35 Burst results for "World War One"

The Lessons We Learn From Martin Niemöller

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:34 min | Last week

The Lessons We Learn From Martin Niemöller

"Well, I'm talking to Kirk Cameron Kirk. I hear a distant dog. It's so beautiful. So bucolic, you're obviously not in Manhattan. Let me ask you a question. Well, you asked me about the Martin email I quote. And of course, it's in my Bonham for book, but it's everywhere. Martini Mueller was a hero, a German hero, he fought in World War one. He got into the ministry, and he was just an incredible guy. But he was slow to wake up to the Nazi threat. He thought, like a lot of people do, like, well, we can work with them or they're not so bad or something, right? Well, when he finally woke up, it was too late, and he wrote a poem and you were talking about it. It's a famous quote where he says, when they came for the trade unionists, I was not a trade unionist. So I didn't speak up. When they came for the communists, I was not a communist, so I didn't say anything. I didn't speak up. When they came for the Jews, I was not a Jew. So I didn't say anything. I didn't speak up. And then when they came for me, there was no one left to speak up for me. And that's the idea is that we need to stand with others. When they say, I'm going to cancel so and so. I'm going to cancel I'm going to come after so and so if we don't all stand for those people, I say it's about Mike lyndell. I tell people buy pillows you don't need. Use the code Eric. Because if we don't support this guy who's been attacked like crazy, what's going to happen when he's gone? And then they're coming for you. There will be no Mike lyndell to stand up

Martini Mueller Kirk Cameron Bonham Kirk Manhattan Martin Mike Lyndell Eric
Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:10 min | Last week

Who Was Nietzsche and How Did He Influence the Nazi Movement?

"Every soldier that was deployed in world war. One was actually given nietzsche And the german front and so they read this idea of the importance of the will which we're going to get into and this idea of becoming the superman or the overman or the uber manche and then they come back to kind of war torn germany and these ideas kinda laid the philosophical trans Foundation four hitler's most popular speech the triumph of the will. And if you read that speech it sounds a lot like nietzsche's ideas so let's let's work our way backwards from there and so can you just give us some biographical context of who this guy was and how he was able why he published ideas at the time that were so different than some of the metaphysics and philosophy. That was considered to be the consensus. Well he was a prodigy. Who's obviously a german philosopher. He died in nineteen hundred at a very young age of was teaching philosophy. He was trained as a philology which means essentially somebody who studies languages in price to think about their meaning and in one of his works. that gay homo. He tells us that he essentially abandoned his post as a professor so that he can become dot and what he meant by that is that he was horrified by what he describes as buddhism for europe which is just code for certain kind of nihilism. You believe that. Europe in particular has lost its capacity in meaning any kind of sense of identity and he was looking to try to inspire certain aspects of european instance that he thought could still breed some kind of idealism or transcendent that was transcendence that was just essentially close to being buried For example industrial era through strength in a very famous speech entitled the last man speech he is characters. Few strokes mentioned that our soil is still thick enough to perhaps a plant a grants Tree some kind of some kind of the ideal but it's getting a increasingly more difficult to find anyone in the world interested in anything beyond just a here

Philosophical Trans Foundation Nietzsche Germany Europe
Retired Officer Barry McCaffrey Tries Downplaying Gen. Mark Milley Incompetence

The Dan Bongino Show

01:54 min | Last month

Retired Officer Barry McCaffrey Tries Downplaying Gen. Mark Milley Incompetence

"You to listen to how this, uh, tier one level grifter Nicole Wallace, who when she, you know, she made a few bucks up the Republican party. Then that's right up because they realized she was incompetent. Then she decided she could drift off the left. She's doing that now on MSNBC. Watch this grifter, and when that dries up, she'll try to come back to the Republicans. Again. Here's the dreadful Nicole Wallace again gold medal winning grifter, setting up another general Barry McCaffrey, who again tries to defend Mark Milley and listen to the way this is all phrased in couch like it's no big deal. It's just a guard rail. There is no guardrail. The president is the commander in chief. Jim play Cut. Three. I wonder if you have any insights into Millie as a guard rail. The last one as as Mike's basically explaining, you know, Throughout this whole period, I had rather firsthand understanding of what was going on and go. And it scared me. I was convinced without question that we were on the edge of a ultimate constitutional crisis. I thought it was unlikely that Trump would use nuclear weapons, although he had all legal and constitutional authority in theory command that But there's wonderful bothered me the most. So he took her defenses and acting sect out Constitution says the Senate will be involved in approving senior answers of government. There was no deal left. So I think what General Milley was doing and by the way, routinely the chairman the service Chiefs, then joint combatant commanders routinely contract With their counterparts globally, part of the the occurrence of unwanted combat. Uh, I think he felt it important to not end up with the World War. One start of the war through miscalculation on the part of the Chinese

Nicole Wallace Mark Milley Barry Mccaffrey Republican Party Msnbc Millie JIM General Milley Mike Donald Trump Senate
The Port Chicago Disaster

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:51 min | Last month

The Port Chicago Disaster

"One is quite sure exactly what happened but at ten eighteen pm there was a loud crash. The seminars reported as sounding like metal and timber falling down. This probably a crane or one of the booms which had collapsed then. There was the sound of an explosion and then a fire about five. To seven seconds later there was a massive explosion that destroyed the entire facility. It was one of the largest explosions in history up until that point pilots in the air at the time saw a fireball three miles into the air. The blast was felt in boulder city nevada. Four hundred thirty miles away. There was damaged onto buildings in san francisco forty eight miles away debris landed over two miles away and the plane which witnessed it said it's all white hot debris shooting past it. At an altitude of seven thousand feet. It coastguard fireboat near the pier was thrown six hundred feet or one hundred and eighty meters away where it eventually landed in the water and sank. There were three hundred and twenty men and the peer when the explosion occurred all of them died instantly. Two thirds of the dead. Were african american enlisted men who were working on the dock. In fact this explosion by itself was responsible for fifteen percent of all of the african american deaths in the second world war. I've got a previous episode on the halifax harbour explosion during world war one. The portugual explosion wasn't quite as large. But it wasn't too far away the biggest difference and the reason why the fatalities were lower. Portugal is that there were no civilians on the base. There were two hundred and fifty other injuries and of the men who were killed only fifty one wherever identified an inquiry was launched only four days after the explosion and the ruling was that it was probably the fault of one of the enlisted men. Nothing was mentioned about the poor safety conditions and the lack of training

Boulder City Nevada San Francisco Halifax Harbour Portugal
The Unexpected Story of a Man and His Bear, Winnipeg

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

02:13 min | Last month

The Unexpected Story of a Man and His Bear, Winnipeg

"The toys from our childhood. Stay with us long after we stop playing with them as adults we may lose track of a beloved stuffed animal or a fun action figure but we keep the memories. We remember how safe they made us feel and darkened bedroom or how much fun we had zooming them around the house as if they were flying and yet no matter what we all grow up and leave childish things behind but thanks to one man's impulsive decision. we learned. We don't have to let the past slip away. Not only can we hold onto it but we can share it with the people we love and keep that joy alive for generations to come harry. Colbourn was born in birmingham england in eighteen eighty seven. When he was eighteen years old he moved to ontario canada where he studied to become a veterinarian surgeon upon receiving his degree he settled in winnipeg in manitoba but duty would eventually call. Harry joined the military when world war one became too great to ignore and he hopped a train to quebec for basic training. It was on his way to the camp when he encountered an odd sight. A hunter had killed a black bear and taken. It's cub to sell at a local trading post. Harry gave them twenty dollars and in exchange he took possession of the bear cub which he named winnipeg after the town where he'd been living. His plan was to raise winnipeg for a little while before releasing her back into the forest. Unfortunately harry's plans change very quickly. Winnipeg became a hit among other troops. They played with her and let her stay in the bunks where. She slept under harry's kat that she grew however winnipeg got too big to live indoors and was relegated to outside like a kind of watch bear for the soldiers. The more time they spend together the harder it became for harry to let go. He in winnipeg had grown close. So close that. When he was ordered to go back to england to fight on the western front he refused to release the bear back into the wild he instead snuck her into the ship with the other troops together. They traveled to the second canadian. Infantry brigade camp near stonehenge in england. Harry let her roam free for a while they were there. She enjoyed playing on the large stones but he soon understood that he would have to give her up. There was just no way for winnipeg to go all the way with him to the front

Winnipeg Colbourn Harry England Manitoba Birmingham Ontario Quebec Canada Infantry Brigade Camp
Race Recap:  Running in the Italian Alps

Marathon Training Academy

02:03 min | Last month

Race Recap: Running in the Italian Alps

"So trevor. I know people are excited to hear about how your sky marathon went in italy. So tell us what made you want to sign up for this event. When i posted some photos on instagram people were asking. Where's the race recap will here. It is so. I went and did the sued t- role sky marathon in italy. Big thanks to angie. For watching the kids while i went over that we're not always able to travel marathons together these days but i was able to get away for a trip to europe was not to like about that for two whole weeks. Yeah kind of squeezing. A lot actually flew into venice and then stayed there couple of days. Amazing place rented a car and drove up to northern italy. In the trentino alto. A dodgy region of italy up against the alps. It's predominantly german. Speaking actually because east to belong to austria until after world war one so in german suty role which means south t. role because it was part of the tea role region in austria. So it was cool to practice german while i was over there and Of course run a beautiful marathon in a beautiful place so the race took place on august. Twenty eighth it was my eighteenth. Marathon to date is my third marathon in the alps and it was definitely the most challenging. We climbed a of twenty eight hundred meters or over nine thousand feet It was just a constant climb up and down mostly up the race also has a sixty nine k one hundred twenty one k which they didn't have this year for i don't know why they also have a half a trail half but with all the events combined they call it. The most extreme experience in the alps. Wow that saying something. I know especially because i can think of some pretty extreme experiences exactly so tell us about the day. You know the days leading up to the marathon. How you're feeling and what kind of preparations that you had to have going into the race will. My training was tough. Because we don't live elevation so i tried to get as much trail time as i could in just going up and down trail. I think that might have helped my leg

Italy Austria Trevor Angie Europe
Josephine Baker Is 1st Black Woman Given Paris Burial Honor

NPR News Now

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Josephine Baker Is 1st Black Woman Given Paris Burial Honor

"Josephine baker at the american born dancer and singer who rose to fame after moving to paris in the nineteen twenties. We'll have resting place. Bakers remains to be moved to the pantheon muslim. For some of france's most distinguished citizens rebecca rosman reports that the honor make speaker the first black woman to be insured there in a statement. A french government spokesperson baker as a quote. Great lady who loved france. The beloved dancer singer and member of the lizzy stoneless was born in missouri in one thousand nine hundred six but moved to paris in the nineteen twenties as part of a wave of black americans who came to the french capital just after world war. One baker was famous for saying she had to love my country and paris baker. Who died in nineteen seventy five and is currently buried in. Monaco will be moved to the pantheon. In a ceremony held on november thirtieth her induction to the pantheon means she will be joined alongside other french. National heroes including malik kelly at example dumas and voltaire

Rebecca Rosman French Government Josephine Baker Paris Lizzy Stoneless Baker France Missouri Monaco Malik Kelly Dumas
Fritz Haber: The Best and Worst Chemist in History

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:52 min | 2 months ago

Fritz Haber: The Best and Worst Chemist in History

"The half of all the crops in the world today are fertilized by. Fertilizers created via the fiber process. With over one hundred million tonnes produced via this method every year. It's hard to stress. Just how important. The fiber process is literally. Our modern world couldn't exist and the lives of billions of people depend on it for taba was awarded the nobel prize in chemistry in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine for his work in this area. Despite the incredible benefits to humanity of the harbor process is nobel prize was controversial. That reason had to do with the other side of fritz harbor. If helping to feed the world was his best side than what he did. Next was his worst despite being born jewish. In what is today. Poland harbor very much identified as german. He converted from judaism to lutheranism primarily to help his academic career when world war one broke out. Harbor enthusiastically supported the german. 'cause he was one of ninety three academics who signed a document called the manifesto of the ninety three here are the first sentences of the manifesto quote as representatives of german science and art we hereby protests to the civilized world against the lies and calamities. A which are enemies are endeavouring to stain the honor of germany in her hard struggle for existence in a struggle that has been forced upon her. The iron mouth of events has proved the untruth of the fictitious german defeats consequently misrepresentation and colony are all the more eagerly at work as heralds of truth. We raise their voices against these claims. Unquote hubbard joined the army and was promoted to the rank of captain. He was then assigned to be the head of the chemistry section of the ministry of war. It was fritz. Harbor who almost singlehandedly was responsible for the use of chemical weapons in world war one.

Fritz Harbor Poland Harbor Taba Harbor Unquote Hubbard Germany Army Fritz
The Best of Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:56 min | 2 months ago

The Best of Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette

"As colette entered a new stage in her life. So did the rest of the world. in paris. Colette found a flourishing network of underground lesbian bars and restaurants. It was in this community that colette met her lover of six years. She was across dressing noblewoman. Nicknamed mri the two for one night performed at moulin rouge together and their kiss nearly caused a riot. Colette tried to continue writing under her own name. But predictably had no immediate success. She resorted to making money in other ways. Before world war one darkened the atmosphere. Cafes cabarets and music halls were full of performances. all kinds. Colette became a music hall dancer. Living a rich life filled with material for her writing. She dedicated herself to her books. While also finding work as drama critic political writer fashion critic and cooking columnist in one thousand nine hundred ten she published the semi autobiographical book the vagabond. The story centers. On a woman named rene who after divorce becomes a dancer music halls. This fresh fighting and sensual book marked the beginning of her new and distinctive voice. A nineteen fifty five review wrote la- vagabond explorers with collects infinite patience and precision. The beating heart of a woman in each and love is not passionate romance nor tender dream but an abiding dul. Colette went onto marry two more husband's court many lovers and right dozens of books. Perhaps her most famous work was g. G the stage adaptation of which helped to launch audrey hepburn's

Colette Paris Rene LA Audrey Hepburn
Vera Atkins' Role in the Special Operations Executive

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:52 min | 2 months ago

Vera Atkins' Role in the Special Operations Executive

"The early nineteen forties. Vera caught the eye of the british secret service. Aside from her fluency in german english. French and romanian she also had multiple family members who had passed confidential information across europe in between world wars. One and two. She was the perfect candidate for covert operation responsibilities. Vera joined britain's special operations executive or the esso in nineteen forty one as a secretary. The sos was set up by prime minister. Winston churchill with the intent of conducting espionage sabotage and reconnaissance throughout occupied europe vero worked diligently to rise through the ranks. She moved from secretary to intelligence officer to principal assistant to the director. Colonel maurice buck master. She was assigned to the majority of the operational planning for the france section of the sob e although never confirmed by author ian fleming. It's believed that colonel. Buck master is m. In the james bond series and vera was an inspiration for the character of miss moneypenny. That said vero did not share miss money. Pennies romantic love struck nature fears. Primary job was to recruit and deploy british agents into occupied france. Vera interviewed the candidates in a stark dimly lit hotel room with just a desk. Two chairs into lightbulb. If they passed that stage vera put their french to the test to ensure they could pass as a native and finally vera closed out the interview process by informing the candidate. This role had a fifty fifty chance of survival and giving the potential agent a few to consider this fate. Vera did not sugar coat. The dangers of the

Vera British Secret Service Colonel Maurice Buck Europe Esso Winston Churchill Vero Britain Ian Fleming France James Bond Colonel Buck
Did Adolf Hitler Father a Son?

Everything Everywhere Daily

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Did Adolf Hitler Father a Son?

"Far as we know. Hitler never had any children however there was a rumor that he had an illegitimate son in france in nineteen eighteen jean-marie laurey was born in san quentin france. You never knew his father and his mother only told him that his father was german soldier in nineteen forty eight just before his mother's death. She told him that the german soldier in question was named hitler. The story was kept a secret but it was eventually leaked to the press in the early. Nineteen seventies hines. Linke was hitler's valet during the war in his memoirs. He noted quote hitler's belief that he had a son born in nineteen eighteen. As the result of relationship he had with the french girl as a soldier in world war one in northern france and belgium unquote. There is no hard evidence to prove this claim and no genetic testing has ever been done. Laura had nine children so they're still might be potential to do genetic testing in the

Marie Laurey France San Quentin Hitler Linke Hines Belgium Laura
Democrat Presidents Have a History of Promoting Propaganda

Mark Levin

01:39 min | 3 months ago

Democrat Presidents Have a History of Promoting Propaganda

"I want to remind you of a few things. Those of you who listened over the years and have read some of these books I've written over the years. This is not the first administration. To try and take out their political enemies and criminalized Politan. Woodrow Wilson was the first they create a whole propaganda machine. And he used a man by the name of Bearnaise. You know, like the like the sauce anyway, His name was Bearnaise. He wrote a book called Propaganda. But before that, he spoke about it. He wrote about it and Propaganda wasn't a bad word back then. And so what? And so Wilson decided to use him and Some of the surrogates. Propaganda. For what he wanted to do in World War one, the League of Nations race and the rest of it because Wilson One of the founding fathers of the so called Progressive movement was a racist in the sensation ist who Resegregated, the military And he supported the Klan. A Democrat, A so called progressive Franklin Roosevelt used propaganda use the IRS. He used the FBI to intimidate, silence his opponents and send some of them to prison. One of the greatest presidents we've ever had just asked the Democrat Party. Lyndon Johnson. And I'm skipping over a few.

Politan Woodrow Wilson Wilson League Of Nations Franklin Roosevelt IRS FBI Democrat Party Lyndon Johnson
July 20, 1924: Tehran Declares Martial Law

Today in True Crime

02:26 min | 3 months ago

July 20, 1924: Tehran Declares Martial Law

"On july twentieth. Nineteen twenty four. Tehran authorities declared martial law after a mob killed an american consul. Major robert embry. The decision was designed to give the city a chance to regain order before an international crisis tore the nation. Apart leading up to the death. Iran had been a hotbed of foreign interest. The british had tried and failed to establish a protectorate over the nation. Meanwhile russia had recently vacated its stakes after their defeat in world war one. The newest foreign party to take an interest was the united states and they mainly wanted one thing oil. They pressured the iranian government into allowing oil tycoons to start drilling into the land when robert embryo was killed at the hands of an angry mob. All the foreign actors in the country started pointing fingers at each other. Tehran newspapers and russian authorities blamed the british for inciting muslims into a frenzy. Others blamed the russians who had expelled embry from moscow after he defended his anticommunist beliefs fellow american spy marguerite harrison who recently departed the near east while posing as a filmmaker claimed international intrigue was to blame but above all according to margarite. Embree was to blame for his own death. He had knowingly entered a dangerous situation marguerite also claimed embry made a serious error by fleeing the initial attack at the shrine. According to iranian custom running away proved he was guilty of sabotaging the site. If he had stayed the people would have merely punished him but not killed him. Br guardless of who may have deserved the blame. There was one person who gained from robert. Inbreeds death raza khan commander of the cossack forces on july twentieth con gain control over the massive city declaring he would arrest those responsible for killing embry. While one part of the cossacks investigated another arm reached in a more opportunistic direction. They shut down the presses instituting a news blackout con then arrested his political rivals throwing the muslim leaders who had defined him in

Robert Embry Newest Foreign Party Tehran Iranian Government Robert Embryo Embry Marguerite Harrison Iran Russia Embree Moscow United States Marguerite Raza Khan Robert
Adolf Hitler's Rise to Power

Conspiracy Theories

01:56 min | 3 months ago

Adolf Hitler's Rise to Power

"The situation in one thousand nine hundred ninety s germany was dire. the country had lost world war one. Their economy was tatters. German rule over its global colonies was no longer and many of their citizens had lost loved ones in the war. The desperate conditions pave the way for young and hungry political figure named adolf hitler in nineteen twenty one. He became the leader of a fringe group. Known as the nationalist socialist german workers party better known as the nazis. They wanted to rebuild germany and make it the superpower at once was regardless of the cost on november eighth nineteen twenty. Three hitler organized a rally of thousands of people outside. Munich's largest beer hall. He gave a rousing speech about his plans to save their fatherland. He urged his followers to start a revolution invade a political rally. Going on inside the hall then. He ordered them to take over political buildings around the city. The crowd was so moved by his message that they followed his instructions immediately. People began marching through the streets of munich. They tried breaking into various government buildings but were stopped by the police. Sixteen of hitler's early followers were killed during the riots. Hitler was later tried for high treason and eventually jailed for the uprising. The event made national headlines and it was coined the beer hall putsch. It gave hitler the attention he needed to spread his ideas to a wider audience. In when he was released less than nine months later he leveraged this new following. Maybe he couldn't sees political office but his followers could certainly vote him.

German Workers Party Germany Adolf Hitler Munich Hitler
"world war one" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:07 min | 3 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"See, we got a little hole in that flag there when Washington took it across the Delaware And a gut powder burned the night that Francis Scott key washing it right and say, Can you see And it got a bad rip in New Orleans, packing ham and Jackson tugging at it seems, and it almost fell at the Alamo beside the Texas black but She waved on, though. She got cut with a sword at Chancellorsville. She got cut again. A Shiloh hill. There was Roberti Leave more garden. Brag in the south Wind blew hard on that ragged old flag on Flanders Field in World War one. She got a big hole from a birth of gun. She turned blood Red in World War two. She hung limp and low a time or two, she was in Korea, Vietnam, she went where she was saying by her uncle Sam. She waved from our ships upon the briny form, and now they've about quit waving back here at home in her own good land. Here, she's been abused. She's been burned, dishonor denied refused, and the government for which she stands. His scandal lives throughout the land. And she's getting thread there, and she's wearing thin, but she's in good shape shape She's in Cause she's been through the five or four And I believe she can take a whole lot more. So we raised her up Every morning. We take her down every night. We don't let her touch the ground and we folder of right on the second thought I do like to pray because.

New Orleans Francis Scott Flanders Field Sam Delaware World War two Texas World War one five Chancellorsville Korea, Vietnam two second thought four Jackson Shiloh hill a time Alamo Roberti Washington
The Origin Story of Agatha Christie

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:44 min | 4 months ago

The Origin Story of Agatha Christie

"Today we're talking about the grande dame of the english. Done it. The jk rolling of selling books before there is a jk rolling. Please meet our dreamer of the day. The queen of crime agatha christie agatha was born in eighteen ninety in the seaside town of turkey in devon england. She was the youngest of three children born into an upper middle class home. Acas father frederick was an american stockbroker and her irish-born mother clara took care of the house and her children's early education after her father's sudden death when agatha was eleven. the family's financial situation became more precarious. An agatha was sent to paris to complete her education when she completed finishing school. I get the return to england only to start a months long tour of the middle east with her mother. While traveling agatha tried her hand at writing short stories and an early novel but wasn't able to get anything published. She did however meet her future husband archie christie while in cairo. They got married right before the outbreak of world war one during the war archie was sent to france to fight the germans. We'll get the returned home to england. She worked as a nurse. And then eventually chemist's assistant on the home front as the war raged across the channel agatha started writing detective fiction in her downtime. She'd always loved mystery. Novels particularly the works of wilkie collins and sir arthur conan doyle so it was a natural fit at this first novel. The mysterious affair at styles was published in nineteen twenty. Her debut work introduced the world to the iconic hair kua paro agatha's eccentric and egoistic belgian detective with the little grey cells and a perfectly quaffed moustache from frog. I am a bloody legal. Belgian perot appeared in about twenty five novels and many short stories. The elderly village spinster. Miss jane marple agatha's other iconic detective first appeared in her novel. Murder at the vicarage in one thousand nine thirty agatha's first. Major literary success came with the publication of her novel. The murder of roger ackroyd in nineteen twenty six. It was met with massive international acclaim and became an immediate bestseller. No spoilers but suffice it to say that. The murder of roger. Ackroyd is an ingenious and innovative. Who done it that still manages to amaze

Agatha Agatha Christie Agatha England Archie Christie Acas Devon Frederick Clara Turkey Kua Paro Agatha Wilkie Collins Archie Cairo Middle East Paris Belgian Perot Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Jane Marple Agatha France Roger Ackroyd
"world war one" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

06:53 min | 4 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"Your radio route sleuth, and My next guest is a professional genealogist by the name of Jennifer Mendelssohn. And Jennifer welcomed extreme jeans. It's great to have you thank you so much. I'm delighted to be here. You have taken on an amazing area of genealogy. I think for a lot of people because there is this myth among Jewish Americans, as you've spoken about publicly many times. There's no way to reconnect with people lost in the Holocaust and families and you're actually making some inroads in this before we get to that. I want to get to how you got started in this direction. Well, it was sort of a happy accident. I had never been a genealogist. I was a journalist for many, many years, which I later learned is actually very good training to be a genealogist. But family history was just not my thing. I have an older brother who was the genealogist in the family, and he actually Got a lot of a claim and attention because he wrote a book telling what happened to our family during the Holocaust specifically to my grandfather's brother and his family, and he showed that it is possible to get to the bottom of the fates of some of these people who are lost her in the Holocaust. But I just let that be his thing and went along until I sort of fell down accidentally down the rabbit hole like Google search that led me to the 19 forties. Census and I had never seen the census before, And I just was sort of fascinated and thought. How cool there's all this interesting demographic information. I was looking at the census listening for cousins of my mother's and I, just as many people do so. So let me look up my grandparents in the 1940 census, and then I started going back to my great grandparents. And you know the next thing I knew I was looking at her. You were But what happened? Very Fortunately for me is about two weeks after I joined ancestry. I was in the car with my husband's 95 year old Holocaust survivor grandmother. She had been born in a little town in Poland in 1917, and she and her husband were the only survivors from each of their respective families. She lost both of her parents. She lost all six of her siblings. She lost her only living grandparents, and she lost about 99% of every and uncle and cousin that she had ever known and grown up with. She finally came to the U. S in 1958 and made her own family. But to say that she had very few relatives was an understatement. Sure. So because I had spent the last couple weeks on ancestry, and in my case, you know, Three of my four grandparents were immigrants. I come from a family where there's lots and lots of immigration. I was just sort of thinking about that great wave of immigration from Eastern Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and just to sort of make conversation because I was thinking about those things. Said Miller. When you were growing up, was there a lot of buzz about going to America. I just had never thought to ask her that before. Great question, And I thought I'd do the answer Interesting late because I assumed that there was not a lot of buzz because had there been a lot of buzz. Her relatives would have emigrated and then they would have lived and unfortunately because they did not immigrate, all of them were murdered and she said, no. You know, no one was really that interested and then she sort of caused and she said. Well, you know, my mother had two older sisters who went to Chicago before World War one My mother was supposed to go to, but the war broke out and she couldn't join them, and I just sort of looked puzzled at her and I said What do you mean? Your mother had two sisters who went to America. I said, Who are they? Who are their Children who were their grandchildren? Because I thought as I later wrote about it. This was not someone who could afford to have two aunts unaccounted for, and she got very quiet and she said, I don't know what became of them. The war broke out, she said. They somehow lost touch. And when she finally got here in the fifties, she did the one thing she knew how to do. Bless her heart. She tried to write a letter to somebody who He thought might know where her aunts had ended up And she never heard back from that person. And she later heard that he had died. And she forgot all about it. So I rolled up my city and I can't remember. I had never done to, you know? No. But you were a reporter. I mean, there are so many of the same skills involved. Yeah, literally. That's what I did. I said if I was going to write a story about two Polish sisters who came to America before World War one. How would I find them? Sure. Very important detail. She didn't know their last names. Oh, she only knew their first names and their maiden name and she knew the town that they were from And she thought she knew the name of one of their husbands. And she also told me that one of them died of cholera after arriving in America. What time period are we talking about where you're doing this research. This was in the spring of 2013. Okay, Not that long ago. Yeah, so I made a lot of mistakes. I made a lot of wrong turns. I really was sort of winging it. That's how you learn, but amazingly, I got a few lucky breaks and the very first thing I learned, which was a very good lesson for a novice genealogist. Was that much of what she told me was wrong? Yep. Well, she told me I had no Ever find them because she said, they both came as married women and she didn't know their married names, but it actually turned out that one of them had come as a single woman under her maiden name, So I found her on a ship's manifest from 1911 had it not to Chicago error number two, but to Massachusetts and from there I did. What genealogist do. I just sort of followed the trail downward, right? Lucky for us back in those days, you had to give the name and address of the person you were going to in the United States. So she gave the name of her brother in law at an address in Lynn, Massachusetts, and I did descendants, the research and I built the tree down and at the very end after two weeks, I drove back over to her senior living place and I sat her down and I said, Mama, you're never going to believe this, but you have three living first cousins. Oh, wow. That had to blow her mind. It was beyond our wildest dreams. I mean, it's hard if you haven't spent a lot of time as I have dealing with families that have been devastated in this way, You sort of can't comprehend what it's like.

Jennifer Mendelssohn Jennifer Poland United States Chicago Massachusetts 1911 America Eastern Europe Miller 1958 Holocaust spring of 2013 1917 19 forties World War one two sisters U. S late 19th Three
Germany Gets 1st Military Rabbi in Over a Century

News, Traffic and Weather

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Germany Gets 1st Military Rabbi in Over a Century

"Got its first ever rabbi in over a century. Hungarian born Zoltek Bala, inaugurated Monday at a synagogue in Leipzig. Many Jews fought for Germany during World War one and dozens of rabbis are known to have performed pastoral work in the military about 300 Jews serve in Germany's 180,000 strong military. Now this is ABC

Zoltek Bala Leipzig Germany ABC
"world war one" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:52 min | 4 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"In nineteen thirteen as well in munich painting munich cityscapes and landscapes and selling them to tourist and then in nineteen fourteen got hauled in by the police Of all things for failing to register for the military yeah and then they he. He went down and registered and then they gave him a A physical exam failed it. They said he was too weak to fire a weapon so they arrested him so that they could humiliate him basically and and then when world war one came around he enlisted and they say we need everybody. We can come on in and try. Yeah yeah even hills her hilter..

world war one nineteen fourteen nineteen thirteen
"world war one" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:25 min | 4 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Terrible and race. And I don't know if you're aware of this, but that that thing at the Capitol on January six that was the worst thing since the Civil War. Never mind the 19 sixties and the assassinations in the Vietnam War in the Democrat riots then and never mind September 11th or For that matter. World War two Pearl Harbor. Never mind. Never mind. World War one. Never mind any of this. So they pandemic of 1919 the Spanish flu. Can we still call it the Spanish flu, Michael? Or is that That considered to be racist. It came from Kansas. Chris. It's not even Spanish came from cancer. But it was Spanish speaking when we discovered so that's why we call it the Spanish flu lunch bucket, Joe. They're not on our side. They don't like us. They don't and he is, you know, he, he said. They've been talking about immigration reform for 30 years, and now it's time we get something done. No more of this. Do nothing. Washington forgetting the fact I guess. That until four years ago, he had been vice president. He was vice president for eight years. He may have forgotten this by now and quite possible. And then he had been a senator for 36 years, 36 years longer than I think Most people in the world have been alive and he was a member of the Senate for that long and then from the early 1972. I think he was elected. It was a local official in Delaware before that, because he's Never had a real job. He's just a government guy all the way. And last night, it was, gosh, we're a terrible country. He did invent jobs, though. Last night did you see this is he's got all kinds of good ideas. He's going to have the National Institutes of Health work on diseases. That's that's another innovation that has come up with. And he thinks that I learned that you see this, Michael, I don't know if you watch the whole thing. Cancer is bad it Joe Biden last night found that cancer is bad, and I'm with him on that. So there's some some area of agreement. There's bipartisan agreement and, uh On cancer being bet he wants to have the NIH National Institutes of Health. He once had work on diseases. Clever, smart. See, That's why you get the experience guy like lunch bucket, Jeff Speaking of experience, I was sitting around my my mind goes places when I'm watching things like this. Oh, by the way, we're at 8886309625888630. 9625 with your thoughts and observations on the the state of affairs. After Joe Biden's big address to a joint session of Congress, not technically, of course, a state of the Union address but setting that aside and he invented jobs. Everything is jobs, jobs, jobs, he said. Jobs lot now it's not like he's famous for being a jobs creator over the course of the last half century or anything like that. But I was watching this with my my best girl. She and she was watching along We're having. We're having a bit of fun and and snacks. You know, it's next. We actually we went out to dinner and it on a patio last night and had a had a lovely time. And walked and walked and had a had a great time. Then we came home and there's uh, lunch bucket. Joe headed on the DVR had to rewind it a little bit because we're out. We're out a little pest, but but never mind that Joe Biden, you see is 78 years old God bless him. Bless his heart. And then he Pelosi over his shoulder. They had two women. It was historic. It was so historic. Felt history. I felt the history of it all and two with the party that prevented women from getting the vote for a generation back in my grandparents day. The Democrat Party, anti women getting the vote anti black people getting the vote. You know, the real history of the Democratic Party is sustain, not just on the history of our country, but on the history of humanity. Really, The Democrat party is that it's an awful institution. Claims defense and it certainly is true. But lunch bucket Joe 78 years old blessings heart Nancy Pelosi over his shoulder. One of two women come along. Was there there, too? And the holes have Kamala and Nancy Pelosi 81 years old and as she was getting up and sitting down, getting up and sitting down, I'm picking her legs are good as she's going to have to get some kind of a Um, like, you know, massage today with some, uh, emollient. Maybe some oils from exotic places $500 a gallon oils to get her legs massage because all the standing up and sitting down standing up and sitting down then she was clapping a lot to her. Her little clause must hurt. 81 years old. She's 81 years old and lunch bucket. Joe 78 years old If you add those two ages up, that's 159 years, 159 years between the two if you go back 159 years, that's 18 62. Just after they started the civil War the Democrats because they think the country was only 86 years old 159 years ago, and I just do this because it's math. I sort of noodle around with math and things like that. But lunch bucket Joe a lot of bad ideas. Very expensive. $1.8 trillion and good news is only millionaires and billionaires will have to pay for it. Because they're bad and they're not paying their fair share and therefore there, he said. There's a study somewhere, says that billions they could plumb billions from the pockets of The richest people, So they plan on doing that, but not you. You don't have to pay for any of it. That's always the big lie. I've seen this lie again and again and again. You know if you study things that happened even before you were born Then you understand history. You don't actually have to live three or 400 years to understand patterns and and understand what politicians have done in the past. You can read about it. So some people wrote the stuff down. What with the written language that we have here and everything, and you can learn about it. And these politicians, they've been lying forever and ever. That you won't have to pay for it. And then, of course, you always end up paying for it Later. Like what? Want one? All And then we found out that you did end up paying for it. Whoa! Oh, gosh. So he didn't tell the truth again. I can't believe that these politicians and he's a politician, but it was a there was there were a couple of funny minutes and we've got some of the I'm using audio for you from lunch bucket Joe last night, and I just love this. We've been talking about immigration reform. They love this word reform. It's never reform for 30 years for 30 years, and he's you know, practically pounding the lectern, uh, saying, you know, but now we're going to get something done. And like, And what are you new to town?.

Joe Biden Nancy Pelosi Democratic Party 36 years eight years National Institutes of Health Chris 30 years $1.8 trillion Vietnam War 159 years Delaware Civil War Kamala Kansas January six 78 years 81 years World War one Jeff
The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:25 min | 4 months ago

The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti

"The crime itself took place on april fifteenth. Nineteen twenty a security guard named allesandro bernardini. And a paymaster named frederick param mentor were delivering the payroll for the slater. More shoe company factory in braintree massachusetts. The men were carrying two large steel boxes full of cash when they were approached by two men and shot dead in the street. The two men took the boxes of cash containing over fifteen thousand dollars and fled in a waiting car to make very long story short. The police suspected italian anarchist based on previous similar crimes. When running up a lead on the getaway car they found connections with people who had weapons that mashed the ones used in the crime. This led them to sako and vans. eddie when asked about guns. They said they never owned any yet. They were carrying firearms on their person at the time they were placed into custody and charged with murder on may fifth and the trial began june. Twenty second i'm vastly over simplifying the case at this point and how they were arrested but suffice to say they were arrested and this is where the real story starts. The trial was a mess on many different levels. The prosecution relied on ethnic differences between the italian defendants and the jurors. There were conflicting testimonies. The witnesses claimed that they saw different things and they had different stories for each defendant. There was conflicting ballistics testimony. The defendants politics were also brought into the trial to prejudice the jury against them. It was also brought forward that both men went to mexico. Nineteen seventeen to escape the draft for world war one. A defense committee was founded soon after their arrests. But they didn't really help during the trial vans eddie. At one point claim that their defense was so bad that they might as well have been working for the prosecutor's on september fourteenth. The jury took only three hours to find both men. Guilty of murder after the indictment. It's believed that the galliani organization began a bombing campaign in retribution in addition to a series of mail bombs sent to us embassies around the world. They were also responsible for the wall. Street bombing of september sixteenth. That bomb killed forty people and injured one hundred and forty three. It was the deadliest terrorist attack in american history up until that point at the same time of the trial. Most people in the country still hadn't heard of soko and vans eddie. The trial itself was really only reported on boston. It was only after the trial when the reports of how these men were treated were made public that the men became a cause celebre.

Allesandro Bernardini Frederick Param Braintree Eddie Massachusetts Galliani Organization Mexico United States Boston
Could Post-Pandemic Life Look Like the Roaring 20s Part Two?

Seattle's Morning News

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Could Post-Pandemic Life Look Like the Roaring 20s Part Two?

"S. Has more than half of adult Americans are fully vaccinated and the country opens up. Historians say we could be entering another roaring twenties, CBS is Nicky Batiste reports that history could repeat itself the roaring twenties defined by flapper girls, automobiles, new fashion trends and overall economic prosperity. It was the start of the jazz era and also prohibition, which led to a rise in speakeasies and wild underground parties around The century later, some are speculating. We may be about to experience deja vu. The original roaring twenties came after great American hardship, post World War one and the flu pandemic which left around 50 to 100. Million people dead worldwide,

Nicky Batiste CBS FLU
"world war one" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

05:32 min | 7 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"And we're both funny at were both good improvisers but for some reason and then we realized is because we're being too polite with each other we were letting the other person sort of we. We would sit back and of okay. Would you wanna do support you rather than this is what we're doing. And then once we got into that it became It was great so there. There are some people you immediately. I think it all comes down to their commitment. When you see their commitment you commit as much in you immediately become you know what was probably like in the trenches in world war one. You're immediately okay this is. We're going through this together. And i was also gonna ask about improv from zoom perspective. Because i know the un bradtha are doing doing zoom shows. What is that like and what of. What are the differences that you're feeling from a a digital. Well i mean you do a show to laughter. Which you know brad is used to for me. It's it's I have to once the pandemic start happening. We realized fairly quickly. It's going to be a while before we get back to being theaters so The people who book us had this incredible tech team so we got together and try to figure out a way of doing our show. We realize fairly quickly..

both world war one brad each bradtha
"world war one" Discussed on Generation Xbox - Your Home for Xbox Series X News and Opinions!

Generation Xbox - Your Home for Xbox Series X News and Opinions!

05:02 min | 8 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on Generation Xbox - Your Home for Xbox Series X News and Opinions!

"The futuristic space were that I can think of but I do agree with you. I think modern is more fun than when they go back to World War one or two and World War one more than two, but I don't know. I'd like to see it modernized again or maybe like, you know, what kind of a Vietnam game I mean Vietnam expansion for Battlefield 3 or Bad Company 2 was awesome like make that game that was fun. It had like mostly kind of modern guns. So the guns didn't feel like super clunky, but it's just like super futuristic. We never hit upon like the Well, I would say cold war but the new card did but we could get.

Bad Company 2 Battlefield 3 World War one cold war more than two Vietnam two
"world war one" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When he started writing the planets at the start of World War one, so it's no surprise, then. That he starts with Mars the bringer of war. Let's Listen, friend that's very militaristic. It almost feels like I'm in a movie. It's super cinematic, and it's really tense. There's no way to relax and listen to Mars. E think this snare drum and the company and all the really percussive elements you know, using auxiliary percussion was kind of new For when this piece debuted and using those you know, really evokes the sound of war these air or centric instruments. Well, Speaking of percussion, here's Mercury, the winged Messenger. S o friend. I mean, there really is some pretty wild percussion in that music right there. You actually using a third F word to describe it in your bog post about this song, But I also understand that you played it. As a student musician. Why do you think Mercury.

World War one Mars Mercury third
"world war one" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:10 min | 11 months ago

"world war one" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"So a world one World war one that Gladys, sir, but I came home from elementary school, and I said My dad was home or I was talking to my dad and it was about John F. Kennedy and I spouted the usual 19 early 19 seventies worship full line about Kennedy, the young president, history hero Camelot to do ask not what your country can do for you and he said, Listen. He said, isn't all right. He is a good guy, but He said. There were a hell of a lot of birds that were about to come home to roost for the Kennedy administration. And he hit me with a couple of guys. Whatever I was seven or eight years old could understand, he said. You know, we weigh sponsored this terrible invasion of Cuba that went completely wrong. And there were awful problems that the FBI and blah, blah, blah. I said, you know, just He wasn't a God and he wasn't a king. He was a president. He wasn't okay one, but there are probably plenty of problems and I remember it. It's funny that it would sear its way into my memory like that, because a I have a terrible memory. Be Um, it must have been because I'd never heard anybody questioned America's prints before, certainly not in school. It was just good to hear from my dad. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, He wasn't a god. Come on. Now. That was like an early formative moment. I didn't appreciate it at the time. I haven't appreciated much through the years, but it occurs to me now. But I thought, Wow, everybody talks about this guy in such glowing affectionate terms. Turns out he made mistakes. Oh, how interesting. So you know, don't worship. So when the government saying Don't worry, master, do where? Master or don't wear a mask, Then do wear a mask. You gotta do your own independent research because I do not want masks. They don't do any good, and they're critical for health care workers. They will save those workers lives. Excuse May Pardon me. You made a bit of a veer there that I didn't follow you bit of a logical hairpin turn and I think I flew out of the car. Yeah. Yeah, well Any other toilet related? No. Until until how about sinks? Showers? I do not that part of the human behavior. I stay away from you ever read everybody poops check to class to my kids that Yeah, well, I don't know if I have the energy to go on. Wow. A cry for help, but the podcast. I mean, right now jump in right now. Not in general. No, just right now. Is gonna mention Speaking of Children's books. Tommy DiPaolo passed away. You ever eat me? Tommy DiPaolo books in your house. Hey, You're right. He I and C. I gotta come up with that. See the 50 shades of gray guy, then? Yes. Yeah, That's right. He wrote that and it's a great read for your kids. Enjoy that. I'm sure the Wikipedia they have the list of books. We read our kids a bunch of Tommy DiPaolo books. But he wrote and illustrated like 265 of them. You know, I'm how I am with authors for, like grown up books..

president Tommy DiPaolo Kennedy administration John F. Kennedy Cuba FBI Gladys America
"world war one" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"world war one" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Randy would kiss her forehead before heading out into the world 26 years of marriage. Probably took her away from me in five weeks. Five weeks. It's not supposed to happen. ELISA in a host was 54 when she died last month. President elect Biden says he will work to rebuild relationships with European leaders. But as NPR's Eleanor Beardslee reports the last four years may have permanently tarnished America's image in Europe edition off the Paris Peace Forum. The Paris Peace Forum opened this week more than 150 nations and organizations looking for ways to solve the world's problems through multilateralism and international cooperation. Director and founders used on Vase says even though it's virtual this year, the U. S still sent no official representative. So in 2018. When the forum was founded, Donald Trump was actually in Paris because he was there for the 100th anniversary off World War one hand, even though he was present in Paris. He didn't show up at the forum, even though leaders like Merkel put in Trudeau and many others where actually present Aside from a few liberal populist governments on Europe's eastern flank, most of Europe is breathing a sigh of relief over the change in administration and nowhere more so than in Germany. So I used to be a fan of Merkel. I used to think she was terrific. A big leader, great leader. I think what she did to Germany is a disgrace. President Trump loved toe lash out at Germany and its chancellor, Angela Merkel, Even on the campaign trail suited David will of the German Marshall Fund says German opinions of the U. S have never been lower. Just a quarter percent of Germans have a positive view of the United States at the moment. There have been other low point, says David Wilt, like during the Iraq war, But America's image quickly rebounded with the election of Barack Obama. This time, David Wilkes says America's image may not recover so fast. Germans have become very savvy to US politics and also realized that although President Trump lost, he did better than expected and Trumpism is here to stay for the near future. Trump's tariffs on European food and wine and his threats to withdraw from NATO have made many in Europe feel they can't count on the U. S. As before excitedly on den Don's off. No In 2017 Miracle proclaimed that Europe must depend on itself. Sylvie Kauffmann, deputy editor of French newspaper, Le moaned, says Biden will make the transatlantic relationship positive and amicable again. And she says Europeans were impressed by the U. S election when we so that the turnout was so high That people were going to vote in droves or had made their votes. The fact that the turnout was so high I gave the impression that you know democracy was working. But Kaufman says political events since the election do not bode well for America's image, the fact that President Trump is refusing to concede Calling for demonstrations that the Republican leadership is not backing down either. Four years of populism and isolationism in America have had an impact in Europe. 29 year old Parisian Martin Cangelosi says after Trump he doesn't see America the way he used to. When I was a kid, I used to think America was a great plays like a dream. You know the American dream that something in Europe We think about you know with, for example. Now, I don't even think America is still a great country. I feel really sorry about that a regret shared by many Europeans who worry that the United States and Europe have grown permanently further apart. That's Eleanor Beardsley on NPR News. And it's w when my C you're listening to all things considered. A break is coming your way in just a moment, And in a few minutes, Bill Bar was seen as someone who could protect the Justice Department from chaotic president. President Trump has sought no assurances promises or commitments from me of any kind. But bars 10 years attorney general has shaken the department will take a look at his time in office. Right after the break on W M I, c E W N Y. C is supported by the Netflix film Hillbilly Elegy..

President Trump America Europe. Germany Angela Merkel president Paris Peace Forum United States U. S President Biden Randy David Wilkes Paris Eleanor Beardslee Le Justice Department Netflix Barack Obama German Marshall Fund
"world war one" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"world war one" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Tools that talk soon turned action by seven thirty that night hundreds of whites who gathered outside the Tulsa county courthouse isn't that ironic demanding that the authorities hand over this black man Dick realm but the sheriff refused to do so so about nine o'clock after reports of the dire conditions downtown reached Greenwood the black community twenty five armed black men many of whom were World War one veterans March down to the courthouse and offered their services to the cops to help protect Mr Rowan who was in the county jail but your phone mail obviously I say obviously because we'll share of those with a bunch of what World War one veterans well I don't I don't need no stinkin help and then about ten o'clock that night a false rumor it green would that the whites that had surrounded the courthouse will storming the courthouse this time there was another contingent of blackmail upwards of seventy five they went back to the courthouse if you get offered their services to the authorities ember again turn Dale as they were trying to lease a white man tried to take the gun away from one of the black veterans a shot was fired in the riots began.

Tulsa county courthouse Greenwood Mr Rowan Dale
"world war one" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"world war one" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hour of news from BBC world service and then at ten o'clock I will stay with the BBC for second hour of programming forum was pre empted this morning by impeachment news there is no form to repeat tonight you're listening to KQED FM San Francisco KQ we I. F. M. north highland Sacramento this is fresh AIR after winning the golden globes for best motion picture drama and Best Director the new war movie nineteen seventeen open wide this past weekend to a strong box office and on Monday it received ten Oscar nominations set over two days during World War one the movie follows two English soldiers trying to stop an impending attack and save the lives of their comrades film critic Justin Chang has this review nineteen seventeen has been widely praised as a mind boggling technical achievement it certainly is the one less convinced that it's a great movie inspired by his grandfather's experiences as a soldier in World War one the writer director Sam Mendes has made a harrowing combat picture by way of a suspenseful beat the clock thriller about two British soldiers on a dangerous mission in northern France in April nineteen seventeen and he has shot the movie in what looks like one long continuous take with no visible edits except for one dramatic cut to black midway through this visual gimmick call it the one take wonder has a long Hollywood history how for Hitchcock famously used it in his nineteen forty eight thriller rope and in recent years advances in digital technology have made it easier for filmmakers to simulate the illusion in movies like bird ma'am you can understand why Mendis chose the technique for nineteen seventeen he and his co writer Christy Wilson Karen's tell a lean pair down story in something close to real time he wants to raise the distance between you and as characters to make you feel as though you're right there with them in the trenches and on the battlefield the soldiers are both in their twenties dean Charles Chapman plays Blake and George mackay place Scofield their mission is to travel across miles of bombed out French terrain to deliver an urgent message to a nearby British battalion warning them that what looks like a German enemy retreat is in fact a deadly trap raising the stakes even further Blake's older brother is a member of that battalion and he and sixteen hundred other men will almost surely perish if the attack proceeds wake in Scofield receive their orders from a general played by Colin Firth he is one of several well known English actors including Benedict Cumberbatch mark strong and Andrew Scott famously known as the hot priest from flea bag who will pop up along the young man's journey to offer a few right words of counsel for the most part Blake in school field are desperately alone upon leaving the trenches they soon find themselves in a no man's land that looks apocalyptic in its desolation the camera never blinking as it follows along side them in one especially tense scene they stumble upon an abandoned German bunker where an explosion occurs temporarily blinding school field and forcing him to rely on Blake to guide him through the darkness the.

BBC
"world war one" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"world war one" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"From folk out what amounts to a Karamazov mind who was at the heights of the Iranian government and had been responsible for hundreds of not thousands of deaths he was equivalent in rank to the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and he had been responsible for attack on the US embassy in Iraq and he was planning more attacks but the left in this nation and around the world are now morning this terrorist and chief CBS news last week praised so the money as a military genius a revered man and a war hero many on other networks planed Mr trump for escalating tensions in the Middle East and call this an assassination now these are the same folks who stood silently by one for eight years president launch thousands of drone strikes the Middle East as of twenty fifteen they were nearly three thousand drone strikes and went to American citizens were killed by these drones without any type of due process the leftist press your own and when Syria crossed Obama's redline Obama did nothing they praise this restraint there was no retaliation in fact it was capitulation appeased appeasement the fact is the left the Stooges said nothing as in the middle of the night pallets of cash a hundred seventy five million dollars in US taxpayer dollars were delivered to this evil nation then secretary of hate John Kerry said I think that some of it will end up in the hands of the I. R. G. C. or other entities some of which are labeled terrorists you know to some degree I'm not going to sit here and tell you that every component of that can be prevented that was John Kerry but now they pile on president trump in full force now they're saying he had no legal right now they're saying he's provoking them now they're saying Solomon was a man of peace well the fact of the matter is the woman was in a foreign nation called Iraq planning attacks against US interests of course as I said earlier many people are nervous and we can't sit here is jingle wish to say great rah rah sis boom box this was all wonderful we don't really know how this is going to end we know that as I said earlier opposing war is in the American tradition and that can go all the way back to World War one because if you study Wilson in World War one president Wilson opposed World War one in fact he won the presidency in that time period because he opposed war there were many organizations and people opposed to war around the periods of World War one activists publish magazines and newspapers they held parades demonstrations and put on plays they use the up and coming new media forms and forms filmon radio to spread the message of peace and reconciliation I'm talking about in the world one of your and after the war and through the twenties and thirties most Americans were against entering another war America is fundamentally an anti war nation so yes today you see the socialists the internationalists the radical women types the peace activists some of the over communist socialist viewing the current situation with growing Hara wanting continuous conversation arbitration with a terrorist nation known as Iran having said that I don't have to give you a pocket history of Persia for you to understand that Iran was not always an Islamic state of hate Iran was converted to an Islamic state of hate when Jimmy Carter was appeasement brought the arch religious terrorist I had told the whole mainly out of exile in London and brought him back to Iran after engineering the overthrow of the Shah of Iran and as a result of that Khomeini poison the world with radical Islam so this is a rather current or recent phenomenon what's going on in Iran the Iranian people themselves hate the religious fanatics never forget.

"world war one" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

15:14 min | 2 years ago

"world war one" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"This is how deep this research is chip, and was that going to be a movie it was Toho project. It was going to be a movie, and it was written by the writer of moth reverses, Godzilla, man. That's one you wish had been well, not only do I wish. But I've also had not heard that which is embarrassing. Remember there was one. Japanese King Kong vs, the robot techno God's was tech mega mega Godzilla or weird. They build a robot zilla to kill Jila and but they make the robot look like Jill official. This no point to it. Now. Well, that's like your bid about the, the castle, where they built they built the lever. Yeah, I always say, like in those movies, like, oh, that leave a blows up the castle. Like, yeah. When they built the castle a needed to leave at a blow case. Yeah. I'll send you this. This was supposedly Toho project minutes. Twenty two page treatment have been so great. What exists. Yeah, I don't know. Apparently bat girl turns up in it, and they fight a villain, who controls the weather. Oh, what, what did you think about the wonder woman series, the TV theory? Yeah. Lyle Wagner was a fan Steve. Trevor that, you know my dad could watch Lynda Carter's boobs bounce all over the place. And I could watch Lila Wagner. Thrilled with it. I was. One of the interesting things about it. Is it started on one network as a period piece, as a World War, Two show? Yeah. And then and then I think it moved to CBS and became in the contemporary world, that's what you're no explanation. And I think what was amazing about that is, she just looked perfect. And I think a big part of it is, you know, the characters look a certain way on the page, obviously. But then when you try to translate them into three dimensions. Sometimes it works. But most of the time, it, does it but she, there's something about her that looks perfectly natural in that outfit and the outfit was absolutely faithful to the comics. And and what do you think of the current Geico kazoo whatever giggles? Zoomed. Gazoo. Bray. Gail Godot you're, so you're so bad. She was an answer in the in the crossword, puzzle the other day, heroic gaffe. Very good. Yes. Which is a good clue because heroic gal they mean her name. Godot. I think she's terrific. She's absolutely wonderful. I think they did a brilliant job. The my big beef is a fan is why on earth, would you set that movie in World War One like? I know we'll put wonder woman and all quiet on the western front. It's interesting. She's completely foreign out of World War Two. And I like it most, Chris, she's hot UP. Yes. Yes, she is. She's in the category, Natalie. That'll her long. Yeah. Source girlfriend, Natalie Portman. Wonder why the God of thunder fell in love with a nice Jewish girl from Massachusetts. End Ringo's wife. Cats are in Bosnia. He's also szeswith Jewish bond girls. Yes, they were sold. So what, what's the name the English one Seymour? Jane Seymour, one of bond. Living current movies. They haven't Isreaeli bun girl, Carol something, I don't know. Do you know the guy? I think that's great. That's wonderful. Hello. And there were two about I think of Jewish bond villains. Wait for. At the. Journo was Joseph Weisman Oregon. Okay. And the other. Never get it African American to yes. Yes, American American Jews muscle was. Yes. Photo. I do. From 'Lion short midnight run. Yeah. Avocados june. Well, great. He must've converted. That's terrific. Yeah. Talk about watching the original Batman dead. About all the. On Batman now. All I can think about is that these circumcise. We, we like that. Now obviously this. This is a question..

Gail Godot Lila Wagner Joseph Weisman Oregon Natalie Portman Toho project Toho Jila writer Kong Lynda Carter Bosnia Lyle Wagner Jill Massachusetts Jane Seymour official Trevor CBS
"world war one" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"world war one" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Fight in World War, One he deployed to France, volunteer to participate in an attack on Saint hill and two months before the guns fell silent at the eleventh hour the eleventh day, the eleventh month. Sergeant David Kerr fell. After the war. The French government, awarded him the credit gear with palm for his courageous service. But a day before the attack sergeant Kerr. Sent a letter to his mom. He wrote, and I quote. Tomorrow. The I totally American Dr commences, and it gives me inexpressible joy and pride to know that I shall be prison to do my share. Should I go under? I want you to know that I went without any terror of death, and that my chief worries the grief, my death will bring those so dear to me. And then he ended saying I feel wonderfully strong to do my share will for my sake. You must try and drown your sorrow and the pride and satisfaction. That I died. Well. In so clean a cause as ours. He ended God bless and keep you my dear heart be kind to little Elizabeth. I love you so, well, David. Today. We remember the service and sacrifice of Sergeant David Kirk..

"world war one" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"world war one" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"World War One. We shut it down. There wasn't. I mean people were authorized I mean, it was it was not zero. But mass immigration was shut down. While we assimilated all those millions that came in through Ellis Island and other places from the late eighteen hundreds into the early nineteen hundreds we need to do something. I've got again just shut it down. Just the Democrats are raised. Holy hell if that happened because the Democrats use illegal immigration is the way to keep their current. Requirements of a number of their people being in an underclass. It's how they keep that that that constituency populated. Here's the president. By the way, this was in the Oval Office. He met with the president of Colombia, Yvonne, my kids and during McEwen a reporters reporters that they can legislation Mr President, Mr president will you sign it. Will you sign it? We're building a lot of wall right now with money that we already have and. When people see what we're doing. I think that'd be very surprised. We're doing a lot of work. I think appoint was made with the last shutdown people realized how bad the border is how unsafe the border is. And I think a lot of good points made. But I don't want to see another one. There's no reason for it. And we're going to look at the legislation when it comes and I'll make a determination than another report. Mr President is the same money this time as as what was on the table a few months ago. The numbers are almost twenty three billion dollars, which you don't report too often. It's about an eight percent increase over last year. So if you look at the total funding, it's almost up to twenty three billion dollars. It's about eight percent higher the border area is happening. It's going to happen at a really rapid pace. We're giving out contracts right now. And we're going to have a great wall. It's going to be great powerful wall. We've got a lot of funds for a lot of other things. But with the wall they wanna be stingy, but we have options. Is that most people don't really understand the twenty three billion is D H S funding department of homeland security. That's what's up eight percent. So there's some money there that they can get they've they've identified I think moving even numbers eight or ten billion. I forget which that they say they found elsewhere. The you've got the fourteen billion from old chapel. The point is that the Democrats have gone along with authorizing a budgetary increase for DHS for twenty three billion dollars. And they've just wouldn't Trump says they're just being stingy with the wall. That's the allocation for the wall. They've agreed. You one point three seven five billion. But I I think I know how this is going to go. Prediction, but I'm pretty sure because you're not gonna give up. This is not going to be the end of it. Any way shape matter for back to the audio soundbites on FOX today after? I've been requested a play this montage again. Russia was funny know, you're taking this too. Seriously, rush, you need you need to laugh at this. Okay. Grab sound bite. Number one. I'm not taking it too. Seriously. I'm just marveling at how folks when you're in the middle of a news story in you know, that it's bogus. And you've told everybody how and why it's bogus for two weeks. And they refused to correct it and get it. Right. It's very instructive teachable moment. Anyway, here's the montage where the drive bys thought that I gave Trump the green light yesterday to go ahead and sign this Bill. Rush Limbaugh appears to give the president the okay to sign the new Ford or compromise. Rush Limbaugh, saying no one can claim the president has caved. Rush Limbaugh was talking about this. And he said president should take for deal. Rush Limbaugh last night gave kind of tacit approval for this strategy of declaring an emergency action then signing this Bill. The president is getting support from the most influential conservative radio talk host that conservative commentators. Of course. Rush Limbaugh Limbaugh gave the president has blessing rush. It has to do with president says declare a national emergency. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There you go. That's what's I think that's going to happen. There will be a national emergency declared along with signing this thing, and that authorizes the use of the money goes to the courts don't need to repeat now later on FOX. They had what they call their eight team the Bill Hemmer and Sandra Smith out there have their news broadcast from nine to noon and during it they have a panel in every day. The members of the panel change, they call it the eighteen today. They're a team was Judith Miller. The New York Times former New York Times Brad Blake man, if current Republican strategist and David Drucker who is the White House reporter, he is he's a senior political correspondent for the Washington Examiner. So three bites here is Sandra Smith asking. The Republicans strategic. Chris Brad Blake man, if he thinks Trump will sign the agreement will the president sign this deal. Rush Limbaugh is making the case that he could walk away with a win here. Even if he does I think the president should sign it based on what we know now is still being put together, but the basics that are known. I think it is a win for the president in a four trillion dollar budget. This is like small claims court if most sides go away unhappy, it's probably a pretty good deal for both sides. But it's just the beginning with divided government. Now, the president has an opportunity to build on his wall as we go. Here's Judith Miller. Formerly of the New York Times with Sandra Smith, Donald Trump has learned the hard word compromise, the c worker that's not ugly. It does get you partly where you wanna go. But let's face it. This is not a win for Donald Trump because one point three seven five billion is less than one point six billion, which is what the house and Senate. Dollar last time she agreed to give that and the president turned it down. So this is taking a very bad situation that he created and putting a good spin on it. But when you can be bullied by Ann Coulter. And Rush Limbaugh told what to do by them. This does not make the president look sleeping. That is exactly why they want to continue with this Bs at the president's being bullied. He can make his own mind. He's weak minded, he's weak spine, which nothing could be further from the truth on both of them. But it's classic Judith Miller gigantic feminist former New York Times cannot stand the idea that Trump is going to win. This Blake men was right? Trump is going to win this winning. This is defined by building the wall. He is going to win this. Now, here's Drucker he is the Washington Examiner senior political correspondent. And Sandra Smith against says, the first of all he hasn't signed the deal, and we're getting reporting from the White House. Now, the president is in. No hurry to sign the legislation. But talk about it as if he already has tell you what he's gonna do when I know who is the last person he is going to speak with. But I think Rush Limbaugh sign off is key for him because these are signals he looks for and I don't think he wants to get into another government shutdown. Yeah. But again. The reason nobody wants another government shutdown is it doesn't provide any leverage over the Democrats to get what you want it served its purpose. The first time around and the purpose. It served was. Education. That thirty day shutdown forced the drive bys to tell everybody what the argument was about at what Trump's position on. It was. Things the drive by media would otherwise not have been reporting. So it served its purpose. Later or earlier, I should say, FOX and friends, Sandra, Ainsley Earhardt, talked to Sarah Sanders. And asked her what was coming. And this is what Sarah Sanders says see what the final package looks like the president will make a determination on whether or not he's going to sign it, but you can rest assured, the president promised he was going to build the wall, and he's going to deliver just like he said he was going to run for president and win any has. He said he was going to make better trade deals, and he has he said he was going to rebuild the military. And he has said he was going to grow the economy. And he's done that he's promised to build the wall. And he's going to get that done to. Yeah. I I that's the key to this. The wall construction is underway as we speak anyway, one more bite here. And this is from Chuck Schumer. This is interesting Schumer yesterday. And then again today, really really really begging Trump to sign this really trying to go Trump into signing. This. And let's listen to bite I will analyze this after it finishes. This is today from Schumer on the Senate floor, President Trump sign this Bill. Neither side got everything at wanted in this Bill, but both sides one will Boyd and other shutdown it provides additional funding for smart effective border security. Let me repeat that it does not fund the president's wall. But it does fund smart border security that both parties support. So I repeat my request President Trump sales sign this Bill remove the axe hanging over everyone's head President Trump in politics to quote, the Rolling Stones. You can't always get what you want. Why I'd much rather hear the stones sing that in the listen to Schumer say it. You can't always get what you want because I'm still here. So what is Chuck? You actually, do you notice. Hear that Chuck you goes to great lengths to tell everybody that they would any money from the wall, and here, this is smart border security, but there isn't any money for the wall. It does not fund the president's. I think he's trying to go Trump into not signing this. By Mr President, please please. I think he's trying to him in Schumer is trying to engineer what he thinks. It'd be a big win win with another shutdown. I gotta take a brief break. We'll be back. We will continue here on the network, right? February Limbaugh letter beat the young hard-charging conservative viewpoint to the national student organization turning point USA. This guy is going to give you more faith than more hope for the future, not just of conservatism. They're four of the country that.

president President Trump Limbaugh Limbaugh President Mr President Trump Democrats Sandra Smith Chuck Schumer Bill Hemmer Judith Miller Ellis Island New York Times Washington Examiner FOX Oval Office Senate
"world war one" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"world war one" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. Good morning. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin our modern memory of World War One is in black and white. The only moving images we have or these scratchy silent black and white newsreels one hundred years after the armistice a new documentary is now giving those images a new dimension. And a voice. I was sixteen years old and my father, and I need to go. I was seventeen at the time. I have a sixteen fifteen years. I gave every part of used to do a job. They shall not grow old tells the story of the young men who fought in World War One in color and with sound. I talked with L A times. Film critic Kenneth Durant about this remarkable product who Al this film is really amazing. It's an overused word, but it's really true. It's taken this old footage. Brought these people back to life. It's almost kind of like reincarnation is fascinating. Because when my producer was telling me about this check out this trailer. They've put footage they've made it color, and I thought to myself big deal that doesn't sound very interesting. And when you watch it it is amazing. How just that change just changing into color? It really does give life to this experience. In a totally new way. What was much more than the color, the keeping? That was done was the frames per second. Sound film was twenty four frames per second. The reason silent films seems jerky is at its hand crank sometimes fourteen fifteen frames per second. They use. Use the computer to recreate missing frames duplicate frames. And so it now plays at twenty four frames. A second it plays the way we're used to seeing film play. So these people instead of being kind of herky-jerky they are actually walking and talking just like us the talking to is crazy. How did they how did they remastered? The audio two things in the silent footage. People talk to the camera. They used lip readers to figure out what they were saying and they hired local actors to have exactly the same accent as the people in the film, but more than that the BBC has six hundred hours of interviews with World War One veterans, and they brought that audio up to speed. And so everything sounds contemporary everything sounds completely real. And this is like a revelation. We should note big names are attached to this in particular Academy Award winner. Peter Jackson produced and directed this. Yes. Peter Jackson who is known for the Lord of the rings film. The hobbit films. He turns out to be an enormous World War One buff. His grandfather was a World War One veteran and the Imperial War Museum knowing this approached him to do a film for the hundredth anniversary of the armistice and he leapt at the chance, and you know, he knows all about this kind of stuff. He knows about special effects. He's really used the same technology that kind of brings superhero films to life to make this stuff comes alive. Why do you think this film works in twenty nineteen? I mean do audiences what I think about World War One. Well, you know, what I have found audiences? We are in wars. Now, we have just come out of wars. We have a lot of veterans in our population. People who care about war who experienced war fake, connective is film. They see them in even though it's one hundred years ago, they say that someone like me, and that's really a powerful thing. Kenneth Taran reviews movies here at morning edition and for the Los Angeles Times when we're talking about the new documentary, they shall not grow old, Kenny thanks so much. Thank.

World War One Imperial War Museum Peter Jackson Al Rachel Martin NPR Kenneth Durant David green Kenneth Taran Academy Award Los Angeles Times producer BBC Kenny one hundred years sixteen fifteen years six hundred hours sixteen years
"world war one" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"world war one" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"But it was it's actual footage from from World War One that was captured by the kind of British what? Authority in charge of shooting film of World War One kind of documenting the soldiers in the war, and what people are going through. But it's been colorized cleaned up stabilized, and and forensic lip-readers employed to fill in the dialogue of the people who who are on these silent, movies and speaking on them, and then and then interviews from from the people who were there from sort of later, but not too much later were you know, interviews late over as the narration. It would be kind of interesting when it it'd be kind of an interesting one to to go to right because at a certain point, you know, at a certain point, what is our what is our obligation to history. What is our obligation to to to kind of co-opt and bastardize the phrase that was very current around nine eleven to never forget, right? And and how how how do we never forget, you know? And how do we draw the lessons that we draw? And how do we sort of ratify for ourselves? The people who we are read this seems to be the enterprise that a lot of these that a lot of these films are a lot of these films are engaged in this one being very very provocative with Dick Cheney saying at the end, look, I work for you. And you put me here, and you sent me to do this very interesting idea like to what extent are we complicit in global horror because we buy Levi's jeans and drink Coca Cola. Interesting question, not one that the film sort of that the film sort of really addresses, but I'd like to close this podcast by saying that you think we've done a bad job at the podcast. Well poop on you you. We're the podcast that you subscribed to and we're doing the job because we see that it it has to be done. So thank you for listening. And thank you that and Pete for for podcasting with me. And and thank you to all the members who support us if you want to join them and and. Kick a little bit of cash back to.

Dick Cheney Pete Levi