35 Burst results for "Writer"

38 percent of Americans listen to podcasts to improve their mood

podnews

02:01 min | 17 hrs ago

38 percent of Americans listen to podcasts to improve their mood

"Thirty eight percent of Americans, listen to podcasts to help improve them mood that's according to new research from Deza, the music and podcasts streaming company founded. Americans are three times as likely to use podcasts to combat loneliness compared to some European countries. An update from anchor following our story yesterday that I could automatically delete your account without warning Anka. Say they do not have an algorithm that automatically deletes duplicates. Instead, the company's is a combination of automated and human detected signals to assess potential infringements and tell news podcasts always elevated to human before any action is taken. In the case, we reported on the podcast hat quote, similar contents to the lipson hosted spotify enlisting. Their return one has subscribed to Nielsen's podcast buying power service. They'll have access to podcast insights spanning eighteen genres and over one hundred and fifty individual podcast titles Bubba. The love sponge a radio personality in the US has launched the Baba Army podcast, which is to be reps by crossover. Media Group Sales Bubba calls it a guests driven podcast that's fresh current relevant, and will become a daily destination for folks who want to have a little fun. iheartradio and Sean Dylan's media announced new podcast with more on the way sean to land media's. AWARD-WINNING TV writer and producer Shonda rhines and you APPs shuffle looks interesting promising that you swipe for the top podcast highlights. Stati cast is a new simple static podcast website generator. If your idea of simple uses composer and markdown, that is now one in five creative jobs are expected to be lost during this pandemic diversity podcast greater than eleven percent is marking twenty thousand downloads. Downloads with crowdfunding efforts to raise twenty thousand pounds for small grants for those in need of support

Sean Dylan Deza Anka Nielsen Lipson Baba Army Shonda Rhines United States Spotify Stati Writer Producer
Socializing in a Covid World

This Is Why You're Single

05:05 min | 18 hrs ago

Socializing in a Covid World

"Welcome to the. This is why podcast journalist author in comedy writer, Laura Lane and author and editor Angeles Sparrow your the Cobras the book. This is why you're single every week give best friend advice on topics including pop culture news friendship dating workplace dynamics parenting, and whatever else is on your mind. This week's episode is called socializing and a covert world will be answering your listener questions including one listener who wants to know if she's being insensitive to her sister's corona virus fears and another listener whose figuring out if it's safe for her to attend a large wedding month what? No, it is not. There it's answered. Then we're talking about what's in the news including sandy new opening up about controlling Tom Cruise. I'm. Know, how how controlling Tom Cruise her? Okay. Sorry. I read. Wait you. Though if she could like mind control I was excited I was like, Dandy noon figured out how to control Tom Cruise. Someone did. And then we're also. And the rose about a John Legend's cheating pass don't worry. It's not as bad as you think, system fund pop culture stuff at the end of the episode but I Angela. What has been going on speak for you. Well on the topic of weddings during coronavirus heard the craziest story recently my friend was invited to zoom wedding which you now to each their own personally I was not interested in doing that for mind touchy. went on sound like literally zooms that have more than. Three people suck. Right, and I want to cry Happy Tears on my wedding day and I feel like a zoom. Made me cry sad tears. So depressing. So depressing. So to make it even worse. So most of those, those zoom weddings from what I have. experienced. Are just like you watch the ceremony the zoom and maybe afterwards there's like a small gathering of people to chat about the weddings. She went to this one where they literally did breakout rooms for how the tables have been set up. What am I gonNa, let so weird 'cause I actually like half the time actually talked to anybody that was able anyway and what's even weirder is it's Not like it was a wedding where she knew people. So it was her with a bunch of strangers that they like put her in private zoom with and I was like that's the worst part of a wedding. Why? Why did they recreate the worst part of a wedding worst part of a wedding I'm so glad that this was not your friend otherwise you would you would have to be very. Sensitive about how you talk about it but I'm really glad that this was like a friend of yours that went to the wedding. So you can talk about how fucking stupid this is it was like. I. Hope it's okay that I'm talking about it because they started problem that I make you self conscious now no, we'll answer probably it's such a specific thing I can't imagine. It's been done that much. I don't know maybe it has been. I'm sure there's some wedding blog out there and it's like this is a great idea to do. It'll recreate their feeling of being at a wedding and I'm here to tell you. I don't love that idea. Palley it's. Stupid. It's stupid. It's really Stephen. I've been very depressed about wedding stuff lately. I. CanNot Watch movies with weddings I cannot. Trust Angela like I'm yeah I'm not in a good wedding place right now. So maybe that's why I'm just being a little bitter bitch about it but I fell down a rabbit hole recently where I went on wedding read it to see like what other Kobe brides are doing and it made me so much more depressed. tobacco. They do Hannity I. Mean. So lots of people doing in weddings somehow someway, I don't get it but like giving out. Masks to their guests which like gray give me out. I. Read One girl was like I'm giving out bracelets that are color coded to indicate your comfort level with interacting with people and I cannot think of a more depressing just delay your wedding. Why are you doing a way of interacting hyperbolic everybody should just noted not interact right? Won't understand. Exactly. Like. Already wearing real wedding if I saw anybody wearing the red bracelet that's like I'm totally fine I'd be like Oh that person's like an asshole like doesn't mind potentially killing other people but also wants your all inside in this like big event where people are like breathing and moving around like your like your nose you're done. But the worst thing that I read was somebody wrote like so I've told all my bridesmaids. If you're feeling symptoms where a mask, if you have a fever stay at home and I was like if you're feeling symptoms wear masks, let that literally makes no sense praises how people die. This is how people die at large events lays your tell your bridesmaids they still have to come Brian Math, that's not how it works.

Tom Cruise Cobras John Legend Laura Lane Writer Editor Fever Stephen Brian Math Angela Hannity Kobe
Wauwatosa PD denies claims Officer Mensah provoked protesters

Mark Belling

05:56 min | 1 d ago

Wauwatosa PD denies claims Officer Mensah provoked protesters

"Background because most of you know the story. There's been ongoing protests in Wauwatosa even before the George Floyd situation over this, that and the other thing and They have focused locally on the case of Officer Joseph MENSA, who is the police officer who shot and killed a man who, armed with a stolen gun was part of a group that was causing a disturbance and running toward Mayfair Mall. While armed with that stolen gun. He also had 36 rounds of ammunition and an extended magazine. And according to the police investigation, he fired a shot that officer men sub and protesters have been going after Officer men ever since The wall photos the city council. Recommended that he his employment be terminated in the fire and police Commission has suspended him. As I had predicted. This is not satisfied the protesters who have disrupted government meetings who made wild statements at a public meeting at hard Park, and then on Saturday, I took their protest directly to the home. Off officer Men's his girlfriend, who is a police officer in Milwaukee. Where Officer Benson Wass and a situation developed in which Officer MENSA says that he was shot at Before we talk to Chief Webber. I want to deal with two new developments today. The first A letter that was sent today by Congressman Jim Sense it better. Guys, you probably know this city election today to replace time is the sense of better who's been in the house for a long, long time Republican primary Today is between Clift Temple and Scott Fitzgerald and the Republican candidate for that seed is going to be determined in today's election. But sensitive writer is still there since it brothers. This thick includes portions, but not all of Wauwatosa. He sent the following letter to me, your dentist McBride of Wauwatosa today, Dear Mayor McBride. I write to you today concerning the deteriorating security and policing in Wauwatosa. The protests, which may have started peacefully have been growing ever more violent and the event Saturday night outside the residence of Officer Joseph Mintz have required a meat require immediate leadership and strong action from you. And the elected leaders of Wauwatosa first allow me to be clear that I am and always will be supportive of American citizens. First Amendment rights, having said that ever since the death of George Flight in Minneapolis and the protests and the protests the incident sparked There has been a push by community leaders throughout the country to weaken, defund and abolish police departments in several cities. Locally, Officer MENSA has become the poster child for this movement due to his three officer involved shooting incidents. Officer MENSA has dedicated his life to protecting our community and has been cleared by the Milwaukee County District attorney's office of two of the three shootings in which he has been involved. The third incident is still under review. Despite the decisions by the Milwaukee County D. A. You're common council passed a resolution calling for the termination of officer menses employment with the Wauwatosa Police Department. While I understand the common Council wants to bring reforms that the OPD the consequences of their actions are having serious repercussions for the residents of your community. Citizens of Baba Tosa are being harassed by these protests. Protesters who have now laid siege to a residence in your community where a gun was fired at a home with women and Children inside. Actions like this, and the breakdown of law and order will spread fear and force the citizens of Allah toasted to reconsider their choice to reside there. The mass emigration from your city would be devastating to the very fabric of that community. In addition to the detrimental effect it would have on your tax base schools and city sciences. As I believe we are teetering at a crisis. I am offering my assistance. I stand ready to contact federal law enforcement agencies and bring them to Wauwatosa in order to bring peace and tranquility back to the community. I look forward to hearing from you. Well, we have reached a critical tipping point in Wauwatosa. I am confident that if we work together, we can restore the rule of law. It is crucial that we strive to preserve the excellent quality of life that has drawn so many toe work. And raise their families in Wauwatosa and signed by Jim Sensenbrenner, member of Congress. His district includes portions of the city of Wauwatosa. Seconds slow. State representative David Bowie and Milwaukee who says he was part of the demonstration in protests that occurred outside this residents. That officer Benson was at on Saturday night is saying that nobody tried to kill Officer MENSA, and he's blaming MENSA for all of the developments that occurred. Quoted in the Js online today, Bowen said, and I quote from the story, Bowen said No protesters fired at MENSA during the protest. It should Bob said 50 to 60 people outside menses Wauwatosa home again. It's actually his girl friend's home. But he's residing there. Bowling and other protesters said they were provoked by MENSA before the physical altercation that took place out outside his home quote. It was clearly communicated as we were trying to figure out what happened that it was Joseph MENSA in that tussle that turned off the safety on that firearm and told the trigger. Owen said today, the Wauwatosa Police Department issued a statement saying there is a lot of false information and rumors being circulated on social media and through the news media regarding the events on Saturday night, August 8th outside the home where Wauwatosa Police officer Joseph MENSA was stag best includes an accurate information and allegations contained an official press releases from a state elected official was outside of the home. Well criminal conduct and a shooting occurred. What occurred Saturday night was not organized a peaceful protest. It was a targeted planned act of violence against one of our police officers. In our community. This is an active ongoing investigation and evidence continues to be gathered regarding the events of August 8. Investigators are looking through a large amount of high quality video footage from the scene and are working to identify suspects and vehicles involved in any illegal activity. A statement, then quotes police chief. Very Weber The welcome toast. The Police Department will not stand by and allow this type of intimidating, aggressive, dangerous illegal behavior to occur,

Wauwatosa Officer Officer Joseph Mensa Wauwatosa Police Department Mensa Officer Mensa Officer Benson Wass Officer Joseph Mintz Police Department Police Commission Milwaukee Milwaukee County Mayfair Mall George Floyd Baba Tosa Common Council Hard Park Jim Sense Bowling
7 Little Known Copywriting Hacks

Marketing School

04:20 min | 1 d ago

7 Little Known Copywriting Hacks

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. Today. We are going to talk about seven little. No. In copywriting hacks and kneels GonNa Start I with any, you're gonna Homey Star I. Okay. So number one, what's funny is most people being by copy like, Oh, I want to be amazing like Ogilby for. Oh. I wish I can have my words to slow super smoothly from just like how Frank Kern does it. So the first copy I have for you is you don't need to be amazing writer the key to converting in getting people to renew your copying buying becoming a lead is actually answering What issue someone may have when on your landing or potentially buying, you answer those objections. A good example of this is you can use survey monkey hot, whatever you want type farm to survey people on your page, find out what issues they have an integrate those within your copy answered, their objections to suck at writing more conversions. All right number two. So when I'm writing I like using sentiment analysis tool, so you can just sent him an analysis, but put him whatever copy you have whether it's a headline or maybe it's Longer form thing, and you just dump it in there and basically score how positive or negative your content is an in general. If I'm trying to write an ad I wanted to be generally more positive. I. Don't like to induce too much fear. Yes. Fear is certainly one emotion you can tap into, but the Jenner I tried to look for positivity. So just go sentiment analysis tool. The third copy hacked that I have for you is all about showing the right copy at the right time. So for example, you have a Webinar may have copied that convinces people to watch your Webinar. If someone doesn't attend your women but registered you wanNA email him copies about the missing the Webinar. In the next, they can go and watch the Webinar if they watch the Webinar ended in by you can have copy answering. Answering objections on why most people don't buy and results would get the by your art service. So figure out what copy you need a in each place to maximize your conversions and have it there. It's not about how smooth you're right. It's about answering objections at the right time in the right place. Number four is create a swipe file. What I mean by that. If you are scrolling through Instagram, you're scrolling through facebook and. And you see in that stops you that is known as a pattern interrupt. So what you should do there is if you actually like the ad and if you think you can draw some inspiration from it, save it, you can save these ads, put him into a collection, and then from there, the beauty of that is you can refer back to these ads, and then you can draw without having to create something from. From scratch, if you see headlines that you like put him into a swipe file, you WANNA create a entire swipe folder where you just pull inspiration from and you don't necessarily need to try to reinvent the wheel here. You can go swipe dot co to try to pull more inspiration. They have great long-form landing pages and sales letters in there. Just don't try to do everything on your own draw from lean on other people. People right stat under shoulders, and you're going to be fine as Ogilby said, and this gets into number five. As we said, eighty cents of the dollar spot on the headline. So what I want you to do is come up with multiple headline variations, fair copy, and you want to try to figure out which headline resonates the most deal customer. You can either upload look like audiences Melissa onto facebook and run ads with. Different. Different headline variations see which one gets the most cooks. All right. Number six for me would be using the framework from breakthrough advertising. So breakthrough advertising still think it's a really great book and you can get it for about one hundred, twenty, five bucks now, I google it, and so here's the framework, the life cycle or from someone going from the top to the bottom when people interact with you, a customer interacts with you. You is usually start unaware, and then they become probably wear. Then they become aware of a solution than your solution, and then you can make an offer to them. So think about that, you can use DA right awareness, interest, decision action, kind of similar, but unaware problem where solution where your solution, and then you give him off i. that is basically how you take from top to bottom when you're trying to actually get the. The convert this framework actually provides to go in with a video can go in with a sales letter can go within a long form. Add. It works really well,

Ogilby Facebook Eric Su Frank Kern Writer Instagram Jenner Melissa
Biden VP Search Narrows to Kamala Harris: Does She Want the Job?

KCBS 24 Hour News

04:30 min | 1 d ago

Biden VP Search Narrows to Kamala Harris: Does She Want the Job?

"Democratic presidential nominee of Vice President Joe Biden could reportedly announced his pick for a running mate as soon as this week. California Senator Kamala Harris. API appears to be one of the leading candidates, but some are questioning if she AH wants to take the job or not for more key CBS News anchor Dan Mitchinson spoke with Carla Marinucci. Senior writer for Politico California playbook. Carla. What do you think? First of all, Do you think this could be Harris there? Even in the last days, Vegas betting circled at this point. Dan is being number one on Joe Biden's list. Who knows how that's gonna play out? But the fact is that Kamala Harris has been mentioned before. For other Possibilities in the administration, including attorney general, including possibly a nominee for the Supreme Court. Obama and during the Obama administration, she was reportedly asked if she wanted to be attorney general. She turned that down on the issue of the Supreme Court. She said She wanted to run for Senate at the time. But times have changed, And perhaps she might have changed her mind. She's getting advice from some Democrats that she might consider turning down the VP job because the attorney general job at this point could be more consequential. Willie Brown, who former San Francisco mayor said in his column on Sunday that he thought, uh, right right now, there's nobody left important than the vice president. I mean, as he said, Ask Mike Pence so that nobody thinks the vice president is a really influential job. But the attorney general, ah could have a long to do list ahead and that could include prosecuting Trump in the trump family law enforcement reform, Other issues related tio inspector generals and other things that the Trump administration has done and Democrats I think may be cheering that on, so we'll see how it plays out. But certainly Kamala Harris has a lot of different possibilities. But right now it looks like she may be at the top of the list or very close to it when it comes to Joe Biden, vice presidential nominee, But let me ask you this. I mean, Biden is gonna have a lot of California locked in the rest of the country, not necessarily a big fan of our state. Do you think a VP from here would hurt or help him then? That's been a debate Janet, But the fact is Kamala Harris has huge name recognition in the rest of the country. The You don't want the advice presidential nominee to do any harm. But in commonly Harrison's case, she could help in helping deliver some of those states where you need to rev up the Democratic base of progressive base. She had those followers right. She had a presidential campaign that brought her to all of those swing states. And so many voters know her out there more than some of the other women on the list. That doesn't mean, however, that people like Karen Bass, perhaps the House member from Los Angeles, Uh, Susan Rice, former ambassador and Tammy Duckworth's, uh, the senator from Illinois who is highly thought of this well couldn't be part of the mix as well. But how tough would this be for not only Biden but for Harris if she decides to run in four years if Biden's only in there for one or even in eight to move into the White House when we have a pandemic going on, and an economic recession? Yeah, you've actually hit on it and that some of the reasons why we've heard some doubts about Kamala Harris being mentioned the fact that she's ambitious. She clearly wants to run for president in some point And the go by in vice presidential nominee is in effect giving a leg up to whoever wants to do that It is effective primary in a way for the for the next presidential contest. Many Democrats would believe that that May hurt Joe Biden in some respects because they may want not wantto help. Comma. Harris is much when it comes to pushing legislation in Washington because they won't want to advance her chances. There's going to be a lot of Democrats who want to run for president, Uh, in 2024. So at this point, Yeah, Connell, Harris and her future plans and her future ambitions have all been part of the mix. It's why some Democrats say she may be the best choice for Joe Biden. Alright, Gotta run real quick. Will she be offered the the VP, And if she is, will she take it? He'll take it if she's offered, Will she be offered? That's the $1,000,000 question right now. That's Carla Marinucci, senior writer for political Oh California playbook.

Senator Kamala Harris Joe Biden Carla Marinucci Vice President Attorney VP California President Trump Supreme Court Dan Mitchinson Writer Politico CBS Mike Pence Willie Brown Obama Administration Donald Trump Senate Karen Bass
Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:36 min | 2 d ago

Unwanted Truths: Inside Trump’s Battles With U.S. Intelligence Agencies

"Us now is Robert Draper writer at large for the New York Times magazine. He's the author of several books including most recently to start a war how the Bush administration took America into Iraq Arbor draper has just published this landmark piece of reporting the Times magazine. It's called unwanted truth this inside trump's battles with US intelligence agencies among the scoops embedded here is news that. The. White House pressured the Director of National Intelligence to change and intelligence community conclusion that Russia wanted president trump reelected in two thousand, twenty, the intelligence director at the time Dan Coats said, no, he was then fired his successor signed off on the change, but he was then fired after one of his deputies briefed Congress that in fact, Russia is working to reelect president trump this year. Mr Draper I, thank you for this reporting for joining us here tonight to help us understand it. Thanks very much for your time. I've said a lot of words about the. Words that you have reported here and that you have printed. Let me just ask if I got anything wrong or if you think that I'm looking at anything the wrong way around. To actually think presences I did when issue two clarifications the I rooted in the most important is that I am not aware the Joe McGuire had anything to do with the alteration of the National Intelligence Estimate this all took place during his first couple of weeks on the job when his hands were very much full with Ukraine whistleblower incident as you correctly pointed at and so this really. Anthem it matter win the in I was approved on September the twenty six inch testifying on the hill all day long. So he wasn't able to cheer that meeting. So that's the first second thing is that You know they're a don't want the story to give anyone the impression that the intelligence community as a whole has been bent to the will of Donald Trump. There's still plenty of analysts in case officers who are doing very good work. The problem is that the people above them have been in the line of fire with the trump administration and had begun to water down such that the intelligence products do not have the integrity that they once did not mean saying black is why end up as down but they are saying things in a more equivocating fashion and we saw this most recently just out of this past Friday. On a no deny official release this election security report saying that for the first time did yes it did appear the Russia. Trump essentially the same breath saying that China in Iran. Favored Biden is if it were kind of a jump ball or something in that was working patient, you did not see before the trump presidency. I feel like I. Thank you for for those clarifications and for drilling down on those things in that way I feel like. When I read it, the beginning of your piece that Dan Coats was pressured to change the National Intelligence Estimate around Russia's intentions for the two thousand election and he said, no felt like, wow, that's that's really big news about Dan Coats to find out that that happened just before he was fired. Is itself a scoop. But then to find out that the National Intelligence Estimate. was in fact watered down in the way that the White House wanted under Joe McGuire. It it does seem like the sort of bending to the White House's will equivocating on things that aren't equivocal casting things in a way that doesn't you know is designed not to upset the president or put things in ways that he likes it does feel like it's not just pressure, but it's effective pressure that's actually working on the I say. Over sharing in. A. probably Rachel that the matter of. Russia in election security has been a sore subject since before trump's presidency and everyone knew I in the NFC in the West Wing and certainly in the intelligence community that to bring the very matter of Russia interfering in two thousand sixteen, it's likely interference patterns through the midterms and into twenty twenty an most of all that if they were trump would be to call into question the legitimacy of this presidency. That's how he would receive this and so because it was such an unpleasant thing as report out then chief definite Mulvaney and then national security advisor. John was a considerable lengths to to keep this completely off the agenda would get on the agenda for example, when it was a single in a seat meeting at relating to Russia in Election Security Pearson Nelson than the secretary of. Homeland Security didn't get five minutes into it before trump started interrupting her and asking questions about a wall along the Mexican border. So this has been a distasteful subject to him people around him have known that and they have adjusted themselves unfortunately accordingly.

Donald Trump Russia Dan Coats Joe Mcguire Director Of National Intellige White House Robert Draper Mr Draper President Trump United States The New York Times Magazine Writer Homeland Security Iraq Arbor America Rachel Biden Mulvaney Director
Threat modeling: Breaking the design with pen, paper, and creativity

Cyber Work

04:39 min | 2 d ago

Threat modeling: Breaking the design with pen, paper, and creativity

"What will your students learn with threat modeling study path? Well, it makes a give him an overview and I'll say. You know, why would you WANNA know trump model Ryan, and then I go into a number of different frameworks because I don't think people utilize the firms that are out there a lot of open source frameworks that are very good. That gives you an overall idea. There are so few almost taxonomy. He's calling frank because they're thinking you very good idea of what you can look for a second year. If you're a writer and you sit down, go to write a piece of paper and let's say you're going to write a novel. And you don't start got a blank piece of paper there. Right. A lot of times they do these days, they could keep you kickstart. And they said, well, you know. A right you know he's walking over the billowing winters prompt. Yeah, it gave you props and so these frameworks prostitute, they allow the security personnel, the non security person to kick, start those ideas, and I train the people dropped the different courses. I tell them okay. Here the frameworks and here the interational between the firms. I don't think enough. You do that enough out there. Don't say I've got from exit firmer Y, how do they relate to each other and I get the students to do that on their on their own? So they understand what the different relations are. And then once they get that the key turns in clicks. I can't. Now I can start mapping these firms between each other, and it's a very powerful way to go about using against affect as infrastructure security, network security of cloud security. The whole smash because it gets his whole relation between knees and they could use all of them. Of. Course RTM, which is rapid prototyping. Okay. Shameless plug. Sure. Can You? Can you sort of walk? Walk us through kind of a sample like like. Modeling session like what like you said, you've got, you've got these sort of these templates and so forth. But people who are because we have people who might be hearing the words threat modeling for the first time here. So I guess, give us a quick ramp up here of like what what, what, what you're doing with this kind of thing. Only, as he is way to penetrate penetration testing in a very cheap way, possible. Normally penetration testing as you get into actual code base taking there and you destroy stuff and you go back and say, hey, broke your coat. Go all knowing they pay a lot of money to fix the code there. What if I told you that trump mornings too cheaply? or I hand over designed to you and I say break the design thinking mad camphor cad or he built the cars in three dimension. Their match Fi said to you you burgess is on and you break it. So that's great. You cost me time of one person might architect. Architect goes back he or she the changes in design you go back you break it again, we do this back and forth it way until you come to designed disagree with, we say look now we've got our our mitigations in place and then we baked those medications into coat Now, you no longer have a flawed design because flaws, verses, bugs, a flaw. design needs it no matter how good you are. You always come flawed code. Designed perfectly is like baking a cake without proper rising lower. Whereas whereas a bug needs you lipid. You. Answer. He said I'm going to pick a cake, and so I said, why don't you? Tell that. I don't want to be flower this. Yeah, okay you're. You'RE GONNA come out with a bad cage, but you're your. Implementation, issue. Science she. Yes. Exactly, exactly Allen. So so in that case, right there throttling goes after the design, and after the the actual flaws as opposed, the station issues is this something. That's is something that's happening. Kind of more before the system is in place, then you're sort of. You're looking at the system before it's even launched. So that's that's so it's not so much. It's not just that you're not breaking the system of penetration testing. It's that you're you're bulletproof. before begins. Exactly. Okay. He thought of another way like if. We wanted credit a bank building and we said, okay, five, we don't know much about it. So we created thank building and we create a transom window that's open to volks, and we say, no, it's going to get into the volt area. So we're not going to lock it. So it goes into the TRANSOM window. It's in the volt steals money you and I have a lot of economic faces. Why ready to penetration tests? That's the sign. Yes, and we didn't say like look there's a transit down there. Why is that there? I don't know. Jeff money down there. Okay. Yeah. That kind of thing. So. Contact, yeah?

Frank FI Ryan Writer Transom Jeff Allen Burgess
The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

Past Gas

05:05 min | 2 d ago

The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

"Welcome back everyone to pass gas As always. I'm your host, Nolan Sykes joined by my friends. One Joe Weber. What's up? And I'm sorry, I'm trying I'm trying to bring the energy, but this is also a very somber script already, and so I want to be entertaining Bhai also want to. Honor respectful. Done that. Be Entertaining, but respectful. And James. Humphrey. You hear him talking now. To, two. The river. All right anyway. gas. So today's are two part our second part of our story on the Isle of Man. T T we're talking about the Dunlop family, are you guys ready to get into it I? Am I think I just want to point out I. Think you're man is the one of the six nicknames I've ever? That's a great and I said well good. It's so it means it means you're a nice guy. It. Yet. It's a rare nickname that sounds really cool. But it also means you're Nice Kylie. Guy that the go-to guy whenever anything needs to be done. Man He's your man. Love it. Great. Start to great episode. Let's dive into it when Marjorie and Ian Forest and their twin teenage sons moved to their house on Douglas Road on the isle. Of Man. One. Of the things they look forward to was the opportunity to watch the legendary I'll of man tourist trophy races from their front yard after all, it's not every day that you can watch the best road racers in the world. Take a corner, your corner in front of your house at speeds of over one hundred, twenty miles an hour. Unfortunately, the forest family had no idea what they were in for on a practice day in two, thousand five, they heard a crash outside Yawkey Carlson, a Swedish racer had run into their gate and flipped into their garden. The Swede was severely injured. Medics rushed to the scene, but there was nothing they could do Carlson's name joined the two, hundred, fifty plus other men who had died on the t course. The horror didn't end there though officials told the forest family that was to logistically challenging to delay the practice and move Carlson's body instead who Carlson was zipped into a body bag on the Front Garden for ninety minutes as the road marshals waited for practice to end, all the garrisons could do was closed their curtains and forbid their sons from looking outside. We'll I got. Doubts pretty awful. there's no way around it. Motorcycle racing is dangerous. Even riding a motorcycle daily traffic puts you at risk of dying in a crash twenty, nine times higher than that. If you were in a car at the same time, motorcycle riders and racers understand that danger. In fact, it's part of what draws them to the sport. Unfortunately, there's no real way around risking your life unlike cars where technology has greatly improved safety and driver protection motorcycle crashes, you're basically experiencing the equivalent of a no seatbelt through the windshield accident every single time. And as dangerous as motorcycle racing is the Isle of. Man. T he stands out as a full degree of magnitude more dangerous than the rest. First of all public road courses like the Isle of Man were writers have to contend with what they call the furniture. That's sick. They're talking about telephone poles, ditches, garden walls. These are much more dangerous than closed circuit courses or dirt bike riding and racing. While those races do see fatal accidents there hasn't been a deadly crash in a speedway race since twenty sixteen and in the twenty years before that, there is an average of less than one year similarly motocross raced at much lower speeds also sees lower fatalities unlike public road races. These courses are designed with plenty of room to minimize danger to the writers. So if Motorcycle Race Games skydiving public road courses are like base. Base jumping in a wing suit taken an already dangerous activity and bringing it as close to the edge as possible. However, even among public road races, the Isle of Man is easily the most dangerous in the twenty seven years. The T T was part of the World Grand Prix, championship thirty, six racers died on the isle. Of Man. Obviously. More than one year. In comparison at Imatra, there were two fatalities in sixteen years at Hockenheim, three deaths in twenty six years. The second deadliest race after the man was a circuit day SPA francorchamps which. Baby Franker Jam Cams, which saw ten deaths in thirty five years making the Isle of Man and average four times deadlier than even the second most deadly race.

Yawkey Carlson Nolan Sykes Bhai Joe Weber James Grand Prix Humphrey Front Garden Imatra Marjorie Ian Forest
Dwayne The Rock Johnson is Buying an Entire Football League

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 2 d ago

Dwayne The Rock Johnson is Buying an Entire Football League

"For many of us, Monday nights sieve Longman, Monday, night football. So today's a good day to consider a shakeup in the football world. The potential revival of a would be competitor to the National Football League last week actor and former pro wrestler Dwayne the Rock Johnson with other investors bought a start-up Football League called the xfl this take some explanation especially to those who aren't avid sports fans. Let's start with the xfl contrary to popular belief. The NFL doesn't football is just had a monopoly for the most part for so long that most. Most people consider it an institution for the last couple of decades though rivals have attempted to build new leagues to compete with the. NFL. The XFL is one of those its roots began way back in the year two, thousand when World Wrestling Federation chairman. Vince. McMahon decided to build a league that could compete with the NFL NBC Cohen the League and planned to carry its games the XFL plan to extend the football season by playing games from just after the Super Bowl in February. Until late April. Now, at the time league owners, hopes were high that the Saturday night games could Wu and elusive audience TV. Teenage boys according to CNN. Vince McMahon. WWF had been almost magical in its ability to appeal to twelve to twenty four year. Old Males who typically don't stay home watching TV on Saturday nights. The xfl hoped McMahon could bring that WWF formula to football and win that desirable TV audience, and for one brief moment, it looked like their hopes were within reach the first game in two thousand, one drew more than fifteen million viewers a massive audience. That gold ring looked close and yet it turned out to be so far away as the season wore on audiences spell like a botched handoff after that single season, the xfl shutdown. Sometimes in life timing really is everything, and so it goes for Vince McMahon who decided that twenty twenty would be the right time to revive the xfl it launched in February, pitching the Seattle dragons against the DC defenders teams played five games among both players and owners. Optimism rained TV audiences varied by geography, but were decent enough that by March believe was well into planning the twenty twenty, one season. And then Kobe came along the League canceled the season March twentieth less than a month. Later, the XFL filed for bankruptcy sports writers added the xfl lists of other WanNa, NFL competitors who'd also tried to make a go of it over the years. The XFL seemed to be just another failed startup, but perhaps they declared the league's death too soon. Let's get back to Dwayne Johnson better known as the Rock Johnson actually started his career as a football player, but never made it to the NFL instead, he joined Vince McMahon's wwf where he quickly rose to superstardom before retiring to become an actor, he's now the highest paid actor in the world according to Forbes. With his business partner Danny Garcia who also happens to be his ex wife, the rock led the fifteen million dollar purchase of the. xfl. Out of Bankruptcy Sports Management Company redbird capital as a third partner. Johnson says the purchase was actually Garcia's idea she loves football and when the XFL declared bankruptcy, she saw their chance to own not just a team but an entire league not to get too grand about this. Consider that the salary of a single NFL football star say. Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak. Prescott is thirty, one million dollars. That's more than double what the partners paid for the xfl which has eight teams. Still, the deal made headlines. Perhaps it's a bit of hopeful light entertainment amidst the onslaught of grim. News in two thousand, twenty, Garcia. Johnson. Say They plan to produce multimedia content for fans year round, not just during the active spring season at production time, they hadn't yet said when the League will start to play again.

XFL National Football League Football League Vince Mcmahon Football Dwayne Johnson WWF Twenty Twenty Danny Garcia Partner Bankruptcy Sports Management C Dallas Cowboys CNN WU Seattle Kobe Chairman Nbc Cohen
How to find yor life's purpose

Optimal Living Daily

03:43 min | 2 d ago

How to find yor life's purpose

"What we learn about life from fairy tales by Jeff Goings of goings writer dot com. At the beginning of every great story before anything exciting happens we see something that looks a lot like normal life long before the protagonists Lazy Dragon or the heroine embarks on a quest we see her in some unsuspecting place dreaming of something more in beauty and the beasts my personal favorite Disney. Classic Bell Sings of wanting more than this provincial life in Star Wars. Luke can't wait to escape the boredom of a farmer's life and in the wizard of Oz dorothy sings about life somewhere over the rainbow. Is Easy to dismiss such people when we meet them in everyday life as dreamers or even downright crazy but are they really. Pleased get up early on Saturday mornings write essays that I would then save on my computer and share with no one a dreamed of publishing my stories somewhere. But for years, they never left the comfort of my living room. I'm not alone in this. This dreaming of another life does a preoccupation of Bailey and it's a wonderful life and the fixation of Walter Mitty is the reason we sometimes daydream or stay up late watching movies. Our lives are haunted by the ghosts of one might have been. Here's the good news though this is where story always starts with an unrealized dream hope deferred a life lived before chain of events sets the hero on a course to his destiny. Sense that there should be more to life than this. But hopefully that's not where the story ends. An important moment everything begins to make sense. There's a with storytellers call the inciting incident. The moment when the characters perspective changes the tale of an average person living in average life becomes one of mythic proportions but something has to happen for any of this to take place the character must choose to enter the story. Bell goes to find her father. Luke leaves home with OBI Wan. Dorothy, get swept up in a tornado in any great narrative. There's a moment where character decides to be more than a bystander that's really want a story begins with the decision to act. This choice though is often preceded by a link of discontent, which is why when people are called to some great task, they know it they recognize the prompting to do something significant something bigger than themselves and then respond. Why because they've been waiting for it their whole lives. Frustration prepares you for your purpose. My friend Ben Armed says every dream begins with frustration. Think that's true. But that frustration must be funneled into awareness that leads to action. Otherwise, it becomes bitterness. You must be willing to do something to step out into the unknown and see what happens. Until you make this choice, you'll continue feeling frustrated seeing other people succeed chalking it up to lock or some unfair advantage. You'll be jealous and critical wonder why not me and in doing this, he will deceiver self. Because, the truth is some do yet lucky and others have been born into privilege. But what are those things to you? You are still called chances come to us all but only those who are ready recognize them. So before you know what you're calling is your believe your call to something even if you don't know what it is yet that nagging said everything is not as it should be that you were meant for more than the status quo is important clue and what you do with that is essential to how your story unfolds with this means is you don't need some big plan. You just need to be a little dissatisfied with the way. Things are to possess a premonition that something is amiss and you may hold the keys fixing it.

Oz Dorothy Bell Luke Ben Armed Jeff Goings Disney Writer Walter Mitty Bailey Obi Wan
Dan Milnor and a conversation (you may need to hear) about pro photography today

PhotoBiz Xposed

05:24 min | 3 d ago

Dan Milnor and a conversation (you may need to hear) about pro photography today

"Today's guest is a photo book and creative evangelist. He loves photography, but he really does it for paying clients anymore, which he says has led to a more rounded interesting and better life. He spent twenty five years as a full time photographer mainly shooting documentary work for newspapers magazines clients in Nineteen, Ninety, seven, he quit photography, but in nine, hundred, ninety, nine talked into coming back. To work as a photographer then in two thousand and ten, he quit a game this time for real and today he works for Blurb the print on demand bookmakers he lives in. New Mexico one of the United States with his wife where he rides bikes explores and continues to work on his own documentary projects and create box that potentially no one will see or even care about. I stumbled across him on Youtube while rediscovering my passion for Photography and start shooting more for myself. He's breath of fresh air full of positivity even though he will potentially go against everything you've heard from any other guests of interview. Thing is crossed. This is a positive experience. All of us I'm talking about Dan. Mill Nor am truly rat to have him here this now Dan welcome might yeah. Thanks, I appreciate it. Wow. I've sounded amazing intro. Maybe. We should read that again. I'll send details to. Tell me why do you feel that you are? A happy better more random person now the shooting professionally. Oh, man it's a great question I just started thinking about this a couple of weeks ago. I've thought about it a lot but prior to that, but I made a realization a couple of weeks ago that I sort of pushed aside since two thousand ten when I made the decision to really walk away from being a full time photographer I became a better person almost immediately, and the reason for that is that being a professional photographer especially if you're trying to. Make your own work and not just you know sort of content with any assignment that comes along the Pike if you're trying to adhere or hold to a certain standard or style that may or may not have a home in the industry, it's very difficult, and so the consequently you're forced to think about yourself far too much. So the moment I quit photography, which was I think it was Tuesday afternoon in two thousand ten just said I'm done and I deleted my email account primary email account and I suddenly didn't have. To think about myself all the time I didn't have to speak about my business I. It was like being on the freeway letting your foot off the accelerator and all of a sudden you can lift back and say, wow, I can take a look around here and I realized one I've been focused on myself for far too long and I've been focused on a very narrow sliver of Tarpley for far too long. I should have been a more well rounded human being and educated in in areas that I wasn't also Just more educated in regards to the creative industry in general, you know what our designers doing, what are illustrators doing, what a writers doing why am I not collaborating with these people? You know it just was a wakeup call of sort of epic proportion and it's on me because I made the same realization in the nineties when I quit the first time and then I talked myself out of it I was like, oh I should do this again and I probably should have never gone back from ninety seven or ninety nine. I was like a square peg round of the photo industry I never really felt completely at home because my philosophy about what I was doing was not typical. And I WanNa make the pictures that other people were making I. Didn't WanNa make them in the style that other people were making them and I just kept finding myself swimming in quote unquote wrong direction and you know my colleagues and other folks in the industry were just like what are you doing? You can't do what you're doing and I thought well, you know I can and I am and it is. A weird scenario to end when you're constantly in the minority. But yeah, I just took a look around inside I need to stop thinking about myself so much and start thinking about other people but understand, hey, you had a chance to thanks so much about is still if you answerable to, I guess an editor so won't you focus on the work you had in front of you had to submit and get done. Well, it depends on what style what I'm shooting. So I made a couple of realizations very early. So I graduated from photo journalism. School. Ninety two I got an internship at a major newspaper ninety three to meet year to find an internship I was like banging my head against the wall. I found internship and ninety three. I got very fortunate because it was a big paper they had good budgets. They had a lot of photographers that I was rabid I was so amped on being talk refer and the photo editor realized that very quickly and it wasn't like I was a great talker or great inter. It was just that I was rabid and my pictures were in focused and I could talk to people without slobbering over myself and so I think the photo editor looked at me and said Oh. He's not a liability like I can actually give him good assignments. So I got good assignments. Photographer when you're working for a newspaper or a magazine Yes, you are almost entirely beholden to their editorial style it what the editor wants, photo editor, etc, and so found very quickly. You know what I could get away with in the newspaper world? Picture wise because we were a very conservative paper and I I would shoot things in in the field in my head as I was framing it up I'd say they're never gonNA run this even if it was a great image, I would say all the higher ups are GonNa make nervous they're not gonNA run. And when I went into the magazine world, it was the same thing I realized very quickly that I was not shooting my photographs shooting their photographs.

Editor New Mexico DAN Youtube United States Tarpley
Jumping Into Markdown

Mac Power Users

06:23 min | 3 d ago

Jumping Into Markdown

"Many Stephen Hackett, and I, have joined is always of my co-host and friend Mr David sparkes. Hello. Steven. How are you? Today? I'm good. How are you? I am ready to talk about markdown. We're touching the third rail here. The podcasting Faux Pas, we're going to talk about a little bit about coating on an audio podcast. I, think mark down the big exception. As we get into this. The whole idea is that it's really simple and so I think we can talk to this syntax and be just fine. Yeah Yeah. Well, this is a good episode we're going deep on markdown today Marc out something that a lot of people are aware of, but not as many people know how to do and it is really easy get through this podcast today. Down pro. I think so too before we get into all of that just real quick it is. We are in August. Now, I don't know how that happened. But we we will be working on and planning episodes around Iowa's fourteen. Macara's Big Sur. Couple of people had had asked about those I. Think we'll do what we did last year and and have A. Episode per release win. That is nobody knows and so we we're kind of keeping an eye on apple said in their results at the phone will be later this year by a couple of weeks does that mean? In Big Sur. Later, by couple weeks to WHO knows nobody knows. So this is going to be a fun adventure all in together this year. And related questions I've had from people are what about shortcuts and the photos field guide the most of those areas got up with this new operating system I. Think I'm going to have an a free update shortcuts when they launch Iowa's where team, but the question is nobody knows when they'll launch it. So if they launch it next week, I will not have an update ready, but there will be an update eventually or hopefully on launch day for shortcuts followed by a free update photos both of those will be free last year. I had to charge for shortcuts because apple rewrote shortcuts I to do the whole thing from scratch fortunately, that's not the case this year. So I'll have some so free updates. If you've already about those field guides also today we are going to in more power users. We're GONNA talk some tech stuff stephen is getting ready to prep for the annual the podcast on and right there's a bunch of technology involved with that. So we're looking forward to talking about that more power users today. So technology and sobbing both. Both. Right now. I really this is a stranger I have a lot of questions. boy Yeah. So let's get into. It's going to mark down. Just. A touch of background markdown was created by John Gruber the writer of daring fireball. We spoke about this episode four, hundred, sixty, six AMAC power users where he was a guest talk about the history of it. He's given other interviews about the history of markdown. and. It's really cool I. Mean it is sort of the definition of writing a project to scratch an edge. You have. He wanted a tool for riding on the web that wasn't. Junkie and Messi like html is and markdown came out of that desire I. think that's pretty cool. Yeah I mean John had a blog. He was one of the first that I was aware of the did the linked posts you know where he would link something and make a few comments about it, but it also have more extensive posts. and. He wanted simple method right in. So he did He created his own tool, and who would a guest that it became such a big thing. It's everywhere and we're GonNa get to that later in the episode of just how many places you can use markdown and it shows up in some pretty surprising projects and websites across the Internet. And the idea of it really though at its at its foundational level is just something you can write with any plain text editor that at the end of the process gives you usable text for html at least that was the original idea now since then it's become so much more because now you can export as rich text and you can do all sorts of cool things with markdown but having a starting point where you can sit there with the keyboard and not have to fiddle with code snippets and make something that's usable later. That's right. So the initial pitch when Gruber announced it is that this is a tool to convert plane tech's to html for people who are riding on the web, and so if you're blogging and you need Italics were bold or links, you don't have to do that in html you can do it in mark down and then they're marginally two things. It's the syntax and there's an interpreter and you can. Get it on your website and it Lowe's html and everybody sees a regular web page. But like you said over the years it has. Shown up everywhere. It's even supported in x code now as of a couple of years ago, which is gonNA. Feel pretty good. If you're if you're John Right this product you built being blessed and put an exco that's gotta be pretty. Cool. Talking about those two pieces of let's break them down for a second because the first piece to me is almost is definitely more important than the second piece in the first piece is it's a text syntax where you can include links and rich text items without having a rich text. You know nobody in air quotes here, word processor at your disposal, and that is something that's very useful but the syntax in addition to being something that's easily convertible he also made it and I think this is the genius of markdown he made easily readable. So when you read if I put a page of html in front of anybody listening to the show next to page of mark down. It would be obvious how much easier it is to read markdown than html because h inasmuch codes and tags and other things in it that really get in the way of finding the words whereas markdown is all about the words and the very simple syntax we're gonNA teach you here shortly. embeds all that stuff for you. So you don't you don't need to worry about.

John Gruber Stephen Hackett Apple Iowa Big Sur Mr David Sparkes Steven Marc Macara Messi Lowe Writer Editor
The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

On the Media

10:04 min | 4 d ago

The rise of Poland's far right has important lessons for Americans

"Of Donald J. Trump. We in the United States have become accustomed to a degree of fabulous. Um I've done more for black Americans than anybody. With the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, the president, self aggrandizement provides the framework for his alternate reality. We have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900 Deaths in a single day. You have the numbers place because I heard we had the best mortality number one low mortality, right? We are being given something I can't recall in my lifetime, a choice of realities. One that is mostly regarded as evidence based and one that you might call faith based that faith being in Mr Trump In either case, you have a sizable cohort to back you up. Truth has been displaced in many quarters by rage and fear. Over the past four months, we've had many opportunities to observe the impact of paranoia. When deployed by a fantasist in the White House in Arizona Man died after taking Clara Quien, his wife said that they heard about it from Trump's briefings. Are you gonna allow the government to tell you you have to wear a mask? Some believe these mask orders go against their freedoms will protect. All right, I will know asked me and I will not pay for antibiotics. Conspiracies of Sena numbers swell on Facebook and doctors warn, if left unchecked, they could undermine an effective vaccine. The death toll from the Corona virus pandemic has surpassed 150,000 in the United States. That's the highest number of fatalities in any nation by far. And accounts for nearly 1/4 of the recorded global. Told immediately after the 2016 election, I spoke with New York ER writer Masha Gessen, who, after having lived long under Vladimir Putin had some advice for anxious Americans trying to navigate the so called new normal. She explained that for the would be authoritarian, the lying is the point that the ability to create a reality flagrantly staring down conspicuous fact. Is a crucial component of building and sustaining power. And last fall boxes, David Roberts noted bluntly, where such a strategy left unchecked, could lead this sort of cultish, increasingly authoritarian movement takes over the country. In Russia and Turkey and Poland. Right's a disturbingly longer and longer list. We see countries that we thought were democracies devolve into this. In the U. S. So much has happened in the last few years that we thought would never happen. I think we should really loosen up our imaginations as to what can happen when a movement that is convinced that everything it knows and loves is in danger of falling apart movements that's thinking like that unconnected anymore to fax or reality. And got its hands on the power of the federal government is the basic recipe for democracy is falling apart. And so last fall on, the media producer Leia Feder reported on one of those places Poland, a young democracy teetering on unstable ground and where it's far right Nationalist government is intent on rewriting the nation's painful history. For almost a decade, Poland has been in the grip of a conspiracy theory what really happened when a plane crashed in a forest in western Russia, killing Poland's president and dozens of other government officials. The plane had been on route to commemorate another Polish tragedy, a massacre that had occurred in the very same location in 1940. 1973 documentary explored the mystery While the German army is advancing from the West, the Soviets crossed Poland's eastern front court in a method of Polish army collapsed, Um, surrendered. The victors, divided the country down the middle and imprisoned every soldier they captured. Russia took a 215,000 Poland officer Corps were never seen alive again. Many. What die near Smolensk, in a forest called catching after decades of opacity and suspicion on investigation in the early nineties, confirmed finally, that it was not Hitler. But Stalin, who had ordered the massacre. And so when, on April 10th 2010 a delegation of 96 Polish politicians and officials traveled from Warsaw to Smolensk. It was in service of remembrance and reconciliation. But what happened instead compounded the national pain. Poland's prime minister burst into tears when he heard the news today that his country's president was killed in a plane crash pilot tried to land in a thick fog at least twice missing the runway. And ignoring the control tower's direction to divert to another city. Not just losing the president of that country. The first lady, the ahead of the army chief of staff, the National Security Office head deputy Parliament speaker, the deputy foreign minister. It was a devastating national tragedy. What's more, the symbolic layering was undeniable. Ah, longstanding tragedy finally solved and a new one appears in its place. And yet, in the immediate moments and days after the crash, there was a kind of common shock. An Applebaum is a journalist and academic beast in Warsaw At the time of the 2010 crash, her husband was minister of foreign affairs in the Polish government, and there was pretty straightforward reporting. About what had happened. What was immediately clear There were people on the ground who saw the crash. So there was a kind of concensus initially about what had happened that it was a terrible Accident and that you know many people of value to the nation had died. But the story started to shift is the investigation into the crash proceeded. Investigators say pilot error was mostly to blame. It became clear that one of the causes of the crash was the fact that the pilots were under pressure to land. The president's delegation had arrived late for the plane. They were running behind schedule as they got closer to smell lens, which was even really an airport. It was a kind of airstrip in the forest. They began to be worried about the fog and the pilots weren't sure they could make the narrow landing. But according to black box recordings, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, head of the opposition party directed the pilots to do it was meant to be the launch of his reelection campaign. So there were cameras there which he knew, and he was very anxious to go under pressure, the pilots tried to make the landing. Instead, they hit a tree, killing all 96 people on board. The president's twin brother, the head of the nationalist right political party in Poland, same parties, the president He didn't like this story. It made the president look bad, more to the point. This is a terrible crash very near to a place where a Nurlita generation of poles were murdered by the Soviet state. Because of that eeriness. People immediately began to speculate that there was actually a different, deeper story that perhaps the Russians caused the crash. Perhaps there was a bomb on the plane. And conspiracy theories began to proliferate online. The president's brother, Nijinsky began openly alluding to them. Kaczynskis Law and Justice Party made unraveling the Smolensk conspiracy. It's key campaign promise once you had bought into their idea that there is a secret conspiracy, possibly involving the Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk. Possibly involving the Russians, and that lots of people high up in the state were implicated in some great big secret plot to kill the president. If you believe that Then you can believe a lot of other things. The point was to get people to believe in a kind of alternative reality to doubt institutions to doubt that the government was telling them the truth, and that was absolutely an attempt to help win an election, But it did more than carve out a new electorate. It created new divides in Polish society. Where one's Polish politics were split between Communists and anti communists around economic policy. Now it was over a vision of history. It was how you see Poland's place in the world. And whether you think secret dark forces air trying to undermine your country and whether you know you need to elect a government of Patriots in order to make sure that doesn't happen. Where you fell on that dividing line affected how you would vote and how you would understand politics for the next several years, And so when line justice one in 2015 it spawned a new kind of power a power based on the willingness to embrace the myth. They fired large numbers of Polish civil servants. Polish members of the foreign service. All kinds of people who work for the government also leaders and board members of state companies and they replaced all of them with people whom they were sure we're loyal. And one element of the loyalty test was belief in this Molinski myth. Smolinski conspiracy implied that there were dark, mysterious forces continuing to try to manipulate and undermine the Polish nation. It also drawn the larger story of a Poland continually attacked by outsiders and the valiant Polish resistance to threats past and present line Justice Road that narrative electoral victory. And then wrote its electoral victory to further consolidation of that narrative in service of Polish nationalism.

President Trump Poland Russia Polish President Lech Kaczynsk Smolensk United States Donald J. Trump Warsaw Prime Minister Mr Trump Federal Government Poland Officer Corps Abraham Lincoln Facebook David Roberts Arizona Masha Gessen Vladimir Putin Deputy Foreign Minister
Author Chat With Julie Abe

Books and Boba

05:29 min | 5 d ago

Author Chat With Julie Abe

"Hello everyone I'm so excited to have Julie obey the. Eva Evergreen semi magical which here with us today. Thank you Julie so much for a be here with us. Thank. You I've been a huge fan of Simba. But a long time. So it's exciting me here. Yeah. We're old friends I remember when when you first started following I, think it was like two years ago or two and a half years ago. So we're we're so excited to have you. I still can't believe people listen to our podcast to be honest I know. Especially all too. Real ask people listen to our pockets. It's a great resource just as an Asian American. It's nice to know that there's a community of authors dogs that are actually owned voices in legitimate though I love podcast. Awesome. So your book is coming out in two days we're recording this on. August second. So so by the time, you hear this is already out. So we're going to hype up the books our listeners can go and just grab it rapidly listen to his podcast. Thank you. Do you have. I. Guess like jitters like are you nervous about your launch it? Yes. Yes and no yes. Because it's finally here in no because I feel like it's been happening for a long time already. So it's a it's exciting just to kneel to finally have the book out in the world and having everyone. Read it. Done very excited. You had. This is your debut, right? Yes, it's my first and only look in the world as of yet. Yeah. We'd love to know more about your background. I mean we're always a writer and what was the process like getting this book maiden put out into the world I never really thought I would ever become a writer I've always absolutely loved reading when I was little I would read all the time. It was my favorite thing like if I could get some Mike Birthday money are doing that always like go towards books like without a doubt. But I never considered. Writing as something that I could do personally. Won I think is is when I was young. There weren't many authors that were. Not White. And Seeing that I was like, okay that's that's not me like I. Love these books. Obviously, I love these authors but I don't think that's that that is me can I can do? So I kind of actually followed in the fall footsteps in my father like what did Biz Adnan or major fight that All all along I did like I love books nevertheless like I loved. Just, the world of books in how it could take away bean escape. I, looking back I didn't do realize that. I did right when I was anchor I never thought much of it but I did right. just refine. Journal or diary land in Middle School. My teacher had speed. The Martian chronicles by Ray, Bradbury. I really liked the book It's budget short stories sort of like said on Mars in then. So her prompt was your own little Martian chronicles on chapter. And having super excited as. Oh. My Gosh is this homework like this can't be homework? This is actually fun. Did that and I didn't think much of it entered it. I was like a penis assignment. That another instance to that like I think this in fifth grade where we did the committee evil medieval course. I also had to write for that class to end up writing like. Twenty K. word count on. The Story? And super excited about that. But then I never thought about it like elevated could be career. Because all I saw Romney was like business medical health care. Fields so might say loss. Eastern. American conduct. Exactly. which you know I still have my day job. Of course in my day job was actually working out really well right now but I I graduated college. I started started day job and. I've been working before you know like I am. Worked Rosen Yogurt shop in high school in like I did internships and stuff like that I worked in the job through college. But my first day job I sat down as her working has. GotTa be more to life than this. Has To. Be. So. Like go back and forth nine to five day job GonNa Commute. Drive home. There's something missing. That job was the right job for me for one company was on the right bit but. I realized I didn't do something more like a Passion Hobby And so I was like, well, obviously like I love books. So maybe I can write like this for fun.

Writer Julie Eva Evergreen Biz Adnan Rosen Yogurt Middle School Romney RAY Bradbury
Introducing the On The Ledge manifesto

On The Ledge

06:23 min | 5 d ago

Introducing the On The Ledge manifesto

"Now, it's time to bring you the on the ledge manifesto is important to say that this really is a work in Progress I. How does Z. Meeting with my Patriot subscribers while ago and ask for their suggestions some of those are incorporated in this but I'd also love to hear your thoughts. This is going to be an evolving document that on my add to as I go along. But it just gives you an idea of some of the core beliefs and views that that underpin the show manifesto point number one is this everybody. Absolutely everybody can be applied to person. There were no such things as green thumbs or black thumbs or any other silly phrase two thumbs. Anybody could be a plant person and it starts with one plot which she may well kill and that's fine. This show is completely open to everybody whatever that age. Background location. Religion race, all those other things that other people try to use to put us into boxes I don't really care about any of that stuff. I just care about helping people about plots. That's the first thing to say anybody can be a plant person do not feel held back by the fact that you think your not very good at science or that you. Have killed plants in the past or that you. Don't know what you're doing because everybody gets on a journey and starts learning and that is absolutely cool. So you're applying person if you have a plot, you are replant person. So that's manifesto point number one. Okay manifesto viewpoint number two, every plant has a story more does that mean? Though? Well, every plant comes from somewhere has a native home and the more you can understand about the ways that your plonk rose in its native home how it was used by the people wear it grew and where evolved. And how other people of discovered I say that in heavy inverted commerce because usually these plants or almost always these pants early, very well ninety by the people who actually live around them. But story that's been built up around, applaud the more you know and understand that the more you can understand. How to the coffee appliance in your home. I just got a little side note to about plot names. DO QUESTION PLOT names. Let's not underestimate the degree to which plants we own today came to us. Thanks to the labors of enslave peoples, the slave ships across the globe and traveled to Africa. Latin America. They carried the plants that we know and love to Europe and the rest of the world I'm going to cover this immoral depth in an upcoming episode, but it's worth knowing about. The journey, the plants of taken to reach us and the ways in which they've been interpreted and named and labeled by by generations of people mostly Bennett it has to be said. and. Let's just get rid of a lot of the really pejorative names that are attached. He so many house plants. I just because you've heard people calling the plant particular name, it doesn't mean that names acceptable all that your not perpetuating horrible stereotypes from in Law's tongue to wandering Jew a much worse. It's time to find alternatives to these names and this this loads of alternatives already out there. So I try to scanty it can be called wondering dude or spider word. Dare say trying to scanty sunset area is this plant. In the show notes that your fund a to peace in the scientist magazine published in Nineteen Ninety one by science writer. Melvin Hunter and in that he urged to change their ways about naming and some of the really offensive names have been dropped out of have dropped uses them, but some of them haven't shockingly. So, do gonna read that piece and have a think an just a little. Check through your head and maybe start thinking about some more positive names for some of the plants that you own. If you haven't thought about that before that's just something to have a think about next up There's an idea that gardening is is green knock okay. You're literally oversee plants are green but manifesto point number three's this gardening isn't green by which I mean eco-friendly unless you make it. So I'm talking about indoor gardening and outdoor gardening here really. As you'll know if you've listened to the show before sustainability is something I'm really passionate about I'm not saying I've got all the answers or done everything right myself but the more I learn about plants, the more I want to respect. The resources that we have and try not to waste them and to use things in a responsible way and accents everything like careful use of non-renewable resources like per light and pumice using pete free compost to avoid denigrating and destroying our world peat bogs. Thinking hard about whether I. Really need to send away to Thailand for applaud when I could. Go. To a plants for locally. Propagate my implants and do swaps give plants away and the more you learn about propagation the mood deeply stand your plans. It doesn't mean you can never buy a plot again, but you do go back and listen to the WHO are talked about the downsides of buying from big bookstores and think hard about whether there's a local nursery will grow with. Ye could support or plants what the Echo Goto said that some of that valuable money, your putting into plants is going to local experts who are paying a fair wage who are growing responsibly because that is. A. Really key part of being a responsible house plant person.

Europe Melvin Hunter Latin America Bennett Dare Nineteen Ninety Africa Thailand Writer Scientist Magazine
Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

podnews

02:59 min | 5 d ago

Music podcast celebrates Indias neighbours

"Iheartmedia the owner of Heart Radio says that it's podcast revenue grew one hundred and three percents here on Aaron. Quarter to the total digital revenue is ninety three million dollars unique podcast listeners group I thirty percent here on downloads grew by sixty two percent revenue for the quarter across the company however was down by forty-six percents complain the pandemic for that. You can read a full quite from Bob Pittman talking about exclusive whether they're a good idea or not in podcasting our show notes and our newsletter today. On track has published its top US publishers list for July Two Thousand Twenty Iheart is now number one for unique monthly audience in the US as well as global downloads beating NPR in both rankings. ABC is now measured alongside ESPN. The rancor only measures participating publishers. An SEC filing states that lip since former CEO Christopher Spencer who resigned on July thirty first will continue to be paid until the end of this year, he ends four hundred thousand dollars. He'll get a bonus of one, hundred, seventy seven, thousand dollars in early January he'll van to hundred and fifteen thousand dollars a year for his role is senior adviser until the end of February twenty, twenty three for which he'll have to work a maximum of eight hours a month. Lipson will also pay spencer four million dollars to buy back shares that he holds. The Board of lips includes those who last year criticized the company for outsized executive pay I'd like to say something sarcastic here. Row Quarter highlights a surge in tippety around sports podcasts. What's happening in House sports? PODCASTERS can take advantage the pre events for the fest global. Summits Twenty Twenty have been happening all week we linked to a bunch of recordings today. Dearest is a new exclusive podcast on spotify in Indonesian. It focuses on letters written and read by writers, musicians and actors, and it's made by Journalism podcast company K B our prime and a number of additional podcast hosts. Now, allowing you to submit your podcasts to the yet to be launched Amazon music and audible podcasts service some people are giving you a backstage link it works for anyone on any Host by the way. Welcome to a special episode of our humble indie music podcast made an India India Center seventy, three years of independence next week. But India's Music Indie podcast made in India. Wants to remind us that I, love for music isn't defined by geographic boundaries it'll produce three shows focusing on music from India's neighbors and the cat returns to audio with a new weekly podcast from the Vox media podcast network avery truthful man is host leading an ensemble voices engaged in the conversations that matter most to women and those who loved them. It returns on August nineteen

Ceo Christopher Spencer Summits Twenty Twenty India India India Center United States Heart Radio Bob Pittman ABC Aaron SEC Vox Media NPR Spotify Senior Adviser Espn Executive Lipson Amazon K B
DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

The Essential Oil Revolution

04:28 min | Last week

DNA & EOs with Dr. Lindsey Elmore

"All Right folks, I'm here with Dr Lindsay Elmore. One of my favorite human beings on this planet, she's a speaker author, brand strategist podcast host am world renown wellness expert, she translates. Science into understandable stories and travels the world educating audiences about natural wellness Lindsey. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for back. Absolutely thanks for having me back. It's an honour. Well, you're one of my favorite guests becoming a recurring us which I love so I'm glad that you're here today and I'm super excited to talk about this particular topic of DNA and what our DNA can tell us about essential oils, and we've actually had a number of guests on the show before to to cover this topic. But I feel like you're gonNA just sort. Sort of put the icing on top of everything and make it click in people's minds because that's what you're best at just breaking down complicated things and making them simple. So this is part of your thirty podcasts in thirty days. Tell us a little bit more about that. Well I recently started a podcast called the Lindsay elmore show, and I, some of my guests have been have been educating me on how you can. Can Get your podcast out there. If you go on a podcast tour and a few months ago, I was at an event called pod Max and one of the speakers was a writer for four herbs and she had written an article about how she accomplished doing thirty podcasts in thirty days, and I just thought, wow, that sounds really hard and I decided why not give it a try and book as many as you. You can get the word out there and really share all the different facets you know. I. Love Essential Oil. So I'm excited to be here to talk to your audience, but we're also looking at podcast that encompass all of the entrepreneurship that I do the Vegan cooking yoga. Even my new little cat. We've applied to some to some broadcast to talk about you know my first couple of weeks having a kitten and so. A great way I, don't know. So it's a great way to meet New People and to share topics that I care about right. Well, I, love how the podcast world is. So multifaceted in that way, like we are human beings, we are complex creatures and we are both passionate, right. So have been able to find. There's a podcast there for everything. So whatever little passion or hobby or? Or thing that's like in your heart that you want express share with the world. There's a show out there to do just that for people who are hungry for that information, which is one of the reasons I just love podcast. Absolutely. I. Completely agree there. We have come across some crazy crazy podcast and we even applied to one and there was only about the health benefits of olives. Like was like, how do you have a podcast only about that? But there is legitimate podcast for anyone and everyone. That's hilarious. I'M GONNA have to add that into my book that I'm writing about podcast. Dina's is just an example how niche you can make these things. So. Let's dive into the Science DNA. Tell us what gives us like the kindergarten version of what is DNA, and what can you tell us about our bodies. So DNA is basically A. For your body, every single person has DNA and there are building blocks of DNA called base pairs, and we each have about three point two, billion base pairs of DNA, and what we have is these base pairs make called genes. So there's a sequence of the base pairs that make gene the gene in codes, a part of your body bit either contributes to the structure of your body. So you can have a gene that helps to encode for tissues or four bones or for tea. Or you can have genes that encode for the function of your body, and so this could be perhaps an enzyme or it could be a spleen soul that is destined to help clean your blood cells. So DNA it's a blueprint, it's built of base pairs that make up jeans, and then genes encode the structure and function

Dr Lindsay Elmore Lindsay Elmore Brand Strategist Writer Dina
Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

The Pilot Network Podcast

04:30 min | Last week

Torgoen and Miracle Flights: Celebrating 35 years of curing the distance

"Flights thirty fifth anniversary and and we fly exclusively commercial now. So all of our patients in all of the families that we serve fly commercially and but that always that that wasn't always the case So when we were founded back in nineteen eighty, five we started as a as a nonprofit and with with a group of this network of private pilots and and it was only with these private pilots on donating their time, their money, their their planes that that these patients would be able to travel say from. Las. Vegas to Los Angeles writer. Las. VEGAS TO STANFORD University for treatment. So. So with our thirty five anniversary of this year, we we've really wanted to sort of celebrate that Celebrate our pilots that that that started this. Entire. Journey. At. Miracle flights and and actually played such a pivotal role as we're starting to brainstorm with Rachel and Matt. From forgoing about how we might activate some of these The. Celebration and really create some ideas and we were thinking about, Hey, what if we actually gifted some of these amazing time pieces to to these private pilots that actually helped us all those years ago. So so our team. Contacted one, a gentleman His name is Dave and and he's actually a Las Vegas resident. is now eighty years old but dave helped. So many of our patients fly back in the I guess it was like the early nineties nineties. And And what we thought would be a good good ideas. If we connected Dave, the pilot, you one of the patients that he flew all those years ago and there's a patient. Her name is Jessica and Chm actually. Has A has a disease called arthri posts and it's an orthopedic, a condition where the the limbs don't necessarily form on the way their intended to and and she her first flight would dave. Back in nineteen, ninety, five and nineteen, ninety, six was Was To Seattle, at Jessica was like two years old Ohka and again day flew her a number of times and when we reached out to Dave and said, hey, we want to do this little reunion. He could. He was just so excited began this is he's eighty now. So you know he's getting up there and he was just so excited to connect so. In the pandemic times we connected via zoom and they had this wonderful reunion where Dave was able to see Jessica who is now walking and anyone who knows a typical diagnosis a of of Arthur guideposts you're you don't walk. You're you're pretty much confined to a wheelchair, but Jessica is walking she she's a college student at the at Oregon State University. And it was so incredible to see them re reunite of the resume, and then we were able to present Dave with with the awesome a Tornado watch as some kind of symbol. Of thanks and and obviously celebrating partnership so it was lovely to do that values are first Reunion that we were planning on doing other ones. In Togo has just been so generous that they really wanted to get into celebrating other pilots as well. So a few things that we actually have in line of for for activation coming the next few months actually going to. meet up with an air. Force. Pilot Air. Force. Vet Who who used to be a pilot and SORTA surprised him with the tour going watch. He's actually been supportive miracle flights for a long time as well and as our kids fly you know our kids are still flying an Algebra Algebra accident short with they're going to surprise their pilots that are actually flying the the commercial planes flying on. Now they're gonNA surprise those pilots with some with some Togo and watches as well. So we have a law planned, but it's it's such a amazing partnership really to celebrate. These families, these pilots are so instrumental in helping these families.

Dave Jessica Togo Vegas Los Angeles Stanford University Writer Seattle Oregon State University Rachel Ohka Matt Arthur
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

03:11 min | Last week

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"How can <Speech_Female> you streamline to <Speech_Female> preserve some of those energy <Speech_Female> pennies for <Speech_Female> more creative uses <Speech_Female> now? Now, that being said <Speech_Female> for some people <Speech_Female> playing with their order <Speech_Female> gives them energy <Speech_Female> playing <Speech_Female> with how <Speech_Female> they can surprise and <Speech_Female> delight themselves. <Speech_Female> These little ways <Speech_Female> can actually give them energy <Speech_Female> obviously <Speech_Female> for a lot <Speech_Female> of us, watching <Speech_Female> movies and shows <Speech_Female> feeds <Speech_Female> us because it's <Speech_Female> more fiction <Speech_Female> that we're just taking in. <Speech_Female> When we need brakes <Speech_Female> I liked to the <Speech_Female> news. It's <Speech_Female> a weirdly <Speech_Female> restorative thing <Speech_Female> for me because it has <Speech_Female> nothing to do <Speech_Female> with plotlines <Speech_Female> or characterization, <Speech_Female> it just <Speech_Female> is. So <Speech_Female> I like to keep up on that <Speech_Female> by being <Speech_Female> mindful of how to. <Speech_Female> Streamline <Speech_Female> these things so that they stay <Speech_Female> supportive and <Speech_Female> not draining of those <Speech_Female> energy pennies. <Speech_Female> Okay. This <Speech_Female> sort of leads beautifully <Speech_Female> to the quote. <Speech_Female> So here <Speech_Female> are words of wisdom <Speech_Female> for Belkessam. Here we go. <Speech_Female> Quote for many <Speech_Female> writers reading <Speech_Female> fills the bolt. <Speech_Female> Especially, <Speech_Female> if you have a personality <Speech_Female> tends towards <Speech_Female> consumption <Speech_Female> of resources <Speech_Female> as food <Speech_Female> for your creativity, <Speech_Female> if you are a person <Speech_Female> who needs to learn <Speech_Female> or research <Speech_Female> in order to produce <Speech_Female> then. Then, learn <Speech_Female> if you are person <Speech_Female> who needs to read <Speech_Female> fiction in order <Speech_Female> to feel immersed in <Speech_Female> new worlds. Then <Speech_Female> read if <Speech_Female> you are a person who needs <Speech_Female> to play video games <Speech_Female> in order to allow <Speech_Female> the back of your brain <Speech_Female> to be creatively <Speech_Female> inactive <Speech_Female> than do that. <Speech_Female> The things we <Speech_Female> often call procrastination <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> for most of us, <Speech_Female> the energy producing <Speech_Female> activities that we <Speech_Female> actually need <Speech_Female> in order to maintain <Silence> our pace <Speech_Female> and quote. <Speech_Female> So. It's a tricky <Speech_Female> thing, and this is why she <Speech_Female> wants to really dig <Speech_Female> into some of these questions. That's <Speech_Female> why I said <Speech_Female> the book is Meaty <Speech_Female> Take Your time with <Speech_Female> it short. <Speech_Female> But you need to do a <Speech_Female> lot of heavy lifting and thinking <Speech_Female> which things <Speech_Female> give the appearance <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> being restorative <Speech_Female> or you think that <Speech_Female> they would be. But <Speech_Female> actually our drains and <Speech_Female> which things do you think <Speech_Female> are procrastination <Speech_Female> and draining <Speech_Female> an actually kind <Speech_Female> of. These <Speech_Female> questions you have to <Speech_Female> work through there is no <Speech_Female> one size, fits <Speech_Female> all activity <Speech_Female> for every kind <Speech_Female> of writer. So I <Speech_Female> this is why like <Speech_Female> her she makes <Speech_Female> you do a little bit of heavy <Speech_Female> lifting and get to <Speech_Female> the core of it and I <Speech_Female> think if you can do that. <Speech_Female> Then <SpeakerChange> everything <Speech_Female> else kind of falls <Speech_Female> into place a little easier <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I. Hope this was <Speech_Female> helpful <Speech_Female> and consider picking <Speech_Female> it up and seeing <Speech_Female> if from <Speech_Female> time to time like me, <Speech_Female> you can <Speech_Female> revisit it when <Speech_Female> you feel yourself <Speech_Female> sliding toward burnout. <Speech_Female> Okay. In the next <Silence> episode. <Speech_Female> August thirteenth <Speech_Female> I will <Speech_Female> be reviewing <Speech_Female> your Book Your <Speech_Female> Brand by Dana <Speech_Female> K, it's <Speech_Female> the August business <Speech_Female> episode. I. Don't know how <Speech_Female> August. Already. <Speech_Female> If you found <Speech_Female> this information <Speech_Female> useful, you might <Speech_Female> also like said, <Speech_Female> considered checking <Speech_Female> out Becca, Sims YouTube <Speech_Female> channel. There are <Speech_Female> playlist <Speech_Female> that correspond to <Speech_Female> each of her books <Speech_Female> which include <Speech_Female> deer writer <Silence> you need to quit. <Speech_Female> Dear <Silence> writer, you're doing it <Speech_Female> wrong. Dear, <Speech_Female> writer. Are you in <Speech_Female> writer's block and <Speech_Female> finally the one we <Speech_Female> today year writer? Are <Speech_Female> you in burnout? If <Speech_Female> you enjoy crime <Speech_Female> fantasy <Speech_Female> horror, <Speech_Female> literary <Speech_Female> mystery Sifi <Speech_Female> suspense, <Speech_Female> or thriller. Fiction <Speech_Female> think <Speech_Female> about, swing over and catching <Speech_Female> my unsettling <Speech_Female> reads podcast <Speech_Female> robin able <Speech_Female> and I offer spoiler <Speech_Female> free reviews <Speech_Female> of books in <Speech_Female> these genres. Last <Speech_Female> week, we <Speech_Female> reviewed the faceless <Speech_Female> old woman <Speech_Female> who secretly lives in your <Speech_Female> home, which was <Speech_Female> robbins pick it was fantastic. <Speech_Female> Goes <Speech_Female> out and see what we had <Speech_Female> to say remember spoiler <Speech_Female> free. So we just <Speech_Female> give taste <Speech_Female> if

writer Belkessam robbins Becca
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

05:52 min | Last week

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hi, welcome to Season Two, episode, twenty, eight of the rookie writer show, I'm Easter Brown and I'm your host today, we're GONNA be talking about dear, writer. Are you in Burnout by Becca Sim? This is the second book reviewed by author. BECCA SIM. She is the woman behind the better. Faster Academy which classes and individual coaching for writers. In addition, she produces a writing productivity podcast and Youtube series of her own called the quick cast for the past few years. She's been co hosting a book marketing show as well. She earned a couple of Master's degrees in coaching related fields as worked with thousands of authors, many of them pulling in six and seven figure incomes. To make it clear though that she does not in any way promise that you'll reach income if you read her books, but it doesn't hurt back, it will be the first one to tell you that her communication style isn't of the blow sunshine up your Wasi variety as I said last time, but she delivers the kind of advice you probably need to hear and a clear an often. Often humorous way. She's not without empathy for your situation. She just isn't interested in letting you shine yourself on either she wants to give you the kinds of tools to start coaching your cell to the levels of productivity that are right for you. She emphatically states in her books are not meant to be full of tips and tricks to get you optimized in a certain way that. That mimic someone else's it's instead designed to get you to ask yourself deep questions, and like she says, in the blurb for this book, she says quote if you are overwhelmed tired frustrated with your career or your sales if you're stuck or stalled come, enjoy me inside these pages and we'll talk about why why is key? We've got this. It's tackle. -able. Let's just get you out. Out of the pit and quote, this is a short book. It's only a hundred and sixty six pages, but it's a medium one. So give yourself time to digest the different points that she's making in each section. I'm not going to be able to cover all of them here, but here are my three things. First recognizing bad cycles is the first step to freeing yourself from them. So. As the saying goes knowing, the source of the problem is half the battle. Many of US set ourselves up with unrealistic expectations which serve as the foundation for what Sim refers to as essential pain. When we can't bend the reality of our lives to the expectations, these unrealistic expectations that we set for ourselves. Then we feel discomfort and we're naturally moved to soothe it because he likes to feel discomfort a Lotta. Times. The approach that we take toward soothing can lead to more essential pain and there you are. There's your loop. Okay. Number two limitless is just a Bradley Cooper movie. It's not a way of life knowing is only half the battle. So that was good number one, but next you need to get smart about your resources so she urges to. To. Think about this in terms of finite units of energy or what she refers to as energy pennies. This kind of reminds me of the spoons approach. You've heard of that anyway, every time you make a decision or create something anything along those lines, you're using up these energy pennies. So it's possible to run through your natural daily supply,.

Becca Sim writer US Wasi Faster Academy Easter Brown Youtube Bradley Cooper Sim
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Read the one page expert from a publication step two for each point is to read the discussion around the expert where no points out specific strategy your technique that he's highlighting there and then step three, and this one is key, and while of this book is for you to try out the exercise now you do it, so knowledge also highlight the good thing about this versus. We're shopping for instances if you mess. Mess Up, no one will yell at you. It's just you this book and your story so very low pressure. He's developed these exercises and others to highlight these strategies through his many years teaching writing and reading his own stories he finds this is far more effective in helping himself and other writers uncovered their own best writing than quote, pontificating and spouting off after the writing is over and done with about the craft or the process or the art and quote my third takeaway, there are no rules fiction, but there are strategies so I think it's tempting to think that if you can just learn. Learn enough some magic set of perfect rules that you can write the perfect work, but then as soon as you learn some end, all be all rule. Someone comes along and rights of beautiful piece of work that flies directly in the face of the quote. Unquote rule were choice matters here, so strategies are different, the defines them as a plan of action or policy designed to achieve a major or overall aim. It's a plan of action. A plan of action can be tried adapted to your own situation to your own story to your own style of writing a ruling contrast suggests a certain. Certain amount of inflexibility, there's a reason that rules are often paired with regulations rules. Ask you to adapt your fiction to serve them whereas strategies to serve you to helps cover the best way to get to sharing your story, so I like that that I think all right the hack. He urges us to pay attention to the places where we skim. He believes that it's the best way to detect where the writer whether it's us or someone else. has quote stopped telling a story and is doing something else like describing setting character, plot or conflict and quote instead of using those things to. To move the story forward whereas he puts it quote, don't look for setting look for the parts where place drives the story forward where character and.

writer
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"We're GONNA be talking about overcoming writer's block with Dave or CEELO. It's another class offered on the creative life platform. Which as you know. I love along with masterclass Kanda Class Junkie. Anyway or solo host the written spoken podcast and has authored several books including before you quit reading. Read this. He produces a free twice monthly newsletter called chronicles of the self storied life. Which you can sign up for his website. He also produces the occasional online course and does speaking of its. He describes his work. This way quote. I spend my days immersed and transformative conversations as a life coach a writing and creativity coach and as a communication strategist story consultant working with creative self starters and service minded professionals who wanNA leave legacies of love in their wake. So he's very intentional. He's very thoughtful about people getting workout. There I like that about him. There's a lot here but like usual. I'm just here to give you a taste. So here are my three things number one everything you have done everything you're doing and everything you will do are all part of you and by extension no one part of your life your past or your present or your feature represents all that you're capable of so get hung up on any of it so if you're spending a lot of time thinking about what you haven't done yet or what you're not doing right now. Don't let that be something that blocks you let it be just a piece of all that you're capable of and release that grip on attaching identity to any one of those three things because they only make up a piece number. Two fighting against your feelings will often backfire. If you try to shame yourself out of your feelings they'll only grow deeper roots. Essentially so absent writing programs like those built around word count so the ones that punish you stop writing could actually had more anxiety and set you back. Further for some people feel bad about some stuff and then you adopt one of these more punishing or strict formats. It can actually backfire and add more anxiety and three off even further so if someone else whereas by a word count or a time goal or whatever that you actually find causes you to produce less work when you use it be glad that it works for them and then ditch it basically or solo urges to always choose what supports you here and now. That's the only way to get your work done so it's working for you use. It isn't don't seems really simple. But it's amazing. How many of these things we get. Sorta we lash ourselves like the massive ship. We just lash herself to a certain like I have to write this many words a day or I have to write this many times a week or whatever it is and you just need to do what works for you to be able to get out your good work me Dave pillow. Give you permission to do what supports you here and now okay number three own the identity of being a writer but not just a writer so I love this because it hearkens all the way back to one of the first episodes of the rookie ratio where I urge all writers to practice calling themselves. Writers practice introducing themselves as authors etc. I like it takes us one step further and then says that while quote titles and labels help us relate to one another on a very simple level they never capture the full human that you are end quote. So you're a writer. Yes and you're also a friend and somebody's child and maybe somebody's soulmate. Parent boss mentor neighbor. Whatever you're not going to be killing it in every area of your life every minute of every day. Don't forget to honor all the parts of yourself and the way that you contribute to this world not just what you're contributing to literary or whatever can okay. It's just one piece but it is a peace and honor it and keep that part alive but just not putting so much pressure on can ease up. Some of the Raiders Block. Sometimes okay. Here'S THE HECK. If you're struggling to get started or finish ask yourself the following question and then see where things take you here it is. What have I been avoiding lately? So the question is what have I been avoiding lately? Maybe Journal about it. You might be surprised to learn what's actually blocking you. Why have you been avoiding that thing and not something else? What can it teach you? Are you afraid to finish? Are you afraid to start? Are you bored with what you're working on? Is it not reflective of what you want? Who knows dig around in there and see if there's some reason and if it's if it's a reason like I'm afraid this might not be very good or I'm afraid no one would like this then balance that out with the cost of you never producing it and how much worse that would be balance it out with regret of having never tried and ask yourself which is worse that maybe somebody doesn't spoiler alert. Somebody's not going to like it or that. You never did it. Think about which one of those things is actually worse. That's a little extra there hack. Okay I love these encouraging. Words from Davis. Illo here they come quote all we can do though is answer the call. Answer the call we are to. We Are Messengers carriers of ideas and stories. We are shepherds of messages. That's a really divine thing and a very special opportunity that we all possess. It doesn't mean that we're better than anyone else who isn't a writer or creative. But it means that this is a really powerful gift that we have to usher ideas from the invisible realm from the intangible plane into the physical world even if that's in the space of your own journal even if that's just your own journey of self actualization being your whole and bestself which means that everybody around you is actually gonNA benefit from it quote. Even if they don't read it they still benefit from it. Because they you become more of yourself you become a happier more full version of yourself like so many of these other courses. There's a lot more to dig into an an overview. The class tells you that you can expect to learn And this is quoting from the creative lie page. You can expect to learn from this class. How to conquer the fear guilt and shame that block your creative writing how to focus on your inner game instead of fixating on your outer game how to sidestep your tendencies toward indecision and overwhelm had a source. Your Voice from other writers creatives teachers had overcome impostor syndrome by being seen nixing self comparison and Yo- kicking into your true self. I picked up this class. As part of creative lives Nanno Raimondo. Bundle about a year ago and it goes for seventeen bucks right now. If you go straight through the lessons on this particular class it will take you about an hour and a half with most lessons. Lasting between five and ten minutes he also throws in downloadable. Pdf copy of all the slides of the presentation. I have a creative live APP on my phone. Ipad and creative live is also available anywhere. You can get a web browser. I've stream classes using all these methods and had great success. So you can pick. You can pretty much do it anywhere you might WANNA consider checking out. Some of those other books published his lead without followers platform for more on the topics of creativity productivity and flow the titles include power from within God whispers on the wind lead without followers. And I am we a book of poems you can get all these things There's links on my website both to Amazon or also to the rookie. Riders Bookshop on bookshop which benefits local bookshops which. I love anyway next week. I'll be reviewing publish and thrive by Sarah Cannon which is offered through her heart breathing's platform using the teachable platform. So something new and other dare news fellow author Robin can able and I recently posted a new episode of our new podcast. Unsettling reads come check at our spoiler free review of Megan Giddings Lakewood. It's another local BLOOMINGTON. Another debut we could not have been more excited about it anyway. Browser other reviews of books from the crime fantasy horror literary mystery.

writer Dave pillow Amazon Raiders Sarah Cannon Riders Bookshop consultant Journal Megan Giddings Robin BLOOMINGTON Nanno Raimondo Davis Lakewood
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

09:11 min | 6 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"On things like Query letters author websites and more an all these links are in the show notes so go look for him admittedly. I didn't read this whole book. But that's because it's so well organized the only reason you would need to read every word of this book if you're not sure yet what kind of writing you're interested in doing and you're still open to learning about all of them. In my case I know that I WANNA indie publish my novels. So I skipped the sections dealing with traditional book-publishing like queering for an agent for my book things like that and anything to do with nonfiction book publishing because I read fiction so things like submitting a book proposal. I want to submit my stories. Essays to traditional markets like literary journals and contests so I read the relevant sections there and produce a podcast which is essentially an audio blog. So I read that chapter. I plan to occasionally submit articles based on the research. I do for my novels and podcasts. So I read the sections related to publishing to trade journals and commercial magazines in March. Two talented writer friends of mine and I will be launching inkster author services and I'll be offering developmental edits and manuscript critiques. So I read the chapters related to freelance editing and freely And freelancing in general but I completely ignored the corporate media careers chapter because I know not open to that right now. Eventually I'll offer classes focused on productivity and craft for the genres in which I write so I read the chapter on teaching but I skimmed the sections that focused on teaching at the university level. Because I know that's not a good fit for me so you get the picture. This is all by way of saying that. There is a lot of good info in this book. But you probably won't need to read it. All here are my three things related to things that interest me for my writing career number one on the topic of indie versus traditional publishing. Not Too long ago. There simply wasn't a great option for taking the Indy Path in publishing but a couple of huge developments have happened in the industry to change that I print on demand or P. OD technology started producing books of quality rivals that of conventionally printed books. This means that now authors can publish their books without a huge investment for print run on the front end secondly Amazon decided to jump into the ring and like anything that Amazon decides to do it completely has ripple effects and changes everything so in the early twenty tens. They introduced the kindle direct program the Katie P program which allowed authors to directly published their books for free within a matter of hours versus the months or even years that it takes to traditionally published a novel and in turn the authors can also keep up to seventy percent of the sales price of their books. Which is a much higher royalty rate. Then again you get in the traditionally published arena So that's one at the same time. The big five traditional publishers were laying off people and there are now a huge number of experienced and talented editors and proofreaders. Who HAVE GONE FREELANCE? So in the author's can now avail themselves of the same sort of editing process that traditionally published books go through which is a good thing number two not so much has changed however when it comes to publishing your short stories and essays while there might be fewer printed journals than there once was there are more online outlets than ever and there's also more indie published. Short story anthologies. So if you're interested in publishing in this way the main thing to remember is that you are usually submitting the whole manuscript for consideration along with a cover letter. That hasn't changed and the cover letter should introduce your story. Share your relevant experiences and make the case for why you think your piece would be a good fit for this journal or contest. She includes a sampler to there are two developments worth noting in addition I the omnipresent submittal which has now become the standard for most literary journal. Submissions charges the journals for the use of their program so in turn these journals now. Charged writers a few bucks to help cover their expenses so while free. Submissions are still possible. They're not necessarily. The norm and small. Entry fee is no longer a red flag that you are submitting to a scam or Sham or journal. I should note that setting up a submittal. Count is both easy and free for writers. There is no monthly or annual subscription. Cost you'll only incur fees associated with the journals that you submit to okay. The second thing that's developed within this area of publishing to Traditionally publishing short stories and essays to literary journals like is that the days of only submitting a story to one time are mostly behind us. The lion's share of outlets now accept simultaneous submissions. Do Double Check the Journal or contest listings. Just in case you are happing upon one of them that doesn't but for the most part most journals and contests do accept simultaneous submission. So you don't have to wait to hear back on a story before sending it out somewhere else however once it is accepted somewhere. Make sure that you let the other journals no asap so that your name's not mud at that journal going forward okay. Just so that they don't get excited about it. Knife got two offers. And you don't know what to do because you've got you. You'RE GONNA have to disappoint somebody. Okay number three thing for me. The process for submitting articles to magazines and trade journals has probably changed. The least the process remains more or less the same as it's always been so unless you're assigned articles by a particular editor publication that you've developed a relationship with you'll pitch articles with the pitch process. You don't submit the manuscript for consideration but instead outlined the idea usually in an e mail Friedman recommends that your pitch reflect the style of the publication. You're targeting and in addition. She says it's important to leave with a strong short hook. Twenty five words or less demonstrate that you've done some of the key research or at least have access to it highlight any writing credentials. You have and list any expenses you expect will need to be covered for the To create story if any then prepare yourself for inevitable rejections because they are a normal part of freelance life even for in demand freelancers as soon as you get a rejection rework pitch and send it back out to another outlet again reflecting the vibe of that publication. Okay for your hack. I'm sure there was a million little tricks But I decided to go with more of a conceptual hack this time. So it is. I wanted to give you a succinct definition of platform. Because that's really what a lot of this comes to and so here's how she defines. It platform is an ability to secure paid writing opportunities or sell books products and services because of who you are or who you reach more thoughts on that. Here's another quote from. Her platform does not develop overnight. You aren't going to finish reading this book. Follow a three step formula and Presto have platform and be done not raiders platforms are developed in the same way or have exactly the same components. Think of your platform as a fingerprint. Your background education and Network Effect. What your platform looks like. In the beginning luck is also going to play a role but for most writers platform is an organic result of building visibility in their community and developing readership for their work. And that takes time. Okay the book is a very standard three hundred and twenty pages and packed packed full of detailed information on just about every type of writing stream or pursuit that you could think of. I've given you a mostly top view of three things that caught my attention for my career. But she's rate about walking you through the process of getting out there and just about every Writing Arena it's also great about including concrete examples of things like contracts query letters Pitch letters things like that. The thing I like about this week's book is that it gives you a lot to think about in terms of the directions. You WanNa go just putting together. This episode helped me fine tuned and be able to say in sync ways the types of writing interested in and the types that. I'm not the type I WANNA do right now and the types that I'll do later and that includes other products and services like editing or teaching classes and things like that. It's a great book one hundred percent recommended. I don't think you'll be sorry if you love Jane. Friedman another way that you can go is to obviously sign up for her free newsletter. You should absolutely do that. Think about signing up for the hot sheet. She also has a class on great courses called how to publish your book. Which again if you keep an eye on great courses. They have sales on things. If don't pay the full price that would be crazy. I hope this was helpful to you. Come back next week and here my three things and a hack and a quote from Lisa Crumbs how to nail the first pages which is a class on live so until then happy rating people..

Friedman Amazon Katie P inkster writer Lisa Crumbs editor Presto
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

12:38 min | 7 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hey everybody welcome to the rookie writer show. I am changing things up on you a little bit. We are starting season two today. I've started a new challenge for myself where I am going to be reading. Fifty two writing books this year one for every week of the year and then in turn I will be sharing some of the highlights from those books in each episode. You can expect the format follow very much like this one will be. which is that that she will get an introduction to the author? So you have some idea who's offering you their advice and expertise a brief overview. What kind of book you're dealing with as an is it looking at productivity or craft or business aspects of writing there will be a maximum of three and only three major suggestions or points that they make in the the book and one tip that I gleaned from it so beyond that? It'll be up to you to decide whether or not the book sounds like something you'd like to delve into further. So that is the intro for the new season. So welcome to season two episode. One enough for the INTRO. Let's get into it. So Oh for my inaugural book. I chose I loved it. It was called dear writer. You need to quit. It's written by. Becca Sim and published in twenty. Nine thousand nine. It's actually part of a three part series and I have a feeling I'm going to be reading the other two because I very much enjoyed this one but before we get into the other two. Oh let's follow the format so I I'm going to introduce a little bit about the author. She is the woman behind the better faster academy which offers classes and individual coaching for writers. She also keeps pretty busy. Doing a writing productivity podcast of her own That shows shows up on Youtube as well as on most podcast carriers. It's called the quit. CAST for the past few years. She's also been co hosting a book. Marketing podcast called Smarty Pants Book Marketing. Believe and she'll soon be launching dear BECA which is a weekly coaching column. She's under a couple of Master's degrees in coaching related fields and she's worked with thousands of authors many of them pulling in six and seven figure annual incomes so impressive. She seems like she might be somebody who knows what she's talking about. Let let me be clear. She does not in any way. Promise that you will reach the income of some of her clients. In fact I would say that Becca might be the first person to tell you. Communication style isn't one of below sunshine up your zoo She delivers the kind of advice. You probably need to hear in a clear but humorous way off. She is I would say she's not without empathy for your situation but she just kind of isn't interested in letting you shine yourself on either. She's really was reluctant to write the book honestly because she thinks of herself as a coach I she has been an author before she spent on that road. She has written fiction So she does understand where you're coming from. She was a little bit reluctant to write this book because she thinks that each person is so unique and that actually one coaching or small group. Coaching is the best way to get someone where they WANNA go. But that obviously limits number of people she can work with so instead what this book tries to do is to capture a lot of the approaches that she used when she's working with clients in hopes that you can glean enough from it to help coach yourself if you like Lisa Kron approached applauding. If if you've ever read any of her books you're probably GonNa like this Book it dips into brain science a little bit Becca dips into it gives you a hint of what is behind the theories but doesn't really get into it very deeply in fact. This is a pretty lean book. I'll reference that later. She she would emphatically state dozen her book that this is not a book of tips and tricks. It's a book designed to get you to ask yourself deep and hard questions about about which writing path best suits your strengths and interests. She's not interested in offering a prescriptive one-size-fits-all despite her own experiences. In fact she views anybody who does do that with a or those programs with a little bit of a wary eye as she mentioned the book she does not buy into a silver bullet solution to anyone's reading woes. Because no matter what worked for someone else it may or may not work for you because you are your own individual blend of environment personality writing platform the resources that you have hand and your existing tendencies habits and patterns earns so her approach again is born out of the fact that she's first and foremost a coach and she really wants you to start thinking about a couple of Questions and that's sort of how the structure mostly this book is asking you to quit things and you can pick this up from the chapter. Titles The table able contents things like quick thinking in a vacuum or quit focusing on your weaknesses or quit ignoring the past quick-thinking facebook is your friend acquitting knowing reality things like this But I would say that if there was something that ran through it as a single core or notion that jumped out to me. It was this and this is one of the three things I she really wants you to question the premise OR CUTE EP. She likes to refer to it She uses the throughout the book. Going back to like a touchstone. If you've been listening to the rookie writer show I'd say it's fairly analogous analogous to my get Meta and what's going on there with the key T. p.. She's really asking you to slow down long enough to actually ask the right questions of your situation to poke and prod your sumptious a little so that you don't run around trying to solve the wrong problems or even create problems. That aren't even they're so cutie. Pie questioned the premise. The second big thing that jumped out at me. That was sort of an overarching thing. I took away with it. Is that she. You believe there are four steps to transformation. That's kind of what she focused on her graduate studies. So would that she sees this as four steps and she uses a really great example in the book which I will not reveal because I wanted to be nice price for you She believes that knowledge is half the battle and it is certainly step one of any transformation part of getting getting the right knowledge is going back to that. Cute EP questioning the premise. To make sure you're actually getting the best information that you have there the second step in the transformation according to her is that you get your support around you get your crew around you. You're going to need it. And the third part of transformation is making a plan plan for when things get tough. Because they're going to get tough. How are you going to deal with rejection? How are you gonNA deal with on we? How are you going to deal with writer's block? How are you going to deal with money worries or being overwhelmed? How are you going to deal with being able to sit in a chair for a while every day? Just finding those ways to do the things that you need to do making a plan for it and then finally executing it pulling the trigger in fact. That's her last chapter is urging you to quit preparing an actually. Just pull the trigger so the third of the three things that I'm GonNA highlight from this book is that transformation is really really hard. That's why only a small percentage of efforts to change behaviors or successful according to them. You're fighting against a lot of patterns of behavior that worn grooves in your brain. You're fighting a lot of established circuitry in your brain. But I love what she says about the occasional difficulty of writing here comes. It's a great quote because resistance is conflict which causes tension strife frustration. Consternation we see it in our books all the the time the differences as storytellers. We know how to make conflict productive yet in our own lives we reject conflict instead of embracing it for what it can offer for us learning what we can releasing our emotions and getting the work done. Now it's really understandable if you are trying to avoid difficulty if you're trying trying to feel like things should not be painful or uncomfortable that's just your lizard brain kind of looking out for you but if you want to be yeah writer. There's going to be times that this is going to be a little tough. She's given you a lot of ways to look at the issues that are holding you back Jack. Having you probe if things that you might need to quit before you can move forward to jettison from your writing habits and approaches I one hundred percent recommend men this one. It's a slim book. It's only two hundred eight pages and I picked it up on Amazon kindle for I think less than five dollars because it was on sale but it packs a good good punch and I'm so excited to discover that BECA SAM has so many other offerings of already caught one of her quick cast episodes on Youtube while I was making dinner the other night and it was also totally worthwhile. Okay one tip. I picked up from her book. Despite her aversion to offering sort of things is this considered setting up a time trekker because remember knowledge is half the battle right. So I've done time tracking before using just downloaded sheet from another Time management expert and while it's useful to write down what you've done every day and you know obviously that's include the things that where you're not on your computer but if you set up a time tracker on your devices It runs automated while you're doing your work in the background. And then generates Anna rates reports of how and where you spent your digital time. which is your work time which may answer a lot of questions about why you're not getting more work done? So she recommended one called Green Tomatoes with a T. O. M. A. T. S.. I actually had trouble getting that one to work very well. I found an article reviewing time. Trekker Trekker APPS for Twenty Twenty Lincoln show notes and after reading those. I chose rescue time. I've been using it for about a week and I really really like it. It's taught me a lot about how I'm actually using my time versus how I think I'm using my time and that is only going to help me build the kinds of habits I wanted i. I want to develop when the thing rescue time. If you go that route someone kind of cool thing about it. Works across my devices with one account. It's a free forever free account and and So I don't see what I'm doing on my computer. I see what I'm doing on my phone my ipad as well so that's kind of cool because I can't kind of cheat which I've done before with other kinds of trackers and blockers by using another device at the same time I know it's shameful anyway later in the year. I'll probably be reading her other two books. The series I've included them in the show notes as well in case. You can't stand the suspense. They are dear writer. Are you in burnout and derived or you're doing it wrong. I hope this was. It's helpful to you. I started this podcast initially because I wanted to put out there something that would have been useful to me when I was starting wording out. I've been messing around with writing in one way or another for about two decades and I don't see any reason that it should take you two decades to learn what I've learned so far so I'm always going to be learning. I'm super excited about this NEW SEASON I'm super excited about this challenge. I will say say that every once in a while I may throw in a class instead of a book. So it's fifty two books or classes because I have a tendency to do both I'm always gonNA keep learning always gonNA trying to get better. I hope that this has been fun and useful for you. If you have any suggestions for books that you are Thinking would be good ones to review semi an email addresses info at the rookie writer dot net or the rookie writer show. Oh on Djamil. Next week I'm going to be applying the same approach to real artists. Don't starve by JEFF COINS SO I hope you'll come back. Thanks for listening until next time heavier adding people..

writer Becca Sim Youtube Lisa Kron Twenty Twenty Lincoln facebook Amazon Pie Anna O. M. A. T. S
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

07:50 min | 8 months ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Today. We're going to be talking about balancing the big and small pictures in your writing life. We are at the cusp of the Star brand new decade. And it's tough for me to get my head around. I would say that it's Kinda snuck up on me. In fact I think the in the past I would have made a bigger deal about this benchmark It would've felt like a fortuitous start. I've always been a real big fan of stuff like that. I love New Year's resolutions lines and birthday check INS and the start of school years and even the starter semesters I'm a sucker for all those sorts of benchmarks and beginnings. I love that feeling of pulling back enough to examine my circumstances any upcoming decisions that I may be facing checking with. Your work is only useful. If you're chugging along in the direction action you actually want to go right so for a long time. I've had the dream of applying the kind of work I used to do for nonprofits things like facilitating strategic planning efforts. Parts to writing so I wanted to convert that process of things like strategic planning into a tool that would be useful for writers and so I started started with the things I knew about strategic planning for organizations and then I filled up an entire file cabinet and bookshelf with resources that it involves some aspect of strategic thinking for writers. It's how I started thinking of topics in terms of breaking it into the five W. H. Approach which as a reminder asks who are you as a writer what do you want to rate. When are you going to do that writing? Where are you going to do that? Writing and using what tools. Why are you inspired to do that? Specific type of writing what motivates in sustains you and how are you going to maintain your health and well being throughout the process us so eventually putting together a course and writing retreats to help walk people through this process but for now. Let me recommend someone else's efforts to help writers in much the same way. I've mentioned it before and here it comes again Syra. Cannon is my virtual mentor and experienced an accomplished writer. She's generous generous. And engaging as a writing coach even a virtual reading coach. She's not actually my reading coach her. HP Ninety system and her publishing thrive programs have both really helped me mentally as a bedrock of her system she advises quarterly planning and given my predilection for these sorts of events that I talked about the New Year's Eve birthdays and the beginnings of decades and things like that become a real. Dot Of this approach myself this quarterly. Planning it just gives me four times as many opportunities to do what I like to do anyway. So while it all sounds really dry and businesses quarterly planning and seemingly at odds with creativity. I've found the following benefits. Basically get four times. As many years eves as I used as to and a lot of ways I was always trying to create those opportunities to systematically check in with myself and the path that I'm taking quarterly planning just gives you those four chances to make sure you're still oh working on the things that matter and it also makes it so that you only have to worry about the stuff that you've decided to work on. This quarter knowing that other quarters will be coming with new projects. New things that you're going to focus on so it helps me. Keep my mind on the big picture of the general directions. I WANNA go but minds minds the smaller details of the things. I've signed to myself for this quarter so they don't spend my time worrying about my whole career every single day. If that makes any sense this quarterly planning also house else. We keep an eye on the details. My husband always says that we're a team because I'm good about getting Meta and thinking about if what we're doing is supportive of our dreams and goals and he's really great at keeping an and I on the details and day to day routines because that latter skill doesn't come as naturally to me. I find the quarterly. Planning is a useful and supportive tool to reinforce skills that I do have an only bolsters my attempts to pay attention to those daily day to day routines. I also get four times as many chances to check in with myself and celebrate what have accomplished over a three month period and so I have a tendency to think in terms of what I didn't do rather than in terms of what I did and I also have a tendency to think that I should be able to do everything right now in fact today in fact yesterday so patients isn't always one of my strong suits and it's one of the best things I can do for myself as to have these quarterly check INS. That remind me even though I didn't get everything anything I wanted to do. Done a lot of work done in areas that matter to me and I know that it's the things that matter to me because I took some time at the beginning of each quarter to stop and reflect act on where I wanted to go and what I thought I could reasonably get done over the next three months so in summary for balancing the big picture and the day to day details of your reading dating life. I heartily endorse the following strategies. I consider giving Syra cannons. HP Ninety Program. Look and see if that's something that can be helpful to you. She does these these boot camps. Every quarter can walk you through how she comes at this quarterly planning. If that's not something that's available to you than she does have a planner planner available on Nazi that includes as part of it. The quarterly program worksheets. That will walk you through a lot of that thinking. And that's how I started started. I loved it and then I ended up signing up for one of our BOOT camps. which once you do you have lifetime access to that course and the community that she meet there that are also going through it? So that's Kinda cool. 'cause more raiders. Whether or not you do Syra cannons. HP Ninety program do strongly encourage you to try out quarterly planning that basically involves at the beginning of every three months give yourself at the minimum and our and ideally a little longer to stop and think about what big things you hope to accomplish -CCOMPLISH over the next season basically. And how you think you're going to be able to do it like looking realistically at your time and the resources that you have to dedicate to it right now. Now give yourself doable goals for just that quarter and then think about the sorts of tasks that would be required to get you across that line. Then once you've done that Matt Make yourself a realistic list. Give that quarterly. Planning a try and then trust yourself throughout the throughout those three months to know that the person who thought through these things was probably thinking of the whole picture more than you might be in that day today. Situation the third thing I would suggest so. The first was considered trying out. Sarah's program program. The second is trying out quarterly. Planning whether or not it's with her and the third thing is try out different ways of tracking your day-to-day efforts. If you don't like super structured approaches she's no worries trial bullet journaling. There's a class by Lisa Khandan on creative live. Show walk you through one way to come at. It is a little less structured if you are more comfortable with a more structured method than there are a number of writing planners on Oetzi. I have a list of ones that I've tried out and then used to create my own version and I've listed those links are there. Some of the names are the HP ninety method which have already recommended the author monthly planner by espe planner the ultimate authorship shit planner by audrey principles and the ultimate business planner by my life plans. I took all of these and a couple of things and then some of the research that I mentioned before I put them all together. I reorganized things. I tried some things out. I tested it with some other writers. I made some revisions and the result. Zolt is I have the second edition of the rookie writer. Playbook which is a writers planner organizer and that's also available on the links on my website if you go directly to at sea it's under the ricky writer shop so give some of these tactics to try see if they can help you to keep an eye on the horizon and what's right in front of you in January. We're going to be looking at the editing process. This should be extra useful if you have a rough or maybe not so rough draft something. You've been working on for a while. I hope you'll come back until then happy writing people..

writer HP Syra W. H. Approach Cannon Oetzi Zolt Lisa Khandan Matt Sarah
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"I don't know if i've ever rewarded myself. My reward is the thrill of getting to getting to work on it. <hes> you know the i will say that my twitter bio says writing to avoid burnout since two thousand seven and and you know there's a certain truth to that i am better at what i do during the day because of what i get to do in those stolen moments you know it's almost like a it's almost like a tryst with a lover. You know you you get you get to you get to spend time with us and you get to create and for people who love to control their environment like people in my profession due to be able to actually control the environment is a fun thing i i like all the outcomes can come out just the way you wanted them to exactly or more importantly the outcomes to come out in a way that should make sense right you know because i wanted to write a superhero book. You know but i didn't want but i wanted to have a little psychological depth to it. You know oh carl. Carl jung meets superman. You know i mean it you know what are the psychological consequences you know. Would you heal the world if you knew you destroyed yourself in the process and you know and it was it was a mental challenge in you know i became. I became this person about ten years ago. That said i'm tired of living my life to acquire do things and to do this. I want to evolve. I wanna make myself better and writing allows me to do that. I can visibly see myself getting better and that's a gift in and of itself. I don't you know i don't i've never been one to dangle carrots carrots in front of myself i just i just can't do it to <hes> <hes> the the the writing is its own reward in my opinion my last question in is this have you brought in thought about bringing in reinforcements in terms of like a critique partner or a developmental editor or a book coach or anything along those lines to help you will. It's it's interesting you ask. It's interesting you ask that because you know i i think there's a possibility ability of you know critique groups in the future for me because i want to get out there a little bit but interestingly enough the the couple who bater at the the rough draft the first draft <hes> go to church with a gal who was in publishing and editing so so i have so i have a little bit of a resource resources there that i'm going to reach out to and say hey maybe you can help my query pop a little bit you know and i remember the time when i thought author writing a book was hard and most people would say boy. I bet writing a book as hard and i said not near as hard as the business of getting it out there. You know you know it's it's funny. I said i told more than one person. The hardest part is the next step. <hes> you know you think oh my god. This was so hard you know like and revising this thing is hard and then i was like no revising things not so hard querying an agent hard and i'm sure if an agent offers is to represent me. I'm going to find out that getting. This book pitched publishers as hard and then if i get a book deal then i'm going to find out that dealing with an editor hard hard or you know having to write the ending twenty three times like a teacher in one of my classes had to do in her novels coming out next year. I ah i make no bones about the fact that the hardest part is the next step underneath and then the next time you go to write something. He won't be nearly as afraid yeah. I think that that's really insightful and i just i just hope that i never lose the enthusiasm for creating a world and do in doing things with it. You know maybe i'm i don't wanna change the world with my writing. I'd just wanna bring some smiles at some people's faces and you know allow them to escape apor world. That can sometimes be a little overwhelming if you had to offer one piece of advice to somebody like you. Maybe a few years ago the you that the u minus three to five years. What would you say. There's a lot of power in first steps the boy how do i how do i articulate this putting yourself <music> out there as the single greatest thing you can do for yourself. You know i'm a you. Gotta believe that the great thing can happen. Maybe you know and yea the time's going to pass anyway. You know don't don't live your life with regrets. I guess that's the biggest bit of advice would do because we all say we're gonna do things all the time and the people that they ride stories about are the people that actually do thank you so much for that. Thank you so much for being willing to do this. I i think that <hes> i know that if i had heard this interview a few years ago it would have been immensely helpful to me. Just your you have a lot of experience and insight on this process in this journey and i think that <hes> i think until you actually get a chance to hear other writers especially writers at the beginning talking about some of the same fears or the same hurdles or whatever you know struggles that you have they they feel unique to you and they feel lake. Sometimes that makes them feel. More insurmountable feels like there's something wrong with you. You are meant to be a writer or you. Don't have the stuff to be writer or whatever but i think that the more you talk to other people. Who have you know and they're getting it done. You're placing contests. You're getting good feedback. You know it the more emboldened people to take that first step which like you said is one of the most powerful things you can do for yourself. I'm just so grateful to to you for doing this. Absolutely absolutely it was it was fun to do. Hey i hope you enjoyed the interview with eric. If you'd like to be a guest on the rookie writer the show shoot me an email at info at the rookie writer dot net or if you'd like to connect with eric his story whether as a critique partner a beta reader or any interstate agents reach out to info at the rookie writer dot net and i will put you in touch. Thanks so much for listening as always come. Check out the website w._w._w. The rookie ready dot net. It'll be chock full of show notes links to other resources the whole shebang come back next week when we will be digging into all the different links of fiction the different outlets available to them the different strategies that you might take when approaching them everything from micro fiction to epic novels and series but between now and then whatever you do happy reading people..

writer twitter partner editor Carl jung eric five years ten years
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

10:22 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hi guys welcome to episode sixteen of the rookie writer show today. We're gonna be talking about the value of fearless about being fearless making career lists recently. I feel like everywhere i go. I'm seeing references to stoicism and tim ferriss has a really <hes> a really really good one on youtube a ted talk on this called why you should define your fears instead of your goals. He actually has a bunch of oman stoicism but that wants my favorite <hes> he's a really big fan of stoicism and says that it's a comprehensive system for doing many many things. I'm not sure what all the many many other things are but i do very much like this feature of stoicism that lends itself to this topic what it does is it helps you to train train yourself to separate what you can control and what you can't control and then to focus on what you can't control and it sounds really really simple. I'm so simple just do that just that just you know work on the things you can control super easy right. It's not and i get that and he gets that and everyone gets that but here's the thing making dedicated effort to consciously think about which things you can control which things you can't is half the battle. It's really so one of the things that you can do to help with this is to create these lists that help you to break down. What is actually keeping you from thinking about what you can in control and what you can't control what you have any agency over at all and that's fear so fear makes you focus on what it wants whether or not you can actually do anything about it so what he does whenever he is facing situation is he creates these three pages of fearless to help them work through those feelings that he has about it so the first thing he he does is he says what if i i and then he plugs in whatever it is he's afraid to do worried about doing and then he makes a conscious effort to list all of the things about that all of the fears ears that that raise their ugly little heads any listen he suggests going as many as ten or twenty. I mean something like that. I made a <hes> a worksheet. That's available on the website for download for free that has maybe five slots for like five things but in any case he lists those out and then he has another column where he lists out what he could do to prevent those situations from happening so then your brain is sort sort of now having to focus on what it is you can do to avoid whatever it is that made you so afraid that you didn't wanna do the thing because you were just basically frozen right. That's a very different part of your brain doing very different kinds of work. The third column he goes through and he for each one of those fears lists what he would do or could would do if that thing he's afraid of where to come to pass like what could he do to remedy the situation and again a different part of your brain is working in there. You're focusing on what you can control act. It's it's very action. Oriented thought process then for his second page he takes a very conservative approach approach to what he could how could benefit again sort of leading fears have the most control over the situation not a pie in the sky kind of situation but but instead like if he were to do the thing these afraid of what kind of moderate benefits could potentially happen again. I've made a sheet that that mimics this this inspired by this that allows you to go through and put down a few things that could happen. If you were to tackle it you know if you were to even just give it a shot and maybe some fallout could happen for that but good follow like rambo. You know things that could happen on the words of her bad ramifications but the the good effects rex of any of the action you're taking even if it wasn't the the dream and then the third thing he does is he has a sheet where he goes through and forces himself to think about what will happen if he does nothing around this topic and so then he forces himself to think about about almost a almost shift the fears and a lot of ways to what it will cost him personally economically spiritually whatever if he he doesn't even try to do whatever it is he's afraid to do and he breaks out for a different time periods and again using this as inspiration nation. I have a sheet for you it. Actually they're all in one file that has each of these three sheets that where you can go through and walk yourself through some some of these sorts of questions so that you can start pushing yourself when you get that that fear push back on something you want to try to do with your writing which are afraid of the outcome also on the same page on the same show notes page. I do have a linked to sage coen's fear worksheets. Her sheets called rewriting my relationship with fear. She is the author of the productive writer and a writing coach. Her website is sage cohen dot com. She's fantastic her free worksheet which is the link as well. <hes> has you go through and take it back another step and kind of getting to know your fear and trying to see what it is that your fear is trying to protect you from so that you can you can get to the bottom of why it has raised its ugly head in the first place like what is it trying to protect you from. It's sorta like the way that the inner critic things. It's protecting you because it just wants to prevent any bad feelings so it. It keeps convincing you you that you don't need to send that submission in or do that reading or enter that contest or whatever it is because it it just wants to convince you you know it's just better not try because then you'll get hurt. It's sorta like that. What what is your fear trying to protect you from and is it something that actually you i need protecting from or are you actually more than well equipped to handle any of the situations. That would come from you doing whatever it is. You're free to do so. Let's go with an example say that you've been waiting to get a response from an agent or journal that has your work under review and you're really hoping this is going to be a game changer. It is super easy to get locked up while you wait and to let your fears and your hopes kind of mixed together together run around and make you immobilized from doing any other work so you can. You'll end up obsessively checking your email to see if you've heard from them or or you'll spend lots of time analyzing your bella writer friends which you think the length of time could mean in terms of why they've had it this long you get the idea but if you ply stoicism awesome the stoic approach to this then you realize that once they have in their hands you have no control over how long review process will take or whether or not they i choose to accept it at all but you do have control over what you do with your writing time so you could be sending it out to other outlets or agents or you could. We'll be starting a new peace altogether so the understandably emotional response. It's stalls you but the more stoic one helps you to keep doing the work that moves you forward now. If you're anything like me then in that last example you heard once. They have it in their hands but so you're thinking okay but that's once. They have it in their hands. What about the many things that i could do before i send it. What about all the things. I need to know or do all the classes. I need to take all the reviews i need to do so can be perfect and therefore my work can be impervious to rejection of any kind like you know that's not realistic at what i do love about the about fear is that when it plays dress up its favorite costume is perfectionism because it seems so virtuous right. I just want to get it right. I just wanted to produce quality work work. That's professionalism. Professionalism is about creating creating quality work about doing your best. It's not about perfection perfection. Shen and professionalism are not the same thing fear itself up as professionalism. Only perfectionism can never be right enough because if it can be read enough then you can be protected from everything in every circumstance all the time and of course that's not gonna happen. You can write the most professional thing that you will ever right in your life that anyone will ever rate in any of their lives and it will still be criticized by somebody it will still get rejected by somebody and the rejection episode that i did recently should be at least a little bit of evidence of that all right you already know. I'm going to say so. I'm going to say it anyway. Please please please don't let your fear stop you from working king or from submitting your work use the tools bust out these tools that i have on the website look for others that might work for you use them and face them head on because in my life i have definitely found that when you let your fears go unexamined they take on the size and shape in your mind of a great and mighty monster like that little noise. You're hearing in the distance starts to take on. You know sasquatch proportions. It's just a beast but the truth piz when you actually turn and look at it. It's usually like a mouse. It's usually not nearly as scary is whatever it is. You thought you heard over there about attack you. You just have turn have the courage to turn and look at them because you're tougher than this. You're a writer. This is what you were meant to do and you are not about to let these fears go unexamined examined and run ram shot over your writing career use the tool see what they how they do for you. Get back to me and let me know what was useful full and what wasn't there's also links again to sage cohen's <hes> sheet and to tim ferris's talk on stoicism and until next week happy.

writer tim ferriss youtube sage cohen ted tim ferris coen Shen
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"As simple as a three ring binder or as complicated as keeping track of your own wiki or your own database but the the idea is that if you have a series of books that will be coming out over time. You can bet that your fans are going to notice if in book one this character had ed green is in in book three. They've got brown eyes or that. The distance between two cities seems to have expanded to one hundred miles when it was only only twenty five miles apart before whatever it is the gist is that you probably won't remember all these details as you're going further and further into the series and it's super helpful to have a series bible bible where everything is already in place okay so to recap the top five essential systems that every writer needs you. He got track your time in your work number. One set up those goals track. Those word counts do a little bit of art and business every day and make sure you just pick a system that works for you. There is no one way to do it number to keep track of your ideas and research put them in one place. It'll save maybe a lot of frustration. It will save you a lot of sadness. It'll make you a more efficient writer. If you don't have to go searching all over the house to remember where where it is that you put that slip of paper that was like the perfect solution for this problem. You've got or the that perfect quote that you heard that just really make this scene sing whatever it is his make sure it all goes in one place all those ideas and research little nuggets that you generate or come across the only go into one spot whatever kind of system that is for you whether it's analog digital or a combination number three figure out a way to organize. Your drafts got a manager drafts. You're gonna have more than one. Everybody has more than one draft of everything right. Save yourself the agony of discovering that a draft that you really really wish you still had access to his gone or that. You've been spending a lotta time polishing an earlier draft. That isn't going to be going anywhere number four. You're you're going to need track. Your submissions getting your workout into the world means that you have to be a little organized about who you want to send your work to whether it's agents or contests or literary journals or whatever outlet you're looking to to publish on or in or through you gotta keep track track of the places you wanna send things and the places you've already sent things. That's basically what you're doing and then finally you want to track your marketing and your sales tells you want to see how your work selling. If you're a freelance writer then you obviously have to track who owes you money for something you've done or if you're ghostwriter or something like that that if you're trying to sell books as an indie author or even as traditional author you're going to want to know how they're selling your if you're doing things to to market those and promote those you're going to want to pay attention to what kinds of effects your efforts are. Having you know where waste your time on stuff. That's not working and you also also wanna make connections with people because you want to help them. They're going to want to help you and it's tough to do if you can't remember where you put that person's number the bonus systems we talked about were tracking. You're reading when you're purposeful about your reading. You get a lot more out of it. Tracking possibly classes conferences podcasts. Yes other opportunities to improve your writing skills so that when you're like oh what was that thing that i was gonna check on that really cool class that i saw when when was that where was it put it in one place that you can find it and then again last bonus system is the series bible. If you're someone who writes a series this is invaluable. You are not gonna remember all those details but your readers will and they'll write you about them okay. So did i forget any. What other systems do you think are critical for managing your writing life. Semi your thoughts. You can reach me by email at info at the rookie writer dot net and if you're interested i do have a planner called the rookie writer playbook. It's available on f._c. And it'll be there will be a link available in the show notes. It's as well it tracks just about all these things i in fact. I designed it so it would all right then. Thank you so much again for listening hope. This was useful to you. I would love to hear from you whether it's on the actual i tunes or other podcasts catcher apps on reviews or whether you're sending me email. I like to know what works and what doesn't work. I don't wanna waste your time tom. Okay thanks so much again until next week when we will be talking about how to deal with fear until then happy writing people <music>..

writer ed green
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"The space and the time to track your sales and take note of the effects that your marketing efforts including putting things like social media is just one of them. The effects that those efforts have upon your sales so you'll also want to keep track of when you're looking at this sorts of marketing and sales tracking systems people that you've met while networking you never know how you might be helpful to one one another with beecher promotions reviews blurbs that kind of thing so i actually have a couple bonus systems that i think are helpful but maybe not essential you might also consider tracking your reading. What have you read. What are you reading now. And why. What do you want to read. Are you keeping up the speed on the types of books papa popular in the genre that you want to write in. Are you continuously building. Your writing skills by reading different books related to areas that you you have weaknesses. Are you reading research for your story. You're working progress. Are you keeping abreast of trends in the publishing industry. Just be a purposeful with your reading and enjoy it obviously first and foremost enjoy it if it's not enjoyable anymore than than you're doing the wrong thing but if you can be a little bit mindful in full of how you choose the things that you spend your time reading your reading time on that will have that will pay dividends as well you might also as the bonus system consider tracking classes or conferences or podcast sir other opportunities to improve your writing skills. Maybe you heard about a conference friends. That seemed like a perfect fit for you but you couldn't do it this year. If you have some sort of system even as i mean even as simple as just popping in your phone's <music> calendar for next year <hes> maybe a few whatever around the time the registration time was this year. Put yourself a little note in there that says hey hey check out this conference. Good fit for me this year mark it could be that you keep track of it on one page a place where you continuously continuously or listing classes or conferences or podcasts or whatever you would like to check back because you know that that's something that you would like to spend a little more time on there are just innumerable valuable ways.

marketing and sales beecher
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"For you. Make sure you factor in your skills. Your resources your inclinations. There's no point in trying to take on a particular app or software program or whatever if it's if you are if you know you're going to fight against against it or you know what's going to intimidate you. Whatever it is. That's gonna keep us. It's going to be barriers to you using it. Just let it go find something better. I will suggest though that you at least try the program and app evernote. You can use it on your phone. You can use it on your computer tablets. Whatever it can serve serve as a short-term harvester of your little ideas as they come at you and the real good information storage system searchable. It's got a million features gers and it's free so what you can do is you can try it out. See what you do and don't like about it and it'll give you a baseline so that she can figure out what else he might be a better fit for you okay. The third system we want to think about is a draft management system so again. There is no one-size-fits-all in this or any of the other system so if for instance you like to write longhand when you're doing your drafts then someone else's file l. naming tricks or the various features on programs like scrivener or story. Is that allow you to save different versions of the same same document within the same major file won't do you any good so the bottom line is this when you start to right make make a decision about how you're going to keep track of your different versions of your project and then stick to it it could be as simple as you print off the version every day or you give it a different name by date or i lots of people have very specific ways that they save their files and organize is them in folders and there's a few links in the show notes where people get into a couple of those whatever it is find your system and then stick with it you wanna avoid the frustration. The things like misplacing draft or section or chapter realizing that you've been revising an old version of chapter been there. There's little more frustrating in the writing process than suspecting that you actually did something better in an earlier version of a story but no longer have access to it. If you always he's working the same document the entire time if you don't create different versions or different drafts then you'll essentially rob yourself of the opportunities to go back to earlier versions one draft means you've already sent those words those versions into the great beyond and they have left no trace that they existed so make your decision decision there and then stick with it. You'll be so glad okay number four a submissions management system. If you want to be published eventually it'll be time to start sending out all those words out into the world and the little bits of business work you've been doing we'll start to pay off now that was seen a wide range of ways ways that people have cut have dealt with this system and figured out a way to manage it for themselves one prolific writer and single mom of two boys who also was teaching the class and like working fulltime and just basically being a dynamo. She kept everything in a notebook where she wrote down where she had sent things and the responses she'd gotten it was a simple as that for her. It wasn't pretty but it was super functional lots of people i know use spreadsheets and swear by them. Some people use online programs like air table which is kind of like a and advanced spreadsheet that is also free and kind of also. That's a little bit like a database so you can go through and track more information. Some use paid services like duo trope to help them track of it or they simply go with the basic features and submit and pretty much only submit to things through submit -able however you do it. Just make sure you have a way to track the places that you wanna send end things and the places you've already said things will save you.

writer
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"If you can try to do these two things things will open up for you that you cannot imagine in the coming weeks. We'll be talking about specific time management tools like pomodoro 's and <hes> words sprints and time studies and things like this that will only how does that up routines eighteens that only enhance seared <hes> the efficiency of your time <hes> word tracking things like this feel free to google any of those I will not have links on any of these sorts of concepts on the page that <hes> for this week's episode but like I said for this week take a look at your work through the Lens of these two best tools number one find the time little bits of time crappy imperfect time and do some work anyway. Even if it's just the tiniest inching forward think of your writing life like a shark and I know this is an urban. This is actually not accurate but we all think this that sharks have to keep moving or they die think of your writing life like that. It has to keep moving or a dis. Even if it's movie just a little bit do it just move it. Move it forward and honor think take a minute when you can set it up some reasonable deadlines. If you don't have time for a big planning process right now I get it and we'll although I cannot urge you enough to take some time and look at big picture but even if you can only make deadlines for yourself for this week like <hes> okay shape I the thing I'm working on want to have a thousand words added to at this week. That's a if you're slammed. That's a very reasonable deadline. That is four pages. You can get four pages in even if you are jam packed in week. If you are had been sitting on something you've been revising revising revising and you're like okay a reasonable deadline for me. This week is that I am going to send this to one other person or I'm going to find find one other person. That would be a good critique partner for me. Are I'm going to find <hes> of good Beta reader for me. Make that your deadline and then honor it. Don't let it go by Keith that forward momentum. And you'll be amazed that you can do next. Week's episode is going to look at rejection and why it's your new best friend. I can't tell you what a great tool of that is as well actually super. We're looking forward to recording that episode. It's maybe one of my favorite topics <hes> for this week swing by the website. Check out the show notes. Thank you for listening. I tell you when I hear someone say that they've been listening and it actually helped them. It makes my whole day. It makes my whole day. Maybe my whole week. This is why I'm doing it. Please let me know what's useful. What's not useful? I did mention the whole thing about planning there are planners on my Oetzi. Shy My on my Oetzi shop the rookie writer shop. I don't know where the rookie writer Varsity shop something like that. They're up there <hes> <hes> I'm going to be putting them on sale at the end of the month. If you WANNA wait for that but if you're ready to go there for July through September <hes> and I think they're twelve bucks or something twelve fifty. Maybe <hes> their our principal. You can use this tool to help you think through when you're deadlines might be in when you might find pockets of time to work. It's been a real game changer for me to use this tool. I looked at about half half a dozen different planners for writers and then created one that worked for me a little better <hes> in how I organize my work I can also recommend with great enthusiasm. <hes> Sarah Cannon does <hes> has a page called heart breathing's and her planner is one that I admire. There's one call the author planner that is very good as well in fact I can even put the links to the other planners. Incase mine is not your cup of tea. Take a look at those <hes> it could be that that would be those would be better tools for you than mine would be more power to you. Go for it <hes> but do try to find something that works for you so that you can track when you can find those little slivers offers of time and when you're gonNA put your deadlines in because those two things will change everything and I since I've said it like nine times if you're still listening. I'M GONNA wrap this up now. I will look forward to getting everything a little more perfect for next week for next week's podcast on rejection which is kind of funny all by itself but anyway <hes> until then happy writing people. If you like this episode subscribe maybe also recommend to a friend or leave a review on itunes or your favorite podcast catcher think also maybe about swinging by the rookie writer dot net. It's the rookie writer dot net there. You'll find show notes for this episode as well as..

writer google Oetzi Sarah Cannon partner Keith principal
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

14:56 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hey everybody welcome to episode ten of the rookie writer show today we're gonna be talking about sales categories in specifically commercial vs upmarket vs literary so again again i'm gonna dive right into it like i always did in the first two episodes of the who what category we've spent some time thinking about whether we want it to be what kind of writer we want to be do we wanna be 'em professional writer an amateur writer or hobbyist where we sort of in the pre writer dreamer stage and we end the next episode we looked at what kinds of stories we might wanna tell like 'em occasion unra basically and today what we're gonna do israeli demystify sales categories and get a sense of where are books might land in these three large groupings here's the cool thing to know you only need the care about these sales categories if you want to be a professional or an amateur writer because they are essentially tools to help communicate what kinds of stories you're writing to agents or audiences so if you're looking to be traditionally published then you need to be able communicate agents and editors at publishing houses this is what i write if you're looking to be nb published then you need to be able to communicate directly treaters hey this is what i right so if you're not looking to be a professional or amateur writer you don't have to worry about these at all if you're just looking to be a hobbyist or if you're still in the preliminary stage where you're just kind of dreaming about maybe someday i wanna be writer you can kind of put those in the back of your mind in case it ever transitions into a situation where you would like to start submitting things either to agents or out into the public but if it's just for you or if it's just for a small community related to you you don't have to worry about these sales categories at all on my website the rookie writer dot net you'll find on the show notes for this page a really fantastic stick info graphic put together by ps literary agency that has in a release the sink in visual way a great way of demonstrating the basic characteristics of literary fiction upmarket fiction end 'em commercials fiction and examples within each of those i'm going to just run through them verbally but i urge you to go and take a look at this it's a it's a really well done graphic okay we're gonna start with literary fiction literary fiction tends to be very oriented towards art end it is looking to question some of the things and the prevailing culture it's asks a lot of the reader to in terms of filling in the blanks or inferring things there's a lot of times if he endings are very clear or satisfying for the reader they play with structure a lot they play with their with language a lot it's a very innovative and they're very comfortable taking risks they contend to be a little slower paced and a little bit more focused on the interior already of the character versus the events happened outside or to the character next i'm gonna actually cut to commercial fiction commercial fiction is at the other end of the spectrum in books it fit into this category they aim is much more entertainment the author does a lot of the work for the reader laying out these events of the story in a way that doesn't require the reader to infer as much or the filling in the blanks the writing tends to be a little more fast paced while they're still lots of character development within these stories the distinct inferiority might not be explored quite as much but it won't be explored as much as it is with literary fiction 'em you opt in has a very satisfying ending the end readers have come to expect that from commercial fiction 'em unless it's part of a series it tends to tie up all the questions that it that it laid out throughout the story it reaches very broad audiences and this is where you're gonna find things like mystery and romance in size fi and fantasy and thrillers in westerns it's all the genres for the most part tend to gravitate towards commercial fiction there is hearing there a few examples of genre books that have have gone into that are categories more as literary fiction but for the most part this is where genre lives in commercial fiction the third category is upmarket fiction and that's where the other two to sales categories meet in the middle it tends to have a lot of the same characteristics of commercials fiction it has a broad audience it tends to be a little faster paced it tends to tie up 'em the questions instead it lays out in the story so you don't have to guess ending irby confused by it or those sorts of things but it elevates the language in the themes in gets a little deeper into the interior already the character's than a lot lot of the the commercials fiction does books in an upmarket fiction category will gravitate towards universal themes that people can relate to in their own lies but the lend themselves to discussion so this is where you're gonna find you're club a book for the most part one of the things that you should know about these different categories is did they oftentimes go by other names literary almost always just goes by literary so that one's easy commercials marshall fiction can also be known as popular fiction or nonfiction and some of these authors and those are the ones that you're gonna know they're gonna be the things that you see in the in the wine while you're waiting at the grocery store 'em it's it'd be the james patterson the written or roberts the dan brown's that kind of thing the upmarket sales category is sometimes also known as mainstream fiction or crossover fiction or book club diction if you see any of those that means upmarket market some sample authors from this might be celeste eating elmore leonard gillian flynn 'em they ten again to blend art and entertainment and you're gonna see these at your book club meetings literary always goes i literary it very much focuses on art and culture and these you're gonna see in class is an on lists for the peel it's there in the booker and things like that if these concepts these sales categories were applied to to fashion just as a way to kind of understand there's a little bit more if this was related to the world of fashion then commercials fiction would be your favorite local malls mainstream stores market fiction would be like the local boutiques or the stores at the fancy mall whatever you're fancy mollis andy literary fiction would be more like new york fashion week i think i forgot to lift off sample authors of this but you know them it's the toni morrison's the colson whitehead's the donna tarts what's interesting to me was when i did a little research on this there was a report on the number of agents seeking books and the different categories end you would think that commercial fiction would actually have be most agents looking for actively looking for books and those cat in that sales category but the truth is 'em as of twenty nineteen there about two hundred ninety five agents actively looking for four books if it these categories like i mean sorry the sales category of commercial fiction there's about sixty three agents actively expressly looking for books that fifty upmarket district description and what was interesting to me would sit there are four hundred and twenty nine agents which is by far the largest number looking for literary fiction so one thing that i think lends itself to 'em explaining this is that for the most part literary fiction is still published almost exclusively through traditional puff publishing methods so that is just say that if you want to publish a literary fiction book the odds are that you are doing it with an agent and through traditional publisher or a small smaller publisher whereas if you're writing commercial fiction there's a decent and chance that you might be looking at c n b publishing pass so that is where i think the discrepancy there might be if i had to guess i think it's interesting that there's so few agents actively looking for up market despite the fact that from everything that i read it's kind of a sweet spot for especially traditional publishers and i v only way i can kind of understand that and if someone knows better please let me know 'cause i think this is interesting topic 'em my best guess is that when agents put out literary but they're looking for literary a lot of times they will be very very very happy to get up market as well so because upmarket k a mainstream fiction jk crossover fiction jk book club fiction is something that people don't really always understand i i think that in some cases they might just not wanna mess with it as part of their profile but again if you know please reach out to me and let me know and and i kind of understand how this might make sense okay which sales category should you should for and the answer is as close as you're bookshelf what do you like to reid what is it you're actually drawn to what is it that you can't wait to get your hands on when it comes when it's released what authors are the ones that you watch out just see when they when they released a new book what do you love to write whatever you love to write in whatever you love to reid that is the sales category that you should be shooting for one of the things that i found was an article by any new power i think it is she does a good job it's called the differences between commercial and literary fiction and again the link is on the show notes on the on the web page she offers examples of books have similar topics in storylines but they're done with different underlying approaches that puts them into three different sales categories and all three are books are accomplished by accomplished authors that have done well they all have plots they're heavy on suspense and intrigue but just the way that they wrote them when whether it went along with the expectations tation of genre for instance or to the degree to which it answered all the questions at the end or the way it played with language determined where if it on the shelf so she gave examples of a commercial example would be loves music love to dance by mary hagans clark a literary example would be pale fire by vladimir nabokov an upmarket example would be rebecca by daphne demane each of these books is well done critically or commercially acclaimed or boat and yet they all fall indifferent sales categories there is no sales category this better than any others it is literally just the way that they percent in group books that have things in common so that at readers know what they're getting an are satisfied with experience now the role the motivation we touched on this a little bit already you should write the books that you liked her reid did she liked to right but one thing that i think is kind of note worthy is depending on what you're what you're motivations are and we looked at this a good bit and episode three which is one of the why episodes i have six different motivators the people often have as reasons for why they want to write and most people don't have just one but in fact a combination of several of them depending on what dominates your motivating equation let's say there there are different sales categories and types of books that might actually better fit your motivations that might sound confusing let me try another way okay i'm just gonna dig in and give you examples if for instance that's your primary motivator for writing books is itchy wanna get a message out about a specific topic her issue than any of the katter sales categories could be a good fit for you there's never any wrong category had a gory for you but perhaps the best fit might be an upmarket book because they tend to be focused on inspiring discussion and relating to issues in people's wives and so because upmarket books tend ten to fit that category that if you are looking to promote a message that might be a good sales category for you to import if for instance you are most motivated by entertaining an audience lifting them out of their data day 'em problems and issues and just whisking them along on a story then you might want to look at commercial because that is the category that tends to value entertainment over any any sort of other aspects of the story they just want to tell a good story whisks somebody away they don't necessarily need them to think heavily about the story liner have a tons of tons of questions about it or any of these issues laid out they really really want that to be something that just gives them a wrist spite from their daily chores and toils if however what you are think you're motivated by you're audience in that you would like to challenge them intellectually early if you would like the challenge the prevailing culture then you might be looking at litter areas a better fit for you because that there's a lot of room for playing with a structure in the language in a way that really that really pushes people to state in different ways and they have before about a different topic endorsed starts a conversation with in the culture is your primary motivation is to be recognized then it depends on how you wanna be recognized if you want to win one of the big prize is that people always refer to like the nobel prize for literature the or the peel it there or.

writer
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Thought of writing when you're first thinking about being a writer or if you're at that stage right now on your entertaining it if I asked you to closure is imagine it you'd probably picture something along the lines of this. You see a writer sitting alone with their computer or their no pad or if you're really old school, maybe their typewriter, there's probably sitting near a beautiful view or maybe in. Like a messy office, the papers everywhere, and they're just they're alone, either typing away, like crazy or scribbling away, like crazy or looking incredibly frustrated because the words won't come at all. And this is the picture that we see in movies that we see teeny and therefore we see it in our minds eye. We think that writing is one thing that it means you sit down and your fingers flying one way or another words are coming or the aren't near incredibly frustrated, and that's rating is, but I'm here to suggest that there are five stages of writing. So let's get into. The first one is pre writing and that at, at this stage you might just be kind of ruminating on an idea. You might be kind of vaguely researching a topic, you might be reading a lot of other books, that remind you of this sort of story that is beginning to percolate in your mind. This pre writing stage could be just along these lines, or it might ramp up a little more to something like now, you're starting to do something along the lines of what author Gwen Hayes calls the spark sheet, where she writes everything down that she knows about her story before she's about to write it. There's nothing necessarily super organized about it. But that's how she does it. Judy Blume is famous in her. I think it was in her masterclass that she talked about how she always had notebook where she would keep all of the thoughts on a project and that one notebook and she would just scribble you know, Willie. Alien it as ideas came to her. She said when she got towards the end of a project, she would go back to her notebook and highlight the stuff that she used and just kind of go through page after page after page to see if she had worked in most of the things that she wanted to get into this book, when she first envisioned it. So this would also be a former pre right and just scribbling in an oak dumping in one place, designating one notebook that would be a former pre writing, you might ramp it up to the next level. And now you're looking at being able to write let's say a log line like a one or two sentence thing that really boils down for you. What the story is about or a synopsis, maybe a three or so page, but it could be longer depending on if it's for you, or if it's something you plan to use later when you're submitting to agents and things, but of whatever link a synopsis that sort of describes scene after seeing what happens or maybe an outline where you. It down. Seen act. One scene. One this happens these characters this point the time line, this setting that kind of thing might be really concrete like that. If you're given to plotting if you're given to be more of a fly by the seat of your pants, or when you're writing and you'd like to just kind of see where the muses taking you, you probably won't do a lot of those more structured and elaborate things. Whether you're a panther or planner applaud her, I would urge you to do a couple of things at this pre writing stage, the first state of writing that is number one take a second to look at your calendar. And get a sense of when you think you might be able to work on this every day. Ideally or whatever you know it works out for you and number to try to keep all of your thoughts on this story in one place. I know it seems really obvious no, too. But you would be amazed at how quickly all those ideas about this, one project, scattered into a bunch of different. Books on nap on your phone, and this file, in that file, it's, it's amazing how quickly that happens. However, you fall on, on the pre writing continuum do try to look at those two habits because I think it will serve you really well. If you go to the website for each of these steps, there's a couple of tips and tools that I include underneath each of the sections, it's my favorite software app. And then also my favorite low tech solution to the same sorts of things for this one, I reference story planner app, and there's a link to that as well as Scrivener in story, est both in this section. And in the next phase, which is drafting now this is the part that does look a lot like the movies, you are actually just getting rolling on writing. This is the time when it's time to start letting those words flow, if you are a Pancer you might have just about started at the stage and if you're a pretty heavy plotter, or a planner then you felt like this day would never come, but here it is. As you are doing it now that you've gotten started drafting don't stop keep going until you get to the finish line. If you're in our editor pops by your desk, or where it is you're working just to say, hi, just repeat the mantra, first drafts crap until they go away. They will eventually leave you alone enough to get across that finish line. Even if you have to crawl across the finish line, even if you are kind of shuffling, and you're outta gas just get all the way through that first draft. I've seen way too many people get hung up on the step. And just try to muddle it by doing too many things at once, like, let's say step number three rewriting during the drafting stage. We don't want you to get stuck in the drafting stage going looping around trying to muddy at doing a little this little of that until you have the most beautiful first chapter, but you're not getting cross the line when you are in the drafting stage get through it just get that first draft down. You will be so happy. Okay. Back to stage three re writing it. It's this point that you should have a complete if imperfect first draft and how much that first draft hangs together structurally will depend a lot on whether or not again, your pants or plotter, if you're a plotter, if you're a hard, plotter, you probably worked out a lot of the bugs of your stories plotting issues before you even sat down to write that first draft. So you might have less to do there in that way, if you are a Pancer, if you're a Pancer, then you probably have a little bit more work to do there, because you just kinda followed things where they went during the writing stage. This is the time that you can actually go back to anything that you created during the pre writing stage as kind of like a touchstone to inform you on the things that you need to do next. So it's a good time to revisit what you had in mind when he sat down to write this book in the first place, and then you can start to better assess where the gaps are between what you actually get down on the page. And what you intended to get down on the page. Now, please. Stand, you will never ever ever be able to get down what you had in your mind's eye, and it's just something I think all writers have to make peace with you might get really close. You might get something that dazzles you almost as much, or perhaps even more. But you are ever going to get exactly that story. It's never gonna live up to that original dream vision. You had when you I thought this is what I want to do. And of course, you could see it all unfolding in the space of a couple of minutes in your mind's eye, and it takes longer to get that down on the pate revisit that first pre writing stash. Look at what you actually have after the second stage drafting and that's when the rewriting that's the magic of the rewriting us try to get those to become a little closer together. So that it's the best story that you can make the feel structurally, solid, the characters feel real the setting skill vivid. Your theme pops your voice is clear those sorts of things get all those things done. One so that you could move on. And however many drafts it takes for some people that might be to persuade people that might be twenty it's really gonna be your process. Don't let it hold you back, though, from getting to the fourth stage which is polishing polishing his things like do you have a favorite word or of words, did you like to use a ton you do because everybody does start finding those so that you can pick those out and start replacing those different or better words, so that you read it doesn't get hung up on this little tick of yours, or do you have a tendency to slip slip into passive voice a lot or? Do you have a tendency? Sometimes you're writing in present tense mall. Sudden rating past tense or your point of view shifted your head hopping. A little these sort of smaller nuance things along with course things like grammar, you know, like are your commas in the right place? Did you use affect when you met effect things like that? So this is the state time to polish I would argue that it's smart not to do this. These sorts of things until you get to the state. Some people cannot resist doing a little of this, while they're drafting and a little of this, while they're rewriting you can do that. It's you do you in the benefit of that, of course, is when you get to the stage, you have less to do than somebody who just sort of force themselves to overlook it for now, which is great. Here's the, the danger of this approach, however, because you've probably gone through and polished, as you were going. If you're if you have that tendency, then you probably polish something that's not gonna end up in that final draft. And then it makes it harder to let it go when it would actually do your story, the most service, it would benefit your store the most if you would. So just as long as you're going in where you're good for both drafting and rewriting. I, I love stories and Scrivner for polishing. I am all about auto credit as a starting place and there's links to all of these programs that you can learn more about them. I think it's also good idea to run things through. Through your word processing spell. Check in grammar. Check word has a particularly good one supposedly Google doesn't, Pat, Google docs is not as good. I don't know where pages falls on that continuum. It seems fine. In addition to that use Gramley I think there's free options, along with paid ones, and, and also Hemingway. They're both good about catching grammar things that between your your word processor. Spell check and grammar. Check grammar early and Hemingway. You should be pretty good on grammar issues. Autocrat does something a little bit different. And it's what it does is picks up things like those favorite words of yours, that you're overusing, or the passive voice of the tent swishes switches, or things like that. Anyway, there's a link on my website to all of these things, and you can check those out, they'll final stage of writing is releasing. And it this is absolutely just as much stage of writing as any of the others and an effect. If you drop the ball this stage of trying to get it out to your intended audience, whether that's through. Agents or publishers, or self publishing or just literally binding it, so that your family can read it because they're your intended audience, if you neglect this last step, you in many ways render all of the others mood. So for this one is far as tools. It really depends on whether your traditionally publishing or, or planning to Indy or self publish and in those circumstances, if you're indie publishing definitely checkout. Vela m-. It's a great way to format your book beautifully and easily, if you're traditionally publishing. That's a more involved topic that will be on an upcoming episode but for starters go check out, submited, -able and set up a free count..

writer Pancer Hemingway Gwen Hayes Judy Blume Willie Google others editor Scrivner Pat
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Me. And might be useful for you as well. I'd like to wrap up this episode with an explanation about why I chose the name of the show. I chose the name rookie writer because I have such an affection for rookies, and let me tell you. Why rookies have a lot of talent and a lot of enthusiasm. That's how they get to be rookies in the first place it basically gives them admission to the game. But they also have a lot to learn. And the thing about it is is that you are going to feel like that probably your entire writing career. Most writers do one of my favorite quotes is from Ernest Hemingway. And it goes something like this. We are all apprentices and a craft in which. No one ever becomes a master. So you might as well embrace it. I know I have lean into that rookie status embraced renews. Yasim and your talent. And yes, also that feeling of always being a little bit at the beginning of something always having something more to learn because that's the nature of writing. That's the fun of it. And that's the challenge of it. Come back for episode one. What kind of writer, are you? Let's find out. Thanks again for joining me. I'll see you next time. If you like this episode, please hit the like or whatever it is give it a thumbs up. Subscribe. I don't know. It's my first episode. I'll get better at this part. And also swing by WWW dot the rookie writer dot net. It's once again T H E R O K I E W R. I T E R dot net is the rookie writer dot net. Okay. There's going to be already some resources books. I recommend the show notes for this episode and links to different tools that I have available for downloading to help you start thinking about how to organize your reading life in a way that works for you. Okay. Thanks again. I'll catch you time. Until then happy writing people.

writer Ernest Hemingway
"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"writer" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Novels or easings. Are you a blogger? Are you a short story writer? Are you a memoir star you a flash fiction person? There's a lot of areas of writing that we don't immediately think of when we're starting out. We just think books, but there's such a world of writing that comes at us all the time that I think that there's room for a lot of exploration here to see what might match up with your interests and skills, and desires, we'll also be looking at things like if you do wanna be professionally published do you see yourself as more of a commercial writer and upmarket writer or a literary writer, and also what is the difference between commercial and upmarket and literary writing. We'll also be looking at John razz, and the organizations that support them and the tropes that are common in them. And the space that they occupy. In the market place at this point in time. They'll just be a lot of ways for you to look at what you're working on really having a lot of confidence and clarity about your choices. In terms of what you're going to write. We'll help alleviate a lot of the problems including things like writer's block and procrastination. Because if you know what it is that you are working on what it is you want to get out into the world. It goes a long way towards making that time that you can carve out to write more productive and more valuable because you know, where you're going. You have that guide star you've answered that question for yourself when we get into asking when and where questions about our productivity challenges they oftentimes are intertwined much like the who. And the what were and you'll see that episode usually episode two in a given month will be tackling those questions the kinds of questions will be looking at in the win episodes might be. Looking at your time and your writing habits, it could be everything from your sort of long range plans to how you're managing your small pockets of time. It's the day to day stuff. And it's also the big picture things. But it's also going to be things like are you the kind of person who enjoys writing at the same time and the same place every day. Or are you the kind of person that needs a little variety? Are you really good at using those little pockets of time as they present themselves, or do you need to have a certain ritual that happens every time before you're able to really slide into that writing space. That is the most productive for you. Where questions will include things like not only the space where you're able able to find to right? But also the tools that you use to rate looking at whether or not you're most comfortable using a computer or writing things out by hand or dictating and pushing you to try some. Of the others to see what that brings to your writing experience. In addition. It will be things like looking at tools and hacks and techniques to help you store the information like ideas or drafts to make it. So that you're more organized, and you can more easily access the work that you that you've completed or the work that you are you would like to do when we get into the Y episodes, which will be usually the third episode in any given month. We'll be looking at primarily our motivation and our support. So in these areas, I mean, what motivates you to face off with the blank page. And the reason we care about the answers to these questions is because there is no better defense against the twin demons of procrastination and perfectionism than knowing why you are willing to sit down and do this when you could be doing just about anything else. Generally speaking every month episode four will be a how episode. And by that, I mean, the kinds of practices and habits and ways that we can support our writing life by taking care of our bodies and our general wellness because though I like to treat myself like I am sort of floating head the truth is I am a better writer. I'm a I'm a better everything when I'm taking care of myself and writing is no exception. You'll hear a lot about this. If you're a podcast fan. Like, I am this is showing up everywhere sort of remembering that writing is just a piece of your life. It's not the whole thing, and you need to treat it that way. Finally on months where we have five weeks. There will be interviews with other rookies where I will get into all of these questions with them and look at their back story and the ways that they have tackled some of the issues that they've found in overcome. So that they're sharing their tips and experiences with you and more ideas grab with all of the. Questions I'll be bringing in experts from time to time. In addition. I'll offer my recommendations on other podcasts YouTube channels books, magazines, apps and software that have worked for me.

writer John razz five weeks