35 Burst results for "Writer."

AJ Benza Shares How He Approaches Events

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

00:22 sec | Last week

AJ Benza Shares How He Approaches Events

"That reminds me when I was asked by a New York magazine writer who was profiling me many years ago, why I never believed in carrying around a notepad or a pen when I was covering events. And I said, for me, I have to live it, see it, and feel it, and commit it to memory and run it down the next day, I want to get home. I can't do it while I'm there. I lose perspective. I write it down tomorrow. It works for me. It doesn't work for

New York Magazine
Eric Chats With 'Mystical Perelandra' Author James Como

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Eric Chats With 'Mystical Perelandra' Author James Como

"To James como, CO, MO. You can find him at James como dot com. He's a lecturer writer, teacher written many books, the new book is mystical para landra, about C. S. Lewis's book, peril andra. And we were just talking about the basic plot, James como. Let's pick up where we left off. The prohibition. So this is an unfallen planet. Weston, who is the. Villain, the villain. He's not there yet. Ransom, the good guy who's named ransom for some big reasons here, right? He arrives on the planet, and he is, in a sense, charged with helping prevent the fall on this planet. It didn't happen here. Here, the fall happened. So it was not prevented. But Louis, I mean, even for C. S. Lewis to have this idea, it doesn't get much bigger than this. It's like, you want something tough to pull off. How does that? It doesn't. The thing is, when ransom first gets there, he has no idea what he's doing there. And then when he realizes what's expected of him, he can't believe it because he's ill suited to this. You know, he's a middle aged philologist. And now he has to prevent this cosmic catastrophe. And there's no one to help him. He needs a miracle, and then he hears the voice, you know? You have a miracle. You're here to do this. And my view of this, and I really do think this is one of the great modern epics in English. We will rival anything from Greek and Roman literature. Look, look, I've said the same thing, it's not you think it is. Okay. And that makes ransom one of the great unacknowledged heroic figures in western literature. Yeah, you

James Como C. S. Lewis Weston Louis
James Como Shares His Favorite Story 'Perelandra' by C.S. Lewis

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:43 min | 2 weeks ago

James Como Shares His Favorite Story 'Perelandra' by C.S. Lewis

"That you've written a book about one of my very, very, very favorite books. It's called mystical peril and so there are a lot of people listening, they're not even C. S. Lewis devotees, so describe, if you would please, what is para landra for my audience, tell my audience. So that I don't. All right, I'll begin with the subtitle. Mystical peril angel my light my lifelong reading of C. S. Lewis and his favorite book. Because peril andro, he said, more than once, was his favorite book. What year did he write it? Amazing. Out of the silent planet, the first of this trilogy had preceded it in 39, and that hideous strength, which is really a stand-alone thing in 45, I think, was the third book. I think of it as the ransom trilogy because of the hero ransom appearing in all three. So let's call it the ransom trilogy, but the so the middle book and you say, it was Lewis favorite book. And boy, he wrote a lot of books. It's called peril lander. So it's a novel. Yes, a fantasy. He would have called it a romance using the old medieval classical term for an adventure. Now, peril andra, people who don't know the book should know, is Louis's name for Venus. The planet Venus. And in this book, elwyn ransom travels magically in a coffin like object transported by el dila angelic creatures to this unfallen Paradise, which is peril andra. Populated by two people, the king and the queen. Prelapsarian before the fall. I mean, look, this is a heavy idea, so I'm going to have to interrupt a lot, because I want my audience to be tracking. This is amazing stuff, folks. So this is a novel. It is brilliant. It is brilliantly written as a writer who values writing who values literature. There are passages in the book power lander, particularly toward the end that are some of the most glorious passages of prose ever written in English, bar none. Some of the most spectacular writing that I have ever read. But the plot is that elwyn ransom goes to this planet. It's his version of Venus, Lewis's version of Venus. And he is sort of confronts the atom in the eve of that planet before the fall, and then is used by God to help them prevent the fall to prevent the fall.

C. S. Lewis Elwyn Ransom Andra Lewis Venus Louis Elwyn
 Grammys add new categories, including songwriter of the year

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Grammys add new categories, including songwriter of the year

"The Grammys are adding 5 new categories including songwriter of the year for the 2023 awards I'm Archie's are a letter with the latest The Grammys already given award for song of the year which honors the songwriters for a single song now a writer of at least 5 songs that others record will be eligible for the songwriter of the year award recording academy CEO Harvey mason junior says someone who writes and records their own music is not eligible The other new categories are spoken word poetry album alternative music performance Americana music performance and video game soundtrack The academy also will give a merit award for best song for social

Grammys Harvey Mason Archie
Open Invite for Media Matters Rep. To Explain 'April 4th Events'

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Open Invite for Media Matters Rep. To Explain 'April 4th Events'

"Over at blaze news great sight And former employee of the left wing watchdog group so called media matters for America accused as ex colleagues of covering up a sexual misconduct incident And social media posts yesterday Timothy Johnson formerly a senior writer at media matters and I have no special interest in Timothy Johnson or anybody there But here it is in the news was threatened with a lawsuit from his former employer that would be media matters Over a Twitter thread in which Johnson said that an editorial director at the group quote covered up for a man who preyed on our colleagues A lot of that going on on the left The Lincoln Project you know Public school system The threat began with Johnson announcing after about ten years I no longer work at media matters Now to let the times vague series of tweets Johnson alleged that media matters editorial director Ben demuro covered up sexual misconduct by another unnamed employee is no longer working for the group of course I have no firsthand knowledge I'm just reading It's all over the news I am very very fortunate My circumstances that I did not up on the street the next day As a consequence of what my former boss then de myrio did I bet a lot of people would have Johnson wrote My experience has been that the vast vast majority of past colleagues at media matters for America even including most executives and managers were wonderful kind people to work with But you two clowns he writes I don't think so Do either of you want to talk about April 4th I doubt it he continued referencing an unknown incident I will advice anybody at the most senior levels of media matters to come on this program and discuss April 4th and reveal to 14 million listeners What this means

Timothy Johnson Johnson Lincoln Project You Know Publi Ben Demuro America De Myrio Twitter
Why the Constitution Still Matters on Guns

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Why the Constitution Still Matters on Guns

"Headline writers came up with the headline what the center wants after evolving. Now I do not presume to speak for the center. I am center right and there are many, many people to my right and 60% of the country that my left I'm probably in the 70% range on most issues. For example, I do not believe in constitutionalizing the status of the fetus in the womb. It's a matter of state law, the police power, it's not a matter of the constitution, that upsets many of my pro life allies. I believe as a Catholic that it's life at conception, but I don't believe it's in the constitution or within the federal government's authority to say so. And I always begin with the constitution, so I begin in this piece with the constitution. I quote. On what can conservatives and liberals agree in the aftermath of the massacre in Texas. Let's begin with justice Antonin Scalia, with what he wrote in 2008, D.C. versus Heller decision, a case affirming an individual's right to bear arms. Nothing in our opinion should be taken to cast doubt on long-standing prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons and the mentally ill or laws forbidding the carrying of firearms and sensitive places such as schools and government buildings or laws imposing conditions and qualifications on the commercial sale of arms. That's the majority of decision in Heller, that is our understanding of the Second Amendment, the majority understanding and the one that has endured. It's now been incorporated to be a different case to the states. That was about a federal law so it needed incorporation. It's an individual right. It may not be abridged, et cetera

Versus Heller Antonin Scalia Federal Government D.C. Texas Heller
Daily Wire: Middle School Librarian Justifies Pro-Prostitution Book to Students

Mark Levin

01:12 min | Last month

Daily Wire: Middle School Librarian Justifies Pro-Prostitution Book to Students

"But if you thought that we'd hit the bottom of the barrel as to what might be pushed in the schools the daily wires Luke rose yak who's done a great job As a story that shows that they just keep reaching lower A loudon county Yes then again Sterling middle school teacher grew concerned when she saw a parent's tweet about a book that was available in the school library seeing gender Which has a chapter titled quote sex work is not a bad term Quote a person may exchange sex or sexual activity for things they need or want such as food housing hormone drugs gifts or other resources Reads one shocking passage in the book is in the library Prostitution is quote a job like being a store clerk in architect or a freelance writer We all unfortunately have to do work to make a living Some of us hate our jobs and some of us love them The same goes for those who do sex work Sadly sex work is generally misunderstood the book states By the way you won't find any of my books in this library will you mister produce

Luke Rose Yak Sterling Middle School Loudon County
Dinesh Continues His Dissection of NPR's '2000 Mules' Critique

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:00 min | Last month

Dinesh Continues His Dissection of NPR's '2000 Mules' Critique

"I'm continuing my discussion or perhaps dissection is the right word of Tom rice box article in NPR. A pro Trump film suggests it's data so accurate it solved a murder. That's false. Before I go on, I want to point out, look at how desperate these guys are, right? This quote solving of a murder. We didn't say we solved the murder, but nevertheless, is totally peripheral to election fraud. It's only used to show that the same geo tracking techniques that could be useful in solving a murder or helping to solve a murder are the same techniques applied to ballot trafficking. But NPR is so eager. I mean, they have so little to attack in the movie, they're like, let's take this case, which is unrelated to ballot trafficking, the Sequoia Turner case, and let us see if we can take it apart and it's granular detail. And so they sat with a certain kind of ahab like determination to try to do that and the effect is, well, let's just see what it is. Now, this is how this is the kind of false sleuth posture that reporter drives back likes to strike up. So he goes, in the episode of the podcast promoting the film, d'souza said Phillips and engelbrecht provided their analysis to the FBI, which turned the data over to the Georgia bureau of investigation, the GBI. Now, NPR contacted the GBI to fact check this claim. Great. Let's see what happens. Quote. The JBA did not receive information from true the vote that connected to the Sequoia Turner investigation said Nellie miles the GBI director of the office of public and governmental affairs. Wait, Tom drives back himself, wrote three sentences earlier that the information was not given to the GBI, but was given to the FBI. And the FBI turned over the information not necessarily with any attribution to true the vote, the FBI is going to look at the data itself. The FBI turns the data over to the GBI. So when the GBI says we didn't get information from truth to vote, true, nobody gave the GBI information directly. The information was given as noted above to the FBI. And then to get even more ridiculous, the writer, Tom dry spot goes quote, an attorney for Sakura Turner's family told NPR they had never heard of the angle bricks and Phillips analysis either. What? What would the family of the victims have to do with any of this? What would they how would they have knowledge of where this information came from? Let's say I go and give information to the FBI, which then gives it to the GBI. Why would I expect that the turnover family would be on the inside of this as the FBI and the GBI regularly sit down with victims families, by the way, we got some tips from here. Let's show you the data. You can no they don't do any of

GBI Sequoia Turner NPR FBI Tom Rice Engelbrecht Office Of Public And Governmen Georgia Bureau Of Investigatio Souza Phillips JBA Nellie Tom Dry Sakura Turner TOM
Dinesh Refutes NPR's Critique of '2000 Mules'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:04 min | Last month

Dinesh Refutes NPR's Critique of '2000 Mules'

"Let's kind of go through this rather slowly because I think we need to in order to see this operation and dissect it. I'm going to dissect it almost like I'm in biology class and this is a frog. It's called investigation. So right there it's telling you, this is serious business. We're in really investigation. A pro Trump film now stop right there. A pro Trump film. Anyone who has seen 2000 meals knows that 2000 mules is not about Trump. How much time does Trump get in the film? I would say maybe one minute, maybe two, out of 90 minutes. This is different by the way than the film rigged. Dave bosse's film had a lengthy interview with Trump that was running all the way through the film. This is not like that. This is a film about stealing an election. Now, Trump was the candidate in 2020, obviously I'm going to mention Trump. I obviously also mentioned Biden, but I was very careful not to make this a film that was sort of about Trump and Trump is just quoted three or four times a single line in the film. And then, of course, that's footage from election night. So just that part of the headline is aimed at saying this film was made for Trump. It's a pro Trump film. We've got a discounted right away. All right, the pro Trump film suggests its data are so accurate. It solved the murder. That's false. First of all, I'm going to say straight out and I'm going to ask you to watch the film so you can make up your own mind. I do not say in this film the true the vote, quote, solved, a murder. In fact, I can prove it. I'm going to go to the exact statement that appears in the film. In fact, it's quoted in the article. This is what I mean when I say that they make a claim in the headline that is subtly undermined by the text of the article, but nowhere does the writer give you any clue about this. He allows you to get the false reading. In fact, it's part of his purpose that you get the follow false

Donald Trump Dave Bosse Biden
Daniel Horowitz on Biden's Warning of an Even Bigger Looming Pandemic

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | Last month

Daniel Horowitz on Biden's Warning of an Even Bigger Looming Pandemic

"Right now is an incredibly wise and great patriot, someone who has been speaking out against COVID tyranny, and has also been unafraid to go into the weeds and do research whether it's Ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine, and really waging a very effective war against Remdesivir, and he's been one of the most articulate and effective writers in the last couple of years, and he's been keeping keeping the bad guys on defense, which is just terrific. It's Daniel Horowitz, who has a new article out all about this topic we're talking about Daniel Horowitz says, quote, states must preemptively nullify any WHO international pandemic regulations. Daniel, welcome back to the program. Tell us what is the WHO poised to do, separate fact from fiction and how should we respond? Sure, you can't view this in a vacuum. Let's first of all, you have to look at the broader context that the Biden administration just conducted this global COVID summit where they essentially warned there's going to be an even bigger pandemic that is even more deadly and it's going to happen in the fall and the winter. It's kind of interesting. They seem to always know that. You know, when it's going to happen, so I would take them at face value, I ignored it last decade and never paid attention to this, but now I think we should take them seriously. So the broader point is that the impression that Republicans are trying to give you. And when I say Republicans, I mean the Mitch mcconnells, I mean, a lot of governors and state legislative leaders when I had friends of mine and state legislators, they're like, dude, we got to immunize ourselves against this to make sure it doesn't happen again. Let's utilize the time we live in when all these non pharmaceutical interventions so to speak have become so unpopular and let's make sure we currently ban it in law and state constitutions. And they're like, no, we're done with COVID. Let's move on. They don't want to talk about it. But we're not done with it. We're not done with the biomedical state because Charlie, this wasn't some once in a hundred year natural virus that happened to come and now it's over with. So maybe they responded inappropriately or even in an evil way, but it's over with. No, they induced it. They created it, and they're on to the next thing. And they've already groomed dare I say our generation to automatically acculturate themselves to this sort of reaction. So

Daniel Horowitz Remdesivir Biden Administration Mitch Mcconnells Daniel Charlie
Eric's Book 'Letter to the American Church' Hits Shelves in September!

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:39 sec | Last month

Eric's Book 'Letter to the American Church' Hits Shelves in September!

"Question number three, let's keep moving. I heard you were writing something new. What's it called and when will it come out? It's called the letter a and I'm writing it right now. Bingo. And there it is. See? That was not so difficult. Everybody can be a writer. Actually, that's just what I wrote right now was the letter a, but what I have been writing is a book called letter to the American church. It will be out in September, which is lightning speed for publishers considering the book is barely done. But it's a letter to the American church. It's pretty serious, folks. It's pretty serious stuff, but it's a very short book. And thanks for

American Church
Scott Baio and Dinesh Discuss the Decline of the Movie Business

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:08 min | Last month

Scott Baio and Dinesh Discuss the Decline of the Movie Business

"I'm back with actor and writer and producer Scott baio, Scott, we were actually talking about movie distribution and you said that you're looking forward to seeing 2000 mules tonight, even though you've seen some of the clips and things about it, I mean, this is a movie that we had to release in an age of censorship. And so our normal distribution, which is, you know, Amazon Prime and Apple iTunes. I'm like, I'm not gonna put the movie on these cancellable platforms. And so, I mean, we're in an industry movies, you of course have been all your life in movies that seems to be changing dramatically, doesn't it? Changing how. Well, because I think we're on the same page. Let's go ahead. Yeah, I mean, I mean in two ways, first of all, you know, I think back to when I came to America in the late 70s, early 80s. And there were just really good movies and by good movies, I mean they had plot, they had character, they had suspense. They had all the elements that make a movie. Now you have to sort of drag me to the movies because I find that those basic elements of storytelling seem to have been lost, so I mean, on the substantive side, but then I also mean that Hollywood has essentially become this kind of regimented one party state within a state. Yeah. Well, first of all, I think the movie business it's become a movie about tentpole movies, which is all the marvel movies and the big giant movies. It's hard for a small story. And I like marvel movies. I do. But it's hard for smaller movies to get any sort of attraction. In terms of television, it seems that they want to shock people into watching shows. And I can never understand that. I mean, you know, I grew up in a different time, I guess I was on television at a different time. There are, I would say a large majority of this country that really would like to see a good solid decent television

Scott Baio Scott Amazon Apple America Hollywood
Why Director Tracy Robinson Created New Film 'The Matter of Life'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | Last month

Why Director Tracy Robinson Created New Film 'The Matter of Life'

"Show today, and I certainly do. We have Tracy Robinson, director of the new film, the pro life film, the matter of life, Tracy Robinson, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thanks for having me. It's an honor to have you. I mean, I was getting prepped for this segment. I was asking your team, I was like, so what is she is she the director and they're like, yeah, she's the director, the writer, the producer, the executive producer. She financed the film. Before we launch into it, I want to play just a quick promo from the movie, so to kind of get our audience in the vibe and understand what we're dealing with here. Cut 72 play right now. I think this is the battleground culture issue in America today. I believe that being pro life is the most progressive value that we can have. She's got to know when she takes that pregnancy test. The hurt church is not going to treat her like the pharisees tried to treat the woman caught an adult shop. As the church we can't just vote pro life, we have to be pro love. That's just a 32nd. I know you got a lot some longer trailers as well. Tracy, but tell us about this film, tell us why you made it. The timing is unbelievable with the Dobbs leak, justice Alito's majority draft opinion. What made you make this film? Well, the matter of life clarifies the abortion issue, we tackle the issue of abortion from the science of embryology, the history of how we got to this point in our society. And we also incorporate powerful personal stories redeeming personal stories of people overcoming just tremendous circumstances, and we also highlight just the amazing things that are actually going on in the pro life movement right now, particularly around the pregnancy care side. And what sparked the vision for this film was actually, when I first heard the pro life case, this was back in

Tracy Robinson Charlie Kirk Alito Dobbs Tracy America
Why Nina Jankowicz Is a Disinformation Specialist

The Dan Bongino Show

00:55 sec | Last month

Why Nina Jankowicz Is a Disinformation Specialist

"She knows she is a disinformation specialist How does she know Because she's caught on Twitter and audio and video saying things that have now been fully discredited as false They're the very definition of disinformation So she sure during our prior hits she knows that she's trying to influence this deep state to push a push censorship right Because that's what they have to do as a component of gaslighting isolate people from the truth So she figures when she gave this interview let me get out ahead Of viable credible claims that I'm a deep stater or will be a deep state or I'm working with the deep state by claiming that the deep state is a conspiracy theory and the writer conspiracy theorists for promoting it The deputy do flipper ruski It's a brilliant theory on how to operate a brilliant strategy I should say It's not theoretical We need to do more of that

Twitter
'Defender of the Faith' Author Joseph Pearce Shares His Story

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | 2 months ago

'Defender of the Faith' Author Joseph Pearce Shares His Story

"Story. You've been on the program before, but we have many new listeners who, first of all, they're wondering, what is that lovely accent? Where do you live now? What is your story? How did you come to be who you are today, which is to say a writer of many books and a man of deep Christian faith. Well, I mean, I told the story, Eric in a book called race with the devil, my journey from racial hatred to rational love. But in a nutshell, I, as a very young man, there's a 15 year old to be precise, what involved with white supremacist politics. I was very anti Christian, very anti Catholic, and very secular, and sort of worshiped that secular fundamentalism of Adolf Hitler. So it was through the reading, first of all, of writers such as G.K. Chesterton, who as you can see behind me there still looks after me like a guardian angel. It was a reading of Chester Turner bell or C. S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien and some of his great Christian figures that led me away from the darkness and that coupled with a spiritual healing, which I didn't even understand until I could look back in retrospect. This miraculous healing coupled with the reason that I was receiving from these great Christian writers that led me away from the abyss and really my life since my conversion has been one of gratitude for that conversion and a desire if you like to make up for all the bad things I did prior to my conversion by trying to live a good and faithful life and bring other people to the truth of Christ. And where did you

Chester Turner Bell G.K. Chesterton Adolf Hitler Eric C. S. Lewis J.R.R. Tolkien
Governor Ron DeSantis Is Spearheading the 'Florida Model'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:44 min | 2 months ago

Governor Ron DeSantis Is Spearheading the 'Florida Model'

"Florida governor Ron DeSantis is creating a new model. Let's call it the Florida model. And this is turning heads all over the country, turning heads on quite short among fellow Republican governors. Who now go, wow, this guy is really showing how to get it done. How to deal with the media. How to neutralize opposition. And really how to insulate yourself from scandal and from counter attack. And desantis is showing that he's really a multi talented guy in the political sphere. CNN is taking notice as an interesting article that talks about desantis, and it's not negative. It actually has a grudging appreciation for him. I'll just read a few lines. He is a generational talent at seizing headlines. Now, he's stalking here the writer is about desantis star quality. I don't think desantis compares in star quality say to Trump, but nevertheless, he does have that star quality. He knows how to not so much on the force of personality, but more by seizing on the correct issue to put himself out front and put himself in the headlines. CNN goes to talk about his quote campaign inevitability. And this is another important phenomenon. Namely, the idea that I'm unbeatable, I've established myself in Florida. Yeah, you can run against me, but it's gonna be kind of token opposition. And so desantis having won a very narrow late to become the governor is now making it look like his reelection is going to be, well, if not a foregone conclusion then at least a great

Desantis Ron Desantis Florida CNN Donald Trump
'Libs of TikTok' Creator Exposed by Taylor Lorenz

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:40 min | 2 months ago

'Libs of TikTok' Creator Exposed by Taylor Lorenz

"There's a huge amount of buzz on social media going on about this doxxing of a woman. This is a woman who runs the Twitter handle libs of TikTok. And this is a woman who posts videos and the videos are nothing more than posted videos by leftists themselves. Now they often are saying crazy things or they look crazy. And it's crazy talk by the left, but what she does is she just collects these videos and posts them. She's reposting the left's own posts. And but these posts are so devastating and they're so hilarious and it shows what a bunch of absolute demented freaks these people are that she has become a dangerous force on Twitter. She's got a big following people share her videos and so the left has been trying to figure out how do we get her. How do we go after this person? She's not doing anything that's wrong. She's not violating the Twitter guidelines and so their idea was how about if we threaten her? How about if we make our life miserable? How about if we even start putting her in danger? Let's dox her. Let's reveal who she is. Let's reveal where she lives. Let's reveal her profession, and this way we can see if her employer may go after her. Let's see if we can get some antifa types to harass her. This is how the left thinks. And no one more than a writer for The Washington Post named Taylor Lorenz. Now, this Taylor Lorenz is a whiny, nasty individual. In fact, oddly and ironically, not very long ago, she posted her own TikTok video saying, toxin is horrible, and she's thinking, obviously, when people are docs like herself or journalists, now remember Taylor, Lorenz is a kind of public figure because she writes articles under her own name and yet she's whining about what happens when people criticize journalists and she's moved to tears and so this is she's a complete drama Queen, but even though she's so sensitive about what might happen to her, she's perfectly willing to ruin the lives of other people. In fact, she sort of reminds me of the kind of nasty village busy body of earlier eras. You know how in every village you had some individual who made everybody else's business, their business, who failed to see like a teenage couple holding hands. It's like, let's follow them. Let's see what they're up to. You know, let's see if I can, if I can tell everybody about it and ruin their lives and make them miserable. So sneaking on people ratting them out, deriving a twisted, twisted pleasure from their public discomfort. Well, this is Taylor Lorenz to a T

Taylor Lorenz Twitter The Washington Post Lorenz Taylor
Author Andrew Klavan Pulls People in With 'The Truth and the Beauty'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:16 min | 2 months ago

Author Andrew Klavan Pulls People in With 'The Truth and the Beauty'

"Folks, welcome back. I'm talking to Andrew clavin with a K into clavin has written a weird, wild, wonderful genius book. It's called the truth in beauty, how the lives and works of England's greatest poets point the way to a deeper understanding of the words of Jesus. Now, Andrew, I'm a poetry guy, I'm an English literature guy, but what you do here in this book, which I think all the best books do is you introduce people who aren't poetry guys or English. You pull people in. And I want to embarras you further and say that you're a great writer. You're writing is great. The ideas are amazing, but the writing itself. Right in the beginning, you use the word Kaka lorem. And I thought, I'm in. Whatever he's selling, I'm in with this guy, but there are words throughout the book that are just like these brilliant archaic, funny words and stuff. So let's talk about the guts of this. How in the world do you go from actually no, explain to my audience if you would, who were the romantic poets? Just because it's your understanding of the history of romanticism and that movement, which I think I had forgotten 85% of what you say in here. So it's kind of an amazing primer on literary history and history. So talk about that because it's fascinating. Because the thing you usually hear about the romantics was there was an age of reason and everybody was reasonable and then the romantics came and they reacted and they didn't like reason. They wanted to have a motion, which is utter nonsense. That's not what happened at all. You know, they lived in a time that was so much like our time that it is truly uncanny. I mean, the comparisons are everywhere. They lived in a time when science was changing everything. And so people were losing their faith. The structures of the world church and state were collapsing and being shown up as unable to take them into the new era. And just to be clear, you're talking about the latter part of the 18th century. So this is the lead up to the French Revolution. I mean, the level of chaos on the continent, just hard for us to imagine what that would have been

Andrew Clavin Andrew England
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

03:26 min | 11 months ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"It wasn't like it was done in a unseen manner or anything. Yeah but i was also reading recently. Well i've been reading it for a long time and finally finished. You might remember several token shops garments talking about jk rollings slash galbraith's books in those reading. The most recent one troubled blood and she makes reference to it in that. Just like an passing as like a random topic of conversation. And i felt that was almost more. Callous away rush just like casually mentioned like. Isn't that terrible. The mike why did you have to do that. Why why are you bringing stuff from. The news like random. It was really strange. I guess it was around that time when maybe the book was published or like just after Yeah i think the one this one's but more recently published this one go to win loss. I found it. I chained throat like within a couple of days because it was quite short by science chapters. Like you could go through chapter in kind of like five minutes okay. So it wasn't a long read. It was it was a good read. Yeah what have you been reading. There's a little bit of a story behind the book that i'm writing so briefly. Go into that. So i mentioned in my blog post but a couple of my friends and i are attempting to watch every movie that's ever been made since we've been born so it's quite a challenge. It's really interesting as well because we've been watching a whole bunch of obscure movies and the only constraints we have on. Is that hester had a theatrical release. So that doesn't take out. That many but it removes all the weird telly features and stuff like that and tv movies and hallmark movies and stuff so We started in november nineteen eighty eight. And thank we've done like fifteen sixteen movies maybe and were somewhere in the middle of november. Anyway where we're watching one. We never look up..

galbraith hester
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

04:18 min | 11 months ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Hit to satisfy the rita. There was one other thing that i thought i would mention buried in there she. The author poses very interesting problem for writers to think about so. She says producing critical. Dystopia is becoming more difficult. Sorry this is not to say that stoep in fiction as dying but rather that to create original content with accuracy presents. A new challenge. So one of those. A lot of. It's been done before so being able to have a new take on. It is becoming more and more difficult. That's interesting yeah so maybe as will be a new take on it. Hopefully people may have learned something from my analysis of this paper or at least is let a little find it hard to find very specific genre related like books and things. I found it really interesting that i could find article about contemporary. Why distorted fiction so hopefully you will got something from it too. Yeah was very interesting. So should we move onto what we're reading now leisure time. Sarah's your book from this month. So i have managed to actually read a book which is the only thing i said. I'm the book i read is another young at oak fiction book. It's cooled win. We will lost fight. Kevin would know and it's a story about a group of teens who were the only survivors in a plane crash in the jungle and thought. I'd just read the blurb out so win the plane crashes in a remote rainforest with Adults lift ally. A group of high school students struggle to survive against Threats from the jungle and one another in this teens thrilla. Tom kellaway didn't want to go on a field trip to costa rica..

Sarah Kevin Tom kellaway costa rica
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:11 min | 11 months ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Is the primary elements the reader identifies with so. I have another quote from her article where she says fans strive to be the hero. They see represented. Sorry i think it's a big wish. She says it's a really big pot of the disturb pick literature as having characters that are quote unquote heroes. But the raiders end up developing a lot of empathy towards them because of their victimization in the world and they have to overcome all the obstacles and whatever else is thrown at them and then the raiders sympathize with their efforts. So this seems to be in all of the books that she went through so hunger games divergent their protagonist was like this all of them. So i was. That's probably fair. And i think as a very similar to our characters where they have a lot to overcome and they're differently victimized but they do end up. Being quote unquote heroic. Yes so that was the fast pot that was essential and the other part was the beginning and i found this very interesting. 'cause she said that pretty much all disturbed pick fiction. Aimed at young adults follows the same. Like blueprint for the opening of the book. So there's three k. Pots in the beginning so the first is the life changing day. And apparently this usually happens. What what is the fess chapter where readers are introduced to the the has the greatest impact on the character's lives so we did that thankfully unintentionally. We'll actually changed as well so it ended up being happen and the fish chapter. Did she say for the three that she followed. Yes happened in the first chapter so in the maze runner there in the maze. Okay i'm just thinking in terms of john marston series which remember a. I can't remember now that we've discussed this on the cost but of written like a short view on and i think probably the main criticism of the fist book is that it's a bit slow to stop because the actual life changing event as you say doesn't heaven into the i think it's the fifth chapter which really fire on in the book really..

raiders john marston
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"I did not kill your husband. Alexis said raising delicate row in throwing her long. Who's here over her shoulder. It sounds fine except for the fact that we do not know. Alexis name was lexuses This point so she's just strangely. Had this best of intuition alexis right. Yeah pick up social But now that you say like oh yeah. That's a very good point. And then i also had a lotus flower and one woman's here randomly ended up and enough a woman's here on and maybe they just had wine and umbro well. If that wasn't enough. I also realized that it was winter and lunches. Flowers grow at that time of year. So it's like yeah. This is just wrong on multiple levels. What does she do to fix. It does put a different flower. Yeah the how took it out of the woman's here because she doesn't she's not important migration. Flower your pasta-roni everyone to confuse simon. The only other thing that i really had was ice struggled elopes with words just. I haven't luxury often where i know kind of. What would i wanna use. And i know the meaning of it but then when it comes to sounding out installing it. I'm totally off. That was full so one of the words was lexical. And i thought it was left as a cool so is looking like l. a. p. and it took me a while to find the correct word. Then i was like stance the one that i mean i. I don't understand how i like. No the word. But then i don't know it. You know what i mean. I know happens to me all the time. I'm terrible at spelling. So i'll be like this word and then it doesn't come up with my gosh. I swear that the word it's not like i'm purposely trying to find these weird. It's just they feel like they fit and then i don't use another word because that's is an when i do look them up and then i look up the meaning just to make sure because obviously struggled to bit and i'm like no. Yeah i was right absolutely sometimes on times anyway. If any of you have a mistake in the month that you'd like to share please place in then we'd love to hear from you and they're always very amusing so i look forward to seeing some of the mistakes that you'll make and if you would like to be on an author spotlight if served then if you go to dub dub And click along the podcast tab in the drop down menu. That will take you to a phone to fill out in yet in. We'll get in touch with after the fall and next time on russia. It's our culturing creativity episode again. And this time. We're gonna be talking about with the your procrastinating. Or whether you're propagating so how sometimes procrastination can lead to good ideas and other times. It's just procrastination. And if you'd like to know a bit more about us.

Alexis russia one woman one of the lexuses
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Tim's is also quite helpful so knowing that you can include things like end to link topics to give and you can use words like not to exclude topics like so you know you do it. Szeged broad general section. You come up with something. that's it starts coming up with something. That's totally off topic. This isn't what i want. But i'm trying to research something. That's kind of similar aso. Go away and you might say. I'm trying to think of an example like version calendar not dork calendar will or something like that. Yeah so that can be helpful. I'm trying to think of the Typically used i think those are the ones. I use most often but actually might shed some light on that. I don't know but also researching sights set a specific to what you're researching so you might find that like for us swimmer. Writing the teen fiction series. Occasionally i would go to like the new zealand. Army site the official military side because it had information on specifically the new zealand army and stuff like that and Ravin wolf medically trusting what wikipedia says. Sometimes some sites have specific goto inflammation and. You're like okay. Yes this is a government side. The well i don't know how trusting people were government that typically..

Tim wikipedia new zealand army new zealand
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Greek theater masks do scooters have keys. There were more. But i had to take them out. So that was like my list of as i'm ryan. Thanks i'm like actually. Is this a thing. That's great make lists. But i just kind of like get sock and then i'm like okay. Hang on a second. I don't usually make but i was. This is ridiculous. The man stuff. I've had to research and then i was thinking of making a blog post about doing research shows like oh just like note down everything and then all this is to amusing every chapter. But i'll just keep this in cases useful so now you get to hear my random less what. I'm actually writing chapters in the past. Obviously there's a lot more extensive. And once i've got a good handle on i can run the say or sections of the saint there in my mind. I then have more specific questions like ate breakfast. Mike what did they eat for breakfast. Did they have played. Did they have cutlery. They sitting at a table or did they use candles or lamps but more often than something like did they have an insert. Whatever item it is here. Yeah happens to me as well but yes or things. Like what plants do they farm in the season because they're walking through farmland. I think that's why it takes such a long time for some of the things. That don't wanna put a placeholder. Because i i need. I'm going to need it for subsequent chapters. So i recently suspicion this ancient greece one. I've tended to do the research even though it's gonna take time in hopes of saving me time later down the line and i think it's worked in some cases because a lot of the time now for some of the everyday conversation type c. I don't need to research every detail anymore. Because they know what they're wearing what season it is. I know what plants around or you know. What the climates. Like kind of what. The house looks like now. So don't need to every time in a different road be like okay. What does the courtyard look like..

Mike ryan Greek
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"We grew up in kind of decision so i can generally see with that. We're moving kinda through. And if i didn't think that needed researching was sometimes like parts of new zealand where i was unfamiliar. They were things relating to the military. Like weapons designations vehicles equipment. That kind of thing. Which was sometimes just easier to ed later because even if you know exactly what make model gun. They're using you can just be like oh well you can imagine like a rifle or whatever necessarily have to him to be super specific about it. So some of that stuff was edited. Light a through editing which Facet writing because of that But yeah what does it look like for you win. You're writing a check to actually address the morning thing. I'd sit down and try to imagine the whole chapter at once. Usually i'll sit down and i'll be able to imagine at a certain point so can ride it but then usually because i play the scene in my mind when i'm thinking about it so the characters that's fine. They walked to the door then. I opened the door. And i'm like Like a head or they'll see a character but like the characters won't do anything. Stand there in space. Yeah pretty much. And i'm like okay so something needs to happen here either. Maybe it's because they don't know each other. Or maybe it's because i don't know what sitting is we'll whatnot my most recent one. I was doing a like sacrifice. Christ the problem was i didn't know you just have them standing randomly outside his like a bunch of people around here. Let what's going on pretty much like standing. And i'm like okay. That's cool who they're sacrificing to know what they're sacrificing so there was just blood. See blood on the ground and random fire somewhere. That's literally all it's my mind. I'm like okay like details. Need to be then. I'll go to do research. I think we do it quite a similar way that way. 'cause i have very much experience where i'm just like i can see a house and there's someone in the house but not doing anything sitting. I did actually heap a-list from one of my chapters. Which i thought i would share..

new zealand one of my chapters Christ Facet
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"And then came the even more research phase want to call it that because you have the loose outlined but then trying to put into a coherent story including character development and changes was very challenging especially trying to work in characters that were there and have them influence event also because it's really in two different time periods so we were like reaching two different threads of the story and trying to work out with a whip is on the same page like a remember that yes especially this book. I think yeah. We always bite often lot we do. We're very ambitious. We couldn't just stick a one story three. We were like we must include more. Well we like it to be more multiple layers and things. I think we talked about this with having multiple layers and a story like she enjoys and so do we so much injury. You can do so much more with it much launching a good way. Yeah city has a lot of races just to do the general because even though you have your key events and your characters now it's another whole nother trying to mesh them together y- into a story and then sarah hitter the chapter plans after that so we go from outline to even more dipped which i think took even more research because at least we then had you have the you know the. He goes to ancient greece. Then sarah okay. Where does he arrive in ancient greece. What's happening when he gets there so you can have a few checkpoints about that. Continue onto the next one. So that's even more research and then end up with your chapter plans and then you go to write in. It's more research again. Found out although actually this does lead into the knicks point really well which was about researching while writing and if we do this and obviously we both do it and what it looks like so maybe i'll pass out to you because i've been talking for ages as i said we do research during rising on generally try and look the check to outline and then win on trying like sit down before writing the chapter look over and then i try to envision kind of what's going happen i hid and with the engine greystoke coke. I often find win on some sitting there. Trying to imagine that they're these black holes where i haven't quite got something good out and so then i have to try and work out what those black holds out. Because sometimes it's not always obvious it'll be like why can't imagine this particular scene and so currently for me For an example. I i'm at a point in my chapter where you know as i said i've written about one hundred hundreds of it and then i'm kind of about to dive into the real meat of the chapter where i need to work out. Watan ancient greek gymnasium looks like and i don't know what it looks like. I like that is a total whole. Like i just imagine. I'm just imagining like people fighting wrestling. I don't really know what it looks like around just kinda away so there's a bit of research he's done there and so when i do go away to a bit of research and then slowly kinda starts filling in stop being able to see if it more and the characters Becoming a bit more alive. The blackhawks happens a lot less often with the t novels is it was based in the very near future in as with explained you know..

sarah two different threads three both two different time periods about one hundred hundreds Watan one story ancient greece greek
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"And how does the events of the past drive the plot forward in a new and interesting way you know we will basically asking ourselves. How can we twist the narrative but keep it consistent with what is currently known in the era and so that all requires a degree of research. Yes a degree of research. Degree i degree. So that's kind of like how i view it will do anything different to add to that. I'm trying to think so. For the tain fiction. One i fill we operate on a similar wavelength with that one because we both know our character is very intimately i think and so a lot of what we have. Is we know what we wanted them to become by the end of the book or by the end of the series. But we've been doing a book by by the end of the book. We know what we want them to be. And we also have ideas of conflicts between characters from previously that we. You know we've thought of like. Hey we should put this end because this happen. So i guess merging those and with the plot and because we've been working on the teen fiction on for a. I feel like we already have quite a good vision of what we want to happen kind of each. The specifics are but up in the air. But we know that we want like big events to happen. So i think that makes one it kind of reduces a little bit of the amount of research you have to. I think because a lot of our world is already set up and the events because we've just imagined yes you have to make sure that they're actually feasible but apart from that you can pretty much have whatever happened that you so choose. Yeah and i think with that. You know we're sort of asking ourselves. The question of what is the worst possible thing that can happen to al characters soon The course of the series and like challenges and the worst possible way. And then you add the extent intolerant to like. Make it even more teams. Yes yes you're just like. Is this event semi realistic. Can we know the external event like feeds into the internal. but yes. Yeah exactly. However i think our experience of the historical fiction or at least for me has been a bit different with our ancient greece. Book ahead require a lot of pre researching just to find even the time period or the loose setting where novel was gonna take place and from there when you start researching around at you start to find other cool interesting events that happened in the Okay this is really interesting. This is really interesting. You could sort of see a plot stike deform and then we had to create a characters. I think this is probably now. Can i guess fade into win. We re looked the spoke because we pretty much had some similar place now. Is that then where we had the rough idea of time here. It was going to take place in the historical events that happened. But then we hit to put characters into and this time we purposefully chose care while some characters that were already there. I think more than there were in the original idea which helped a lot and we also created more purposefully our main characters that would browns in that time period and differently with an eye on who they were and how what we wanted them to learn in the process.

each both One one greece
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Feel more authentic. I thanking build your world more accurately as well. Especially if you've done it before had received have to go back and then try and build the world around what you already have. Because you've done something that's not quite accurate or you've accidentally included something that wouldn't have happened or whatever so healthy that way you know. There's nothing worse being reader. When you know talked about this before on. I think it was the injuries and inconsistency we you know about as sending thing and then. You're this is just not realistic at a whole so. I think that's the obvious sort of reason for researching. Yeah there is like obviously a lot more to researching as well and why it's important to do regardless but yeah that's gonna say a kind of a good example of us researching and finding out things that have helped book. I think with characters especially in our historical fiction doing the set around the time period has given us a lot of characters that were historical figures that we may or may not have found on our own like we probably just into some people but researching time. Here we've actually incorporates. These really interesting characters that are already exists to make. It hopefully feel like you're actually in ancient greece with these people and their ideas and things researching differently gives you more ideas for ev- for your book but also can give you ideas for books you'll come across an interesting side point and you're like that's very interesting. I'm just gonna note that down for later. Maybe we can use or maybe it can come into play in a different book or something like that. Yes this is true like. We've had that with like researching the our time period and whatever we find certain things we're like. Oh that's super interesting. Maybe we can use that as the foundation for one of the knicks books in the series or whatever which is good. Yeah yeah. I had a few of those like ooh. This is an interesting person sort of close to the time timeframe but isn't quite kind of in the thick of it yet and it's like well i can see involving this person later down the line. Something yeah yeah. I guess you already briefly mentioned about writing what you know Vessels writing. I guess without any sort of fest hand experience. Does you want to expand on that. And oh sure ways to hit an answering these questions so but to expand what i said. I don't believe you need to be an expert in something to write about it. But you know it doesn't hit to do some research. She gives you writing. All seem to feel and i think taking what you already know and combining it in a fresh way with the world you have put your characterization can make full some really interesting reading and to that you know a bit more research to confirm and expand your knowledge and it helps to put that knowledge in put your characters until i could be a context and it helps to put your knowledge into context as well. What your character's going through. If that makes sense. I really believe in the old adage that issue anything or show as she. What is a us you and me. Yeah definitely it's taken me far in life and far in my career because as a nurse. You really don't want to be issue now. You wouldn't yeah victorious for writing to because you don't want to believe everything that you see know darn something that happened on tv show just seeing. It doesn't make it true. So you troll through the incident to find real people's experiences in real examples and you'll find that the quality of your work will improve immensely. I think we've found editing and writing are teen fiction series. We found a lot of instances where as teenagers we just assumed something was true and then later on like i don't think that's right and then double check..

one Vessels greece double knicks characters lot
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"You like a smoothie writings it also helps you to envision not only with a works. How an idea might work so you could have some basic idea that maybe you even seen dunk. Before but researching the sitting in the world might bring a whole new. Spins the idea which gives it a fresh take and without resist. She might completely misled idea. Though i exactly believe in the right what not kind of thing that people talk about you can only imagine as far as your current experience. Knowledge takes you. You can't write about the thing if you don't know it exists and sometimes research can help uncover those things that you might not have thought about before. So that's kind of my take on. Why researching is important to an awful. You have anything to end this. I would definitely agree with the research helping to envision the scenes in your mind because especially when you start off with a very basic idea. note that little nugget. And you're like oh this is really great. And then you if you're able to start researching et definitely opens your eyes to so much more information and possibilities that you didn't even know before you out so always gives you really great ideas to continue expanding on your idea and make a more realistic guess plot. I also think researching before you start. Your novel also helps you. Establish with the yearbook or ideas actually doable or not. Because there's always the chance that you have this one little piece of information. It's not enough of that makes any sense or it's been done before so i think researching not necessarily even researching terms of getting on your computer and finding out information about it but also reading in your genre or reading other books that may have that idea in it to say with a actually festival novel in the best place but also that. It's going to be doable and give you an interesting plot. Yeah yeah and then sort of to add to what you said. I think researching also helps you bring your characters and setting and plot to life and when you have all that information backing you up can help give.

one little piece
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Welcome becky one to derive it today. We are onto if sir twenty four and it is one of our main roads in today. We are going to be talking all about our research methods. How we do it. Why researching is important for novel writing. Yeah should be a good discussion. I think i think so too. But i we probably update you as to how own writing is going. So how have things being on your end. Actually they've actually been okay. I finished the chip to that. I had started last time. And i'm about halfway through the next one. Which is spain of relief. It's being going quicker. I think it's because the check. Jake carries on directly from the one before right here. The character point of view switched but it starts with the other one left off which helped a lot. Because i already had the idea of where the chapter was going. So that's that's been good and having the easter break to unwind a little bit and then work on the does was also quite good just having that time you know yet definitely what about you. I have also had slightly more success. I managed to finish the chapter. That i had been writing which that one has taken me a ridiculous amount of time so i was very heavy to get to the end of that. It claimed of wasn't really the end of it. Because i ended up. Just basically riding in extra chapter to kind of finish off like appointing ashley heading quite managed to get to but then that ended up. Being the entire of the czech deaths are actually still. Have my check to plan in quotation marks. Which i never got to any of the points. Also this now lennox chapter so i have started that and i'm not quite i'm probably about eight hundred would stir up so not quite a little did mock 'cause we tend to aim for about three thousand so it's not too bad we had sort of kind of like what would you call it pass. The parcel of information and chipped is because i think started. You didn't get to a point in one of the first ones. And then i was just put it in my chapter. I didn't get to the end of that. One i can go in the next on. I didn't quite fit in. Chapter ended up being i five thousand ways. I can't possibly fit this. This one moved onto yours in the end up being its own. Does it probably for the best. I didn't put it in that funeral chapter. That would have just been way too long. I should clarify in explain that. It's not likely. Pass the same point chapter that we never got through. It was like you know we had one lifter point in that started off the beginning of the next chapter in them so just pushed the end of the two points each chapter into a new chapter. Eventually if that makes any.

Jake today one each chapter two points about three thousand five thousand ways about eight hundred one lifter point first ones One lennox becky roads twenty four
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"Of passing in that because even though you've you've mapped try that same you still go to think about the conversations that people are gonna have won't be eating what led to him. Having a conversation of us on. Yeah recovery plan that kind of thing. His is just a conversation. Isn't it and i think you'd never really get away from one to the other. I think you do need to be of in-between nothing. My tummy has a plan sir control. I think you're right. It gets the gets the idea across. Doesn't it but yeah i was. I now foods something swing bridge if you will definitely a good spot to be. It's hard to wing a book having at least a outline to follow even if it's not super in depth differently at least keeps you focused and you can still go off on tangents and add an extra things along the way if you feel like it so Can you tell us a little bit about your very first novel. So that was so capture We did the inspiration for come from and we kind of touched on this. How do you feel like you've grown as a writer. Since since then. Initially i came up with the idea of of fossil fuels. Melissa stuff. it didn't really sit right That obviously the pandemic happened. Took odin a different direction but the idea of of so capture is so when you die you you'll so loaded into the cloud as it were and then the company can create a three d. printing bullying and you saw can be transported back into that body so that was kind of the idea for that one. That's a really cool idea. Yeah yeah so we'll dive. It's kind of now as Subplot then. He comes to the front a guy in the lawsuit which she's using rava would to describe it wraps in that one's go which i've so described that as a lien Blight runner retailing. I think that's the best way to describe. It is definitely gonna be obliged runner. Ask ideas but.

first novel Melissa odin
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"To read. Just the whole idea is office isn't it. We want people to battery it really quickly. So that was one thing and then just other. Youtube isn't people like that. And then eventually People recommending on writing by stephen king. I recommend that really get one. Yes is an into the woods as well forget the is nyman that one. He's a screenwriter. But it talks about structure structure and the inciting incident. An reliance things that you know the ivy coup when you're when you're either and then you become an ole opry discover with each time like we'll slat was live point and the the bit in the middle and all that stuff Latin when you start looking into it so yeah so. It was a combination of of internet wherever gnaws and trade. I never read the stephen king one. It's i've been wanting to get it from the oakland library but it has a waiting list of like twenty seven people. I might just have to buy it. Would where to go because it gives you. The first office is to barbara fan. He talks about his rising career but then he comes back to what got in through when that was written as well so really good. I might have to buy it. I think i'll have to. I've wanted to. I've always quite admired stephen king. Even though i haven't read a lot of his books just you know when you see. How like some of his books and they're always such interesting stories quite good to what goes on. You will on reading a semester brick of a book. I'm reading a one phase which is eleven twenty two three Discovers the guy back in time and his friend trust to convince him to stop kind of bit from being assassinated so sent interesting. Interesting imprimis does not released bookstore at our like i thinking horror. But he's chris Us sir how you juggle your work. Life with your writing was pretty easy right now. Because i'm a lot of a lot of time you have to. You have to prioritize. You have to make time to do the writing in the end day. Sometimes you just have to sit there and just put one word in front atla but there comes a point with his natural breakoff sometimes act a lot of the time i can sit there six thousand i can just bang out a lot of words and it's great but then a guy after you get to that six hour period Awesome todd from that. There is a natural breaking point where you think right. That's enough by yeah My wife have been really support. Is i think it's amazing. I've decided to write books myself into it so that they're really supportive of it. So that's great. I forgot what i was gonna say..

six thousand Youtube twenty seven people stephen king one word six hour chris Us Latin first office one phase twenty two three one thing oakland library each time nyman eleven barbara one
"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

Dear Writer

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"writer." Discussed on Dear Writer

"A house that they moved and trying to explain this in actual house that they moved implausible on a piece of land so they had to cut the fences. We ought to get the house end because they got a nice new villa that they did often. So we're not new villa villa that they did up anyways so they can fully repeat the in the grass was so long that we could actually say that the bottom line of defense messing so muslim warning was spent rounding the shape beckon into the pedic. The rest of the afternoon was spent in halt on sharing the and it was the most exhausting day of my life. That sounds really exhausting. But speaking of moving how physically moving houses the other day so to put it into context. James and i live down a shared driveway so the pace of the driveway runs in front of our house in his four houses where the third down. It's like one two three four five and across the driveway. This offense and then on the other side is more houses. Complex of houses is like four or five houses. Anyways relay from. That's so weird noise. It was probably nine o'clock at night. Lots of beeping and things. That's very strange but didn't think anything of it. Why keep in the morning. I opened the curtains and they had moved five houses. They were there in the evening and by the time morning came around. They were all gone. So now there's a clear sight line from our house to the road. That's probably five houses away from home. It's hilarious how did i miss them. Moving five houses and so funny so confused and magically five houses disappeared. They must've been working really this so you reminded me of the anything. Houses was literally turn. That's funny so move on to grace one chip to three the sound of truck tires crunching on gravel silenced us. I rushed to the window and crash. The blinds to army trucks screwed up the drive. They hid lights faming harshly soldiers here..

villa villa villa James
"writer." Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

12:38 min | 2 years ago

"writer." Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hey everybody welcome to the rookie writer show. I am changing things up on you a little bit. We are starting season two today. I've started a new challenge for myself where I am going to be reading. Fifty two writing books this year one for every week of the year and then in turn I will be sharing some of the highlights from those books in each episode. You can expect the format follow very much like this one will be. which is that that she will get an introduction to the author? So you have some idea who's offering you their advice and expertise a brief overview. What kind of book you're dealing with as an is it looking at productivity or craft or business aspects of writing there will be a maximum of three and only three major suggestions or points that they make in the the book and one tip that I gleaned from it so beyond that? It'll be up to you to decide whether or not the book sounds like something you'd like to delve into further. So that is the intro for the new season. So welcome to season two episode. One enough for the INTRO. Let's get into it. So Oh for my inaugural book. I chose I loved it. It was called dear writer. You need to quit. It's written by. Becca Sim and published in twenty. Nine thousand nine. It's actually part of a three part series and I have a feeling I'm going to be reading the other two because I very much enjoyed this one but before we get into the other two. Oh let's follow the format so I I'm going to introduce a little bit about the author. She is the woman behind the better faster academy which offers classes and individual coaching for writers. She also keeps pretty busy. Doing a writing productivity podcast of her own That shows shows up on Youtube as well as on most podcast carriers. It's called the quit. CAST for the past few years. She's also been co hosting a book. Marketing podcast called Smarty Pants Book Marketing. Believe and she'll soon be launching dear BECA which is a weekly coaching column. She's under a couple of Master's degrees in coaching related fields and she's worked with thousands of authors many of them pulling in six and seven figure annual incomes so impressive. She seems like she might be somebody who knows what she's talking about. Let let me be clear. She does not in any way. Promise that you will reach the income of some of her clients. In fact I would say that Becca might be the first person to tell you. Communication style isn't one of below sunshine up your zoo She delivers the kind of advice. You probably need to hear in a clear but humorous way off. She is I would say she's not without empathy for your situation but she just kind of isn't interested in letting you shine yourself on either. She's really was reluctant to write the book honestly because she thinks of herself as a coach I she has been an author before she spent on that road. She has written fiction So she does understand where you're coming from. She was a little bit reluctant to write this book because she thinks that each person is so unique and that actually one coaching or small group. Coaching is the best way to get someone where they WANNA go. But that obviously limits number of people she can work with so instead what this book tries to do is to capture a lot of the approaches that she used when she's working with clients in hopes that you can glean enough from it to help coach yourself if you like Lisa Kron approached applauding. If if you've ever read any of her books you're probably GonNa like this Book it dips into brain science a little bit Becca dips into it gives you a hint of what is behind the theories but doesn't really get into it very deeply in fact. This is a pretty lean book. I'll reference that later. She she would emphatically state dozen her book that this is not a book of tips and tricks. It's a book designed to get you to ask yourself deep and hard questions about about which writing path best suits your strengths and interests. She's not interested in offering a prescriptive one-size-fits-all despite her own experiences. In fact she views anybody who does do that with a or those programs with a little bit of a wary eye as she mentioned the book she does not buy into a silver bullet solution to anyone's reading woes. Because no matter what worked for someone else it may or may not work for you because you are your own individual blend of environment personality writing platform the resources that you have hand and your existing tendencies habits and patterns earns so her approach again is born out of the fact that she's first and foremost a coach and she really wants you to start thinking about a couple of Questions and that's sort of how the structure mostly this book is asking you to quit things and you can pick this up from the chapter. Titles The table able contents things like quick thinking in a vacuum or quit focusing on your weaknesses or quit ignoring the past quick-thinking facebook is your friend acquitting knowing reality things like this But I would say that if there was something that ran through it as a single core or notion that jumped out to me. It was this and this is one of the three things I she really wants you to question the premise OR CUTE EP. She likes to refer to it She uses the throughout the book. Going back to like a touchstone. If you've been listening to the rookie writer show I'd say it's fairly analogous analogous to my get Meta and what's going on there with the key T. p.. She's really asking you to slow down long enough to actually ask the right questions of your situation to poke and prod your sumptious a little so that you don't run around trying to solve the wrong problems or even create problems. That aren't even they're so cutie. Pie questioned the premise. The second big thing that jumped out at me. That was sort of an overarching thing. I took away with it. Is that she. You believe there are four steps to transformation. That's kind of what she focused on her graduate studies. So would that she sees this as four steps and she uses a really great example in the book which I will not reveal because I wanted to be nice price for you She believes that knowledge is half the battle and it is certainly step one of any transformation part of getting getting the right knowledge is going back to that. Cute EP questioning the premise. To make sure you're actually getting the best information that you have there the second step in the transformation according to her is that you get your support around you get your crew around you. You're going to need it. And the third part of transformation is making a plan plan for when things get tough. Because they're going to get tough. How are you going to deal with rejection? How are you gonNA deal with on we? How are you going to deal with writer's block? How are you going to deal with money worries or being overwhelmed? How are you going to deal with being able to sit in a chair for a while every day? Just finding those ways to do the things that you need to do making a plan for it and then finally executing it pulling the trigger in fact. That's her last chapter is urging you to quit preparing an actually. Just pull the trigger so the third of the three things that I'm GonNA highlight from this book is that transformation is really really hard. That's why only a small percentage of efforts to change behaviors or successful according to them. You're fighting against a lot of patterns of behavior that worn grooves in your brain. You're fighting a lot of established circuitry in your brain. But I love what she says about the occasional difficulty of writing here comes. It's a great quote because resistance is conflict which causes tension strife frustration. Consternation we see it in our books all the the time the differences as storytellers. We know how to make conflict productive yet in our own lives we reject conflict instead of embracing it for what it can offer for us learning what we can releasing our emotions and getting the work done. Now it's really understandable if you are trying to avoid difficulty if you're trying trying to feel like things should not be painful or uncomfortable that's just your lizard brain kind of looking out for you but if you want to be yeah writer. There's going to be times that this is going to be a little tough. She's given you a lot of ways to look at the issues that are holding you back Jack. Having you probe if things that you might need to quit before you can move forward to jettison from your writing habits and approaches I one hundred percent recommend men this one. It's a slim book. It's only two hundred eight pages and I picked it up on Amazon kindle for I think less than five dollars because it was on sale but it packs a good good punch and I'm so excited to discover that BECA SAM has so many other offerings of already caught one of her quick cast episodes on Youtube while I was making dinner the other night and it was also totally worthwhile. Okay one tip. I picked up from her book. Despite her aversion to offering sort of things is this considered setting up a time trekker because remember knowledge is half the battle right. So I've done time tracking before using just downloaded sheet from another Time management expert and while it's useful to write down what you've done every day and you know obviously that's include the things that where you're not on your computer but if you set up a time tracker on your devices It runs automated while you're doing your work in the background. And then generates Anna rates reports of how and where you spent your digital time. which is your work time which may answer a lot of questions about why you're not getting more work done? So she recommended one called Green Tomatoes with a T. O. M. A. T. S.. I actually had trouble getting that one to work very well. I found an article reviewing time. Trekker Trekker APPS for Twenty Twenty Lincoln show notes and after reading those. I chose rescue time. I've been using it for about a week and I really really like it. It's taught me a lot about how I'm actually using my time versus how I think I'm using my time and that is only going to help me build the kinds of habits I wanted i. I want to develop when the thing rescue time. If you go that route someone kind of cool thing about it. Works across my devices with one account. It's a free forever free account and and So I don't see what I'm doing on my computer. I see what I'm doing on my phone my ipad as well so that's kind of cool because I can't kind of cheat which I've done before with other kinds of trackers and blockers by using another device at the same time I know it's shameful anyway later in the year. I'll probably be reading her other two books. The series I've included them in the show notes as well in case. You can't stand the suspense. They are dear writer. Are you in burnout and derived or you're doing it wrong. I hope this was. It's helpful to you. I started this podcast initially because I wanted to put out there something that would have been useful to me when I was starting wording out. I've been messing around with writing in one way or another for about two decades and I don't see any reason that it should take you two decades to learn what I've learned so far so I'm always going to be learning. I'm super excited about this NEW SEASON I'm super excited about this challenge. I will say say that every once in a while I may throw in a class instead of a book. So it's fifty two books or classes because I have a tendency to do both I'm always gonNA keep learning always gonNA trying to get better. I hope that this has been fun and useful for you. If you have any suggestions for books that you are Thinking would be good ones to review semi an email addresses info at the rookie writer dot net or the rookie writer show. Oh on Djamil. Next week I'm going to be applying the same approach to real artists. Don't starve by JEFF COINS SO I hope you'll come back. Thanks for listening until next time heavier adding people..

writer Becca Sim Youtube Lisa Kron Twenty Twenty Lincoln facebook Amazon Pie Anna O. M. A. T. S
"writer." Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"writer." Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Me. And might be useful for you as well. I'd like to wrap up this episode with an explanation about why I chose the name of the show. I chose the name rookie writer because I have such an affection for rookies, and let me tell you. Why rookies have a lot of talent and a lot of enthusiasm. That's how they get to be rookies in the first place it basically gives them admission to the game. But they also have a lot to learn. And the thing about it is is that you are going to feel like that probably your entire writing career. Most writers do one of my favorite quotes is from Ernest Hemingway. And it goes something like this. We are all apprentices and a craft in which. No one ever becomes a master. So you might as well embrace it. I know I have lean into that rookie status embraced renews. Yasim and your talent. And yes, also that feeling of always being a little bit at the beginning of something always having something more to learn because that's the nature of writing. That's the fun of it. And that's the challenge of it. Come back for episode one. What kind of writer, are you? Let's find out. Thanks again for joining me. I'll see you next time. If you like this episode, please hit the like or whatever it is give it a thumbs up. Subscribe. I don't know. It's my first episode. I'll get better at this part. And also swing by WWW dot the rookie writer dot net. It's once again T H E R O K I E W R. I T E R dot net is the rookie writer dot net. Okay. There's going to be already some resources books. I recommend the show notes for this episode and links to different tools that I have available for downloading to help you start thinking about how to organize your reading life in a way that works for you. Okay. Thanks again. I'll catch you time. Until then happy writing people.

writer Ernest Hemingway