters whose median salaries are falling want their talent agencies to stop charging packaging fees, which they say have been largely hidden yet drained money from the shows that the agency clients are making the WJ also has an issue with agencies that have started creating and financing content through affiliated companies. The writers argued that the agents who are both the employers of writers and represent writers create a serious conflict of interest. Karen, Stewart is the executive director of the association of talent agencies. And I asked her to explain the role of talent agent in two thousand nineteen the writers in the driver's seat this week this I want to make clear, but they need a strong agent in the passenger seat because what you have seen and what we know is happening today and over the next five years are because of the vertical integrated companies the fact that you work for a company it ends up in their side. Hello. It never comes out. It's got no place to sell. There's no transparency and that silo. These are all concerns for the agent and their artists are asking them to be strong and to render more services than they do today. I want to start with something that I suspect both you and the writers guild would agree on. And that is that writers are making less money now than they used to you have a different theory as to why they're making less money. What do you think's behind that economic loss? Well, we know that the writers guild issued its own report saying that its members had record earnings. I think it was a billion dollars in TV and four hundred million in features. I think those are the right numbers. So we know overall is that there are more shows there are more opportunities. But we also know that because of streaming and consolidation and fewer episodes being made that the lower to mid. Level of folks are feeling left behind. Yeah. They would argue that their median income has gone down that while the pot is bigger as you said, they're more shows, they're more people working. But if you look at an individual writer his or her income is actually going down. I think that's correct. Imagine. There used to be twenty two episode orders thirteen episode orders in the area, the new areas, specifically streaming and OTT. We're not seeing orders that that resemble at all broadcast television, even cable television. So imagine fewer episodes, but you have an exclusivity agreement with your employer. You're tied up. You can't do other work. Of course, that's going to result in mid level writers getting less money. I wanna ask you about a couple of issues that seem to be central to the negotiations right now and one is the so-called packaging fee where a talent agency takes a fee off of the budget of a show, and maybe some of its income. What is the? The historical justification for the packaging fee. Why are they important to agencies? Well, we've we've had a lot of meetings both ata with our members and our talent agents with their clients they're writer clients specifically. And what we've heard is they want more transparency, and we believe yesterday was first step in our statement of choice to make sure that we're addressing the concerns that the client spoke to their agents about and in that transparency choice. The information will be made available to the writer. Client, exactly what the agency is doing. It's it really we believe based on what our members have heard from their clients loud and clear is they want us to make a new agreement, and they want to have choice and transparency why weren't those fees transparent before why haven't the agents been sharing that information? I believe that the agents have not heard what they're hearing from their client. Today. They didn't hear this before. But now that we have spent literally months hundreds of hours listening to the writer clients, we understand what the concerns are. And we believe our proposals yesterday are the path to a new deal. One of the things that the writers guild has suggested is what they're calling kind of an open borders idea that writers can work with directors and actors at other agencies. They don't all have to be under the same roof when they're put together on a project. Is it your position that writers are pretty much free to go wherever they want and that they're not steered into any one specific place with specific clients from a specific agency, I believe that is the writers choice. I believe it sir choice today, and it should always be their choice. Karen, Stewart is the executive director of the association.

writer writers guild writers guild of America Karen executive director entourage Stewart billion dollars five years
Writers Guild Meets With Talent Agents Over Proposed Rule Changes

Digital Production Buzz

08:51 min | 2 years ago

Writers Guild Meets With Talent Agents Over Proposed Rule Changes

"It's time for Jonathan handle. He's an entertainment and technology attorney of counsel at Troy gold in Los Angeles. He's also the contributing editor on entertainment labor issues for the Hollywood reporter, which is why we're chatting with Jonathan today. Jonathan welcome back. Larry, thanks for having me. Jonathon? Let's get right into it. What's happening with the writers guild? The registered is trying to change the rules that apply to talent agents the guilds like the state of California state of New York regulate calendar agents each of the Union's has a set of rules called an agency agreement or franchise agreed. There is named for it almost a year ago, the writers guild Sanday one year notice of termination. So the existing rules expire April six on April seventh the writers guild is likely to impose new rules unilaterally. And that's something that the talent agencies are very very very uncomfortable with to put it mildly. Well, why does the writer skilled wanna make changes in the first place? There are three reasons. One of them is basic question of power. We think of the talent agencies and the guilds as both being very powerful. They both serve their overlapping constituency of writers in this case, and they have their own pepper functions writers guild negotiates, the basic union agreement the basic wages and so forth. The talent agents negotiates wages above that for people who have more more power and more standing in the industry so to organizations one overlapping constituency, that's that's the way it works in practice. But a guild says look as a matter of very basic power unions. Have the exclusive right to represent the United Workers in this case, the writers, and therefore any power that the agents have notwithstanding that they live in you know, they have these beautiful expensive buildings and lots of money any power that the agents have derives from us the union, and we're gonna dial it back. That's that's number one. The next two are two specific practices that the agents engage in that the gills don't like one of them is called packaging to aspects of package at one is you take a script someone, you know, your bring your agent script. Eight and says, this is great nature says this would be great for George Clooney who just happens to be client of our agency as well. So we're package the script with George Clooney. We're gonna persuade Clooney that Clooney likes the script. And if so we're going to go out to the marketplace with Clooney, plus the script package together and find a studio that wants to buy this as a movie or TV series or whatever this project is now, that's that's fine. But what? What the guild objects to is is the payment process that works in conjunction with that. You may think that agents get ten percent of what their clients make in general, especially at the big agencies. That's not it at all. They don't take anything from what the client's make let's suppose this Clooney. Plus Jonathan handle script pilot television series actually gets picked up by studio. Are they going to take ten percent of what they negotiate for me and ten percent Clooney's fee? They're not they're gonna take what's called a packaging fee from the studio itself, not paid by the clients paid by the studio and the way that packaging fee is calculated complicated. We don't have to get into it. But the writer skill says, you know, what that reduces their incentive to maximize the money that comes to Clooney, and and handle, and in fact, notwithstanding the fact that handle created this series this television series to begin with, and it turns out to be really successful series. Sometimes the agency makes more money. Than the crater himself or herself. We don't like that finally a newer practice called affiliated production, the talent agencies the big three, which is w EMMY William Morris endeavor, CA and UTA have all set up affiliated companies that actually substitute for studios and our buyers themselves and do production or production type activities you're not forced to take your project to them. They are an additional choice in the marketplace. But the writers guild says that's inherently conflicted that if your agent is also at least in in even indirectly your employer. You don't have an agent to begin with now, the irony is that one of people who's in business with endeavor content. The w EMMY affiliated entity is is none other than Bo Willem on who's the president of the writers guild east. So while the writer skill these is taking his very strong stand against -ffiliated production, but Willman is actually availing himself of.

George Clooney Writers Guild Jonathan Writer Contributing Editor Emmy Larry Los Angeles California Troy Gold United Workers Jonathon Reporter Hollywood Of Counsel Attorney Bo Willem New York William Morris
"writers guild" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Of the writers guild award goes to. The writers of Nathan for you. We lose every year at a siren I live. So I didn't. Preparing anything. But. Right. As the other word issue. Right. Right. Something right. Ron howard. Seriously. Everyone here is we we did not expect a witness. Everyone up here is incredibly talented and amazing writer and. I truly feel we have the best team in television. Design else wanna talk or? Say everyone so great. Thank you. I don't know we weren't expecting to win that. So I thank you so much for this honor and comedy central for lying us might this show. Very cool. You guys wanna say wanna? Great. Thank you so much. The nominees were outstanding comedy variety special are and the winner is the writers of the fake news with Ted how now. Thank you very much though. Thank you, very exciting. Sorry, fellow workers. It means a lot that as members of the lumpen proletariat, we can all get together and event like this. And celebrate each other. And we really appreciate it. I I think we'd all like to thank the continuing dissolution of the country. We live in which has forced satire riders to reach ever new heights of strangeness to make any sense at all. I don't know. Anyway, I didn't win either. So I didn't write anything I should have. Anyway. Thank you very much for this one. Thanks to the guilt for everything. It does for us. Thank you very much to comedy central for letting us do this ridiculous show. That makes no sense at all. And if you haven't seen it, you should see it. It's a crazy show. I'd like to thank at Helms for making the whole thing possible relay and it was his real vision. I would say that the whole thing through and made it really really possible. I'd like to thank all of our writers who joined us on this ridiculous sprint to make it. And I think came out really nicely. I don't know other people do do you wanna say something?.

writer Ron howard Nathan Helms Ted
'Eighth Grade' and the vagaries of awards season

The Frame

08:58 min | 3 years ago

'Eighth Grade' and the vagaries of awards season

"From the broadcast center at K P, C C. This is the frame I'm John horn on today's show could future Academy Award ceremonies honor the best screenplay written by an algorithm. Then why Bo Burnham the writer director of eighth grade channeled his feelings about the internet into the character of a thirteen year old girl, I I was very interested in young people flogging about their own life. And I watched hundreds and hundreds of videos and not to be cruel to the boys. But on average, the boys of this age talked about XBox and the girls this age talked about their souls and musician and photographer Anthony Wilson combines both disciplines for his latest release all that coming up on the frame. Welcome to the frame. I'm John horn. This Sunday, they'll be an Oscar for best original screenplay and for best adapted screenplay. But could there soon be a trophy for best screenplay written by an algorithm? We've known for years that technology is radically changing the way that movies are made. But what's remained fairly constant is the human screenwriter after all you can't make a movie without someone writing the script. Or can you if one artificial intelligence company has its way there's an algorithm out there that might be fighting for a share of the writing credit on the next studio blockbuster. We now revisit our peace with frame contributor, Colin freezing. Who explains it all if Robert Altman's movie, the player taught us anything it's that making a hit movie takes a lot of creativity. And frankly, guesswork psychic political thriller comedy with a heart with a heart and not unlike ghost meets entry and candidate conventional wisdom has it that no one ever knows exactly. Audiences want or what will get butts in the seats? But screenwriter William Goldman's aphorism that in Hollywood, no one knows anything may be changing. Here at the American film market in Santa Monica where the world comes to buy and sell movies. There's a company that thinks it can answer that question William Santer, Jack, Jan or with productivity media, and they're here to introduce an artificial intelligence program that will read your script analyze it for forty thousand data points or attributes then we'll tell you how to change it to make it more successful a horror film that features a ghost and the child imperilled has a eighty seven percent probability of overperforming. The benchmark the other day we actually had a conversation on. What kind of weapon with the youth in action film? We have all the kind of what kinds of breakdowns if you use a pistol compared to a handgun compared to a machine gun. We have all these planning or details of of these attributes you put all of that in and you go, you know, what if we changed the handgun to a bazooka this should outperform. We can we can see how it would into the program draws on a database of three thousand eight hundred films going back to the nineties it tracks what elements were in a movie, and how well that film did in any number of demographic groups computer will do a first run and say hope these are the potential elements, and you know, and we have recently started working on getting another layer people looking at those attributes and see, you know, how how actual relevant they are the story. So it's to stop. It's definitely a when you think about it. It's a complex problem solving. Right. The comedy drama or. Thriller. Their gold is to help any genre pitcher become the most successful version of itself. It can be they call it over performing the market or making sure you're cross generational buddy cop comedy with a dog does better than any other cross generational buddy cop comedy with a dog. It's like getting studio notes, but not from some slick executive with a gut feeling but from a coldly calculating cyborg. So it's just a tool set to I always say do one of two fundamental things. Number one is going to confirm what you believe to be true about your project or two it's going to give you an opportunity to ask another question. It all started just a couple of years ago. Jan an engineering student at the university of Waterloo in Canada, cold called the company called productivity media amid sized film. Finance firm Jiang was selling an algorithm that would predict how well a studio would do based on the movies. They were releasing. He. Intrigue the company decided to conduct an experiment using Jiang's database. They paid a film student. Make a trailer with all the key elements of a successful horror film impossible things a movie that doesn't really exist. Features of equestrian house in bath tub and a ghost in child in peril. It's honestly not much to look at. But the response on social media two point four million views was enough to tell them they were on the right track. But this feels like something we should resist to keep creativity alive. Monica Levinson is the president of production at shift Hans pitchers, the company has produced trombone and captain fantastic. And a ton of other. Well, reviewed dramas Levinson is not only skeptical, but worries that drawing on films that were successful sometimes formulaic retreads with mostly white actors might mean, there's no place at the table for new voices and diverse casting choices other things that we're trying to deal with now having more women characters and having better representation. And diversity and better representation of you know, just how characters behave all of that will be continued because that bias will continue from what worked in the past. That's not what works today, but productivity media says there's room in their analytics for all kinds of creative progressive choices take the gay coming of age drama and Oscar winner moonlight. When they ran that script through the algorithm. It determine the film would definitely find an audience before you also made tell based on two essential element in the film to have about eighty percent chance to before in the marketplace. And what was it about the movie that made you think we're made the algorithm think that it was going to do? Well, when we plugging, you know, a drama film with LGBT Salomonsson features African American. Essential elements, those the combination of those three already has a very significant influence on the outcome. But it does beg the question. If everyone is making a movie with the same elements won't that result him. Well, the same kind of movies coming out Santer says you need to think of it like music, if we said to heal whole bunch of musicians that we wanna song that's written in four four time in the key of c with this progression etcetera etcetera, etcetera, we're we're going to get you know, twenty different songs as for how screenwriters will react when. And if they're script feedback comes from an algorithm, maybe nNcholas cage playing version of screenwriter, Charlie Kaufman in adept Haitian, summed it up best sex or guns or car chases. I or characters you know. Learning profound life lessons or growing or coming to like each other or overcoming obstacles to succeed in the end. You know? I feel very strongly about this or the frame. I'm pollen freezing. Coming up on the frame our conversation with Bo Burnham the filmmaker behind eighth grade. He won the best original screenplay prize from the writers guild of America this past weekend. And he's nominated for best feature and best first screenplay at tomorrow's independent spirit awards. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us tomorrow, independent filmmakers will gather under a massive tent set up in the parking lot next to the Santa Monica. Pier. To celebrate the spirit awards they honor movies typically made outside the studio system. Among the nominated movies is eighth grade. It's in the running for four awards including best feature. The comedian. Bo Burnham who made it big on the internet as a teenager with YouTube videos wrote and directed eighth grade. And earlier this month, he won the directors guild of America award for first feature film, eighth grade is about a thirteen year old girl named Kayla who makes self help videos from her bedroom. Kayla's played by the newcomer Elsie Fisher, and the movie immerses you in her point of view in one scene. She's lying in bed scrolling through social media while an NGO song plays in the background when I met. Bo. Burnham after eighth grade premiered at last year Sundance film. Festival. He told me how he was able to reach Enya to license. Her song for his movie was like do. I write a note on like a salmon and put it new Fridays. Like, how do you contact like, how do you? Like like, a smokes they go on the air.

Bo Burnham John Horn Oscar Monica Levinson William Santer Santa Monica Anthony Wilson Robert Altman William Goldman Kayla Colin Freezing University Of Waterloo Writers Guild Of America Charlie Kaufman Canada Jiang
Shock as Eighth Grade wins best original screenplay at the WGA Awards

The Frame

01:42 min | 3 years ago

Shock as Eighth Grade wins best original screenplay at the WGA Awards

"This past weekend, the writers guild of America announced its winners for the best screenplays of the last year and WGN voters ordered best original screenplay to a movie that wasn't even nominated for an Oscar Bo Burnham's eighth grade. Claudia Puig is the president of the L A. A film critics association and she joined me in studio today to discuss the WG, prizes and other trophies handed up by Hollywood's big guilds, we started by talking about eighth grade. It's such a terrific script. And it was such an oversight that it wasn't. I dominated that. And many of us have been upset about it. So it was really great to see this get the love it deserves. And I it doesn't surprise me that it's the writers because the writers a are used to being overlooked. So no. So of course, they you know, they were trying to correct that wrong. And I also think there's, you know, comedies of always kind of gotten short shrift, and it's not really a comedy per se, but it has comic elements and then films that are about about tweens and teens are kind of overlooked. I mean, I was thinking about like the movie to hate you give which was at least as good as bohemian rhapsody or green book or some of the others do get nominee for best pitcher completely overlooked because it has the Waie taint. And I think that in this case, right? You know, you hear the title eighth grade. And you just assume that maybe she was improvising. You don't realize how tightly scripted it was by Bo Burnham talk with Bo Burnham about his lead. Actress Elsie Fisher about a year ago when the film premiered at the Sundance film festival. So there was a long rehearsal process, which was mostly for the script mostly just to make sure that it sounded right? And if things didn't sound, right. It was always the scripts fault. What I was trying to capture what she was in many ways. So to have the real thing there. It's just you know, just completely subjugate myself to it.

Oscar Bo Burnham Elsie Fisher Writers Guild Of America Claudia Puig WGN President Trump Hollywood
"writers guild" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

Ellen on the Go

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

"Everything cords, whatever he saves it all, and we also have something here called the free pile where people send us promotional items or whatever books t shirts, and there's just too much for Ellen to keep. So she puts extra stuff in this free pile, and he is checking it who is the free pile usually meant for for the pace for like as he who. Don't maybe salaries make the lease money their entry level jobs as well compensated for your work here. The benefit of really getting some great stuff from people who they want to show to Ellen. And she can't keep everything I mean, Troy's in the writers guild, so he's barely getting by. So he goes in there about eight nine times a day. Ever. He can get. Yes. And he makes a point to get here early. So he beats out the pe- as to think I've left my office nine times this year. That's probably right. As a surprise to him. We booked Marie condo to help him. Eliminate some of the clutter from his office. It's so worth watching this piece, but will play a little bit of it for you. You know, you gotta watch this piece go to your DVR and watch Troy's office kit rehabbed by Marie condo. And just know that you know, it seems to you that choice not wired up like everybody else. You're correct. That's no, we couldn't live a more. Oh boy. And somehow married way up. Yes. Yes. He did. She's beautiful and cool and normal and he such a he's so weird. He's a baby. Daddy now. So one of my writers is name is Troy has a very very messy office. I mean, there's clutter everywhere. Can I say where it comes from? We'd like there's there's a pile of free pile. We have lots of things that are sent to the show. And there's there's too much for me. It's just too much. So I offer it to whoever wants it. And have you been to the free pile before? No. You don't know about. Well, you need to know about it. Some of them are promotional items. There's some gifts sent from different. You know, if I mentioned something on the show, whatever. Anyway, I decided to do something about it. Do you know who Marie condo is everybody? Okay. Okay. So given great show it's on Netflix called tidying up. And so I had her surprise Troy and make him clean his office. And he was completely caught off guard. Hi, Maria condo. Who you are. Room with this many things on the wall. Cops. It's one of my roles to greet the space that I'm about to tiny. Quiet process. Get down to. At the heart close, your eyes and just in your heart express gratitude for all that this office for you. I'm good. Quite. So what's very important hiding is that you must touch each item with your hands. All day. If you do that..

Troy Marie condo Ellen Maria condo writers guild Netflix
"writers guild" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"Supported and free. If you have a cable subscription or you can. Pay for it as a subscription service in the same vein as that flex and get it without commercials that may pose an interesting challenge to the gills in terms of how to categorize that service for purposes of residuals shifting to the Gill lens for a moment. One of the things that's difficult for the unions is that the contracts, particularly the residuals portions of their contracts are built on a sumptious that are shifting out from under their feet in terms of the discrete differences between different media and the way media categorized, who's the residuals formulas. Depend very critically on what medium something's made for and what it's being reused in. But when the definitions of media start to blur and overlap and shift that presents challenges while the guilds brings us I think to another core issue that's going to be happening this year, which is negotiations of to come to mind one Seig after the others DJ what's happening with sag. After in the commercial. Israel's contract courses contract expires March thirty first and so negotiations are expected to begin next month, February and technology is the watchword there the ad industry is under a lot of pressure. The fact that people are watching Netflix these days, which they're willing to pay for ten now twelve thirteen bucks a month. They've just raise their prices. There's no ads on that flex when they're no ads on a large portion of the media that people are watching that creates difficulties because sag after really rests on three pillars for the actors. Anyways, film television and commercials and commercials are equally large if not larger than each of the other two pillars. And so anything that affects the health of the ad industry affect sag after the other challenge for the union is that there's a significant non union contingent. A lot of companies shoot commercials non union and members in. Some cases violate the working rules the rules of sag after global rule one and will work on a non union shoot in violation of those rules just this weekend. There was a Cadillac commercial being shot out in the high desert honor and forty miles from Los Angeles and sag after reps traveled in the pre dawn hours to document that chewed and to identify sag after members who were working on that shoot in violation of the rules. Those members now probably are going to be facing discipline, and what about the negotiations? Well, the DJ likes to negotiate early. And they're contract doesn't expire until the middle of twenty twenty. We're talking TV theatrical now same for sag after and the writers guild, but the DJ if history is a guide is likely to begin negotiations and finish negotiations in December of this year. So that's looking ahead towards the end of the year a little bit. But there again, we w-. Will see residuals at the forefront and an variety of other issues again very much related to the changing industry background. Jonathan two thousand nineteen is going to be an exciting air for people who want to follow your reporting where can they go t- HR labor? The Hollywood reporter labor dot com for my labor coverage, and they can also find me at J handled dot com..

Jonathan Israel Netflix writers guild Los Angeles Cadillac reporter Hollywood
"writers guild" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Yes. What you tell us. How you really feel though? I mean, I could no no joke joke joke way worse than I want to get to your writing. I want to get you. Right. Tell us about your habit. When you sit down to write something like this. Do you start with an outline? Yeah. I mean, I don't like to really talk too much with authority. Unlike what kind of a right, Aaron what kind of drugs are just just because I did one thing. So really is like knows the way I write this, you know, whatsoever. And there's no one way to do it. We're just curious how you did it. So did you start with an outline? Did. You know, you're beginning middle and end. Yeah. No. I didn't I really for this to set down wanting to write to enjoy myself. That's really what I I was in a really really bad place. Mentally, and I was like I just need to enjoy writing because I'm like miserable. And I want to just like sit in a coffee shop and feel good. So I did that. And I just wrote a bunch of things I was trying to write some big sort of like, you know, like weird like shortcuts like magnolia version of the internet where I'm going to rid of ROY. Like how I have so much to say I'm gonna talk about fifteen characters. And then I. Eventually stumbled on the voice of this girl, and and found that I could say absolutely everything I wanted through her and then just started writing and just just dug into the middle. And I think that is probably a process with my writing going forward. Whereas like, I for me need it needs. I need to see the end before I began in the end for me is the moment to moment. Experience of the film. I need to see the thing like living and breathing in a scene before I even begin to extrapolate and think like is this a movie, I just need to like write the scenes, and it needs to feel alive in a moment. And then I can go. Okay. But for this one it was like, I just wrote wrote wrote wrote just scenes I wanted to see not worrying about connecting exposition or anything out of order just. Yeah. Like, oh my God. If she went to a pool party that she was invited to whoa. Oh, if she went to a had to go to a high school shadow program, Microsoft, we're documentary were you in final draft. I was in does that right? He does make us. No, no. I did. Just for this kind of outline this outpouring or were you really just writing? Oh, yeah. No just seems the final draft then eventually at sixty pages of just a mess, and that was like Lee, and this this is not my style at all. I'm not as quick, but that was like literally like seven days. Wow. It's had sixty pages and was very excited about it. And then started to back off and go like, what is this story, and I had these sort of like floating blogs that I knew I felt I knew definitely wanted to function as voice over that would overlap scenes, but it's fascinating. And for anyone in the room that doesn't know Bose just recently nominated by the writers guild of America for best original screenplay for eighth grade. So. That's why we're spending some time on the right? And but but it's fascinating. Because you you kind of like our bearing the lead here, not only did you put these blogs in the movie as part of your structure, they're echoing what hurt innermost feelings are at these moments..

Aaron writers guild of America Microsoft Bose Lee seven days
"writers guild" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Yes. What you tell us. How you really feel though? I mean, I could no no joke joke joke way worse than I want to get to your writing. I want to get you. Right. Tell us about your habit. When you sit down to write something like this. Do you start with an outline? Yeah. I mean, I don't like to really talk too much with authority. Unlike what kind of a right, Aaron what kind of drugs are just just because I did one thing. So really is like knows the way I write this, you know, whatsoever. And there's no one way to do it. We're just curious how you did it. So did you start with an outline? Did. You know, you're beginning middle and end. Yeah. No. I didn't I really for this to set down wanting to write to enjoy myself. That's really what I I was in a really really bad place. Mentally, and I was like I just need to enjoy writing because I'm like miserable. And I want to just like sit in a coffee shop and feel good. So I did that. And I just wrote a bunch of things I was trying to write some big sort of like, you know, like weird like shortcuts like magnolia version of the internet where I'm going to rid of ROY. Like how I have so much to say I'm gonna talk about fifteen characters. And then I. Eventually stumbled on the voice of this girl, and and found that I could say absolutely everything I wanted through her and then just started writing and just just dug into the middle. And I think that is probably a process with my writing going forward. Whereas like, I for me need it needs. I need to see the end before I began in the end for me is the moment to moment. Experience of the film. I need to see the thing like living and breathing in a scene before I even begin to extrapolate and think like is this a movie, I just need to like write the scenes, and it needs to feel alive in a moment. And then I can go. Okay. But for this one it was like, I just wrote wrote wrote wrote just scenes I wanted to see not worrying about connecting exposition or anything out of order just. Yeah. Like, oh my God. If she went to a pool party that she was invited to whoa. Oh, if she went to a had to go to a high school shadow program, Microsoft, we're documentary were you in final draft. I was in does that right? He does make us. No, no. I did. Just for this kind of outline this outpouring or were you really just writing? Oh, yeah. No just seems the final draft then eventually at sixty pages of just a mess, and that was like Lee, and this this is not my style at all. I'm not as quick, but that was like literally like seven days. Wow. It's had sixty pages and was very excited about it. And then started to back off and go like, what is this story, and I had these sort of like floating blogs that I knew I felt I knew definitely wanted to function as voice over that would overlap scenes, but it's fascinating. And for anyone in the room that doesn't know Bose just recently nominated by the writers guild of America for best original screenplay for eighth grade. So. That's why we're spending some time on the right? And but but it's fascinating. Because you you kind of like our bearing the lead here, not only did you put these blogs in the movie as part of your structure, they're echoing what hurt innermost feelings are at these moments..

Aaron writers guild of America Microsoft Bose Lee seven days
"writers guild" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Adaptation of the writers guild of America awards nominees for the best original screenplay include eighth grade Roma and vice I'm Elliot Francis. Have I it's Jamie, progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the hi, Jamie. It's me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song what the name your price tool. So when it's like tell us what you want to pay. Hey, hey, trombone goes, Wah, Wah, and you say we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while choir goes, savings coming at ya. Savings coming at ya. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway, see you practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap break. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Price and coverage match limited by state law. Message and data rates may apply. Earning a graduate business degree online from the w p Carey school of business at Arizona State University is an easy. But that's the point. Great change. Requires hard work, persistence, and dedication, and with ASU online. You'll have a team of success coaches and academic advisers supporting you every step of the way as you prepare to transform your life and career texts diploma two seven nine six four five. To learn. Why w p Carey graduates are sought after by some of the top companies and organizations around the world. If you're ready to commit the time and effort, it'll be worth it. Because nothing great comes without commitment. Learn why the NBA information management and business analytics master's degrees from ASU are some of the most highly ranked and selective online business programs in the country. Text diploma two seven nine six four or five. That's D. I P L O two seven nine six four five. I'm living in seven years old and I'm blind. You can help me. Help Ravina and other blind people by making a tax deductible donation of your used car, truck or almost anything with wheels to the national federation of the blind. Just call eight five five six five nine nine three one four or visit cars, helping the blind dot org. That's cars, helping the blind dot org. And if you know a blind person who needs help, Email and be at NFV dot org..

Jamie Arizona State University w p Carey school of business NFV dot writers guild of America Elliot Francis Carey NBA Ravina national federation seven years two months
"writers guild" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"But the Americans was the winter best performance by an actor the nominees were John C Reilly Robert Redford Vigo Mortenson in green book Lin Manuel Miranda than tamed that Nancy Pelosi couldn't say that time limit. I'm gonna Lin Manuel Miranda Mary Poppins returns, and then Christian bale was your winner. Best performance by an actress in motion picture drama. Now, this is where lady Gaga was supposed to win. Everybody thought she was going to win for a star is born also nominated were Nicole Kidman Melissa McCarthy. Rosamund pike Glenn. Close one for a movie I've seen called the wife. I don't know if I've even heard of that. Best performance by an actor in a motion picture. This went to a very deserved guy. Bradley Cooper was nominated for a star is born. I really like Bradley Cooper Willem Dafoe, Lucas hedges, John, David Washington, and then Ramey Malik or medic for Baheen rhapsody. He was great in that see bohemian rhapsody yet. Wow. I mean, it sound like I had time off or anything like a long break or anything like that. Except you just did. I forgot. Yeah. Weird. I mean, I want to see it badly is he known for anything else or is this breakout role. No, he's been in something else. I can't think of what right. What's his name again? Mister robot? Then there's something besides that though. I think but Remy Ramey. Malik M A L E K K see best motion picture musical or comedy went to bring green book was green book Zada comedy. I know it's not a musical the nominees were crazy rich, Asians, the favorite Mary Poppins returns. And the winter green book and then for both best motion picture in a drama. A star is born if Beale street could talk black KKK clansman Black Panther and the winter bohemian rhapsody. So how about that? How often is the Golden Globe? Best picture all these awards carry over into the Oscars. I think fairly regularly it doesn't necessarily follow. But I think it's pretty regular that they win. Both seems like it's sometimes it's a it's a hint as to what's going to win the Oscar. So of the of the best motion pictures. How many of these have you seen? Panther. Yes. Black clansmen, no bohemian rhapsody. If you'll streak could talk stars born so three of us ought to sell stars born, no. You know, I saw a Black Panther. I saw Bo Hebron wraps of those two which one's better. Bohemian rhapsody. I enjoyed example size. I guess I was wrong. Yeah. Sorry. And as far as movies this past weekend. Aquaman was number one again made thirty million this particular weekend at up to two hundred fifty nine million in three weeks. So I think it's made a hundred million of its budget. Then we say it was one sixty or something. Yeah. One sixty one eighty somewhere in there. Then the I guess it's a horror movie escape room. Yeah. Made eighteen million that only cost nine to make is that one of those Jason Blum how bloom house things because he is amazing at making low budget movies that make a lot of money. No room director, Adam robo. Say was maybe Jason Blum, Mason Bolom house productions. No, all right, Mary Poppins returns made fifteen point seven over the weekend. It's up to one hundred thirty eight million cost one thirty to make sense in the in the black now Spiderman into the spider verse is at one hundred thirty three million that's making money that cost ninety million Bumblebee is at ninety seven million. But that cost one hundred thirty five million to make. Then the mule still doing well that was number six the weekend. That's my nana's favorite movie there. And you haven't seen that one yet. No vice. May twenty nine million not over the weekend five million on the weekend. Second act. Ralph breaks the internet and Holmes and Watson round out the top ten at just horrible. Sorry. I take great pleasure in the fact that that James Cameron movie isn't even in the top twenty right now that machine thing whatever it's called..

Ramey Malik Lin Manuel Miranda Mary Poppin Mary Poppins lady Gaga Lin Manuel Miranda Jason Blum John C Reilly Oscar Rosamund pike Glenn Nicole Kidman Melissa McCarthy Bradley Cooper Willem Dafoe Remy Ramey Bradley Cooper Robert Redford Vigo Mortenson Nancy Pelosi Malik M Bo Hebron James Cameron Ralph
"writers guild" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"writers guild" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"Hey, this is John. So today's episode comes from a panel hosted for the writers guild back in October. We've sat down and talked with a bunch of writers about their experience moving from being an aspiring writer chewy professional writer who got paid for it. There's a few bad words in this episode. So if you're driving in the car with your kids, this is the warning and joy. Thank you so much. We are gathered here to celebrate. Now, we're going to talk about what it's like to be starting off. And hopefully offer some practical tips for beginning your career, this is hosted by the right as little America West. I am so proud to be a board member of the writers guild of America West on all your seats. Probably you gotta know reading left behind sticker as part of the frugal process for the no riding up behind sticker. But also the message, and so I think one of the things we'll be talking about today is you're going to be going into meetings. Hopefully, and you're gonna be talking to folks about the things you want to write if there are things that you own that you created by yourself you can do anything with those. But so often you'll be going in to talk about things that they own you'll be talking about the book they've bought or the remake they wanna do or their idea. And this campaign is to remind members all scream hunters. Great talk, talk, talk, talk, talk, all you want. But writing is the thing you're paid to do and make sure they're paying you for writing. So don't leave that supplement. Don't Email them pitches and treatments. That's one of the things. You can do is help protect writers from. Abuses that you just encounter as screenwriter. But we'll talk about some scary things muscles and really happy things. Hopefully with amazing writers, I got very lucky to bring on board. So let's bring them up first off. Welcome tests. Morris has Morris is a writer whose credits include man shoes on his most recent season has will next up Christine Hodson, Christina Hodson. She is a writer whose credits include the upcoming Bumblebee. Next up the cold. Perlman credits include oh is the galaxy the upcoming captain marvel and literally last show up. But but here Jason Fuchs credits include wonder woman and other things Jason Fuchs. All right. Let's start a career before we started a career and talk about that period of time, which you are writing. But no one is paying you for your writing. And what that's like it a Chauhan's who's in that stage of your career right now. Yeah. That was me. So let's talk about that part of your career when you are hopefully professional that you're you're tweeting your craft professionally. It's just that. No one's paying you for that Jason fields stopped within just a few. What was your life like before you were getting paid to write? What were you doing? I started off as an actor in New York City so was working here. And they're doing the regular New York actor stuff law and orders and all that. And so who did you play on Rio anybody's, I know has never body. I was on special victims unit where I was I was a teen rapist. Like, we all remember that episode. Yeah. Yeah. And then it gets worse. I beat her up with a baseball bat. And and the re reveal at the end is the reason why I did it is because she gave me the clap. That was like the big twist at the end of my episode orient. We're church and then my dad was killed at my bar mitzvah and criminal intent. So I really I played a variety of Jews in my acting career criminal Jews has Siddiq, but SARS acting quite a bit. My first writing gig was actually working at a place called defense and foreign affairs publications. I had an interest in the Middle East in politics. I did an internship there. I worked there very briefly. And I was pretty young to be working there. And I thought this is kind of a weird experience, and I wrote a screenplay about that on spec. Hoping that that would would help me started screenwriting career got me an agent got me more, unpaid work. But ultimately, I still couldn't get hired to do anything in a script that ultimately changed my life. I wrote a spec script after that call the last first time as a romantic comedy that my agent refused to send out..

writer writers guild of America Christina Hodson Jason Fuchs Chauhan Siddiq Jason fields Middle East John America New York City baseball Morris Christine Hodson Perlman marvel New York