20 Burst results for "Wrangel"

"wrangel" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:35 min | 6 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on WTOP

"I'm rich hunter, thanks for being with us. A quick look at the top stories we're working on at WTO P. That got skipped. How about this? The State Department's diplomat in residence program has been around for decades, but many aren't aware of it. WTO national security correspondent JJ green spoke with daring akins, the diplomat and residents for the D.C. metro area. I was completely unfamiliar with the foreign service. Until I served as a peace corps volunteer and actually met a foreign service officer. And not only foreign service, I was introduced to a number of careers about which I'd never been familiar, never heard of until I served as a peace corps volunteer. And that started my open the aperture in terms of what my professional possibilities were You are a diplomat in residence in the D.C. metro area. I had never heard of that. What exactly it is. I mean, I know what it is now, but I'd like you to explain it to our audience. So many people will say we're recruiter. I would quibble with that definition. So I have a four state region, Washington, D.C., Delaware, West Virginia, and Maryland. I like to say I am responsible for encouraging and inspiring people mostly students and mid career professionals to consider a career in international affairs, most specifically the foreign service. There are 16 of us around the country. Soon to be 17, we're mostly affiliated with universities. In my case, I am actually affiliated with the Ralph J bunch international affairs center at Howard University, where I coordinate and work closely with the director of that program, the center, as well as the directors of the Pickering wrangel and Payne fellowships because our university is our implementing partners throughout the country for those programs. And so I work very closely with them. Where are some of the places you've served? I have served in Malaysia, India, Afghanistan, Australia, Indonesia, Germany, and this is my second time serving in Washington, D.C.. You can hear more of daring naked story on this week's episode of colors, a dialog on race in America, you can find it anywhere, you get your podcasts

"wrangel" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:27 min | 6 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on WTOP

"WTO news It's ten 15. I'm Ralph Fox thanks for taking us along at this hour. The State Department's diplomat and residence program has been around for decades, but many aren't aware of it. National security correspondent JJ green spoke with darion Atkins, the diplomat in residence for the D.C. metro area. I was completely unfamiliar with the foreign service. Until I served as a peace corps volunteer and actually met a foreign service officer. And not only foreign service, I was introduced to a number of careers about which I'd never been familiar, never heard of until I served as a peace corps volunteer. And that started my open the aperture in terms of what my professional possibilities were. You are a diplomat in residence in the D.C. metro area. I had never heard of that. What exactly it is. I mean, I know what it is now, but I'd like you to explain it to our audience. So many people will say we're recruiter. I would quibble with that definition. So I have a four state region, Washington, D.C., Delaware, West Virginia, and Maryland. And I like to say I am responsible for encouraging and inspiring people. Mostly students and mid career professionals to consider a career in international affairs, most specifically the foreign service. There are 16 of us around the country. Soon to be 17, we're mostly affiliated with universities. And in my case, I am actually affiliated with the Ralph J bunch international affairs center at Howard University, where I coordinate and work closely with the director of that program, the center, as well as the directors of the Pickering wrangel and pain fellowships because how are university is our implementing partners throughout the country for those programs. And so I work very closely with them. Where are some of the places you've served? I have served in Malaysia, India, Afghanistan, Australia, Indonesia, Germany, and this is my second time serving in Washington, D.C.. That's a lot of frequent flyer points right there. You can hear more of Darien's story on this week's episode of colors. It's a dialog on race in America. You can find it anywhere. You get your podcasts. Quick look at the top stories we're working on here at WTO, banking giant UBS group, as buying one of its rivals for $3.2 billion. This in an effort to avoid further market shaking turmoil, the Dow futures are up the Asian markets are mixed, mostly down. Manhattan's DA is standing firm against Donald Trump's hostile rhetoric, telling his staff that the prosecutor's office will not be intimidated or deterred. Stay with us at WTO for full details on these stories in the minutes ahead. Traffic and weather on the 8th and when a break, back over to Steve dresner in the traffic center. In Maryland and Montgomery county area dealing with a multi vehicle crash on the southbound side of two 70 right after it looks like I three 70 and last report it is two to the left getting you by not affecting the lanes over on the northbound side. Traffic moving pretty well on the beltway throughout Montgomery county and prince George is counting. We are dealing with crash activity southbound on the BW Parkway up near one 75 single left lane does get you by now over on the northbound side roadwork is set up right near the exit for I one 95. Single right lane getting by. At the Chesapeake Bay bridge, road war closes the westbound span two way traffic pattern set up over the eastbound spam. Over in Virginia a quiet ride on the beltway no current delays on 66 or I 95, northbound three 95, the in ball lanes to the 14th street bridge, the works on that set up currently blocking the right lane. Traffic moving much better on the northbound side of the GW Parkway right near park police headquarters earlier crash activity cleared southbound lanes, no issues from the beltway down to the I three 95 interchange

"wrangel" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on WTOP

"I'm Luke Luke, thanks for being with us this morning. The State Department's diplomat and residence program has been around for decades, but a lot of people aren't aware of what it is or what its purpose is national security correspondent JJ green spoke with Darien akins, the diplomat and residents for the D.C. metro area. I was completely unfamiliar with the foreign service. Until I served as a peace corps volunteer and actually met a foreign service officer. And not only foreign service, I was introduced to a number of careers about which I'd never been familiar, never heard of until I served as a peace corps volunteer. And that started my open the aperture in terms of what my professional possibilities were. You are a diplomat in residence in the D.C. metro area. I had never heard of that. What exactly it is. I mean, I know what it is now, but I'd like you to explain it to our audience. So many people will say we're recruiter. I would quibble with that definition. So I have a four state region, Washington, D.C., Delaware, West Virginia, and Maryland. And I like to say I am responsible for encouraging and inspiring people mostly students and mid career professionals to consider a career in international affairs, most specifically the foreign service. There are 16 of us around the country. Soon to be 17, we're mostly affiliated with universities. And in my case, I am actually affiliated with the Ralph J bunch international affairs center at Howard University, where I coordinate and work closely with the director of that program, the center, as well as the directors of the Pickering wrangel and Payne fellowships because Howard University is our implementing partners throughout the country for those programs. And so I work very closely with them. Where are some of the places you've served? I have served in Malaysia, India, Afghanistan, Australia, Indonesia, Germany, and this is my second time serving in Washington, D.C.. You can hear more of vacant story on this week's episodes of colors at dialog on race in America. You can find it anywhere you get your podcasts

"wrangel" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on WCPT 820

"She has to out crazy and out treason everybody. Yeah, doesn't she? She's just never done. Sarah and Texas, you're on with Jody, hi, Sarah. Hi, Stephanie and Jody. Once again, I have to say, I love you, mom. But I love you better. Carol Burnett will be 90 in April. She will. Very exciting. Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh. Well, date me. So I'm not even going to say it. The one thing I took one day off. Just one. Only to wake up on my what the hell? You know what, my opinion on marjoram Taylor Greene is let them associate it also now with their succession become they are not eligible for social security. Right. I take all that. Yeah, because they want to blow it up. That's how he thinks social security. There you go. Bye bye red states. 13 states go bye bye. Bye bye. When she was doing her little tea cart and she said, she started writing and said, bye bye. Go away. I like it. You're done. Can you record that for us so we can play it whenever they suggest secession? Stephanie, at Stephanie Miller dot com. Thank you so much. Please, thank you. We need it. Yeah, we need new toddlers, all the ones in our box are 58. They've got their AARP cards. I have mine. I do too. How old is Brandon? Brandon, you know, dump truck. Yeah. 27? No. I think he's in his teens. He's got to be. Audrey wrangel? Yeah. Yeah. Okay. 29 minutes after the hour, we roll along with Jody Hamilton live in studio. You are listening to WCT 8 20. Here's the latest Chicago weather update. From the winner weather center, I meteorologist Jennifer vuit ski. Partial sunshine develops here this afternoon. We'll see high into the upper 30s. West winds are on 5 to 10 mph gusting as high as 20, and then for tonight mostly cloudy and low near 35. By Wednesday, the chance for rain showers cloudy high 38°, Thursday slight chance for snow early skies become mostly sunny, windy in a high around 48. Friday partial sunshine high 27. That's your latest Chicago weather update. Currently, it's 26. The David

Jody Taylor Greene Sarah Stephanie Carol Burnett Audrey wrangel Stephanie Miller Brandon Jody Hamilton Texas Jennifer vuit AARP WCT Chicago David
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:57 min | 10 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"President Kamala Harris. She has been historic in so many ways, not only as a first, but because of the work that she has done. And the benefit that has resulted from her work. Okay, so Laura, let's talk a little bit about Nancy Pelosi's legacy and the work that she's done with The White House, her relationships with the different presidents, of course, Donald Trump made it very clear he was happy, of course, that Republicans had regained the majority in the House, but he seemed to have some specific sentiment for Nancy Pelosi. We have taken over Congress, Nancy Pelosi has been fired. Now, that was as he was announcing his own run for president. And still managed to invoke Nancy Pelosi's name. Let's talk a little bit about Nancy Pelosi's relationship with Donald Trump. Well, it was a very tense relationship and involved in many cases. One or the other than walking out of White House meetings. One of the most famous moments was in May 2019, she had a meeting with Trump on infrastructure and she seemed to realize that she could kind of get under his skin and as a powerful woman and kind of throw him off track and this was one of the big examples. But at this meeting, kind of devolved into a discussion about how Democrats investigations of him and she at one point accused him of a cover up on their investigations and he ended up leaving the meeting and she wrote a letter to all House Democrats the following day that said Trump had had a temper tantrum for all of us to see. So the next day he's holding a meeting or a press conference to talk about a multi-billion dollar farm aid package. And instead of talking about that, he spent full half hour talking about House Democrats and how unfair it was that they were investigating him and referring to crazy Nancy. Now, you had mentioned that I know a temper tantrum when I see one because she's a mother of 5 grandchildren to so many grandkids. Let me ask you about how she has managed the democratic side of things because she's had to hold that coalition together. She's had to hold that caucus together between the more progressive Democrats and the more moderate or more traditional type Democrats. Making sure that that vote didn't split, that party didn't split. Not an easy task. No, it's not, and there were quite a few moments, especially under Biden, she's had some moments where she was obviously struggling to keep progressives in line on the infrastructure package and letting that move on its own and before trying to work on Biden's economic package. She would use a variety of tactics, you talk about her being a mother. One thing she's over the years, I've noticed sometimes you would hear about these negotiating sessions in her office with no food going on all night to try to almost force the conversation. But more often than not, she wasn't operating so much as a parent or a parent figure she was engaging in very tough tactics to consolidate her own power and I'll point to the best one of the best examples might be what she did the moment she got in a speaker in 2007. She without the knowledge of other House members at the very last minute in a rules package that passes to convene the Congress the first day, which is includes all kinds of routine things. There was a sentence in there saying that committee chairman could only serve for 6 years. And everyone voted for this without realizing that that was in there and it consolidated her power because there were these three democratic chairman called the old bulls John dingell on energy and commerce, John Connors on judiciary, Charlie wrangel on ways and means that wanted to rival her power and could stay in these jobs forever, and they didn't realize they voted for it and they were furious. And then just two weeks later, John dingell finds out that she, he's connected with the auto industry, and wasn't as big into climate change proposals as some other progressive Democrats were and he finds out that she is encroaching on his committee's jurisdiction by creating a select committee on climate change and putting Ed Markey, who's very progressive on these issues in charge of that. So that would be her legacy, then wouldn't it? The way that she was able to use her wiles and use the other guys may be mistakes. And use that to help consolidate power. That's one of them. But another example, though, there's another side too, which is her ability to unify them all when she really needed to. And you can credit the democratic takeover in 2007 and again in 2018 with her keeping everyone together on in the first instance, everyone, every Democrat in the house against president Bush's push to privatize social security accounts, which she could see would be politically unpopular, and he had been he had a very high approval ratings and by tacking this program again and again and again. It helped to drive down his approval ratings and set the stage for their campaigns. And then with the lead up to the 2018 elections, it was the repeal of ObamaCare genchi held all House Democrats together against that. She also changed the whole idea about being a working mother because she launched her career in politics quite late. She did, she didn't even run for Congress until her last child was going off to college. But she had been very involved in politics, attracting attention many years earlier as a leading fundraiser for her party. She actually rose up to become the chairwoman of the California Democratic Party and later was the finance chair for the democratic senatorial campaign committee, and it was those fundraising skills that then attracted attention. She ran for Congress in 1987, but she was when she was moving into leadership. It was her ability to raise money for the party that helped her excel and become that whip in 2001 that set the stage for a rise. So she was 50 close to 50. She was 47 at the time. And it's also worth noting women used to wear pinstripes. In dressing charcoal gray and try to look like they were similar dressed to men in the workplace. They didn't talk about their children. She always surrounded herself in when she was being sworn into speaker with her grandchildren or other children of other members, she would talk about being a mother often in the grandmother. She has 9 grandchildren, she's wearing bright colors, pink, and other things. And just showing a more feminine side. Is that where the white pants it comes from? Is that more of a suffrage thing? That's more of a suffragette, symbolism. And she was very good at these intentional wardrobe choices. You know, the white when she showed up last week in the capitol wearing the white pantsuit. This was the day she was going to say whether she was going to seek the democratic leadership position again. And everyone was wondering they knew it was a big moment that she has that suit on. The white was worn by women and the women's movement dating back to the early 1900s and we've seen Hillary Clinton when she accepted

Nancy Pelosi president Kamala Harris Donald Trump House Trump White House Congress John dingell Biden John Connors Charlie wrangel Laura Nancy Ed Markey California Democratic Party president Bush democratic senatorial campaign house Hillary Clinton
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:58 min | 10 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Has been historic in so many ways, not only as a first, but because of the work that she has done, and the benefit that has resulted from her work. Okay, so Laura, let's talk a little bit about Nancy Pelosi's legacy and the work that she's done with The White House, her relationships with the different presidents, of course, Donald Trump made it very clear he was happy, of course, that Republicans had regained the majority in the House, but he seemed to have some specific sentiment for Nancy Pelosi. We have taken over Congress, Nancy Pelosi has been fired. Now, that was as he was announcing his own run for president. And still managed to invoke Nancy Pelosi's name. Let's talk a little bit about Nancy Pelosi's relationship with Donald Trump. Well, it was a very tense relationship and involved in many cases. One or the other than walking out of White House meetings. One of the most famous moments was in May 2019, she had a meeting with Trump on infrastructure and she seemed to realize that she could kind of get under his skin and as a powerful woman and kind of throw him off the track and this was one of the big examples. But at this meeting, kind of devolved into a discussion about how Democrats investigations of him and she at one point accused him of a cover up on their investigations and he ended up leaving the meeting and she wrote a letter to all House Democrats the following day that said Trump had had a temper tantrum for all of us to see. So the next day he's holding a meeting or a press conference to talk about a multi-billion dollar farm aid package. Instead of talking about that, he spent full half hour talking about House Democrats and how unfair it was that they were investigating him and referring to crazy Nancy. Now, you had mentioned that I know a temper tantrum when I see one because she's a mother of 5 grandchildren to so many grandkids. Let me ask you about how she has managed the democratic side of things because she's had to hold that coalition together. She's had to hold that caucus together between the more progressive Democrats and the more moderate or more traditional type Democrats. Making sure that that vote didn't split, that party didn't split. Not an easy task. No, it's not, and there were quite a few moments, especially under Biden. She's had some moments where she was obviously struggling to keep progressives in line on the infrastructure package and letting that move on its own and before trying to work on Biden's economic package. She would use a variety of tactics. You talk about her being a mother. One thing she's over the years, I've noticed sometimes you would hear about these negotiating sessions in her office with no food going on all night to try to almost force the conversation. But more often than not, she wasn't operating so much as a parent or a parent figure she was engaging in very tough tactics to consolidate her own power and I'll point to the best one of the best examples might be what she did the moment she got in a speaker in 2007. She without the knowledge of other House members at the very last minute in a rules package that passes to convene the Congress the first day, which is includes all kinds of routine things. There was a sentence in there saying that committee chairman could only serve for 6 years. And everyone voted for this without realizing that that was in there and it consolidated her power because there were these three democratic chairman called the old bulls, John dingell on energy and commerce, John Connor's own judiciary, Charlie wrangel on ways and means that wanted to rival her power and could stay in these jobs forever, and they didn't realize they voted for it and they were furious. And then just two weeks later, John dingell finds out that she is connected with the auto industry. And it wasn't as big into climate change proposals as some other progressive Democrats were. And he finds out that she is encroaching on his committee's jurisdiction by creating a select committee on climate change and putting Ed Markey, who's very progressive on these issues in charge of that. So that would be her legacy, then wouldn't it? The way that she was able to use her wiles and use the other guys may be mistakes. And use that to help consolidate power. That's one of them. But another example, though, there's another side too, which is her ability to unify them all when she really needed to. And you can credit the democratic takeover in 2007 and again in 2018 with her keeping everyone together on in the first instance, everyone, every Democrat in the house against president Bush's push to privatize social security accounts, which she could see would be politically unpopular, and he had been he had a very high approval ratings and by tacking this program again and again and again. It helped to drive down his approval ratings and set the stage for their campaigns, and then with the lead up to the 2018 elections, it was the repeal of ObamaCare again she held all House Democrats together against that. She also changed the whole idea about being a working mother because she launched her career in politics quite late. She did. She didn't even run for Congress until her last child was going off to college. But she had been very involved in politics, attracting attention many years earlier as a leading fundraiser for her party. She actually rose up to become the chairwoman of the California Democratic Party and later was the finance chair for the democratic senatorial campaign committee, and it was those fundraising skills that then attracted attention. She ran for Congress in 1987, but she was when she was moving into leadership. It was her ability to raise money for the party that helped her excel and become that whip in 2001 that set the stage for her rise. So she was 50 close to 50. She was 47 at the time. And it's also worth noting women used to wear pinstripes. In dressing charcoal gray and try to look like they were similar dressed to men in the workplace. They didn't talk about their children. She always surrounded herself in when she was being sworn into speaker with her grandchildren or other children of other members, she would talk about being a mother often in a grandmother. She has 9 grandchildren, she's wearing bright colors, pink, and other things. And just showing a more feminine side. Is that where the white pants it comes from? Is that more of a suffrage thing? That's more of a suffragette, symbolism. And she was very good at these intentional wardrobe choices. You know, the white when she showed up last week in the capitol wearing the white pantsuit. This was the day she was going to say that whether she was going to seek the democratic leadership position again. And everyone was wondering, they knew it was a big moment that she has that suit on. The white was worn by women and the women's movement, dating batch of the early 1900s, and we've seen Hillary Clinton when she accepted the nomination, the democratic

Nancy Pelosi Donald Trump House Trump White House Congress John dingell Biden Charlie wrangel Laura John Connor Nancy Ed Markey California Democratic Party president Bush democratic senatorial campaign house Hillary Clinton
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Has been historic in so many ways, not only as a first, but because of the work that she has done. And the benefit that has resulted from her work. Okay, so Laura, let's talk a little bit about Nancy Pelosi's legacy and the work that she's done with The White House, her relationships with the different presidents, of course, Donald Trump made it very clear he was happy, of course, that Republicans had regained the majority in the House, but he seemed to have some specific sentiment for Nancy Pelosi. We have taken over Congress Nancy Pelosi has been fired. Now, that was as he was announcing his own run for president. And still managed to invoke Nancy Pelosi's name. Let's talk a little bit about Nancy Pelosi's relationship with Donald Trump. Well, it was a very tense relationship and involved in many cases. One or the other than walking out of White House meetings. One of the most famous moments was in May 2019, she had a meeting with Trump on infrastructure and she seemed to realize that she could kind of get under his skin and as a powerful woman and kind of throw him off track and this was one of the big examples. But at this meeting, kind of devolved into a discussion about House Democrats investigations of him and she at one point accused him of a cover up on their investigations and he ended up leaving the meeting and she wrote a letter to all House Democrats the following day that said Trump had had a temper tantrum for all of us to see. So the next day he's holding a meeting or a press conference to talk about a multi-billion dollar farm aid package. And instead of talking about that, he spent a full half hour talking about House Democrats and how unfair it was that they were investigating him and referring to crazy Nancy. Now, you had mentioned that I know what temper tantrum when I see one because she's a mother of 5 grandchildren to so many grandkids. Let me ask you about how she has managed the democratic side of things because she's had to hold that coalition together. She said to hold that caucus together between the more progressive Democrats and the more moderate or more traditional type Democrats. Making sure that that vote didn't split, that party didn't split. Not an easy task. No, it's not, and there were quite a few moments, especially under Biden, she's had some moments where she was obviously struggling to keep progressives in line on the infrastructure package and letting that move on its own and before trying to work on Biden's economic package. She would use a variety of tactics, you talk about her being a mother. One thing she's over the years, I've noticed sometimes you would hear about these negotiating sessions in her office with no food going on all night to try to almost force the conversation. But more often than not, she wasn't operating so much as a parent or a parent figure she was engaging in very tough tactics to consolidate her own power and I'll point to the best one of the best examples might be what she did the moment she got in a speaker in 2007. She without the knowledge of other House members at the very last minute in a rules package that passes to convene the Congress the first day, which is includes all kinds of routine things. There was a sentence in there saying that committee chairman could only serve for 6 years. And everyone voted for this without realizing that that was in there and it consolidated her power because there were these three democratic chairman called the old bulls John dingell on energy and commerce, John Connors owned judiciary, Charlie wrangel on ways and means that wanted to rival her power and could stay in these jobs forever, and they didn't realize they voted for it and they were furious. And then just two weeks later, John dingell finds out that she is connected with the auto industry. And it wasn't as big into climate change proposals as some other progressive Democrats were and he finds out that she is encroaching on his committee's jurisdiction by creating a select committee on climate change and putting Ed Markey, who's very progressive on these issues in charge of that. So that would be her legacy, then wouldn't it? How the way that she was able to use her wiles and use the other guys may be mistakes. And use that to help consolidate power. That's one of them. But another example, though, there's another side too, which is her ability to unify them all when she really needed to. And you can credit the democratic takeover in 2007 and again in 2018 with her keeping everyone together on in the first instance, everyone, every Democrat in the house against president Bush's push to privatize social security accounts, which she could see would be politically unpopular, and he had been he had a very high approval ratings and by tacking this program again and again and again. It helped to drive down his approval ratings and set the stage for their campaign. And then with the lead up to the 2018 elections, it was the repeal of ObamaCare again she held all House Democrats together against that. She also changed the whole idea about being a working mother because she launched her career in politics quite late. She did. She didn't even run for Congress until her last child was going off to college. But she had been very involved in politics, attracting attention many years earlier as a leading fundraiser for her party. She actually rose up to become the chairwoman of the California Democratic Party and later was the finance chair for the democratic senatorial campaign committee, and it was those fundraising skills that then attracted attention. She ran for Congress in 1987, but she was when she was moving into leadership. It was her ability to raise money for the party that helped her excel and become that whip in 2001 that set the stage for her rise. So she was 50 close to 50. She was 47 at the time. And it's also worth noting women used to wear pinstripes. In dressing charcoal gray and try to look like they were similar dressed to men in the workplace. They didn't talk about their children. She always surrounded herself in when she was being sworn into speaker with her grandchildren or other children of other members, she would talk about being a mother often in the grandmother. She has 9 grandchildren, she's wearing bright colors, pink, and other things. And just showing a more feminine side. Is that where the white pants it comes from? Is that more of a suffrage thing? That's more of a suffragette, symbolism. And she was a very good at these intentional wardrobe choices. You know, the white when she showed up last week in the capitol wearing the white pantsuit. This was the day she was going to say that whether she was going to seek the democratic leadership position again. And everyone was wondering they knew it was a big moment that she has that suit on. The white was worn by women and the women's movement dating back to the early 1900s and we've seen Hillary Clinton when she accepted the nomination, the democratic presidential nomination in 2016 wearing a white

Nancy Pelosi House Donald Trump Trump White House Congress John dingell Biden John Connors Charlie wrangel Laura Nancy Ed Markey California Democratic Party president Bush democratic senatorial campaign house Hillary Clinton
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg business week with Carol masser and Bloomberg quick takes Tim stennis from Bloomberg radio I gotta say Tim what I always love about our company I love a lot of different things I love the people first and foremost but I also love the different aspects of the businesses that everybody at Bloomberg works in And being able to tap their perspectives and pick their brains about what they are seeing it ends up really giving certainly me a wide and deep view of our world which is why we loved recently catching up with Karen Klein She's founder Bloomberg beta Bloomberg beta is Bloomberg's venture capital firm It invests in early stage tech companies that make businesses work better Karen previously led SoftBank's team that reviewed all new investments during the period when SoftBank invested in the likes of BuzzFeed seed round an expert when it comes to the startup scene Quick take co host of liver cross reporter Katie greyfield and I caught up with Karen to talk about how the pandemic has only accelerated existing trends related to how we do our jobs Physical space was more of a dependency and we had to find alternatives So it's been fascinating to see how work is changing Now that we need to find new alternatives and strengthen some of the things that we were doing before related to distributed teams and working remotely And so what does that translate to into 2022 I mean it feels like this pandemic is never ending that remote work both people like it but also you've seen so many companies around Wall Street and beyond having to delay return to office plans How does that translate into a sort of venture capital theme There's a bunch of ways that it's affecting us I mean we're seeing it certainly around certain areas like learning right Like how do you figure out what you're supposed to do with one's kids right Should they be in school Should we emphasize and move more toward remote types of learning So there's been huge growth in education similarly around digital health We had a fine solutions because we couldn't necessarily go to visit our doctors physically So those two have been areas where we've seen a bunch of opportunities and then just naturally what's happening in the workplace is changing as well because it used to be very easy where you could pop over to somebody's desk and ask them how they're doing And now there has to be and one of the things we love about Bloomberg is you were talking about earlier and you'd be in the pantry and you'd be able to bump into colleagues and get updates and there'd be all sorts of serendipity that would happen And we just don't have that now So we need to turn to online tools and examples of such I can give you a couple of them that we've seen and we like the product so much We ended up investing and it's things like donut which creates a water cooler so that there's more of an opportunity to get to know the personal side of what your colleagues have happening as well as just to check in which is also extremely useful during this time Well I love what you said Karen too about serendipity because I do think about that is so much part of our Bloomberg culture You run into somebody from a different division a different part of the business and it's like oh wait we should be doing this right And that's how things happen I mean what's happening in this space in terms of innovation and disruption Are you at all a little bit concerned that some of that might slow down although it feels like the pandemic sped up a lot of innovation but because we're not because we're often having to meet with people virtually that maybe some of that serendipity is lost in this environment There's definitely a benefit to seeing people in person and just being able to read some of the reactions and responses and around collaborative work such as brainstorming We haven't yet necessarily cracked the code on how to do some of those well But the other thing that we're seeing is we're just all getting inundated There's just too many messages alerts notifications and it's very hard to follow what's happening and keep organized And so there's been a proliferation of tools that have emerged there too There's a company that we like out of North Carolina that is called wrangel and what it does is it allows people to since we're all living and slack and teams it allows us to stay in some of those chat rooms and be able to approve vendor requests or pass needs on to different divisions within the company So there's certainly a rise in different productivity tools to ensure that some of the things that we used to be able to pop over to somebody's desk and learn about still gets done Karen tell us a little bit more about some of the companies that you guys at Bloomberg beta have invested in when it comes to how we work One of the areas I'm particularly excited about right now is around culture and just because we're spread out our homes are becoming our workplaces It's just so important for leadership to be much more intentional around that And we've heard a lot of talk about this great resignation I actually think it's an opportunity for the best leaders to upgrade their talent and that that's the way they should be looking at it And so there are a bunch of tools and technologies that can kind of help us keep them better touch with our employees and know what's going on And it might be around corporate training so that people feel valued and can develop the skills they need.

Bloomberg SoftBank Carol masser Bloomberg quick Tim stennis Bloomberg radio Karen Klein Karen Katie greyfield Tim North Carolina
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"From Bloomberg radio I gotta say Tim what I always love about our company I love a lot of different things I love the people first and foremost but I also love the different aspects of the businesses that everybody at Bloomberg works in And being able to tap their perspectives and pick their brains about what they are seeing it ends up really giving certainly me a wide and deep view of our world which is why we loved recently catching up with Karen Klein She's founder Bloomberg beta Bloomberg beta is Bloomberg's venture capital firm It invests in early stage tech companies that make businesses work better Karen previously led SoftBank's team that reviewed all new investments during the period when SoftBank invested in the likes of BuzzFeed seed round an expert when it comes to the startup scene Quick take co host of liver process reporter Katie greyfield and I caught up with Karen to talk about how the pandemic has only accelerated existing trends related to how we do our jobs Physical space was more of a dependency and we had to find alternatives So it's been fascinating to see how work is changing now that we need to find new alternatives and strengthen some of the things that we were doing before related to distributed teams and working remotely And so what does that translate to into 2022 I mean it feels like this pandemic is never ending that remote work both people like it but also you've seen so many companies around Wall Street and beyond having to delay return to office plans How does that translate into a sort of venture capital theme There's a bunch of ways that it's affecting us I mean we're seeing it certainly around certain areas like learning right Like how do you figure out what you're supposed to do with one's kids right Should they be in school Should we emphasize and move more toward remote types of learning So there's been huge growth in education similarly around digital health We had a fine solutions because we couldn't necessarily go to visit our doctors physically So those two have been areas where we've seen a bunch of opportunities and then just naturally what's happening in the workplace is changing as well because it used to be very easy where you could pop over to somebody's desk and ask them how they're doing And now there has to be and one of the things we love about Bloomberg is as you were talking about earlier is you'd be in the pantry and you'd be able to bump into colleagues and get updates and there'd be all sorts of serendipity that would happen And we just don't have that now So we need to turn to online tools and examples of such I can give you a couple of them that we've seen and we like the product so much We ended up investing And it's things like donut which creates a water cooler so that there's more of an opportunity to get to know the personal side of what your colleagues have happening as well as just to check in which is also extremely useful during this time Well I love what you said Karen too about serendipity because I do think about that is so much part of our Bloomberg culture You run into somebody from a different division a different part of the business and it's like oh wait we should be doing this right And that's how things happen I mean what's happening in this space in terms of innovation and disruption Are you at all a little bit concerned that some of that might slow down although it feels like the pandemic sped up a lot of innovation but because we're not because we're often having to meet with people virtually that maybe some of that serendipity is lost in this environment There's definitely a benefit to seeing people in person and just being able to read some of the reactions and responses and around collaborative work or such as brainstorming We haven't yet necessarily cracked the code on how to do some of those well But the other thing that we're seeing is we're just all getting inundated There's just too many messages alerts notifications and it's very hard to follow what's happening and keep organized And so there's been a proliferation of tools that have emerged there too There's a company that we like out of North Carolina that is called wrangel and what it does is it allows people to since we're all living and slack and teams it allows us to stay in some of those chat rooms and be able to approve vendor requests or pass seeds on to different divisions within the company So there's certainly a rise in different productivity tools to ensure that some of the things that we used to be able to pop over to somebody's desk and learn about still gets done Karen tell us a little bit more about some of the companies that you guys at Bloomberg beta have invested in when it comes to how we work One of the areas I'm particularly excited about right now is around culture and just because we're spread out our homes are becoming our workplaces It's just so important for leadership to be much more intentional around that And we've heard a lot of talk about this great resignation I actually think it's an opportunity for the best leaders to upgrade their talent and that that's the way they should be looking at it And so there are a bunch of tools and technologies that can kind of help us keep in better touch with our employees and know what's going on And it might be around corporate training so that people feel valued and can develop the skills they need and we have a company we invested in called code academy that's just getting sold to skill soft because it helps people learn how to code in a much more seamless seamless kind of way degree does corporate education training And so there's some along the training part I think we're going to see a lot more There certainly have been some around mental health and it's now becoming more okay just because to talk about it And so companies are going to be offering a lot more resources to make sure the well-being of their employees work If they want to retain those employees I'm eager to see that transition One of the other things that maybe not even in the culture around that I think is going to also pop up is because we are working in different places There are even greater security vulnerabilities happening And so we're going to continue to see a lot of movement around security We have a company called flashpoint New York based And 6 years ago they were a small startup Now they're buying risk based which is a big deal that they're able to buy another meaningful company and continue to make us all safer And in particular it's doing it around the log four J challenges I think is going to be a lot more buttoned up with that They're combined offering That's Karen Klein founder of Bloomberg beta She spoke with Carol as well as my co host on Bloomberg quick take stock Katie Griffith Business week a company called ID me is trying to control.

Bloomberg SoftBank Karen Karen Klein Katie greyfield Tim North Carolina New York Katie Griffith Carol
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Takes Tim stenton from Bloomberg radio I gotta say Tim what I always love about our company I love a lot of different things I love the people first and foremost but I also love the different aspects of the businesses that everybody at Bloomberg works in And being able to tap their perspectives and pick their brains about what they are seeing it ends up really giving certainly me a wide and deep view of our world which is why we loved recently catching up with Karen Klein She's founder Bloomberg beta Bloomberg beta is Bloomberg's venture capital firm It invests in early stage tech companies that make businesses work better Karen previously led SoftBank's team that reviewed all new investments during the period when SoftBank invested in the likes of BuzzFeed seed round an expert when it comes to the startup scene It will have a quick take co host of liver cross asset reporter Katie greyfield and I caught up with Karen to talk about how the pandemic has only accelerated existing trends related to how we do our jobs Physical space was more of a dependency and we had to find alternatives So it's been fascinating to see how work is changing Now that we need to find new alternatives and strengthen some of the things that we were doing before related to distributed teams and working remotely And so what does that translate to into 2022 I mean it feels like this pandemic is never ending that remote work both people like it but also you've seen so many companies around Wall Street and beyond having to delay return to office plans How does that translate into a sort of venture capital theme There's a bunch of ways that it's affecting us I mean we're seeing it certainly around certain areas like learning right Like how do you figure out what you're supposed to do with one's kids right Should they be in school Should we emphasize and move more toward remote types of learning So there's been huge growth in education similarly around digital health We had a fine solutions because we couldn't necessarily go to visit our doctors physically So those two have been areas where we've seen a bunch of opportunities and then just naturally what's happening in the workplace is changing as well because it used to be very easy where you could pop over to somebody's desk and ask them how they're doing And now there has to be and one of the things we love about Bloomberg is you were talking about earlier and you'd be in the pantry and you'd be able to bump into colleagues and get updates and there'd be all sorts of serendipity that would happen And we just don't have that now So we need to turn to online tools and examples of such I can give you a couple of them that we've seen and we like the product so much We ended up investing and it's things like donut which creates a water cooler so that there's more of an opportunity to get to know the personal side of what your colleagues have happening as well as just to check in which is also extremely useful during this time Well I love you You said Karen too about serendipity because I do think about that is so much part of our bloomer culture You run into somebody from a different division a different part of the business and it's like oh wait we should be doing this right And that's how things happen I mean what's happening in this space in terms of innovation and disruption Are you at all a little bit concerned that some of that might slow down although it feels like the pandemic sped up a lot of innovation but because we're not because we're often having to meet with people virtually that maybe some of that serendipity is lost in this environment There's definitely a benefit to seeing people in person and just being able to read some of the reactions and responses and around collaborative work such as brainstorming We haven't yet necessarily cracked the code on how to do some of those well But the other thing that we're seeing is we're just all getting inundated There's just too many messages alerts notifications and it's very hard to follow what's happening and keep organized And so there's been a proliferation of tools that have emerged there too There's a company that we like out of North Carolina that is called wrangel and what it does is it allows people to since we're all living in slack and teams it allows us to stay in some of those chat rooms and be able to approve vendor requests or pass needs on to different divisions within the company So there's certainly a rise in different productivity tools to ensure that some of the things that we used to be able to pop over to somebody's desk and learn about still gets done Karen tell us a little bit more about some of the companies that you guys at Bloomberg beta have invested in when it comes to how we work One of the areas I'm particularly excited about right now is around culture and just because we're spread out our homes are becoming our workplaces It's just so important for leadership to be much more intentional around that And we've heard a lot of talk about this great resignation I actually think it's an opportunity for the best leaders to upgrade their talent and that that's the way they should be looking at it And so there are a bunch of tools and technologies that can kind of help us keep them better touch with our employees and know what's going on And it might be around corporate training so that people feel valued and can develop the skills they need And we have a company we invested in called code academy that's just getting sold to skill soft because it helps people learn how to code in a much more seamless seamless kind of way degree does corporate education training And so there's some along the training part I think we're going to see a lot more There certainly have been some around mental health and it's now becoming more okay just because to talk about it And so companies are going to be offering a lot more resources to make sure the well-being of their employees work If they want to retain those employees Eager to see that transition One of the other things that maybe not even in the culture around that I think is going to also pop up is because we are working in different places There are even greater security vulnerabilities happening And so we're going to continue to see a lot of movement around security We have a company called flashpoint New York based And 6 years ago they were a small startup Now they're buying risk based which is a big deal that they're able to buy another meaningful company and continue to make us all safer And in particular it's doing it around the log four J challenges I think is going to be a lot more buttoned up with their combined offering That's Karen Klein founder of Bloomberg beta She spoke with Carol as well as my co host on Bloomberg quick take stock Katie Griffith A company called ID me is trying to control a.

Bloomberg SoftBank Karen Tim stenton Bloomberg radio Karen Klein Katie greyfield Tim North Carolina New York Katie Griffith Carol
"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Today Ten year treasury jumping more than 8 basis points and yield weird one 78 some disappointing economic news beginning with at retail sales figure in December we were we saw a drop the biggest one in about ten months and it really underscores this idea that surging inflation now is taking a greater toll on consumers also today were the growth in U.S. factory output unexpectedly declined I'm Doug Krishna and that is your Bloomberg business flash Really appreciate it With that Bloomberg business news flash You're listening to Bloomberg businessweek Cal master along with Katie Griffith on this Friday and what I love Katie about our company I mean I love many things And truth be told front and center is the people but also the different aspects of the business that everybody works in their perspectives and our access to pick their brains about what they're seeing I feel like it really gives us a wide and deep view of our world Oh absolutely I mean just in this building alone Bloomberg headquarters there's so many different parts of the organization in this building and I mean back in the old days the before times every face in the pantry it felt like it was a new one Yeah exactly Well which is why I loved recently catching up with Karen Kline founder Bloomberg beta She worked previously at SoftBank She led their team that reviewed all their new investments during a period when SoftBank invested in the likes of BuzzFeed Their seed round really just has seen so much when it comes to the startup scene And she joins us on the phone in Florida on this Friday Karen so nice to have you with Katie and myself How are you Oh Carol It's always a pleasure to speak with you and hello Katie It's great to connect This was just such a great way to wrap the day to get a chance for us to catch up Me too I feel that way It's been a bit of a crazy weekend I think we're trying to make sense of a lot of stuff that's out there and a lot of uncertainties with the outlook I think about Karen the longer we are in this pandemic and you guys at Bloomberg beta you are thinking about how we're working how we will be working How does all of that the pandemic kind of shape some of your thinking as a venture capitalist investor and maybe some of the trends that are with us to stay Yes So the pandemic has had a profound impact on a lot of the things that we've been seeing Bloomberg beta focuses on the future of work And the pandemic essentially accelerated a lot of the trends and things that we saw where physical space was more of a dependency and we had to find alternatives So it's been fascinating to see how work is changing Now that we need to find new alternatives and strength in some of the things that we were doing before related to distributed teams and working remotely And so what does that translate to into 2022 I mean it feels like this pandemic is never ending that remote work both people like it but also you've seen so many companies around Wall Street and beyond having to delay return to office plans How does that translate into a sort of venture capital theme So there's a bunch of ways that it's affecting us I mean we're seeing it certainly around certain areas like learning right Like how do you figure out what you're supposed to do with one kids right Should they be in school Should we emphasize and move more toward remote types of learning So there's been huge growth in education similarly around digital health We had a fine solutions because we couldn't necessarily go to visit our doctors physically So those two have been areas where we've seen a bunch of opportunities and then just naturally what's happening in the workplace is changing as well because it used to be very easy where you could pop over to somebody's desk and ask them how they're doing And now there has to be and one of the things we love about Bloomberg is as you were talking about earlier is you'd be in the pantry and you'd be able to bump into colleagues and get updates and there'd be all sorts of serendipity that would happen And we just don't have that now So we need to turn to online tools and examples of such that can give you a couple of them that we've seen and we like the product so much We ended up investing and it's things like donut which creates a water cooler so that there's more of an opportunity to get to know the personal side of what your colleagues have happening as well as just to check in which is also extremely useful during this time Well let me say Karen too about serendipity because I do think about that is so much part of our Bloomberg culture You run into somebody from a different division a different part of the business and it's like oh wait we should be doing this right And that's how things happen I mean what's happening in this space in terms of innovation and disruption Are you at all a little bit concerned that some of that might slow down although it feels like the pandemic sped up a lot of innovation but because we're not because we're often having to meet with people virtually that maybe some of that serendipity is lost in this environment There's definitely a benefit to seeing people in person and just being able to read some of the reactions and responses and around collaborative work such as brainstorming We haven't yet necessarily cracked the code on how to do some of those well But the other thing that we're seeing is we're just all getting inundated There's just too many messages alerts notifications and it's very hard to follow what's happening and keep organized And so there's been a proliferation of tools that have emerged there too There's a company that we like out of North Carolina that is called wrangel and what it does is it allows people to since we're all living in slack and teams it allows us to stay in some of those chat rooms and be able to approve vendor requests or pass seeds on to different divisions within the company So there's certainly a rise in different productivity tools to ensure that some of the things that we used to be able to pop over to somebody's desk and learn about still gets done Sit tight for a second camera We're going to do a little bit of news but we'll come back and continue our conversation We're talking about Karen Klein She's founder of Bloomberg beta will get back to her in just a moment In the meantime out.

Bloomberg Katie Doug Krishna SoftBank Katie Griffith Karen Kline Karen Bloomberg businessweek Carol U.S. Florida North Carolina Karen Klein
"wrangel" Discussed on Lacey & Flynn Have Sex

Lacey & Flynn Have Sex

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"wrangel" Discussed on Lacey & Flynn Have Sex

"Today are tenure a ten year anniversary because we began our love in yoga ten years ago in my small yoga studio on wrangel. Strata in christ's virk. I'm going in berlin. I'm going to take you now to do a private yoga class where we're going to focus on love and be taught by someone else so that's what we're going to do right now so beautiful. We'll have the whole space to ourself so cool. Yeah we'll done thank you so much. Let's go do what i love. You love you honey. Alright all right. That's another episode of lacy and flynn wrapped. Thank you for giving us your time. We love you now if you stayed if you listened if you're here this spoke to you in some way gave you something challenged you. It inspired you and so we would really appreciate some love. We're literally giving the love as we can on the podcast snaking love and you get to listen and what we want is just a tiny bit of love back a couple of minutes. Yes so here. Are the three things that we would really like from you. We want you to follow or subscribe wherever you listen. This means that you'll get our episodes straight to your pocket and it also means that our show will be shown to more people so we can help more people and inspire more people. It's win win. Take a second to give us a review. Hopefully it's five stars. And then think back to appoint in the age that really spoke to you and and right about that share on and we will be sharing favourite reviews on the show. So you can keep your ears open to hear. Maybe your name spoken live on the show and then the last thing we want from you is to share screenshot. While you're listening pop onto social in your stories. Whatsapp it to a pow. Your word of mouth is so important to us. It's how we've gotten our work out there in the first place. It's how we're here doing this. So maintaining that momentum in connection is paramount to creating a thriving community and to elevating the sex of the world and you get to obey the person that discovered us. Share us with your friends. I call i love being the person that spreads the cool stuff. Because the other gonna look at your lot holiday. Always the one that is funding. The cool stuff is true. All right we love you so much. Thank you for joining us for lacy and flynn and we will see you next week to sumo. We love you love. You was while love forever. One terms and conditions apply..

berlin ten year five stars next week Today Whatsapp ten years ago three things One terms first place sumo virk christ Strata
GE, AerCap join air leasing businesses in $30 billion deal

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

GE, AerCap join air leasing businesses in $30 billion deal

"General Electric has reached a deal to combine its jet leasing business with rival air cap. In a deal valued at $30 billion As G moves to reduce its debt load. The creation of a new industry giant could mean airlines get better deals on planes has a larger leasing company from Wrangel. Lower prices from Airbus and Boeing. Shares of G, though, are tumbling 4.7% Today. It

General Electric Airbus Boeing
"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

"In your life that you were there for them. John just want to remind you. I'm here for you. Yeah thanks thanks. I'm still here for you. Yeah bet you are. He's got to believe in this. That's she's not an actress. Let's not performance. Should that was. That was real. She was very sad very well. Get her off the air. Then know this is. This is the ratings. Babies is how it goes where we want. Meanwhile the real story is in other dead. People meet ken mckenzie. We actually have to give a reservation code to a family just so that they could be seen when people call him. He says they usually want to interview to decide if they want to. Use the services. But now i question is are you taking cases to panic in their voices just so sad. Mackenzie runs his own funeral. Home here in long beach california. He is busier now than at any other point. Democ a year ago. People were complaining about not finding toilet paper this time of year concern because we're running out of granite headstones. The nearly five hundred thousand people who have died with covid nineteen three members of the wrangel family who mckinsey cremated and the span of sixteen days. All three of them pass through lewis. Jerry and all maringgele was alone. We had to watch her on an ipad. Take our last breath. I had to ask a doctor. Didn't know to hold her hand for me. It was the wrangel family walking into his funeral home with back to back deaths. That just broke him. I have never broke down. I'm supposed to be professional. And it was yet another death with the same family. And i sat there and cried with them. It was non. Stop this type of reporting collectively roll out. The death stuff boys trying to milk this a little bit more than should i. You know. i don't know. I'd we still have all these different factions in the different teams. That play so. I'm not quite sure you know is who is the. I think the idea was The the president will go out and we'll do our vigil. Everyone participate will cry. We'll told the bells and that will be the you know. We can put that behind us. But i just don't see the the media doing that. The just not stopping at continue to to put a there. I think i mentioned this in the newsletter. I think they're freaked out that they were the To down the no income is they have to do this. Fear porn. I mean they're doing it on. Abc i do have a series of clips. When you're ready go ahead go ahead i. I don't have anything really specific. I have a lot of different things But most stuff i got was international by did get these these clips about the A number of screwball things Let's play these vaccine clips. This is easy. Okay all right we can do. This is this is the covert yak yak yak yak yak vaccine one. This gonna play these three clips in one of them. I wouldn't ask you some questions about before it before we go to it. These a short. This is the part one of the series. The new sixty two page report from the fda out today saying the one shot vaccine is safe and effective emergency use authorization. Could now come within days. Those welcome numbers tonight. The vaccine is eighty six percent effective at preventing severe illness here in the us one hundred percent effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths at least seventy percent effective against asymmetric spread. When you have no symptoms when you don't even know you have it if we can hope that we can reduce transmission. All of this comes after pfizer said just yesterday that it will meet that deadline by the end of july three hundred million doses and derna saying three hundred million doses by the end of july two. That would be enough for all americans. And all of that was without the news from johnson and johnson tonight so this evening what does this. All mean for the timeline. Could vaccinations happen sooner. Even if it's just weeks sooner and protracting more fema vaccination sites opening just today this one in queens new york aiming to administer three thousand shots a day this one in houston tonight hoping for six thousand shots a day so this evening what you need to know about. This new one shot vaccine. And how soon could we see it. Dr jaw standing by. Abc's pilgrim leading us off all right. Now we're going to have a couple of years. Knows a couple of things. David muir there. He hinted about things like what we need to know. What what's the difference with this new vaccine and on and on okay. Let's play part two tonight just days away from potential emergency use authorization the. Us is now likely on the verge of a third vaccine and this time a single dose and the news is promising new analysis. Today finding the johnson and johnson one does vaccine safe and effective eighty six percent effective for preventing severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent affected in preventing hospitalizations or deaths another key sizing the report saying single-dose maxine may really yeah notice that all she does is reiterate with david. Muir said this. I have noticed this in general. And you'll you hear a couple more times in the clips. The way the reporting goes is the the president said it would take five years to accomplish this and they go to clip. It'll take five years to accomplish this and they go right they don't go to. This is worse because this is not going to the clip and the guy saying what you said is just proof. Yeah but this is different. There's no proof here. You have one eighty six percent effective and they said what do you have to say about this. Eighty six percent effective of another reporter reporting the same fact and land a new a new number though one hundred percent effective at stopping hospitalizations and death seriously. Oh that's interesting david. Muir said the same thing that she said it again and they say it again in a later clip reporting the reporting on the previous report. That's how you do it from the same memo. His hundred percent thing is a bit questionable if he asked me be careful with. That advertisement is what i'd say. Hey you said one hundred percent. I'm suing you know you call. They never does. Suga was the report. You're correct right. Let's listen to the whole thing then. Dinning severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent effective in preventing hospitalizations or deaths. Another key finding the report saying the single-dose vaccine may also prevent some eysenck disease. When you don't even know you have it which means it could help. Reduce the spread of the virus. Preliminary analysis suggests that a vaccine provides a seventy four percents protection against a symptomatic disease which is important because if you can prevent asymmetric disease then you will also reduce transmission. The fda saying vaccine had the expected side effects like fever and fatigue but no reports of severe allergic reactions. Overall of the vaccine provides very robust protection throughout the world including against the worrisome bio variants. So what does this mean for the vaccine supply in the us. Johnson and johnson says it could have three to four million doses. Sent out next week. It could have one hundred million doses. By this summer visor and madonna already promised enough doses for all americans by the end of july. So this newest maxine could simply add to that supply. The us could actually have a surplus enough for four hundred.

David Mackenzie johnson Jerry five years hundred percent John Johnson four hundred ken mckenzie next week one hundred percent yesterday one hundred million doses Today sixteen days houston Eighty six percent ipad today
"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

"In your life that you were there for them. John just want to remind you. I'm here for you. Yeah row thanks thanks. I'm still here for you. Yeah bet you are. He's got to believe in this. That's she's not an actress. Let's not a performance. Should that was. That was real. She was very sad to very well. Get her off the air. Then know this is. This is the ratings. Babies is how it goes where we want. Meanwhile the real story is in other dead. People meet ken mckenzie. We actually have to give a reservation code to a family just so that they could be seen when people call him. He says they usually want to interview to decide if they want to. Use the services. But now i question is are you taking cases to panic in their voices just so sad. Mackenzie runs his own funeral. Home here in long beach california. He is busier now than at any other point. Democ a year ago. People were complaining about not finding toilet paper this time of year concern because we're running out of granite headstones. Nearly five hundred thousand people who have died with covid nineteen three members of the wrangel family who mckinsey cremated and the span of sixteen days. All three of them pass through lewis jerry and all maringgele. My sister was alone. We had to watch her on an ipad. Take our last breath. I had to ask a doctor. Didn't know to hold her hand for me. It was the wrangel family walking into his funeral home with back to back deaths. That just broke him. I have never broke down. I'm supposed to be professional. And it was yet another death with the same family. And i sat there and cried with them. It was non. Stop this type of reporting collectively roll out the death stuff boys. I think they're trying to milk. This a little bit more than should i you know. I don't know i'd we still have all these different factions in the different teams. That play so. I'm not quite sure you know is who is the. I think the idea was The the president will go out and we'll do our vigil. Everyone participate will cry. We'll told the bells and that will be the you know. We can put that behind us. But i just don't see the the media doing that. The just not stopping at continue to to put a there. I think i mentioned this in the newsletter. I think they're freaked out that they were the To down the no income is they have to do this. Fear porn. I mean they're doing it on. Abc i do have a series of clips. When you're ready go ahead go ahead i. I don't have anything really specific. I have a lot of different things But most stuff i got was international by did get these these clips about the A number of screwball things. But let's play these vaccine clips. This is easy. Okay all right we can do this. Could this is the covert yak yak yak yak yak vaccine one. This gonna play these three clips in one of them. I wouldn't ask you some questions about before it before we go to. It is a short. This is the part one of the series. The new sixty two page report from the fda out today saying the one shot vaccine is safe and effective emergency use authorization. Could now come within days. Those welcome numbers tonight. The vaccine is eighty six percent effective at preventing severe illness here in the us one hundred percent effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths at least seventy percent effective against a cinematic spread. When you have no symptoms when you don't even know you have it if we can hope that we can reduce transmission. All of this comes after pfizer said just yesterday that it will meet that deadline by the end of july three hundred million doses and derna saying three hundred million doses by the end of july two. That would be enough for all americans. And all of that was without the news from johnson and johnson tonight so this evening what does this. All mean for the timeline. Could vaccinations happen sooner. Even if it's just weeks sooner and protracting more fema vaccination sites opening just today this one in queens new york aiming to administer three thousand shots a day this one in houston tonight hoping for six thousand shots a day so this evening what you need to know about. This new one shot vaccine. And how soon could we see it. Dr jaw standing by. Abc's pilgrim leading us off all right. Now we're going to have a couple of years. Knows a couple of things. David muir there. He hinted about things like what we need to know. What what's the difference with this new vaccine and on and on okay. Let's play part two tonight just days away from potential emergency use authorization the. Us is now likely on the verge of a third vaccine and this time a single dose and the news is promising new analysis. Today finding the johnson and johnson one does vaccine safe and effective eighty six percent effective for preventing severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent affected in preventing hospitalizations or deaths another key sizing the report saying single-dose maxine may really yeah notice that all she does is reiterate with david. Muir said this. I have noticed this in general. And you'll you hear a couple more times in the clips. The way the reporting goes is the the president said it would take five years to accomplish this and they go to clip. It'll take five years to accomplish this and they go right they don't go to. This is worse because this is not going to the clip and the guy saying what you said is just proof. Yeah but this is different. There's no proof here. You have one reporter saying eighty six percent effective and they said what do you have to say about this. Eighty six percent effective of another reporter reporting the same fact and land a new a new number though one hundred percent effective at stopping hospitalizations and death seriously. Oh that's interesting david. Muir said the same thing that she said it again and they say it again in a later clip reporting the reporting on the previous report. That's how you do it from the same memo. This hundred percent thing is a bit questionable if he asked me be careful with. That advertisement is what i'd say. Hey you said one hundred percent. I'm suing you know you call. They never does. Suga was the report. You're correct right. Let's listen to the whole thing then. Dinning severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent effective in preventing hospitalizations or deaths. Another key finding the report saying the single-dose vaccine may also prevent some eysenck dramatic disease. When you don't even know you have it which means it could help. Reduce the spread of the virus. Preliminary analysis suggests that a vaccine provides a seventy four percents protection against a symptomatic disease which is important because if you can prevent asymmetric disease then you will also reduce transmission. The fda saying vaccine had the expected side effects like fever and fatigue but no reports of severe allergic reactions. Overall of the vaccine provides very robust protection throughout the world including against the worrisome bio variants. So what does this mean for the vaccine supply in the us. Johnson and johnson says it could have three to four million doses. Sent out next week. It could have one hundred million doses. By this summer visor and madonna already promised enough doses for all americans by the end of july. So this newest maxine could simply add to that supply. The us could actually have a surplus enough for four hundred.

David ken mckenzie five years Mackenzie johnson Johnson John ipad one hundred percent houston next week four hundred yesterday Today a year ago today Eighty six percent one hundred million doses sixteen days david
"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

"In your life that you were there for them. John just want to remind you. I'm here for you. Yeah row thanks thanks. I'm still here for you. Yeah bet you are. He's got to believe in this. That's she's not an actress. Let's not a performance. Should that was. That was real. She was very sad to very well. Get her off the air then. No this is. This is the ratings. Babies is how it goes where we want. Meanwhile the real story is in other dead. People meet ken mckenzie. We actually have to give a reservation code to a family just so that they could be seen when people call him. He says they usually want to interview to decide if they want to. Use the services. But now i question is are you taking cases to panic in their voices just so sad. Mackenzie runs his own funeral. Home here in long beach california. He is busier now than at any other point. Democ a year ago. People were complaining about not finding toilet paper this time of year concern because we're running out of granite headstones. Nearly five hundred thousand people who have died with covid nineteen three members of the wrangel family who mckinsey cremated and the span of sixteen days. All three of them pass through lewis jerry and all maringgele. My sister was alone. We had to watch her on an ipad. Take our last breath. I had to ask a doctor. Didn't know to hold her hand for me. It was the wrangel family walking into his funeral home with back to back deaths. That just broke him. I have never broke down. I'm supposed to be professional. And it was yet another death with the same family. And i sat there and cried with them. It was non. Stop this type of reporting collectively roll out the death stuff boys. I think they're trying to milk. This a little bit more than should i you know. I don't know i'd we still have all these different factions in the different teams. That play so. I'm not quite sure you know who is the. I think the idea was The the president will go out and we'll do our vigil. Everyone participate will cry. We'll told the bells and that will be the you know. We can put that behind us. But i just don't see the the media doing that. The just not stopping at continue to to put a there. I think i mentioned this in the newsletter. I think they're freaked out that they were the To down the no income is they have to do this. Fear porn. I mean they're doing it on. Abc i do have a series of clips. When you're ready go ahead go ahead i. I don't have anything really specific. I have a lot of different things But most stuff i got was international by did get these these clips about the A number of screwball things. But let's play these vaccine clips. This is easy. Okay all right we can do this. Could this is the covert yak yak yak yak yak vaccine one. This i'm gonna play these three clips in one of them. I wouldn't ask you some questions about before it before we go to. It is a short. This is the part one of the series. The new sixty two page report from the fda out today saying the one shot vaccine is safe and effective emergency use authorization. Could now come within days. Those welcome numbers tonight. The vaccine is eighty six percent effective at preventing severe illness here in the us one hundred percent effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths at least seventy percent effective against asymmetric spread. When you have no symptoms when you don't even know you have it if we can hope that we can reduce transmission. All of this comes after pfizer said just yesterday that it will meet that deadline by the end of july three hundred million doses and derna saying three hundred million doses by the end of july two. That would be enough for all americans. And all of that was without the news from johnson and johnson tonight so this evening what does this. All mean for the timeline. Could vaccinations happen sooner. Even if it's just weeks sooner and protracting more fema vaccination sites opening just today this one in queens new york aiming to administer three thousand shots a day this one in houston tonight hoping for six thousand shots a day so this evening what you need to know about. This new one shot vaccine. And how soon could we see it. Dr jaw standing by. Abc's pilgrim leading us off all right. Now we're going to have a couple of years. Knows a couple of things. David muir there. He hinted about things like what we need to know. What what's the difference with this new vaccine and on and on okay. Let's play part two tonight just days away from potential emergency use authorization the. Us is now likely on the verge of a third vaccine and this time a single dose and the news is promising new analysis. Today finding the johnson and johnson one does vaccine safe and effective eighty six percent effective for preventing severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent affected in preventing hospitalizations or deaths another key sizing the report saying single-dose maxine may really yeah notice that they all she does is reiterate with david. Muir said this. I have noticed this in general and you'll you'll hear it a couple more times in the clips. The way the reporting goes is the the president said it would take five years to accomplish this and they go to clip. It'll take five years to accomplish this and they go right they don't go to. This is worse because this is not going to the clip and the guy saying what you said is just proof. Yeah but this is different. There's no proof here. You have one eighty six percent effective and they said what do you have to say about this. Eighty six percent effective of another reporter reporting the same fact and land a new a new number though one hundred percent effective at stopping hospitalizations and death seriously. Oh that's interesting david. Muir said the same thing that she said it again and they say it again in a later clip reporting the reporting on the previous report. That's how you do it from the same memo. His hundred percent thing is a bit questionable if he asked me be careful with. That advertisement is what i'd say. Hey you said one hundred percent. I'm suing you know you call. They never does. Suga was the report. You're correct right. Let's listen to the whole thing then. Dinning severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent effective in preventing hospitalizations or deaths. Another key finding the report saying the single-dose vaccine may also prevent some eysenck disease. When you don't even know you have it which means it could help. Reduce the spread of the virus. Preliminary analysis suggests that a vaccine provides a seventy four percents protection against a symptomatic disease which is important because if you can prevent asymmetric disease then you will also reduce transmission. The fda saying vaccine had the expected side effects like fever and fatigue but no reports of severe allergic reactions. Overall of the vaccine provides very robust protection throughout the world including against the worrisome bio variants. So what does this mean for the vaccine supply in the us. Johnson and johnson says it could have three to four million doses. Sent out next week. It could have one hundred million doses. By this summer visor and madonna already promised enough doses for all americans by the end of july. So this newest maxine could simply add to that supply. The us could actually have a surplus enough for four hundred.

David ken mckenzie johnson five years Mackenzie Johnson John ipad four hundred hundred percent Today houston one hundred percent yesterday next week end of july today a year ago Eighty six percent sixteen days
"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

"In your life that you were there for them. John just want to remind you. I'm here for you. Yeah thanks thanks. I'm still here for you. Yeah bet you are. He's got to believe in this. That's she's not an actress. Let's not performance. Should that was. That was real. She was very sad very well. Get her off the air then. No this is. This is the ratings. Babies is how it goes where we want. Meanwhile the real story is in other dead. People meet ken mckenzie. We actually have to give a reservation code to a family just so that they could be seen when people call him. He says they usually want to interview to decide if they want to. Use the services. But now i question is are you taking cases the panic in their voices just so sad. Mackenzie runs his own funeral. Home here in long beach california. He is busier now than at any other point. Democ a year ago. People were complaining about not finding toilet paper this time of year concern because we're running out of granite headstones. The nearly five hundred thousand people who have died with covid nineteen three members of the wrangel family who mckinsey cremated and the span of sixteen days. All three of them pass through lewis. Jerry and all maringgele was alone. We had to watch her on an ipad. Take our last breath. I had to ask a doctor. Didn't know to hold her hand for me. It was the wrangel family walking into his funeral home with back to back deaths. That just broke him. I have never broke down. I'm supposed to be professional. And it was yet another death with the same family. And i sat there and cried with them. It was non. Stop this type of reporting collectively roll out. The death stuff boys trying to milk this a little bit more than should i. You know. i don't know. I'd we still have all these different factions in the different teams. That play so. I'm not quite sure you know is who is the. I think the idea was The the president will go out and we'll do our vigil. Everyone participate will cry. We'll told the bells and that will be the you know. We can put that behind us. But i just don't see the the media doing that. The just not stopping at continue to to put a there. I think i mentioned this in the newsletter. I think they're freaked out that they were the To down the no income is they have to do this. Fear porn. I mean they're doing it on. Abc i do have a series of clips. When you're ready go ahead go ahead i. I don't have anything really specific. I have a lot of different things But most stuff i got was international by did get these these clips about the A number of screwball things. But let's play these vaccine clips. This is easy. Okay vaccines all right. We can do. This is this is the covert yak yak yak yak yak vaccine one. This i'm gonna play these three clips in one of them. I wouldn't ask you some questions about before it before we go to. It is a short. This is the part one of the series. The new sixty two page report from the fda out today saying the one shot vaccine is safe and effective emergency use authorization. Could now come within days. Those welcome numbers tonight. The vaccine is eighty six percent effective at preventing severe illness here in the us one hundred percent effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths at least seventy percent effective against as symptomatic spread. When you have no symptoms when you don't even know you have it if we can hope that we can reduce transmission. All of this comes after pfizer said just yesterday that it will meet that deadline by the end of july three hundred million doses and derna saying three hundred million doses by the end of july two. That would be enough for all americans. And all of that was without the news from johnson and johnson tonight so this evening what does this. All mean for the timeline. Could vaccinations happen sooner. Even if it's just weeks sooner and protracting more fema vaccination sites opening just today this one in queens new york aiming to administer three thousand shots a day this one in houston tonight hoping for six thousand shots a day so this evening what you need to know about. This new one shot vaccine. And how soon could we see it. Dr jaw standing by. Abc's pilgrim leading off All right now we're going to have a couple of years. Knows a couple of things. David muir there. He hinted about things like what we need to know. What what's the difference with this new vaccine and on and on okay. Let's play part two tonight just days away from potential emergency use authorization the. Us is now likely on the verge of a third vaccine and this time a single dose and the news is promising new analysis. Today finding the johnson and johnson one does vaccine safe and effective eighty six percent effective for preventing severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent affected in preventing hospitalizations or deaths another key sizing the report saying single-dose maxine may really yeah notice that all she does is reiterate with david. Muir said this. I have noticed this in general. And you'll you hear a couple more times in the clips. The way the reporting goes is the the president said it would take five years to accomplish this and they go to clip. It'll take five years to accomplish this and they go right they don't go to. This is worse because this is not going to the clip and the guy saying what you said is just proof me up but this is different. There's no proof here. You have one eighty six percent effective and they said what do you have to say about this. Eighty six percent effective of another reporter reporting the same fact and land a new a new number though one hundred percent effective at stopping hospitalizations and death seriously. That's interesting david. Muir said the same thing that she said it again and they say it again in a later clip reporting the reporting on the previous report. That's how you do it from the same memo. One hundred percent thing is a bit questionable if he asked me be careful with. That advertisement is what i'd say. Hey you said one hundred percent. I'm suing you know you call. They never does. Suga was the report. You're correct right. Let's listen to the whole thing then. Dinning severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent effective in preventing hospitalizations or deaths. Another key finding the report saying the single-dose vaccine may also prevent some eysenck demotic disease. When you don't even know you have it which means it could help. Reduce the spread of the virus. Preliminary analysis suggests that a vaccine provides a seventy four percents protection against a symptomatic disease which is important because if you can prevent asymmetric disease then you will also reduce transmission. The fda saying vaccine had the expected side effects like fever and fatigue but no reports of severe allergic reactions. Overall of the vaccine provides very robust protection throughout the world including against the worrisome bio variants. So what does this mean for the vaccine supply in the us. Johnson and johnson says it could have three to four million doses. Sent out next week. It could have one hundred million doses. By this summer visor and madonna already promised enough doses for all americans by the end of july. So this newest maxine could simply add to that supply. The us could actually have a surplus enough for four hundred.

David five years Johnson Mackenzie Jerry johnson John four hundred next week ken mckenzie houston one hundred percent Today Eighty six percent sixteen days yesterday end of july today one hundred million doses One hundred percent
"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"wrangel" Discussed on No Agenda

"In your life that you were there for them. John just want to remind you. I'm here for you. Yeah row thanks thanks. I'm still here for you. Yeah bet you are. He's got to believe in this. That's she's not an actress. Let's not a performance. Should that was. That was real. She was very sad to very well. Get her off the air. Then know this is. This is the ratings. Babies is how it goes where we want. Meanwhile the real story is in other dead. People meet ken mckenzie. We actually have to give a reservation code to a family just so that they could be seen when people call him. He says they usually want to interview to decide if they want to. Use the services. But now i question is are you taking cases the panic in their voices just so sad. Mackenzie runs his own funeral. Home here in long beach california. He is busier now than at any other point. Democ a year ago. People were complaining about not finding toilet paper this time of year concern because we're running out of granite headstones. Nearly five hundred thousand people who have died with covid nineteen three members of the wrangel family who mckinsey cremated and the span of sixteen days. All three of them pass through lewis jerry and all maringgele alone. We had to watch her on an ipad. Take our last breath. I had to ask a doctor. Didn't know to hold her hand for me. It was the wrangel family walking into his funeral home with back to back deaths. That just broke him. I have never broke down. I'm supposed to be professional. And it was yet another death with the same family. And i sat there and cried with them. It was stop this type of reporting collectively roll out the death stuff. Boys think they're trying to milk. This a little bit more than should i. You know. I don't know i'd we still have all these different factions in the different teams. That play. I'm not quite sure you know who is the. I think the idea was The the president will go out and we'll do our vigil. Everyone participate will cry. We'll told the bells and that will be the you know. We can put that behind us. But i just don't see the the media doing that. The just not stopping at continue to to put a there. I think i mentioned this in the newsletter. I think they're freaked out that they were the To down the no income is they have to do this. Fear porn. I mean they're doing it on. Abc i do have a series of clips. When you're ready go ahead go ahead i. I don't have anything really specific. I have a lot of different things But most stuff i got was international by did get these these clips about the A number of screwball things. But let's play these vaccine clips. This is easy. Okay all right we can do. This is this is the covert yak yak yak yak yak vaccine one. This gonna play these three clips in one of them. I wouldn't ask you some questions about before it before we go to. It is a short. This is the part one of the series. The new sixty two page report from the fda out today saying the one shot vaccine is safe and effective emergency use authorization. Could now come within days. Those welcome numbers tonight. The vaccine is eighty six percent effective at preventing severe illness here in the us one hundred percent effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths at least seventy percent effective against asymmetric spread. When you have no symptoms when you don't even know you have it if we can hope that we can reduce transmission. All of this comes after pfizer said just yesterday that it will meet that deadline by the end of july three hundred million doses and derna saying three hundred million doses by the end of july two. That would be enough for all americans. And all of that was without the news from johnson and johnson tonight so this evening what does this. All mean for the timeline. Could vaccinations happen sooner. Even if it's just weeks sooner and protracting more fema vaccination sites opening just today this one in queens new york aiming to administer three thousand shots a day this one in houston tonight hoping for six thousand shots a day so this evening what you need to know about. This new one shot vaccine. And how soon could we see it. Dr jaw standing by. Abc's pilgrim leading us off All right now we're going to have a couple of years. A couple of things. David muir there. He hinted about things like what we need to know. What what's the difference with this new vaccine and on and on okay. Let's play part two tonight just days away from potential emergency use authorization the. Us is now likely on the verge of a third vaccine and this time a single dose and the news is promising new analysis. Today finding the johnson and johnson one does vaccine safe and effective eighty six percent effective for preventing severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent affected in preventing hospitalizations or deaths another key sizing the report saying single-dose maxine may really yeah notice that they all she does is reiterate with david. Muir said this. I have noticed this in general and you'll you hear a couple more times in the clips. The way the reporting goes is the the president said it would take five years to accomplish this and they go to clip. It'll take five years to accomplish this and they go right they don't go to. This is worse because this is not going to the clip and the guy saying what you said is just proof. Yeah but this is different. There's no proof here. You have one reporter saying eighty six percent effective and they said what you have to say about this. Eighty six percent effective of another reporter reporting the same fact and land a new a new number though one hundred percent effective at stopping hospitalizations and death seriously. That's interesting david. Muir said the same thing that she said it again and they say it again in a later clip reporting the reporting on the previous report. That's how you do it from the same memo. This hundred percent thing is a bit questionable if he asked me be careful with. That advertisement is what i'd say. Hey you said one hundred percent. I'm suing you know you call. They never does. Suga was the report. You're correct right. Let's listen to the whole thing then. Dinning severe illness in the us alone and one hundred percent effective in preventing hospitalizations or deaths. Another key finding the report saying the single-dose vaccine may also prevent some eysenck dramatic disease. When you don't even know you have it which means it could help. Reduce the spread of the virus. Preliminary analysis suggests that a vaccine provides a seventy four percents protection against a symptomatic disease which is important because if you can prevent asymmetric disease then you will also reduce transmission. The fda saying vaccine had the expected side effects like fever and fatigue but no reports of severe allergic reactions. Overall of the vaccine provides very robust protection throughout the world including against the worrisome bio variants. So what does this mean for the vaccine supply in the us. Johnson and johnson says it could have three to four million doses. Sent out next week. It could have one hundred million doses. By this summer visor and madonna already promised enough doses for all americans by the end of july. So this newest maxine could simply add to that supply. The us could actually have a surplus enough for four hundred.

David johnson ken mckenzie Mackenzie Johnson five years next week John four hundred ipad houston hundred percent one hundred million doses Today yesterday sixteen days Eighty six percent a year ago one hundred percent david
Misplaced Science

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:35 min | 3 years ago

Misplaced Science

"Night Welcome to kids Miss Mystery Cyber your host kit chrome today. I'm going to talk about how some Mistakes made it into text books and I'm going to start with the woolly mammoth arose about five point one million years ago in Africa according to the curator of the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated through Eurasia North America their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing what we know now as the wooly mammoth beginning roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand years ago. mammoths were extinct about ten thousand years ago. OOPS more like three, thousand, five, hundred years ago scientists now believe an isolated population of mammoth persisted on Wrangel Island off the northeastern coast of Siberia. And deep in Canada's Northwest Territories, World Heritage site in hunt, valley until about three thousand, seven, hundred years ago. Unfortunately, the ten thousand year mark of extinction is in most textbooks. But let's take a closer look at that date the prominent theory that made it into most textbooks. Encyclopedia's remember those was ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through. Eurasian North America, driven by the last ice age, they were following the food supply. If that's the case, then it makes sense that some moms ended up into Hani because it was never touched by. The last ice age and yes bone. So the mammoth have been found in that region but this isn't the first theory published in Texbook. As fact that there's some founded expend believed and yes, made it into text books that the continent of Antarctica has been covered by ice for millions of years again hoops the Perry reese map drawn in fifteen thirteen shows the northern coast of Arctic as ice-free. The most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be. So accurate three hundred years before Antarctica was discovered but that the map shows the real Coche line under the ice geological evidence. has confirmed that the latest date and Artika could have been charted in an ice free ages. Four thousand BC officials sciences been saying all along the ice cap, which covers yet arctic is millions of years old the Perry reese at Arctic map shows, but the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it. That could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time further and more accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice free condition and already got ended about six thousand years ago. The question is who map Queen Maud land at Arctic six thousand years ago which unknown civilization, how the technology or the need to do that I wanNA touch on just one more scientific nestled in the ancient city of Komo. Polka Bolivia are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of Pyramids Wayne from two hundred to four hundred tons each block nothing unusual there the city dates back to five, thirty, six AD. Yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found. Staple shaped clamps that fit in place were used to hold the blocks together. How could the indigenous people? No knowledge of urgency have created these clamps and where did the metal they use come from? This isn't the only case of metal clamps being used to hold giants don't together in Cambodia's anchor watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the site of the temple from nearby mountain via series of waterways. Close inspection of stones that are scattered around the site have revealed carved indentation receptacles for metal clamps perhaps. How about an eerie coincidence just outside the magnificent ruins of anger what stands an ancient pyramid temple known as backseat clump core now from Cambodia. Travel over eight thousand miles to Guatemala in the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at the call is the Temple of the Great Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid in Guatemala the similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both. These pyramids both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that didn't exist in many other pyramids or temples however, and perhaps most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on the top of both once there you can see there's a small door that goes inside the pyramid on both and there's another internal structure that looks the same. Basically what you have here is an ancient civilization. Cambodia. Another one in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles, they feature incredible similarities that no one not even science has been able to explain

Cambodia Arctic Antarctica Africa Wrangel Island Guatemala Canada American Museum Of Natural His Polka Bolivia North America New York Perry Reese Hani World Heritage Texbook Pyramids Wayne Mesoamerica Artika BC
Scientific Hiccup

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:03 min | 3 years ago

Scientific Hiccup

"All Welcome to kiss Miss Misery. Sime your host kit chrome hoping you're healthy and staying sheltered in place today. I'm going to talk about scientific hiccups and I'll begin with the woolly mammoths arose about five point. One million years ago in Africa according to the curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated throughout Europe Asia North America. Their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing the woolly. Mammoth we know today. They began roughly two hundred fifty thousand years ago. Mammoths went extinct about ten thousand years ago. Hoops that's the first scientific hiccup more like three thousand five hundred years ago. Scientists now believe in isolated population of mammals persisted on Wrangel Island off northeastern eastern Costa Siberia and deep in Canada's Northwest Territory and World Heritage Site than Hani Valley. They were there until about three thousand seven hundred years ago. The ten thousand year more of extinction is in most textbooks though. But let's take a closer look at that date. The prominent theory that made it into most textbooks and the cyclopes. Pedia is ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through Eurasian orth America driven by the last ice age. What scientists called police to seen ice age following the food supply? If that's the case that it makes sense that some ended up in the valley because it was never touched by the last ice age and yes sponsor the mammoth have actually been found in that region. But this isn't the first theory published in a textbook as fact that is founded. It's been believed yes. Baited into text books that the continent of at Artika has been covered by ice for millions of years again. Oops scientific hiccup. The Perry reese map drawn in. Fifteen thirteen shows a northern coast of Antarctica. Ice-free the most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be so accurate three hundred years before and articles discovered but that the map shows the real coastline under the ice geological. Evidence has confirmed. How could that have happened or been charted in an ice free age four thousand years ago which is what science states? That was the last time that Arctic was ice free officials. Science has been saying all along that the ice cap which covers the Antarctic is millions of years old. The Perry reese at Arctic amount shows it the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it that could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time. Furthermore accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice-free condition in that Arctic area the northern tip ended about six thousand years ago the question is who mapped Queen Maud Land of Antarctica. Six thousand years ago which unknown civilization had the technology or the need to do that. I want to state at this point. That the Perry map has been validated as being real and brought back to that data. Fifteen thirteen it is not a about that which made twenty years. I pushed office something true. I want to touch on just one. More scientific kick up nestled in the ancient city of Papun Kabul. Libya are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of pyramids each block. Wade from two hundred to four hundred tonnes. Nothing unusual there. The city dates back to five three six ad yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found giant staple liked clamps. That it in place and we're used to hold the blocks together. Wait a minute. How could the indigenous people with no knowledge of metallurgy have created these clamps and worded the metal used for them? Come from? But this isn't the only case of clamps be used to hold giants Jones together and Cambodia's Angor Watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the side of the temple from a nearby mountain bias. Here's waterways close inspection. The stones that are scattered around the side has revealed carved indentations receptacles for metal clamps. Says kind of interesting. How about an eerie coincidence? Just outside the magnificent ruins of anger. What Stanton Asian Pyramid temple known as boxy CAM gone now from? Cambodia travel eight thousand miles to Guatemala and the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at to call is the temple of the Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid Guatemala. The similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that don't exist in other pyramids or temples however most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up to the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on top once there you could see. There's a small door goes inside the pyramid and there's another internal structure that looks the same basically. What you have here is an ancient civilization in Cambodia and another in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles away featuring credible similarities that no one has been able to explain. Thus my idea of being a scientific hiccup because when you read in the textbooks is different than what facts

Perry Reese Cambodia Africa Stanton Asian Pyramid Temple Pyramid Guatemala American Museum Of Natural His Europe New York Pedia Artika Arctic Guatemala Wrangel Island Papun Kabul Hani Valley Antarctic Tacoma Canada Queen Maud Land