36 Burst results for "World Wildlife"

World Leaders Address Collapse Of The Natural World At The U.N. Biodiversity Summit

Environment: NPR

02:10 min | Last month

World Leaders Address Collapse Of The Natural World At The U.N. Biodiversity Summit

"While the US is still talking through last night's presidential debate. Nearly every other country is gathering digitally today to try to address a bigger challenge. The collapse of the natural world NPR's Nathan Rot reports that scores of countries are making new pledges to conserve nature but the US is not participating in two thousand, ten world leaders gathered in Japan to try and slow humanities rapid destruction of nature. They said twenty targets for the coming decade to slow extinction, protect wild spaces and limit pollution and development. Nearly every country in the world signed pledges ten years later. As yet been met Elizabeth Mirim Raimo is the assistant secretary general for the United Nations, and she's leading today's Convention on biodiversity. World leaders are setting new goals in the midst of a pandemic that says should serve as a warning to us all want to avoid another covid. Then we have to take action communist really was not their friends with says with with the boiler with HIV all these wacky signs. were either serve and protect that nature by it ever city aw it will make a Safa is we do not deforestation about diversity loss, increase the risk of pathogens jumping from animals to humans. It also puts humans at risk by eroding natural processes that we all rely on and Laurie Guidry is the executive secretary of the intergovernmental platform on biodiversity and. Ecosystem services capacity of forest who draw Kaban controlled climate other capacity of rivers to provide clean water. All of those have been strongly declining because of this binder REC- loss and lost she says is unsustainable. Rebecca shop chief scientists at the World Wildlife. Fund says there seems to finally be a growing recognition of that fact worldwide, we're seeing an intensity of insurance. Around doing things differently, the hope is that ten years, some of the promises being crafted made now will actually this time be carried out. A thin rods. NPR News.

Elizabeth Mirim Raimo United States World Wildlife NPR Npr News Executive Secretary Laurie Guidry Nathan Rot United Nations Kaban Japan Fund
Fresh update on "world wildlife" discussed on  John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

00:40 sec | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "world wildlife" discussed on John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

"Blew my mind. I mean, when you're sitting on the beach so peaceful and you sort of forget there's a whole other world under there, just full of all kinds of life way saw the most beautiful corals. I remember thinking they're waving at us because they moved with the ocean. And then there were all these amazing fish. They kind of reminded me of tropical birds. They were so bright and colorful, just darting all over the place like birds in the sky. I'll never forget it completely changed the way I look at the ocean. Most of us have a memory of being in nature will never forget. Let's protect the world's natural places so more memories could be made for generations to come. Visit world wildlife dot.

"world wildlife" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:04 min | Last month

"world wildlife" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"State. To put that number into perspective. In the last 10 years, we see an average of 500,000 acres burn in an entire year. Seven more deaths are being blamed on the Northern California wildfire Bring the total in that state to atleast 10 with 60. People unaccounted for. A week old blaze in California's Butte County is just 50% contained. President. Trump insist he was leading and not lying when he publicly downplayed the threat of the pandemic, while knowing that millions of Americans would get sick. Trump was referring to recorded comments during interviews with Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward. I want to show Level of confidence and I want to show Strength as a leader, and I want to show that our country is going to be fine one way or the other. The press briefing tonight, Trump said. It's China's fault that things turned out so badly more than 191,000 Americans have died from covert 19 since the pandemic took hold of the U. S. Six months ago. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says President Trump deceived the American people about the threat of covert 19 more than 30,000. New Yorkers have died from the disease or from NPR's Brian Man during the darkest early days of the pandemic, when New York City reeled under thousands of daily Corona virus cases. Cuomo gained a national profile with daily briefings followed by people across the U. S. Speaking to reporters on a conference call Thursday, Cuomo said Bob Woodward's new book proves President Trump misled Americans about the threat. It's the same fraud that he perpetrated when he stood up and said, This will be gone by Easter that it's going to Disappear as this miracle, Cuomo says some state leaders followed trumps lead by downplaying the threat. Trump says he minimized the deadly nature of the virus to avoid causing panic. Brian Man NPR news. The union representing Houston Police is denouncing the firings of four officers involved in a fatal shooting last April. Ah bystander video shows 27 year old Nicholas Chavez, pacing in the dark while being pelted with beanbags Taser and then shot from a distance as he picks up a teaser dropped by an officer. 24 bullets were fired at Chavez during the confrontation. The officers were responding to a call about the well being of a man with a history of mental health issues. This is NPR news. A new before from the World Wildlife Fund finds the world has lost more than two thirds of its animal bird fish, an amphibian populations in just the last 50 years. NPR's Nathan Rot reports that human activity is the primary cause. The decline is staggering. Wildlife populations plummeted 68% worldwide from 1972 2016, according to the World Wildlife Fund's bi annual report on the planet. And we humans have to shoulder the blame. Deforestation is the leading driver of population lost, the report says, mainly in the tropics. Climate change is a growing concern, and both problems are worsening. Report joins a long list of scientific studies and international reports warning that we are in the middle of an extinction crisis. The latest study, like many before, also says that the decline of the natural world is a threat to human life and that actions are needed fast. Nathan Rot NPR news. British actress Diana Rigg has died at the age of 80 to bring appeared in more than six dozen shows during a stage television and movie career dating back to the early 19 sixties. She had prominent roles and the Avengers and bond movies as well as Thie, HBO series game of Thrones. Wall Street stocks fell to extend losses for the week. The Dow Jones industrial average Temple 405 points, the NASDAQ lost 221 and the S and P 500 fell.

Trump Governor Andrew Cuomo NPR President World Wildlife Fund Brian Man Nathan Rot Bob Woodward New York City Diana Rigg Nicholas Chavez Northern California China Washington Post California HBO
The World Lost Two-Thirds Of Its Wildlife In 50 Years

KYW 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | Last month

The World Lost Two-Thirds Of Its Wildlife In 50 Years

"The World Wide Fund for Nature formally, the World Wildlife Fund warns. In the last 50 years, human activity has led to over a two thirds decrease in wildlife populations, with no sign of slowing its A frightening reports. The organization says the wildlife population around the world is in a catastrophic decline of free fall is how the organization's chief executive describes it, and many species are in danger of becoming extinct. In the last 50 years, populations have fallen by two thirds. This is due to a loss of habitat lands used by wildlife. Growing smaller and smaller. Poaching is also a problem and the loss of wildlife could have other ramifications, disrupting critical

World Wildlife Fund Chief Executive
"world wildlife" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:48 min | Last month

"world wildlife" Discussed on WTOP

"World's wildlife. But a new report by the World Wide Fund for Nature finds there are many, many reasons his correspondent Steve Futterman, It's a frightening report. The organization says the wildlife population around the world is in a catastrophic decline of free fall is Ah, the organization's chief executive, describes it, and many species are in danger of becoming extinct. In the last 50 years, populations have fallen by two thirds. Part of this is do the loss of habitat lands used by wildlife. Growing smaller and smaller. Poaching is also a problem, and the loss of wildlife could have other ramifications, disrupting critical ecosystems. Steve Futterman, CBS News journalist, Bob Woodward's new book claims The president knew about the dangers of Corona virus in February, even though he never said so. Publicly. The president on Fox News last night, defended that decision. We don't want to be jumping up and down and going while don't panic, a cheerleader for this country and I don't want to see Paddock in London. A hearing for Wikileaks founder Julian Assange changes extradition to the U. S. Has been suspended because one of the lawyers may have been exposed to the Corona virus. US. Jobless claims held steady last week Layoffs remain elevated. Six months after the pandemic began. CBS's Jill Schlessinger, another 884,000 Americans claimed unemployment benefits in the week ending September 5th the exact same amount from the week prior, which was revised higher and checking the early numbers on Wall Street before the opening. Dow futures are now higher as our NASDAQ futures This is CBS News. Presented by Rocket mortgage need to know what it takes for a home loan to fit your budget and your family rocket can visit. Rocket mortgage dot com Today eats Teno three..

Steve Futterman Rocket president World Wide Fund for Nature Bob Woodward CBS News CBS US chief executive Jill Schlessinger Julian Assange Fox News Wikileaks London founder
"world wildlife" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:31 min | Last month

"world wildlife" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"World's wildlife. But a new report by the World Wide Fund for Nature finds there are many, many reasons his correspondent Steve Futterman, It's a frightening report. The organization says the wildlife population around the world is in a catastrophic decline of free fall. The organization's chief executive, describes it, and many species are in danger of becoming extinct. In the last 50 years, populations have fallen by two thirds. Part of this is do the loss of habitat lands used by wildlife. Growing smaller and smaller. Poaching is also a problem, and the loss of wildlife could have other ramifications, disrupting critical ecosystems. Steve Futterman, CBS News journalist, Bob Woodward's new book claims The president knew about the dangers of Corona virus in February, even though he never said so. Publicly. The president on Fox News last night, defended that decision. We don't want to be jumping up and down and going while don't panic. I'm a cheerleader for this country and I don't want to see Paddock in London. A hearing for Wikileaks founder Julian Assange changes extradition to the U. S. Has been suspended because one of the lawyers may have been exposed to the Corona virus. US jobless claims held steady last week, Layoffs remain elevated six months after the pandemic began. CBS's jail Schlessinger, another 884,000 Americans claimed unemployment benefits in the week ending September 5th the exact same amount from the week prior, which was revised higher and checking the early numbers on Wall Street before the opening. Dow futures are now higher.

Steve Futterman World Wide Fund for Nature president Bob Woodward CBS CBS News chief executive US Julian Assange Schlessinger Fox News Wikileaks London founder
"world wildlife" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

01:42 min | Last month

"world wildlife" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"World's wildlife. But a new report by the World Wide Fund for Nature finds there are many, many reasons here's correspondent Steve Futterman. It's a frightening report, The organization says the wildlife population around the world is in a catastrophic decline of free fall. The organization's chief executive, describes it, and many species are in danger of becoming extinct. In the last 50 years, populations have fallen by two thirds. Part of this is do the loss of habitat lands used by wildlife. Growing smaller and smaller. Poaching is also a problem, and the loss of wildlife could have other ramifications, disrupting critical ecosystems. Steve Futterman, CBS News journalist, Bob Woodward's new book claims that President knew about the dangers of Corona virus in February, even though he never said so. Publicly. The president on Fox News last night, defended that decision. We don't want to be jumping up and down and going while don't panic, a cheerleader for this country and I don't want to see Paddock in London. A hearing for Wikileaks founder Julian Assange changes extradition to the U. S. Has been suspended because one of the lawyers may have been exposed to the Corona virus. US jobless claims held steady last week, Layoffs remain elevated Six months after the pandemic began. CBS's Jill Schlessinger, another 884,000 Americans claimed unemployment benefits in the week ending September 5th the exact same amount from the week prior, which was revised higher and checking the early numbers on Wall Street before the opening. Dow futures are now higher as our NASDAQ futures This is CBS News. You can listen to CBS News Radio 24 hours a day, seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio.

Steve Futterman CBS President CBS News World Wide Fund for Nature Bob Woodward Jill Schlessinger chief executive Fox News Julian Assange US Wikileaks London founder
Tons of food delivered to families on Pine Ridge as part of COVID-19 relief efforts

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 5 months ago

Tons of food delivered to families on Pine Ridge as part of COVID-19 relief efforts

"This is national. Native News Antonio Gonzales, running strong for American, Indian Youth has delivered twenty two tons of food to families on the Pine Ridge Reservation in south, Dakota as part of Covid nineteen relief efforts boxes with fruits, vegetables, proteins and grains have been delivered across the reservation field coordinator Dave Lone elk says accessing food during the pandemic has been of concern with stay at home, orders and recent lockdowns of the reservation. To some of the local grocery stores within hours distances. Are you know it's far between when we're having a hard time getting there to get the groceries, and so we're left with the few grocery stores that are on the reservation which tend to be. Around four grocery stores, but when you're dealing with the. reservation full people right around ten thousand you know. RUN, out of out of stock, running strong also distributes clothing has heating and water programs along with providing other seasonal assistants. Reach out, and we help each other. If we have extra, we give that. Toby determine well. How much we get to each other, not how much we approve, and so you've been doing very good in our efforts. Several Cova nineteen orders remain in place on the reservation, including stay at home and nightly curfews as of Tuesday. There were twenty-six positive cove nineteen cases on the Pine Ridge reservation according to the Oglala Sioux tribes. Cove Response Task Force. The Rosebud Sioux tribe wants to create the largest native American owned managed Bison Herd in North America Seth Tupper was South Dakota public broadcasting has more with Zepa. Has a big vision for Bison. On the Rosebud reservation. He wants to build a herd of fifteen hundred animals and processing facility to provide food and economic development for tribal members. He says now is the perfect time for the project. The COVID nineteen outbreaks at packing plants and meet shortages and stores have consumers looking for different ways to get their food we we've always felt that our work was around. It will self sufficiency and. You know empowering families and doing good by people, and in the world in the environment, and we've always felt that work was important but I. Think what has happened with the coronavirus pandemic is that the world has told us that that our work is not only important, but that it is urgent little elk is CEO of the Rosebud Economic Development Corporation with help from the World Wildlife Fund. Fund, the corporation plans to convert cattle pastures on the reservation to a bison range of forty square miles. The Development Corporation will get excess bison from the Interior Department which manages a number of herds including those in national parks. Little Oak says the grass-fed Bison will be killed and slaughtered humanely. Basically what that Games is treating Buffalo Buffalo in not treating them like cattle. I, they'll replace cattle. Cattle fences with bigger sturdier fences for Bison. The first animals are scheduled for delivery. This fall and a feasibility study for processing plant will begin soon for national native news I'm Seth Tupper in rapid city South Dakota some native candidates running for Congress. When Tuesday's primary election unofficial results show, the Shoshoni tribes congratulated tribal members. Rudy Soto Impala Jordan on social media Tuesday night after Idaho's election Jordan. Jordan seeking to serve in the US Senate and so two in the house. Both are Democrats in New Mexico Congresswoman deb Haaland Laguna. Pueblo did not have a Democratic challenger in the primary. She'll seek another term Yvette. Herald Cherokee nation won the Republican nomination for us. House seat to other native candidates in New Mexico who ran for Congress lost Republicans Lisa Martinez and Gavin Clarkson I'm Antonia

Pine Ridge Reservation Seth Tupper Rosebud Economic Development C South Dakota World Wildlife Fund Antonio Gonzales Covid Dave Lone Elk New Mexico Congress North America Coordinator Pueblo Jordan Deb Haaland Laguna Indian Youth Cova Toby Yvette Zepa
Monarch butterflies drop 53% in wintering area, Mexico says

Mark Levin

00:16 sec | 8 months ago

Monarch butterflies drop 53% in wintering area, Mexico says

"Officials in Mexico say the number of monarch butterflies that showed up at their winter resting grounds dropped about fifty three percent this year the world wildlife fund says it may sound alarming but called last year's numbers a typical is a marks a return to average population levels in

Mexico World Wildlife Fund
Nature and wildlife, critical to our existence

UN News

06:44 min | 8 months ago

Nature and wildlife, critical to our existence

"It's time that humankind realizes that nature doesn't exist for us. The head of the environment programs office in New York said just ahead of World Wildlife Day Assistant Secretary General Suchitra. Patty described twenty twenty as a soupy for nature warning that we are currently standing on the precipice of complete annihilation. He said there's seldom being a year. When so many critical meetings taking place which could help avert the devastation of the natural world? Mr Potty began by telling this graffiti about the new documentary wild Karnataka which shines a light on the rich biodiversity of that Indian state. I've seen the film It's amazing the kind of footage they have managed to gather through different technology including drone photography and others. It's not deterred by the legendary David attenborough and what I was very excited about. Was that it released as a mainstream movie in the theaters to full houses. Which gives you hope that people still have a lot of interest in wildlife and given the right motivation they would protect it. Can you tell us how the film undisclosed the importance of protecting the environment? Who START IT presents? The mega diversity of other life forms a nut and how humans relate to it and also it does it in a very endearing way that you really feel for them and that you feel one with nature and I think that's very important because human somehow have come to believe and very wrongly. I would say that everything exists for us and each year exists for us. The planet exist for us which is so wrong. Nothing could be further from the truth. So that is why movies like wild Kamata really bring home. The roots that we are just one of the seven point eight million magnificient species that inhabit the planet. And that we are to live in harmony with nature at is the link to land degradation while I think the land loss and degradation story is also the story of the loss of species that we are confronting a million species are about to go extinct tanks to human behavior and and much of it can be ascribed to land use and land use change and so as agriculture and advances in the Forest Frontier Receipts and deforest frontier is home to the wildlife species of the planet. They don't live in. Auburn spaces with. Urban spaces are primarily created for you once you might have an occasional bird or a b. here and there but that's certainly not their habitat so as we advance and our greed makes us take over more and more territory or not. The species are rapidly going extinct because we're taking over their habitat and that's something that really needs to stop. This is the Superhero for nature. We have the World Conservation Congress in a few weeks and then we have the nature summit that the president of the UN General Assembly is hosting in September in New York which will then be followed by the Biodiversity Convention Conference of Parties in-coming that China's hosting this year and then of course in between we have the World Ocean summit which is happening in Lisbon Portugal. So when you look at all these things that has seldom in a year where you would see. So many critical. Gathering off policymakers from around the World Civil Society Actors Private Sector. And what have you so I think this is the superhero furniture. So I think if all these can be major milestones in our commitment to conserving nature. And doing what is right for the planet not just for us. Because that's what has brought us to the precipice of complete animation and why we really need to change course and there couldn't be a better year than this. How would you say the sustainable development goals tie into World Wildlife Day? I think we need to understand the web of life that sustains all life on earth and is basically the story of the harmony in which humans and all wildlife exist together and that is why it is so important that we understand the importance of wildlife to our own existence even if we are very selfish even if we don't see anything else as being of importance just ourselves as being of importance even then we should actually recognize what does for us. I mean you take the example of bees. We have never sent an invoice to anybody. Dip pollinate every food that comes out on the planet and when their colonies collapse we spend millions of dollars backing them into boxes and putting them in trucks and take the case of interest rates alone. People are carrying beehives across the length and breadth of the United States just to get their pollination done and so it is time we realized that nature doesn't exist for us we would finish as a species and nature would go on it will heal itself it has existed for millions and millions of years without us though even if we are very selfish we really need to understand the criticality of nature to our own existence. And what can an average person do to support this? Being mindful being mindful off the natural resources. We use this to give you a little later which I concentrate significant at this point of time. The poor capita use of materials by humans is roughly thirty two thousand pounds for year. One human being. That's how much resources we are using. It is not sustainable and it cannot go on like this and by simply being mindful being concentrate and being respectful of nature. We can actually turn this around. There's a lot of things that we do can easily avoided. Take the case of food. Forty percent of the food that we grow is wasted and we keep talking about. How are we going to ten billion people by two thousand fifty? That's what I call false. Bindis you astor wrong question. The right question to ask is. How do we conserve nature? How do we improve the factor of productivity in the same land so that we can actually grow more healthy foods and you can sustain as many species? You aren't what would your message before? World Wildlife Day. I think the biggest message would be for humility for us to understand that we are one of the seven point eight million species that inhabit the planet. And we need to respect the right of other species to coexist alongside humans because even if we are selfish that's in our interest because that's what sustains the web of life is there anything else you would like to add. I think this is a time to act. We've been talking for too long for decades now and we have reached a very critical point in the history of our planet and how humans behave in two thousand twenty and in the next few years will determine certainly our fate and also the fate of the other species and the planet as well.

New York Secretary General Suchitra Mr Potty David Attenborough Deforest Frontier World Civil Society Actors Pri Patty World Conservation Congress Un General Assembly United States Auburn Biodiversity Convention Confer Lisbon Portugal China President Trump
Biggest US Beverage Companies Start Recycling Initiative In North Texas

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:02 min | 10 months ago

Biggest US Beverage Companies Start Recycling Initiative In North Texas

"Near way well the DFW region has been selected for a multi million dollar investment focusing on boosting recycling opportunities to North Texas families and we're the first region selected under the initiative and Josh will baka senior vice president of the American beverage association joins us on the care of the news live to tell us about it what is this that we bottle back initiative everybody back in addition if that was watch last October the goal of the initiative is to reduce the use of new plastic that our beverage companies are needed to bring beverage containers to bark at and the goal is to do so is to increase the collection of of our plastic bottles people don't know this R. bottles are one hundred percent recyclable very handily base to be remade by people use and what we're capturing in collecting more of the bottles we made world to their the using flash new plastic so what are the details in today's announcement part of that announcer is without a fond of four hundred million dollars that is being worked on in conjunction with the recycling partnership close with partners and the world wildlife fund some of the leading the global a billion of our mental leaders thank you can you know work with and the goal is to fight regions of the country that are either the approach but on recycling access to education and infrastructure and today we announced that part of that investment the Dallas fort worth metroplex was the first region selected for those it but when you look at that in places like say Seattle or Portland or even parts of the northeast there might be more of social pressure and awareness to recycle do you feel like we're lacking in that area here that we really could use more education I mean look I think there's definitely an opportunity to approve a regional recycling and you know what we think about it consumers need to have confidence that when they put something the recycle bin cycle how are they also need to know what needs to go in the recycle bin what does it show part of the investment that that we're making center around three or four components one is working with the city of war working with the Dallas metroplex area working with the North Texas council of governments to educate residents voted single family homes and multifamily homes about what to recycle and how to recycle world to working to expand recycling access the places are throughout the Dallas metroplex area multi family housing who don't have access to recycling and speak and then the third component of that is actually investing in the infrastructure to process the recycled bottles add to a facility that processes the plastic bottle so that they could be made into your bottles and so we think about it all kind of goes together the initiative is being supported by America's leading beverage companies like coca Cola Pepsi and you're

DFW
"world wildlife" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Because we're kind of an intellectual family that likes to learn so there's obviously we've been peppering him with questions I've been really nice they're also very focused on preservation you know conserving the not from Texas around us a focus on conservation that's also important to the naturalists sounds like you've always had this drive to conserve but there a moment when you thought I want to be a naturalist I have a lot of knowledge in my mind and I have a lot of experience question in a win this year it's the once in a lifetime the real live these experiences that puts the region at risk but it's something the world wildlife fund says can be managed you are not always the former WWF director for Ecuador he said mobile H. four he can be good and it can be bad so let's make sure that we manage to do soon the best possible way and we use them as a conservation to isn't a nine to five job that night at home with Federico we saw how networks are responsible for reporting everything they see when they describe what it when they saw what was good in wrong for example sometimes there is some people a destroying vegetation sometimes I've found families with dogs dogs are restricted because they can cause cross contamination so can we that's because each of the at least fourteen islands here are so drastically different from one another do you logically and kinds of plants and animals that live on them the most important trade to buy diversity on islands he's invasive species because of the long distances between.

Texas world wildlife fund director Ecuador Federico
Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Documentaries are known for their sweeping natural vistas. This does their amazing footage seriously. How did they get that shot in often soothing baritone of Sir David attenborough strain incontinent what those documentaries don't do though is show the realities of environmental destruction historically particularly BBC documentaries have shied away from that Nikki Rust is an environmental social scientist at Newcastle University in the UK Russ studied work by the BBC in the World Wildlife Fund which had teamed up with Netflix to make what they said would be a whole new kind of production. They wanted it to reach. I think a billion people and that it was going to revolutionize nature documentaries except for the fact it may be that attenborough would be the narrator the Netflix series our planet aim to be different because it promised to reveal the threats facing wildlife in the natural world so did it deliver liver rust and her colleagues analyzed scripts of our planet along with three recent. BBC Series Planet Earth to Pimple Dynasties Twenty into hyenas and Blue Planet to spider cramps and logged everything they saw on the screen turns out planet only talks about threats and successes successes a bit more than Blue Planet to fifteen percent of the script did focus on the woes of the natural world but very little devastation was actually shown on screen. The spite being filmed the analysis is in the Journal people in nature. The lead author of the Study Julia Jones was in Madagascar at the time where net that flicks were there filming and she knows that they were there filming the destruction of Habitat and burning and lots of mental devastation so they've got fatigue is just unfortunately it wasn't chosen to be included. It's not clear if that's really a bad thing. Though we still don't really know whether showing environmental tragedies on screen green motivates people to support conservation but what climate change communication has taught us. Ross says is that the ideal way to motivate audiences is with optimism tinged with trepidation. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata BBC David Attenborough Netflix World Wildlife Fund Nikki Rust Julia Jones Attenborough Cramps Newcastle University Ross Scientist Russ UK Madagascar Sixty Seconds Fifteen Percent
Food Expiration Dates May Mislead Consumers

60-Second Science

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Food Expiration Dates May Mislead Consumers

"Best results use by you probably have many of these labels on items in your fridge and Pantry right now a lot of behavior on what what you throw away and how you consume food a lot of people go off what's on the label and so what we're looking at is trying to shift behavior trying to make consistency in terms of how are labelled so that we can avoid waste and avoid people throwing away products that are perfectly good to eat pete. Pearson Pearson is the senior director for food loss and waste at World Wildlife Fund seventy percent or more of the biodiversity loss on the planet is attributed to Food and agriculture. The Natural Resources Defense Council estimates that forty percent of all food in the United States goes uneaten that that translates to some two hundred eighteen billion dollars in wasted money annually beyond the hit to the wallet food waste in landfills creates methane tain which is a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide and these figures don't include a full accounting the accumulated waste producing and transporting in food that we don't eat water and fertilizer maintenance of animal habitats and fuel and often because of labelling and consumer behavior we throw throw it away and it's still perfectly good to eat another part of the solution could come from the bipartisan food date labeling act which would expand spanned federal standards on expiration dates from just baby formula now to most everything else. The bill is making its way through Congress and could streamline line what you see when you're shopping part of the goal to reduce customer confusion what they're trying to do is introduce a series of binding federal enroll standards in some cases this is done by states and local jurisdictions and so what you have is a big confusion and inconsistency in terms of language the the House bill recommends a label of best if used by for when a product's quality or freshness may start to worsen and then use by for when it's definitely definitely time to get rid of it and Pearson recommends well a little bravery so I've found as as food waste leader and the director of a program program. I find that I'm eating a lot of foods that most people probably wouldn't end. We need more food waste warriors. We need people that are willing to cut the mold off at cheese or scrape some falls out of the sour cream because it's not going to detract anything from the actual product and you will survive. You're not GonNa die and when you're GonNa Save Food and help save the environment the process thanks for

Pearson Pearson United States World Wildlife Fund Senior Director Natural Resources Defense Coun Congress Director Two Hundred Eighteen Billion D Seventy Percent Forty Percent
Sweet Science

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Sweet Science

"Did you know that a third of the food on your plate could be lost without honeybees. This is innovation now. Bringing bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. The western honeybee is honey producing powerhouse. A single hive contains between twenty thousand and fifty fifty thousand bees that help pollinate countless crops but recently western honey bee populations have plummeted so post grad student who focuses on agricultural rick cultural conservation for the world wildlife fund joined a team from the nasa developed program to build a tool called hive s by by incorporating satellite observations and citizen science feedback from in hive sensors honeybee researchers can better understand the role local environmental environmental conditions as precipitation soil moisture or vegetation play in the complex factors linked to be health. The best bees company uses the tool to determine prime locations for placing beehives. Be enthusiasts can use the information to plant vegetation and maintain optimal be habitats and the sweet science behind hive. O._s. is bringing the power of earth stations to life for innovation. Now i'm jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa and is distributed by w h._r. v.

Nasa Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac O._S.
"world wildlife" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Keel over but there they can revive but and if they're very slow yeah they're very similar down yeah yep so anyway let's figure out how to kill all the iguanas your Maryland Tom rushes down morning buddy rather her you well you have been better yeah yeah anyway when you recall back on conditions morning out with just gone and they handed to me in the box all ripped off all money morning sometimes when they get older box worth as much if not more guns are no question no question about it and when their reaction was although I was not yeah we were using well it it was a big box it was pride was it was a how old was the clerk our early twenties there you go yeah there you go your son yeah yeah say again I have a good weekend good thought Hey good talking you man I'm sorry about the injury hope you feel better give all of it so he he yeah they indeed hi Hey look I had I've had I've had both shoulders done you know you'll be okay new here yeah Sparky Sparky has all of his bark is almost back to normal she's only lost forty five percent I can't do our job anymore but I think you'll be alright your your young you'll just no question I'm gonna try I know you will thank you bye bye areas a little little down mouth about the shoulder injury and I understand so let's talk about bears already mentioned at the bare lotteries open till August thirty first let's open now open fifteenth go online fifteen dollar lottery application fee non refundable finally got a bear stamp looks like a bear Rebecca later with Hastings Minnesota won the twenty third annual Meryl black for conservation design contest there's the titles explore I was on last year's I was actually part of that committee that picked last year's bear stance it's interesting process on the stamp selection thing then I watched them pick the duck stamp which is pretty cool how they do that anyway so we talked about it and there is a guide for hunting black bears in Maryland twenty nineteen hunting season will be open for five days October twenty first the twenty fifth the quota system is no longer used to manage the hunt hunters will not be required to call hot line every evening to determine the status of the hot black bear hunting zone is Allegheny Frederick Garrett in Washington counties all four counties are open some permit tease may hunt black bears regardless of whether the permit to use actively hunting as in previous seasons the only only one black bear may be harvested by a permit he sub permitting hunting team permit TV's and sub permit TV's are not required to maintain visual contact with one another while hunting black bears as it used to be hunters are reminded that a permit to use a permitted teams of hunters may kill only one black bear responsibility the hunting team to maintain some form of communication to ensure that only one there is taken that is why we have cell phones but here's another story about a bear in Italy for strangers in Italy this is from this is by Paul de Dios she's or Paulina the Dodge she's a writer reporter for foxnews for strangers in Italy are on the hunt for a genius brown bear they're reportedly escape captivity by scaling three electric fences and a thirteen foot barrier the province of Trento press office released an image of the fugitive bear Doug M. forty nine by officials on Wednesday that indicated the annals last seen on the slopes of the Mars ola mountain the previous night at ten fifty four officials say the bear was caught on a camera trap a trail camera in an area not far from where it was seen early Tuesday morning M. forty nine was captured last Sunday by but several hours later the bear was able to by pass three electric fences in a thirteen foot bear unharmed twenty as governor Mari Mar easy Fugazi marine zero four godi hook gaudy gave Rangers the authority to kill the animal if given the chance as its ability climb over seven thousand volt fence shows how dangerous the bay area I wonder if them forty nine approaches the areas inhabited force are allowed to shoot it down translation of Fugazi's comments read the fact that the bear managed to by pass electrified seven wire seven thousand volts fence certified by the ministry and by its sprawl demonstrates the fact that these specimens were dangerous and there was a public safety problem that justified the order of capture seven thousand volts that bear can go anywhere anyway once you yep Kim wide berth orders to kill a bear sparked anger amongst animal rights advocates to criticize the government over faulty fencing as the reason the bear was able to display this cake W. W. F. Italy probably world wildlife fund in rights activist suggested coyly that the fence was likely not working properly since bears do not fly Coley I think it's bigger but you know Hey Luigi you turn them gone Bulma mommy you know that there was in there last night Luigi you were watching the friends mama me Italy's league for the abolition of hunting they have a league for the abolition of hunting commented the bear's escape efforts they commended the bear's escape efforts thank god he's out no that's not exactly what they said they said they called escape the brown bear out rather large looking fellow brown bear in European Remington Russian brother whatever kind of Robert Shrum there's a damn big bear it like you know chrisley size only larger you know yeah they call him an escape genius gifted with super powers akin to a hero in Marvel Comics which one later man the hulk which Marvel comic book hero would a brown bear probably a thousand pound animal what what which hero who would that be a kid into I have no idea I didn't really do you want a Marvel guy now okay yeah yeah spider man's latest rage I guess the Avengers and though the wave sometimes inspire man then it's the group of them the yeah the jet will they call justice league or something something like that I can't remain in exile act singular character in and it's just yeah don't know baby Wolverine is that it is out of Marvel Comics character either that or do you see a twenty that maybe he sprouted clause like Wolverine there you go slash through those those electric lines remain yeah one great throat it's an animal how I got through seven thousand bolt fans who knows thirteen foot barrier for brown bear nothing that stands ten feet high probably not much not much of a chance I watched I want to wait till Bach mature whitetail Buck in West Virginia down at think of it name valley state park okay okay golf course there big hyphen I watch a mature whitetail Buck from a standing start within three feet of the fence just up over an eight foot fence like it was nothing and even there yeah you know I'm not sure the brown bear probably jump that I would imagine if it's thirteen foot fence you know he he probably he probably watch like Starsky and Hutch when you're chasing a guide hit the chain link fence yeah hi into criminals able to escape and the cop never is yeah exactly you know I can't figure that out yeah that they're probably just put one Paul on top of wall this call himself up boom hi exactly email eligibility cell doors dot com just be forced land club members tell your officers there is a meeting July twenty fifth at the link would volunteer fire department in link would Maryland and that is for club members club officers two of them there's a group called the Chesapeake forced alliance going to meet to consider solutions to your issue and here's the issue about half the Chesapeake force lance half Republic kaffir leased by the state those leases will be abolished according to the plan it to some degree next February if you have a lease now this is your last hunting season on your lease because your lease will be canceled in February and not renewed nestled against some of these leases have been in effect for thirty forty fifty years all the leases of all these two hundred fifty hunting clubs hunt club let's remember one guy leases property okay who will be put into a bagel basket and up for lottery and they will only be leased for one two four five years show every year and they'll they'll be divided out so every year there will be a twenty percent turnover on the people who are occupying these leases that it is that makes sense in other words if you lease it for one year that's twenty percent of five years so every year that particular lease will turn over and then every two years that particularly soul turn around without you without the possibility of renewing the lease so the new people on that land every year or every two years or every five years now the clubs have been established some of them have you know thirty forty fifty members show more family someone have to members five members whatever might be their two hundred fifty separate groups that lease just pick force and it's great for the forestry industry it's great for the agriculture industry because the guys going there they they manage the the imminence of land they manage wildlife you know especially these bigger clubs long term leases they know what they're what they're doing they some of them were adopted you know quality deer management practices where they're you know they're bringing the the herd into balance some work with the farmers who have adjacent land you know farmers love it because you got people next to you shooting the deer that you know the guard damaging their crops and so forth Forster people like it because they have access through the clubs the clubs in general maintain the properties so that if there does come time for the timber to be harvesters are tumors allowed to be harvested authorized we harvested they have access to get in there they don't have access to the you know the becomes less desirable property to for the for lumber company Glenn and and you know and do their thing but you know there are people in lumber industry the agriculture industry and other interested folks conducting this meeting under the banner still speak for flights when USA well they would have just listen either a one six so July twenty fifth that's next Thursday link with volunteer fire department registration search five thirty so it's going to be.

Tom thirteen foot twenty fifth seven thousand volts twenty percent five years two years thirty forty fifty years one two four five years seven thousand volt forty five percent fifteen dollar thousand pound eight foot three feet five days one year ten feet
"world wildlife" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on Le Show

"And then tortoise plastic islands of the Atlantic, which I didn't even know about did you this island is believed to be only temporary accumulation zone driven by currents that have been worsened by freak weather conditions not Greek freak weather conditions. Just freak. Situation shows the extent of plastic pollution affecting the terrain. Ian otherwise bec- Jurassic waters. Don't be taking a picture of now. They don't. I don't know what it looks like there's no picture here in a huge report last year. The World Wildlife Fund as you may remember warns that the Mediterranean runs the risk of becoming a sea of plastic. Oh, you wouldn't remember that. I didn't I didn't remember with increasing levels of pollution from micro-plastics threatening the ecosystem, the Mediterranean, said that report has a concentration over one point two five billion plastic fragments per square kilometer of the sea. Just one percent of the world's waters in the Mediterranean, but seven percent of the global micro-plastics. Primarily because the Mediterranean coast home to a lot of people. And europe. Did you know this Europe is the second largest producer plastics in the world rivaled only by China? That's right. We're not even number one at that. Wow, US isn't even the world's leading producer of plastic anymore. I give up. Oh, and then I wow, I say, wow, I say, wow. Down in the city. It's what's their kids running. How much do I have to get? Get me said where the jets said guests. Do do. City better, watch them on a bus ahead throw over Appoint appointed. amendments lady got back. The do. Do. All know about is what I come on. That me on a TV screen. Gives me rail by all the way up the hill. From New Orleans. This is the show. Lidge gentleman, and international labor union federation has derided difficult working conditions at some of the sites where they're building the Tokyo Olympics. Yes. It's news of the Olympic movement. And an I o c inspection team took a routine tour. The venues being built just after that report. The IOC officials will be meeting in Tokyo, this week, not with the, the president the president. But with local organizers where labor issues will be on the agenda. Rising costs are on that agenda. Two worries about summer heat when the games open in little more than a year are on the agenda and complaints about cost, cutting from international sports, federations, the labor report was titled the dark side of the Tokyo Olympics focusing on labor issues at the national stadium and the Olympic village. The two centerpiece venues. Depend with an ageing and declining population. I think declining numbers. Is shorthanded in many industries, the government has provided visas for construction workers tied of the Olympics and started allowing more foreign workers to reside in the country. Let's all go to Japan. The critical report had been sent to the president. Thomas bach. Trying to find remedies. This from the head of the. Building Woodworkers union. I'm bet you on said it not received a response from the Tokyo government, which is building the Olympic village nor the Japan Sports Council building the stadium. They said they are reviewing the report and couldn't be awake. Wakened the workers interviewed complaint about a pervasive. Culture of fear. Well, at least I got a culture that discourage speaking out, they could be they could be working in the nuclear industry. Then at Hanford. It's almost half of the workers interview did not have formal contracts hoops. And it found dangerous patterns of overwork at both of the high profile venues, some workers at the Olympic village reported working twenty eight consecutive days and twenty eight straight and up to twenty six straight at the national stadium. Said the head of the union, some problems rate worse with title deadlines and the pressure to finish done. Well, you know, when you when you got a deadline, the situation is even worse. He says, so called interns, or migrant workers with issues language employment contracts and immigration issues, massive overtime construction is a really big problem Japan..

Tokyo Olympic village Olympics Mediterranean Building Woodworkers union producer president Thomas bach Japan national stadium Europe bec- Jurassic World Wildlife Fund international labor union fede Ian Hanford New Orleans IOC jets China
Prince Charles, Prince Harry And David Attenborough discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Charles, Prince Harry And David Attenborough discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

"A new eight part Netflix series chronicling life on earth and the threat posed by climate change has received a Royal sendoff at London's natural history museum Prince Charles lauded, the our planet series and its narrator. David Attenborough at a special world premiere event, he was joined by sons Prince, William and Prince Harry, the first segment features astonishing footage to tilling the variety of the world's wildlife and capturing the sound and fury as seventy five million tons of glacial ice collapsed into a sea off Greenland. Of an iceberg. The size of a skyscraper. Generates a titan. The emissions. Netflix series produced in conjunction with the World Wildlife federation was four years in the making involved six

Prince Charles Prince Harry David Attenborough World Wildlife Federation Netflix London William Seventy Five Million Tons Four Years
Lights around the world are turning off for Earth Hour

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Lights around the world are turning off for Earth Hour

"For a brief moment tonight. The earth will go dark. It's all part of what has become an annual tradition earth. Our people all over the world will turn their lights offer a full hour to spread awareness about climate change and sustainability earth hour, which is not to be confused with Earth Day that's on April. Twenty second started back in two thousand and seven in Sydney Australia with the World Wildlife Fund at the helm since then millions of people around the world participate at various landmarks, including the Empire State building. It happens tonight all times local from eight thirty to nine

World Wildlife Fund Empire State Building Sydney Australia Twenty Second
"world wildlife" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on WGN Radio

"An ad from dad just this one line, right? Save money on car insurance when you. Mike. This is the Mike here. Okay. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive is too close. Sorry. Well, I don't know where to stand. Nobody's told me where to stand progressive can't say to you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates in other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations. We live in an interconnected world every action we take impacts life around us and increasingly those impacts are harmful on Saturday March thirtieth at eight thirty pm local time turn off your lights with World Wildlife Fund and millions of people around the world for earth hour is show your commitment to protect nature together. We'll speak up for wildlife and forests we'll show our support for rivers and oceans will rally around crucial actions needed to curb climate change. Learn more at worldwildlife dot org slash earth hour. Crumbles? Baking. Now that I think of it go to Little Caesars. Deep dish pizza instead. Little Caesars large, hot and ready bacon. Deep deep. Dish. Pepperoni and bacon. Pizza wrapped in over three and a half feet of bacon for just twelve bucks at participating locations, plus tax pizza. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for a university. That will help me Vance in my education and career our university that will make me feel supported and connecting ready for ODU online. Click this ad or go to online only you got you today. Sports. Today's.

Mike World Wildlife Fund Vance ODU
"world wildlife" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

10:33 min | 1 year ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Mike Broomhead show the World Wildlife zoo making national news, we'll talk about that. With the spokeswoman from the welcome to the Mike Broomhead show. Got a song. Hey. Thanks for being here. It's the Mike broom had show we're here until ten AM Monday through Friday. Now, a big story came out over the weekend that struck me because as most of you know, I am a huge fan of the wildlife world zoo. I'm out there. All the time. It is absolutely. My grandkids favorite place in Arizona to visit one of my grandsons talks about Crockett who was a sea lion out there being his best friend at school. We love that zoo. It is the most family friendly everyone. No matter how old they are loves the place. I love to go there. And I've been talking about it for years. So over the weekend. There was a story that a patron was mauled was the word by a Jaguar. Well, that is going to get national attention, and man has it ever gotten national attention. So we ask Christie Markham who was the spokeswoman for the zoo to join us to talk to us about what really happened Kristie. I know it's been a busy weekend. I appreciate some of your time. Tell us what actually happened over the weekend. Good morning. Yes. So it was Saturday evening when we had a report that one of the guests had crossed over the barrier. One of our female Jaguars had actually gotten a hold of the guests, and our employees ran over there that they called the paramedics she had to receive medical attention. However, she did cross the barrier. And those barriers are set there for a reason Kristie, I I saw the I saw the statement that you made also the owner Mickey the statement that he made that this was human error. It was not the animals fault. And that the animals not going to be put down which I think is the right choice from my experience when I've been around the exhibits where the animals are where they are wild animals. There's always a pretty high barrier. And it's what four or five feet from the actual exhibited itself. So this woman would have had to have jumped over a wall walk three or four feet toward the exhibit. And then actually get close enough inside the exhibit to have this happened. Correct. Yeah. When something like this happens. It's definitely a reminder to everyone that these are wild animals, and when they cross over those barriers not only are they putting themselves at risk. They're putting other guests at risk employees at risk and even the animal at risk. In this case, I know that there have been calls from some people that they wanted something done to the animal through your own investigation. Is they're going to be an investigation by an outside agency. Well, we are we are credited by Z A. We are also inspected by USDA. So I have no doubt that they're going to be out there doing their own investigation, and we have an ongoing investigation going on. But we have absolutely concluded that the Jaguar was not at fault for the injuries sustained, and it was human error and the woman actually came out to the zoo yesterday. Who is involved in the incident? She came out to the zoo yesterday to talk with you about what happened. Yes. She sat down. She apologized. She took full responsibility. She felt horrible for the negative. Attention is getting and she was a couple of miles away from the she's there all the time with her family, and she was just very remorseful. Did she say what prompted her to cross the because I I go to the zoo a lot. So I'm very familiar with this. You really have to make an attempt. This isn't like you can reach across and ask. You know, what I mean, it gets you close you have to make a big attempt was if she goes to the zoo all the time did she explain why she was prompted to do this this time. He didn't explain why she just took full responsibility. She knew she was responsible, and she felt really bad about what she had done, Christy. Moore joins us. She is the spokeswoman for the wildlife world zoo talking about the incident over the weekend, that's got national attention. So so at least that part of it from her perspective on your what would happen with that patron. And thank God. She wasn't seriously injured because this could have ended a lot worse than it. Did. Absolutely. It could have ended worse were so thankful that her injuries were not life-threatening. She said that she did go and receive medical attention to the emergency room. But she was not admitted they did give her stitches, and she was home later that night when something like this happens when you get an initial report like this you guys go to great lengths to make the zoo, very accessible. I mean, people can get kind of close to the animals, but I've never seen a situation where it looks dangerous unless you do something like this. When a word goes out to you that something like this happens. What what are your first thoughts? My first thoughts were I just wanted to acquire as much information as I could of course, tearing the initial headlines which made national and actually international news this morning. It can sound very terrifying. And I was relieved to find out the details weren't as bad as what everyone was claiming. And anytime anything like this happens we really assess and learn from the event is a part of an ongoing commitment to ensure public safety and great animal welfare. And we wanna keep our zoo family friendly, we wanna keep people close to the wildlife, but we have to make sure the public's also say, so we're gonna take all those things into consideration as we continue with our investigation. Well, I know that you are getting international requests from international news outlets for for interviews and questions. I appreciate you spending some time with us this morning. And I'm glad this woman was not you know, serious or life threateningly injured. And I'm glad to hear that things are back are getting back to normal. Anyway at the zoo. Me too. Thank you so much. Thanks christi. That is Christie Markham she joins us from the zoo. And I you know, I love that zoo. If you've not been out there. It is unique. It is like no place else you've ever been you had the ability to get close enough to the animals to see them. We've been to the zoo many times, I take my grandkids. They run around like crazy never afraid that they're going to be injured. But when you crossover a barrier like that, and I'm not trying to pile on this woman that made this mistake if she goes to the zoo, very often, I'm pretty adventurous. But I'm not crossing over a barrier. They have an exhibit at a new part of the zoo or a newer part where they have some. I think they're Brown bears from Arizona and or black bears. And there is a pit. That is probably it's like a moat almost that is like probably six feet from the edge of the while. There's no way you can get near the bears. But when you're looking over the wall, you get very close there's a barrier. They have a huge. Rhino out there. A male rhino have three new female rhinos on the other side of the park. The male rhino is got to be three thousand pounds. It's one of the biggest animals I've ever seen. You can get really close to this animal. There's no way unless you do something really dumb that you're going to get near enough to that rhino to get injured. It is a unique way for you to get as close as possible with animals, you'll never see anywhere else. And interact with them without any danger to the public is long as you are, you know, as long as you're reasonable. And I'm glad to hear that this woman came to the zoo. I don't wanna out her publicly. I'm sure she doesn't want to be outed. I'm sure she doesn't want to be publicized. And I don't blame her for that. But I'm glad she went back to the zoo the guy Mickey that started the zoo started decades ago, and he he was a bird guy is kind of an aviary is kind of a bird sanctuary, and it's expanded into a zoo where they they take in endangered animals. They are it is just a great place. And I it really was sad to me that they got the kind of publicity. They did over the weekend because they don't deserve it. They do are. They are. So public friendly the experience for people is most important to them. And so our people safety, they're not endangering people's lives. They're not taking risks that are unnecessary. This woman crossed a barrier. She should not have. And unfortunately, she paid a price. I mean, she it wasn't a close call. She was actually this. I don't know if it was she was bitten. I heard she had been scratched. I don't know which it was whether it was clawed or bitten by a female Jaguar. But that's because of human error. So the people that were calling for the animal to be put down. It's not going to be. I think that's the right decision. I just feel for Mickey especially for Christie because it's been this kind of a weekend for them where it's been trying to explain without saying that this woman did something stupid. They weren't trying to damage this woman's character intellect or anything else. She just made a horrible mistake and paid a price for it. And thank God for the quick thinking of people around their other patrons that distracted the Jaguar using a water bottle and got its attention away. I mean, that's that's great. I mean, I it ended as good as it could in a bad situation. But I wanted you to hear firsthand from the people at the zoo because they are they're great people. And I hope you'll go out and see if you ever go out to that zoo. You'll see you have to make a serious effort to get close to a dangerous animal where there could be an incident because they do a lot to make sure that it's is close. It's it's a great experience for you. But it's absolutely safe. Coming up seven twenty Alexandria, Cossio Cortez is at south by southwest calling America garbage. And Ronald Reagan a racist. You're going to hear her say it, and it's seven thirty five one of my favorite guests name is Mark lottery. He used to be an advisor to President Trump. And he also was the press secretary to the vice president the vice president Pence there is no one that I know of that's more connected to this administration. He is a phenomenal guest will talk with him about the forthcoming Muller report. The news of the day, the border wall fight and everything that's going on in Washington DC, and there's no one that knows it better than Mark laudner that happens at seven thirty five big our the show. Make sure you stick through it all of that coming up. You know, I wanna talk about something. Called patriot property management. It's a local veteran owned property management company. Here's their promise if they don't rent your property to a qualified renter in thirty days..

Christie Markham World Wildlife zoo Mickey Arizona Mike Broomhead Kristie Mike broom Crockett vice president Washington Z A. Mark lottery Ronald Reagan Christy USDA Moore Muller President Trump christi advisor
Woman attacked by jaguar while taking selfie at zoo

Brian Kilmeade

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Woman attacked by jaguar while taking selfie at zoo

"Maybe a posting about this one over the weekend at Jaguar zoo in Arizona attacks woman who jumped the barrier this morning Park Rangers at the World Wildlife zoo say that they will not be putting the Jaguar down after what happened Saturday metro fire says the Jaguar bit the woman as she was taking a selfie near its enclosure. Witnesses told authorities the woman had crossed over a fence to get the photo absurd. The barrier. They're there for good reason. We try to keep everyone safe. She had non-life-threatening injuries zoo. Staff says the Jaguar was never out of its

Jaguar Zoo World Wildlife Zoo Park Rangers Arizona
Who is Gerald Butts? And what happens now?

The Big Story

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Who is Gerald Butts? And what happens now?

"His resignation, the typical political scandal narrative swirled around Gerald butts, a political stunt up from Ottawa one of the prime minister's most trusted advisers, a longtime friend Gerald butts has resigned amid allegations the prime minister's office interfered to help Quebec engineering giant SNC loveline avoid a criminal prosecution statement butts flato denied any wrongdoing saying the allegations have become a distraction from the prime minister and the government's work. So he stepping aside except Jerry butts, isn't your typical political staffer resignation not at all as much as this move will dominate headlines all week. And of course, it indicates that the SNC level and scandal is probably going to get a lot worse before it gets better. The most interesting story from this is about a break-up. You see Justin Trudeau has never won anything without Jerry butts. And now he's got an election in eight months and butts walked away from his partner and his friend at the time. He was needed more than ever. So why? Who is the man that every insider on the hill has used as an unnamed source at one point or another how much Justin Trudeau's policy came from him. What will the prime minister of Canada do now without his right hand, man. I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story Holwell's is a senior writer at Maclean's. He knows more about the personal relationships at play in politics than anybody on parliament health. Paul who is jailed butts. He was until. Minister's principal secretary, which is which is a job title looking to have many meanings over time. He was the prime minister's right hand Ranya was his right hand since long before he was the prime minister he co managed the campaign in twenty fifteen. He went to McGill University Justin Trudeau in the nineties and they've been nearly inseparable ever since. I mean, I I was hearing rumors guesswork from people who the both of them better than I nearly twenty years ago. Just try to prime minister Sherry butts wants to make up and he did it and then he walked away. Yeah. He there is around town that Jerry butts doesn't have hurt in the job as much lately as he had those rumors are from before Christmas from last autumn. And so to some extent as amazing is not a huge surprise. This is not somebody who was in the middle of new adventures and was looking forward to the next grade accomplishment. There was there was a sense. That but says been a little listless and not not as deeply engaged with files as as yet been for. That's kind of interesting because the first thing that everybody went to is the timing and the relationship to the scandal you're saying that that this might have been brewing for some time. Well, it's pretty clear that the scandal has something to do with it. But it's easier to get someone to give up on a job, if they are have already in toying with the idea, you know, and and a lot of quite reasonably a lot of speculation a lot of the reaction to the announcement of his resignation was people say, well, look if he's done nothing wrong. Then why is he quit if you know if there's no fire than wildest smoke. And I think it's possible that possible we'll find out, but that the resignation was kind of an expression of to hell with this. I don't need. I you know, I made my best friend minister he's been prime minister for three years. I was in all the meetings. I was at dinner with Barack Obama off I go, you know, there's still there's still way more unanswered than. Answered questions around the sessions, he level and business. So I'm hesitant to speculate with great certainty, but that's a that's a looking supposition. What was to the best of your knowledge people around the hill. Anyway, what was their working relationship lake? How how close were they I I mean, I know they were really good friends. But but how did it work between them important decisions were made by the prime minister is chief of staff, Katie Telford and its principal secretary Gerald butts all three of them together in meetings that they would have a few times a day. And you know, sometimes the the circle would be extended is probably ten or a dozen people who would be frequent make frequent appearances at those meetings. But if they were all in the same city together and Telford or would never be absent from those big decision. They were at least as necessary to the process was the prime minister. Maybe who is he is a guy if you spent any time with them, you hang out with them. Remember the first time you met him. I don't remember the first time I met him. But I'll tell you an early extended. That a time. I spent with him was on a big maybe both in the Arctic for a week in probably two thousand eight why the hell did that happen? Because even Harper was would have the Canadian forces do annual sovereignty patrols in Arctic waters. Right. And I was interested in that as a journalist. He's coming Stephen Harper throw budget that point was the head of the World Wildlife federation for Canada, and he was interested in it for climate change. And so I asked the harbor PM. Would you put me on his boat? And when I got there Jerry was there, and so he and I spent a week on the deck of a Canadian navy boat in the art looking at icebergs, and what was he lying? What struck you about him? He he's a low T. He's not emotionally demonstrative. He is friendly to everybody he encounters. He is not nearly as sort of confrontational and abrasive in person as us on Twitter where he's very act and where. Since long before the election every night. He would cheerfully Perec journalists on on his perception of the flaws in their reporting and analysis, which is when I had a bit of a falling. But in person he seeks agreement rather than confrontation. He doesn't pull rank particularly he doesn't say, you know, look, I'm I'm Justin Trudeau in. You're not his competitive advantage in history comes to the fact that when when else these he's in the room until recently, he wasn't room with the leader with the prime minister. And so he he gets the last say, but in the moment, he doesn't he's not look looks for fights. There's been a ton of discussion since he resigned about him kind of being the man behind the curtain when it comes to Justin Trudeau. Do you have a sense of how much power he wielded there? And how many how much of of Trudeau's actions kind of came from him, or is that just kind of the typical stereotype people tend to exaggerate the roles of left tenants for people who are. Supporters or members of government. It's a way to criticize the leader with criticized leader, criticized the people around and for Ponant of the government. It is a handy way to make it look like the prime minister staffed himself up with monsters as having many times with conservative and liberal prime ministers people used to claim that Stephen Harper was we're in for a university of how profit and Tom Flanagan and then for the last seven years. Harper was prime minister was was well known that he wasn't even speaking time finding his angry. He didn't need the supposed send galley was controlling. Similarly, look, I expect that Justin Trudeau will be able to function as prime minister for the rest of this calendar year without without journal butts around, but even people in the gone, even people whose future was bound up with Justin Trudeau's continued electoral success would complain about the extent to which biggest then get made until Jerry butts got around to getting the file and and the decision. This government is not a super fast that decision. And since the beginning large part of perceived reason for that is that Jerry butts and or Tito for half to personally find off on every important decision. And so there was just this huge bottleneck. It was not a discentralising when he came to power Justin Trudeau announced that cabinet government cabinet is none other words ministers have power to make their own decisions. Everything I hear says that hasn't been true you've covered a lot of governments. Do you have a sense of how rare it is for it to be structured that way and decisions to made like that? It is everyone complains about excessive power in in five ministries EM Brodie who was chief of staff to Stephen Harper for a while. We're really interesting book that outlines all the reasons why that's kinda needs to be the case. Why important decisions have to go through the? But I mean, there could be six or eight people who make those decisions the definition of what is the decision. So important that it has to go through the pm couldn't does change from government to government and the combination of very elevated executive decision. Making power in the hands of prime ministers to principal tenants, and the very close personal relationship. It's not unprecedented. But it's very it's very novel. I mean chief of staff John tape phone after back city Christian and Peltier went to seize up together, you know, in the stone age, and so there there have been cases where personal relationship translates to a functional relationship in office. But Harper was not buddies with any of his chief of staff, so if a bit of a pendulum, and and and it can it can go both ways. Do we have a sense yet

Prime Minister Jerry Butts Justin Trudeau Gerald Butts Stephen Harper Sherry Butts Principal Chief Of Staff Canada SNC Barack Obama Mcgill University Jordan Heath Rawlings Secretary Partner Twitter Ottawa Arctic
"world wildlife" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Sometimes will give us. Who? You got a window. Let's look at the weather. Let's get a fresh. Copy of the weather here. Temperature is about. Hold on. Here comes twenty five. It's gonna be a cold walk home. Today. We have cold weather. It'll be sunny, but cold it's not going to get much higher than it is now I twenty five to thirty feel like single digits and teens. Tonight. It's gonna be ten across some suburbs. Saturday up to thirty Sunday clouds giving way to some sun. I wonder how it'll be in the mountains. Arlington near twenty four twenty five Weymouth the same. So that's Jenny's Tom Jenny you're at twenty five. I'm going to tell you about more about Woodstock, but I'm gonna tell you about Woodstock ninety nine and the things that went wrong. So we have Melinda. Melinda in Quincy who also waited 'til the last guns fired as my mother would say before. Really, I was kinda busy. But I did want to get one in before the weekend. Good. Let's see. I just want to get some things on animals wise, you know, because that's my number one thing thanks to Doug for that about the saying about the cows. You know, how they whenever milked all the time. And I I can't stand the thought of that. I do hope they do get to grace. I'm gonna look into that. He was saying something about well. He doesn't drink it. And he's saying something free range milk or something or grain fed cows. Yeah. So I'm wondering if there's a free range milk because I I want to look into this. 'cause I'm interested in this very much. I don't I don't think the unions. It's weird to humans drink some other animals. Up with it. You know, it's weird. You can you eat a cookie without milk? It's just we really if you're going to drink milk. It should be human milk. I. It's made for you. It is. I know. But no, that's not. I don't wanna do the cows. Even I mean, I'm getting to the point. I don't know here weird. We don't want our own. Because we have pain in the neck to get human milk because you can't really hook up. Raking machines. You have to drink the cow milk. And that's that's made that's made for an animal with four stomachs. Okay. Right. Well, if I just wish that, I just can't stand the idea like being on those machines all day night in. I mean day in day out. They gotta be out in the grass. I thought of it. It's just telling me. What about jeez? Yeah. All of it. It's just it's just we'll least I'm on the meat kick. And I'm doing that. And I don't eat bacon or any of that stuff. I just I'm just trying. My best one day to time. Like you say. Since since I eat chickens is to chickens don't give milk because then we could have chicken milk and get all from one animal. I just wanna tell you. I think it's awesome. That you you've done this. I think that every little bit helps, and I think the fact that you're not eating meat is is a step in the right direction for everybody. I think it's good to do. It doesn't matter. If you're not giving up everything, I just I think at least you try I know well and also some people give me a hard time for saying. I'm not gonna eat beef chicken. Really the same time. You come on isn't a chicken a step down. I know. It's right at the cow is a lot of soul. House actually, very affectionate. And then very social animals, and I do know one chicken, and he's you know, is is cool. Oh, let's face it. I mean, if I saw when I see chickens turkeys, and if they were gonna panel something I'd be thinking, oh my God. I wouldn't want to eat them and little chickens or adorable, and I it, but when it comes down to chicken, my doctor said you really do need protein. So it's like you can get protein from kinds of stuff like you can get it from other things. So I just I'm I'm doing my best. But I'm like like you said the chicken you'd think of is not as bad, but still they should they should not live in cruel conditions. Anybody? Don't go to Kentucky Fried Chicken because they they keep chickens in a horrible horrible way. In other words, stacked on top of each other in cages. And they're not allowed to move in that whole thing. And so that's out, but it's still places that, you know, have a bomb. The the chickens are allowed to walk around and everything. But even that at the end of the day. I don't feel they deserve to die. I just don't I don't. I just don't think it's right for me to say, well, you can die, and you can't fish. About fish? I I don't see a problem with fish. However, I will say I don't like when they go out on a boat, and they take all these fish, and they let him out of the net. And they just they they they can't breathe. Yeah. In other words, water smothering basically to death. I would be better off if I didn't eat fish because now fish poisoned as well. Most all fish has chunks of plastic dad, plastic in it and also the mercury and all that stuff. Getting the turtles everybody get to getting plastic nets on themselves. And it just I just can't stand it. I I actually went to suit knock recently just about a week ago. And I got bought a bunch of those bags. They sell like canvas type thing. So I could do only got five and say, well, they started throwing stuff in the plastic bags. I said, no, no, no, no. And I got a bunch of kind of you know, you can reuse reuse reuse. So I'm starting to really get on the wagon. They're doing things, right. I go shopping a little bit every day being doing the walking thing as a vantage that I have a backpack. And I go to the store every day and get a days with food every day, and I don't even need any shopping bags. Oh, yeah. Well, well, I've got these now. So everything's cool. Because whatever I get is going to go into these bags, and I wanted to mention I'm glad Jenny talked about it because I was going to bring up the little dog. And I said, I better be careful. You're probably going to be like why did I ever bring up the little dog because? How's the little dog? I got to tell the folks we're talking about a little dog that I know who I would come home. He was out. And I assumed that he'd been all night. After checking into it. In general. No. And because I on nights when I stay up all night. Now, I check check check on these cold nights. And we'll see. Well, like, she said, I would be willing also to call for you. Yeah. I totally would do. I would do it. I will do it. No problem. So have you ever want that done? Just let me know you guys got my back. Thank you. Yes. Yeah. In the little dogs back definitely rally. What what else was the? Oh. So we don't see. Let's see. Oh. And I want to mention the girl Christie called she talking before about the t shirt, and she was so sweet because she said, I just make them just she said she wanted a v neck, and I said, let's not get into all that. Let's just do the cronut simple. And she she agreed. And then she brought up last week about Peter. And maybe you could get them and see what they're up to. And then of course, is or the ASPCA she made say or the World Wildlife Fund any one of those, you know. Okay. Would be good to talk to. So that's that's my thing on the animals right now to tell my daughter told me one night, she said she'd go into a Bowie a Bowie being tribute than-thank. Young americans. It was it was going be the phone to road by. I went. I heard you start time. I said oh my God. I met the call and tell him about this thing. And she I said what I so. I asked her how it wasn't. He she said she liked it a lot. And I I mentioned. Yeah. He he liked it too. And then she said she's seeing them off with the mid midway. Cafe. Okay. Yeah. So she's sharp. She's she's so anyway, so she was at your data was at the same place. I was. Yeah. I was like God. I wish I was there because I wouldn't mind seeing that either. And she said, well, maybe next time. At dances might she sings too like I do. So she shakes to get up and sing and stuff husband plays guitar. So all that. Yeah. A lot of music in my brother does drums so on the girl on on the girl's name God I had so many can I give you a feel about dawn's. We're talking about our contest. We we were trying to find song titles with the girl's name for every letter of the alphabet. Go ahead. Let's go. With a Angie Rolling Stones. Aubrey from bread. Oh, yeah. You love bread. I like bread. Yeah. Mantech? But I say, you're. And Sylvia's mother s Dr John Dr hook. Don't do it safer clear. Sullivan. Okay. Yeah. And then there was several Leyla by Eric Clapton. I had megi made. I Rod Stewart and baby. Jane, Rod Stewart, Billy Jean Michel Jackson. I- brandy or a fine girl looking glass, I had so many, Shannon, which I've told you about before by Henry garage. It's about a dog a dog that drowned. But but it's it's a nice song. So oh Delilah. By Tom Jones, who you mentioned the other night. What we got that one? I know. But this also plain white t's Delilah. Oh, okay. Know that one. Plain white t's was that a band. Yeah. Blame my teeth. They saying Hello. Delilah. Looking. Goes like. Newburgh kinda new but not all that new probably about five years. I haven't even I'm out of. Maybe you haven't heard this song because that's not your thing. But I know people out they've heard Delilah by. Oh, play white teeth. But they have that song too. So I can ask you a question. What would you think it's some of the other night? How wouldn't it be cool? If we could go out, and you were talking to was a Ken from me. Kenny remain poor guy. I just my heart. When you Kenny I I know. Pressed with how together he is. At least you seem great. He's crazy. Re I got diagnosed in two thousand one. Luckily, they found it and took care of it. So you know, but any anyway, I wish him the best some. At some point not not this week. But maybe next week. Kenny, if you're listening then few ever in the mood, not to talk about the physical part. But to talk about the mental part. Yeah. What it was like as leading up to the diagnosis. Like your worries what it was like. When you found out like in that room. What happened? Me for me. I'll tell you once you've been told that word, you always think that jeeze is this going gonna come back. You have to go like every four years and be checked to see if it's it's somewhere else did a comeback. So it's something even never leaves. You thought of it? Maybe I haven't navies come back. I mean, it's awful because you think it might come back. But thank God. I mean, this was in two thousand one and it's not yet. I don't want to jinx myself. I say that. But but yeah. So that was. He's a good guy. But I was gonna ask you quickly. Do you saying you guys say about going out and feeling young again? What makes I think it brings back the memories of when we were young. And for me a lot of it with disco. I wonder if we could ever get anybody to bring that back and play in a club. We know school seventies. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You know, like Casey was sunshine being a lot of BG's. Either way. I revisited the song Massachusetts by the BG's and the live version. I like it. I like it. Now, it is good. It's like I kind of a song. It's us. It says I need it. So I made fun of it before. You like to pick on them and another one I was thinking he picks on that. I go, but Frankie Valli is much high of any Frankie Valli. So that's really out there. But what do you think on the discount that you think anybody love it bring it back? We can get it back. Should they really should write a couple more than you would want to hear on that dance floor? Well, like like cases like get down tonight, which I I would never be able to go inferno. Yes. Definitely burn baby. Burn. Baby. Wow. Did.

Tom Jenny Kenny Melinda Frankie Valli BG Delilah Woodstock Rod Stewart Doug Arlington Massachusetts Weymouth Quincy World Wildlife Fund Eric Clapton Christie Casey Angie Rolling Stones Bowie Peter
"world wildlife" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"And how are you going to use this episode? So for me it actually started before our workshop in Kenya. It's a year in the making for me. I thought you know, we're really trying to adapt. Conservation at World Wildlife Fund were trying out some new ways of doing that. And I really wanted to document the process in the learning over time. So that WWF staff could learn from it, and hopefully your listeners as well. So we're actually producing off. Oh documentary. Okay. So WBF is a fairly complicated organization. You have offices all over the world, but WWF isn't a single organization. Can you give a little background to help my listeners better understand WWF as they follow the rest of this episode short WWF is pretty complicated organization. Many people think we're just one single organization with a headquarters and a lavar many offices take direction from that single headquarters. But actually, we are a federation of thirty or more WWF by now with one hundred offices all over the world and each country has its own conservation strategy, and so when we dive into this episode, your listeners are going to hear from lots of people from our country offices all over the world, and it's good to remember that they each have unique challenges with conservation and climate change in their countries, and they all have different strategies to tackle those challenges. Okay. So let's just do this in. The first part of this episode. We're gonna take a world tour to learn how climate change impacts are already feting WWF conservation work. Yeah. So I'm really excited about this part of the episode. We're going to start off by going to the Mekong delta in Vietnam. And we'll hear about how rapid economic development and climate change are together threatening the rich by diversity of that region. And then we're off to Mexico to learn about how climate change is threatening the monarch butterfly and its wintering grounds. And then it's dmed a gas car where a lot of people have been displaced by severe droughts. And now they're moving into forest land, cutting down this force to farm in the Philippines. We're going to learn how that country WWF is involved in planning for super typhoons in Uganda will learn how increase water scarcity is driving conflict between farmers and elephants and finally will land in Cape Town, South Africa to see how the severe drought there has affected. The city has even made it difficult for wwltv staff to come to work. Okay. Let me just say really quickly. How awesome it was for me even Skyping in with these folks from all over the world. It was just fantastic opportunities. So let's jump right in here from them. My name is Kate tech men, and I'm working in WW Vietnam 's climate and energy practice WWF works a lot on the maycom delta, which is a priority landscape for conservation WWF, his vein working there since two thousand seven and we were to restore the resilient to the delta and highlight risky investments and support by visiting resilience of local PayPal the doses..

World Wildlife Fund Kenya maycom delta Mekong Vietnam PayPal Skyping Kate Cape Town Uganda Philippines South Africa Mexico
"world wildlife" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"So what did you think of our three guests? I really enjoyed talking with them and learning from them. And I think they have a lot to offer what we're trying to do with our flood management work. So that was really exciting for me. Okay. Did you learn anything particularly new from from any of these speakers? Well, I think we learned about how difficult it is to define what a community is. And I think those of us who work with communities, and particularly and non-government organizations we've gotten into a habit of just saying that community, and there is no such thing as that community. It can be so many different sectors and attributes that those of us who want. To work with the community. I think need to do a little bit more thinking around. How do you even define what a community is? Okay. So I used to work in a previous life as an adaptation practitioner in. I felt like there's very few opportunities when you think about the grants or the project money that you have to really build in the sort of creative. Science communications creative engagement in. How're you doing it? And how to my listeners out there that they would like to do something similar what be some practical ways for them to kind of move on these things. Well, I think in terms of doing more, I think we are doing it. And I think we're trying to be creative. And and the guest we had today are examples of that. And we're doing it. And I like this like this podcast, and you or working with educators and on how to use podcast in a classroom, for example. And so there are resources and experts out there and creative people out there to call upon and sometimes. It's just a matter of taking advantage of opportunities. Unforeseen opportunities that present themselves. So for example, I learned about Liz Miller in the work that she's doing with the shoreline project through a person I happen to meet at at a conference and Catherine talked about plan international NGO who contacted her to help them with engagement around community climate change at uptake action. And so I think it is happening. I just think that we who often are trained to think in our professional or sectoral boxes need to put more effort into stepping outside of those boxes and looking around at things that may be available to us that could be very helpful is I agree. And I applaud you guys at World Wildlife Fund that you kind of step outside the box in your you've worked with me several times using podcast. I not that. My listeners have in the Scillies podcast. But sometimes I think you kind of bake in your pro-choice, I'm going to do a report instead of the standard things that come with reporting out on these all these really important in centrally cool things but just communicating people to think going to develop position..

Catherine Liz Miller World Wildlife Fund
"world wildlife" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"This is a lot of really useful information in I think it's gonna compliment. This is part of our three part flood episode series that American doing with World Wildlife Fund. And is there any resources people listening to what we're talking about here that you would recommend any online resources any particular? Specific things that you'd recommend. Would it be the little to infighter for me to say that I plug the plug green? We linked to weed leak it every showed every episode that Joe. So it'll be there. You don't have to worry about that one. You can plug it. We may cut it out later, but we will always take shameless promotion. I really would. Yeah. I really would would say that. I mean, this very genuinely that when I did have the opportunity earlier this summer to weed the entire pink ice cover to cover. I found it to be very helpful piece. You can't cover every topic in there, or course. But I do think that all of the different sections in guide that are route to community engagement citizen science monitoring evaluation said guide itself provides a lot of different sources for people to read more. And so I think that to me would be really the primary document resources available right now civically for commuting gauge for for nature based methods. But we're also if I if I can sort of plug a little bit of the work that we're doing it semantic reviews of the evidence on community engagement in community impact, social health impacts all nature base methods for flood management until refining there that there isn't much really. Useful information there at the moment. A lot of it is talking about the need for it. But the actual evidence is quite air. So that's something that we're gathering together hopefully able to share in the near future. But I think that one of if I could just sort of make the point that I don't think the research that are to be tailored very specifically to this topic of nature based methods for plug with management a lot of these children vailable on across the spirit of community based work that has been going on for hundreds of years. And so there are many great resources in the terms. I would sort of throughout their participatory rural appraisal PR a community based participatory research or CB PR. These are really two methods help people this is not about academic. I retire research that actually help organizations are really tried to do work with communities as opposed to just during for Kenedy. Thank you. Thank you so much. This was incredible information. I think it's really complementary to some the other information we've been getting these interviews, but really create your time in in the work that you do having any on any final words now. Thank you. This has been great so informative and inspiring. And yes, it does align nicely with some of our other discussions in further resources will be able to share with you, particularly in terms of storytelling. So thank you. Okay. Perfect. That's great. Great. I like saying that. Hit actors. I'm talking with professor Elizabeth Miller a documentary maker and professor in communication studies based at concordia university in Montreal Canada. Welcome to the podcast. Liz, thank him. All right. So you're involved with with a lot of things. But I guess first off I just wanna start with the shoreline project, and could you really summarize what's that all about? Well, sometimes I describe the shoreline project as an interactive storybook or an alternative tests textbook for the future. And whole idea was to bring solution based stories about issues around climate change and sustainability to a form that would be open successful and of interest to wide audiences like students or community groups. And so in the project, we have forty three unique short films that play out along our global coast, and we found inspiring portraits of people making chain. Change along the coast from nine different countries is this just something like a project you were able to get funded out of the university or they're sort of external partners because it seemed like it's a pretty good looking series of short films and such basically in Canada as a university..

concordia university Joe Canada World Wildlife Fund professor Kenedy Liz Montreal Elizabeth Miller
"world wildlife" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Nine two seven zero three good to be with you. Good to be with you. It is anything goes, right, or whatever's on your mind is on my mind, Kim porter, man. Camp porter. Forty seven years of age dies. Mother of. Sean Diddy combs children. I think she was mother of three of them. Yeah. Yeah. Very smart, very savvy. Yeah. Beautiful woman. So right now, they're not saying an official cause of death that yet to be reported officially four zero four two two seven zero three. Let's go to Dougie in college park. Dougie? Good day. Welcome. Can you hear me? I can hear you. Okay. Great. This is a critical time. In our history. Species. Homo sapiens. We've been around for two hundred thousand years, and there is the possibility. Yeah. We are approaching. In time. Of our species within the next eighty or a hundred years and hard inspiration. Is. Right now, the only generation Nikki prevent eventual catastrophe, and we really have to celebrate all the voters who went out, you know, Democrats did extremely well and take your back about three hundred eighty seats. But I hope that we can continue this momentum and continue to register voters. So that by twenty twenty we can replace what gnome Chomsky dissident intellectual known around the world. It said is the most dangerous organization on the planet. And that is the Republican party one hundred thirty one Republicans in the house and thirty eight in the Senate if basically sold their souls to the Basel fuel industry. They are completely corrupted. And the only way that we are going to be able to get rid of over twenty twenty is more this massive voter participation Rashad, there's a pew reports. It just recently came out. You don't hear on the corporate media because the corporate media received so much money from the fossil fuel industry. But there was a report it just came out a week and a half ago that that says that the ocean have been warming sixty percents fab. Than than they knew before. Another report came out that. The World Wildlife. This is from the World Wildlife Fund over sixty percents of wildlife. Have been have been destroyed since the nineteen seventy. So we're destroying ecosystems were destroying the biodiversity on the planet where destroying the animals birds reptile sixty percent of them have disappeared since the nineteen seventies. Another report from the IT C IDC. They national panel Saima change. We have twelve years to drastically reduce our emissions and by twenty forty goats zero percent carbon emissions that means we have to reduce emissions by five percent. Each year. To meet that goal. So they don't so that we don't reach the point where the world's sinks, no longer absorb carbon dioxide emitting it, and if that happens, we can go we can start having runaway global warming where we have no control of it where the ice sheets could become destabilized over time. And we'll have two hundred feet of water. From the ICU melting. We'll have over half of the world by twenty fifty covered with drought. We'll have more climate refugees more conflict in the world. Yeah. So let me ask you are you going to be at the sleep out tonight, brother? What will you brought that up is important? It's such an important ties because last year. There was seventeen million climate refugees created by climate change. And by twenty fifty it's expected they will have one hundred and fifty real right? So Dougie Dougie, sir. You can't blow me, man. I actually a direct question, brother. Are you going to be with us tonight? Well, what what ten PM? Does come there for thirty minutes on our show some support you can talk about climate change. I have to work early in the morning. I've been technology to get the address. Beg your brother. I appreciate your man you too. All right piece four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three fail. Iphone yet Fe. Good day. Welcome. How you doing great? How are you? I'm doing fine. Listen, here's my concern. Well, I'm glad I knew seeing they will make them give CNN back there press credential. Lemme that that didn't even make no sense. And if it would have been me, I would have charged to talk because she hit him. I he laid hands on him. I yeah. But anyway, about this election thing in Florida and in Georgia. Georgia has the largest legislative black caucus there is and they need to go in this session and handle this boating this voting mess, and they need to handle it. So that we never get caught up in what Brian Kemp was able to do and plot the eight years that he was in office. And the first thing they need to do as mandate. Well, first of all they are the mandate that nobody can be purged from the polls once up on the thunder rolls once they're a voter because many states do not purge and, but if they don't wanna do that they should mandate that if you purge somebody you send him a certified letter just like every other agency has to do when they get ready to take away something from you. They send you a certified letter they maintain it. Another thing I'm upset about that. I hope we can go to that one two three Ballard like they have in Maine, which is at you you vote for your number one candidate than you pick two and three and that eliminates run off because. That is how the democrat actually ended up beating the Republican who actually won on election night. But most importantly, we need to look at the situation in Florida, and the more you keep talking about what's happening in Florida, and the more you make us aware of it, the more we realize that Florida needs to revoke how you gonna tell me somebody voted by fax. You don't know where that facts came from you don't know who that person was and I guarantee you all they sent in was there absentee ballots the effects, so if they can vote the affects then why can't everybody else vote the effects and the and the fact that they disqualified all the ballots in Broward County but being two minutes late. Yes. Two minutes late. Right. Well, you know, see, here's the problem. We need to make sure we need to get more vocal and more in the street and more protesting. We don't need to let this in no matter how the. The election end. We don't need to stop this by for the right for the right to vote votes to be counted. Because I guarantee you, and you your political analyst I guarantee you there were enough votes thrown away that Nielsen could have won and Abrahams could have forced a runoff, and I am glad you reminded people that Bush won Florida which made him president by one vote in every precinct. That's correct. And that is easy to manipulate when you are controlling the controlling the the machines. So, you know, me personally, I read it. I like to vote on paper because I figure people you can't cheat with people. But anyway, my brother we have got to do something. I wish you well tonight. You know, I got bad knees. I wouldn't make a nasty Mark get I can't get down on the. Ground. Make sure you pray for Fe. We'll be allowed before you send a little donation, but I can't do anything else about coming out there. But anyway, my brother, you stay on the case, you keep them honest. And you make you make sure and if you get any problems anybody, you know, let me know 'cause me, and my bad knees will come down there with a picket sign. Thank you says bless be blessed. I appreciate your four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three that gets you in the conversation today..

Dougie Dougie Florida World Wildlife Fund Kim porter Camp porter Sean Diddy Basel Brian Kemp CNN Rashad Republican party official Georgia
Biologists says mass extinction due to Human activity

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Biologists says mass extinction due to Human activity

"Up. Is. Team of biologists. With the National Academy of scientists says none of the known previous five mass extinctions were caused by man. But the six one we're currently in is caused mostly by the ongoing destruction of forest lands. The team reports of humans don't double down on mammal conservation. So many will become extinct and just the next fifty years that evolution would take three to five million years to recover the loss Linnea juice between one thousand nine hundred seventy and twenty fourteen I knew living planet report from the World Wildlife Fund says populations of vertebrates, including fish and mammals fell an average of sixty

National Academy Of Scientists World Wildlife Fund Five Million Years Fifty Years
"world wildlife" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Are you guys willing to give up your car and everything and start jut jetting around the world to stop global warming? I hear a lot of politicians talked to walk, but they're jetting around the world destroying the the world. Are they willing to take right? A horse to work. Are you willing to write a horse to world? Troy, Troy, you're talking to I just because. Yes, good question. You're talking to someone who doesn't own a car and has an owned one for twenty years. I walk and take public transit. No rideshare as well. But that's I guess I'm using car in that sense. But I think you're asking a really important question. Troy and thank you so much for your call carries his area. Let me turn back to you. Because the the point Troy's making, and we just got sixty seconds left here to go is our human societies. Especially in the developed world are built around exploitation of nature. And if we're going to really save it we have to change the way we live right now. And how many people are genuinely willing to do that? I mean, that's why we need to balance our consumption with the needs of nature. And we have an opportunity to do that. I mean, we do have these embedded impacts that we can't change at the same time life is resilient and given a chance we have convinced back. I mean, we have the return of the ball Daego. We have the reforestation of New England. I mean, there are there are examples where when we have worked kind of at the government level and in collaboration we can turn turn back that we can bend those curves. And so I think now is the time to do that. We'll carry serial vice president for forests with the World Wildlife Fund. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you and Motown reporter and editor for Reuters editor in charge of waiters multi-part series. Ocean shock MO thank you so much. Thank you and Bradford listener, professor of biological sciences. At Rensselaer polytechnic institute. It's been so wonderful to have you professor listener. Thank you. Thanks for vitamin. It's been a real pleasure. And by the way, if you go to on point radio dot org, we have links to all the three reports that we talked about today. Definitely check them out and let us know. You think while you're there final thought here from a listener on Twitter? We've got a lot of these kinds of thoughts years. A holy Forsman says she's used to drive around in a windshield. It'd be spattered with insects. Now. There are almost none. I Magnin Chakrabarti. This is on point. So about the time that he begins putting the duct tape on. He says this is a robbery. Last seen a new podcast from WB VAR in the Boston Globe investigates, the largest unsolved art heist in history. The theft of thirteen artworks from us about Abouna Stewart Gardner museum in Boston artwork involved was from Rembrandt and was from Vermeer. It is to holy feel authen- five hundred million euros will the painting. There's absolutely no question knew the police weren't coming the authorities. That are on this case are the wrong stories with says, we solved it. We know who did it. It's like no you don't because you don't have the paint dis. Subscribe. And listen to last seen now on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Sponsored by Samuel Adams, an ADD smart home.

Troy World Wildlife Fund Rensselaer polytechnic institu Boston Globe Samuel Adams Magnin Chakrabarti editor Twitter vice president New England professor of biological scienc MO Abouna Stewart Gardner museum professor Reuters apple robbery Bradford
China reversing ban on tiger and rhino trade

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

China reversing ban on tiger and rhino trade

"China is reversing a twenty five year ban on the trade in use of rhino horns and tiger bones. A move that is delivering a blow to international conservation efforts. The decision would permit the use of endangered species parts for medical and scientific use the conservation group World Wildlife Fund said the policy would have adverse effects in protecting the animals which was approved in nineteen Ninety-three amid an international drive to protect threatened wildlife. The decision comes at a time when wildlife parks continue to be trafficked in Chinese territory. The Hong Kong Standard reported last week that a rhino horn smuggler was sentenced to eight months in prison for bringing nearly seven pounds of rhino horns in the Hong Kong from Mozambique

World Wildlife Fund Hong Kong Mozambique China Twenty Five Year Eight Months Seven Pounds
Effects of Human Activities on the Environment

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Effects of Human Activities on the Environment

"Human consumption is having a major negative impact on wildlife across the world and USA's. Chris Barnes has more on the story. According to a new report from the World Wildlife federation vertebrate species, which include reptiles birds mammals fish and amphibians declined by sixty percent on the globe between one thousand nine hundred seventy and twenty fourteen increased food production for humans and demand for energy and land and water are driving the changes south. And Central America. Saw the biggest declines an eighty nine percent loss of vertebrate species between seventy and two thousand fourteen

World Wildlife Federation Chris Barnes Central America USA Eighty Nine Percent Sixty Percent
"world wildlife" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Certainly Corolla breeds a tweet from James woods. I'm getting a job from your mom. Now back to the Adam Corolla shell and he's Eucker and studio the book, he started it my Twitter war with Trump is available now at Amazon, and you can bookmark us and click on through. It's always good for us. And the proceeds go to charity the World Wildlife Fund and Planned Parenthood is well good. See again, it's great to see you. Thanks for having me on hygiene. My pleasure. We'll talk about the book, we'll talk about modern family and should roll huge fans, and to me modern family sort of brought back the sitcom genre for me. It was it was kinda gone. It was oh were were were moving onto a single Cam. And I know you guys are single Cam. But I mean, like Garry shandling or curb your enthusiasm or other sopranos over just moving away from sitcoms, and they brought me right back, which I guess good writing can do. Yeah. Genius. What was so subversive about the show, and I didn't create it was created by God. Steve Levitan, Chris, Lloyd. But it was that it wasn't revolutionary. It wasn't cynical. It wasn't subversive. It was sort of like it was you know, you think about the comedies of the nineties and the early thousands. I love those and wrote on a lot of them. But it was a lot of people slam each other. And and the show family that really loved each other was weirdly revel. Lucien area at the time. So also, it's it's it's weird. How we're wired as human beings, which is there's this imaginary sort of camera crew on a fourth wall and people would have their little sit downs there. You know in the wral the biz I think they the calm like a God confessionals. Yeah. Confessional. I come over here and tell me what just happened. Yeah. And they do it and you go. Well, isn't that going to bump people for Mattingly, and it doesn't and then also people will flash the camera. Yeah. Like, they'll go fill look at the camera like, oh what's going on? And you think well, wait a minute. We're not in the confessional anymore. Why we flashing the camera because now this is supposed to be life. And it doesn't bump you either. That was a lot of discussion early on. I remember when we came in. Because I didn't do the pile up on the first episode we'll kind of came in with and when I was under the impression that it was going to be much more present documentary crew there in terms of like almost like the offices. You know, it's like memory. And so I had pitched it there is a cousin who has not signed a release. And so they would be pixellated the entire run of the show. And and Steve levity had had a really smart thing about this. Because they were debating whether to do it in an early draft a documentary and was one of the characters, but they said we don't like a family that's going to be on a reality show. We don't care a family that's going to make that choice is sort of. It's not you couldn't tell the same heartwarming stories. And I think he was really smart about that. Yeah. Well, it's weird in that. I mean comedy is really this way maybe more than than anything else, which is it either works or doesn't work. It's it's weird. Having this is my my beef with the the the system the studio system as you sit in a room with people and argue about what's going to work, and what's not going to work, and nobody has any idea. No. Because every example of every movie ever loved would've never worked in that room. Yes. And including modern family, which is like flashing the camera and doing the confessionals and stuff like that. So let's let's just right. The funniest show. We can write and check it out. But please stop telling me, you know, it's not gonna work 'cause nobody knows anything. Yeah. Getting the best cast. That's all luck. This the other. I can talk for hours about what I hate about the studio system, everybody's competing for the same actors at the same time every pilots, and so sometimes a great actor will be up, but they've already committed to show that's going to be done in three. And so it's just luck..

Steve levity World Wildlife Fund Garry shandling Twitter James woods Amazon Steve Levitan Mattingly Trump Chris
Turkish central bank hikes rates in a bid to save tumbling currency

English News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Turkish central bank hikes rates in a bid to save tumbling currency

"Rate in an attempt to stem, the currency crisis. The bank's policy makers decided on Thursday to increase the rate from seventeen and three quarters to twenty four percent. The Bank says, decided on the strong tightening of monetary policy to limit the threat recent inflation poses to price stability. The market had forecast tightening of about three percentage points. Traders believed the higher than expected. Hike would help stem. The lira's decline. The currency is now recovering. Inflation is rising in Turkey due in part to a currency affect the lower value of the lira translates into higher prices of imports. The collapse in the lira's value came about as the result of a diplomatic row between Turkey and the United States. It's value was down about forty percent this week from the level early this year, Turkish president regime type air to one has been a verse to rate hikes out of fear of an economic slowdown. But earlier this month, the central Bank hinted at a possible rate hike. Feeding market speculation. It would act in that direction. The International Whaling Commission has adopted a

Japan Turkey World Wildlife Fund Japan Bank International Whaling Commissi United States France Nobelists Brazil Eiffel Tower Jack Chew President Trump Brazil Russia Yahoo North Korea Ella CUP
River Depor Station, Director and Amazon discussed on "News

"News

02:49 min | 2 years ago

River Depor Station, Director and Amazon discussed on "News

"This isn't the first time a musician has been accused of stealing from gays hits in two thousand eighteen and appeals court ruled robin thicke and ferrall had to give up fifty percent royalties to as a state after it was deemed they borrowed heavily from gay song got to give it up and their smash hit live that's abc's diane macedo reporting in the rivers of bolivia the species as allusive as it is exotic swims in the amazon river pink dolphins are legendary in that part of the world but their numbers are dwindling rapidly can if you dedicated scientists helped save the species abc's victor kindo has the story the dolphin of the amazon river is a living legend in at the end of two thousand seventeen or first links the world wildlife fund is on a mission to tag fifteen dolphins twelve brazil colombia bolivia just studied their health and behavior the group consists of fishermen and scientists scientists fear pink river dolphin is to extinction due mostly to mid made threats like finding putting deforestation waiting for them under ted's is a big ship award pink dolphins can only be of the water for just under sixty minutes with the clock ticking veterinarian carlos sanchez entertain hydrate the dolphin to lower its stress as they conduct a physical the researchers know its tail then take tissue and blood samples to test for mercury toxic substances and general health scientist don't know for sure how these freshwater dolphins get their pink color hypotheses include diet water quality and sunlight exposure but they do know they get pinker as they age and as quickly as it keno dolphin is returned to the water dolphins are known as an indicator species highlighting the overall health of the amazon if they're doing well so is the river depor station has been changing the water deforestation is an ongoing concern leading the tracking charge is a biologist and director of libyan ngo to know how far the travel how far trevor in the river searching for fema searching for family searching for four with the examination complete the tagging begins each tag pool ping data back to a satellite once a day because.

River Depor Station Director Amazon Carlos Sanchez TED Colombia Brazil Trevor Libyan Ngo Robin Thicke Scientist Bolivia Victor Kindo Amazon River Diane Macedo ABC Ferrall Fifty Percent Sixty Minutes
"world wildlife" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"world wildlife" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Food some time to get in the forests with shellfish were part of their diet to uh yeah i i want there to be dodos really that i look forward to perhaps i think the recently discovered some dna evidence of the dodo vienna they hadn't done through who knows to some scraps of bones and all that kind of stuff and people have stayed on it for years and years and just recently in the somewhere in the 2000s the discovered something with enough dna evidence that you know it's like the mammoth where you sort of hope that they can re uh it's a ground pigeon is the dodo it's in the pigeon family so if we can sort of reverse engineer the dodo per will for what it's worth winds or brits believed the dodo still exists according to a study from the world wildlife federation people ran yeah i know once upon a time the sun never set in the british empire that's true that is through anybody you know it also who knows maybe the brits are hiding secret goto may be buckingham palace hadras of barrio dan very limited bounce on a aren't what if there is some form of dimensional travel of which these saw squad she's a member of a vote came up in our in writing say i want to say that once upon a time the unicord's figured out how to slip through dimensions okay and again the big foot was sort who about to get extinct.

vienna engineer world wildlife federation buckingham palace