7 Burst results for "World Galvin"

"world galvin" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

03:33 min | 10 months ago

"world galvin" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis they they are really really unlikely. Then you add onto that the complicating factor of such family getting noticed by science and not being cast to the winds not having people end up homeless or the family falling apart or everybody descending into addiction or suicide. I know that you went through a lot of records and you did a lot of research learn a lot. You just said that you knew the doctors names who diagnosed the boys what was that like I mean just I don't know what medical records looked like in the seventies but I know that medical records and twenty twenty aren't exactly what we would call. I'm going to go with legible. Was this a difficult thing to get a hold of medical records, fifty years old and tried to decipher them the ones that still survive mostly come from the State Hospital in Colorado where so many of the brothers cycled in and out those all still existed and they are sitting there on paper in accordion folders in those folders are all stacked up and they were wheeled into a into a room. Where I and Lindsey Galvin rouch the youngest Galvin Child, sat and waited and there were two huge carts with folders spilling out and we'd spent as much time as we could going through every page scanning what we could reading what we could it was kind of a a raiders of the lost Ark Moment where you see like at the end with all the the Warehouse filled with boxes. Suddenly I saw there was this wealth of information and yes, a lot of it is a little too clinical but then there are things like the notes from the college. Health Services Office where Donald Galvin was irregular back when he was in college in the mid sixty s with written reports handwriting saying that he ran into a bomb siren wasn't sure why I got into an altercation with a cat and was bitten by a cat and wouldn't say exactly what happened there lots of information that was really quite provocative and quite tantalizing and tell a story really about a young man who is becoming a stranger to himself and not really knowing exactly what was happening to him and being afraid to talk.

Donald Galvin Linda Lee Lindsey Galvin World Galvin Galvin Child Stanley State Hospital Colorado Health Services Office twenty twenty
"world galvin" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

"world galvin" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. . Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. . York Times. . Magazine. . Bob Welcome to the show. . Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. . Your book is non-fiction. . It's a true story. . I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. . Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. . Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, , you met the Galvin family. . That's right. . My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. . So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, , this is a family that's been through so much. . Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. . But when they were children, , six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. . The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. . But before that happened, , there was tremendous amount of denial, , a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, , and so it became clear that by telling their story, , maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, , which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. . I'm horribly bad at math, but , they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So . there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. . It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, , blaming bad mothering, , and then of course, , the medical treatments, the , pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. . So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, , Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad . Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, , but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. . It's not parent to child it's not recessive. . It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. . What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. . But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. . Perhaps, , we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. . Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. . Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, , they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. . They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. . Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. . Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. . It doesn't necessarily add functionality. . They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, , and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You . didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. . Is that true? ? That's right. . I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. . Personality which is. . Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. . So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, , but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. . Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, , it means being paranoid and in fact, , that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, , which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. . Syndrome. . It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. . And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about <hes>. . There is such a thing as schizophrenia. . It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, , we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, , and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. . When doing your research for the book? ? Obviously, , you spoke to the family. . Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? ? Yes. . Absolutely. . My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. . But of course, , in the back of my mind I was thinking well, , how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this , might happen all the time. . So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. . To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, , but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, , have you heard of this family? ? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? ? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? ? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? ? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? ? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. . So in terms of the numbers, , they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. . Way So. . There's a lot of hope in this story as well. . Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. . This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, , one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, , which is families with more than one perhaps many instances <hes> six mental illness, , not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. . Nineties was to collect data on as many. . Multiplex families as possible. . So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

schizophrenia Galvin family Schizophrenia Galvin New York magazine Mimi
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 10 months ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:26 min | 4 years ago

"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"No longer have to be the registration deadline wbz's bernie score puzder explains specificity court judge has ruled that the state's twenty 20day voter registration deadline is unconstitutional the plaintiffs in the case believe the arbitrary cutoff date was quote a giant barrier for voters but secretary of state bill galvin believes removing the deadline would lead to chaos you'll end up with an administrative chaotic situation and i traffic every wants to make sure their voters and cancelled out by somebody who doesn't do something wrong but maybe administrative we made the wrong choice to go wrong line of something like that obviously the the reviewers was reporting world galvin plans to appeal the ruling bernice corp whose wbz newsradio 1030 without obama congressman the roaming for the us senate is defending a new ad for his campaign that uses sound from the shooting of house majority whip steve scalise this is the ad from congressman mo brooks called second amendment he reminds viewers that the gunman was a bernie sanders supporter and then a type line that brooks donated his belt two serbs attorney kit then he goes after the socalled liberal media change your views on on the gun situation in america the second amendment right bear arms is inherited we always have so no i'm not changing my position on any of the rights we joy as americans a spokesman for the badly injured steve scalise says some people have different ideas about what's appropriate jackie quinn washington autopsies to be performed all the bodies of abandoned a woman found dead in their pits feel hobie yesterday afternoon police were making a wellbeing jacco john and celeste gordana would they discovered the bodies after forcing their way into though neighbors say they hadn't noticed anything unusual that the whole of real estate tycoon accused of killing a female friend because she may have known to budge about his wife's disappearance back los angeles courtroom today robert jurist isn't even on trial yet but the judges allowing prosecutors to take testimony from elderly witnesses just in case i is accused of killing his best friend susan berman in the year two thousand to keep her from talking about his wife's disappearance long before a man named peter schwarts testified monday he he attended a party of the durst hominid your thirty six years ago and claims and angry robert durrest attacked him without provocation kicking him in the eye and.

secretary of state los angeles real estate celeste gordana america attorney bernie sanders mo brooks senate obama bernice corp bill galvin congressman voter registration robert durrest peter schwarts susan berman robert jurist john jackie quinn second amendment steve scalise us thirty six years twenty 20day
"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"A different planet plenty of sunshine 75 to 80 for the high that's tomorrow of president trump's soninlaw jared kushner meets behind closed doors today with the house intelligence committee he after talking yesterday with senators kushner insists neither he nor anyone else with the trump campaign colluded with the russians during the presidential election cbs news chief congressional correspondent anti kortesis kushner's insiders perspective on the campaign was welcome there's been a lot of confusion around here about what exactly his role in the campaign was to hear him tell it he basically did a little bit of everything so the fact that sort of gave them a little more insight into you can't pain as he put all the different roles he was playing something that they will appreciate however they also have there our own sources of information kushner has been invited back to meet once again with the senate panel the president last night going off on the washington post on twitter he is angry about a recent story from the post in which us officials say the president ended a covert program to aid syrian rebels over concerns about ryu establishing a working relationship with russia the tweets accused the post of fabricating facts fake news he writes wbz news time seven eleven here in massachusetts a judge strikes down the state's voter registration deadline wbz's birdie score poos with the store that this if you're court judge has ruled that the state's twenty dave voter registration deadline is unconstitutional the plaintiffs in the case believe the arbitrary cutoff date was quote a giant barrier for voters but secretary of state bill galvin believes removing the deadline would lead to chaos you'll end up with an administrator chaotic situation and i think every wants to make sure there voters in dc cancel golf by somebody who doesn't do something wrong but maybe it administrative we made the wrong choice to go wrong line of something like that obviously the the accuracy of your kitchen is very important world galvin plans to appeal the ruling bernie corpus wbz newsradio 1030 wbz news time seven eleven time for.

senate bernie corpus dc administrator bill galvin secretary of state voter registration russia us washington trump kortesis kushner presidential election the house jared kushner massachusetts twitter president kushner
"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"With the metro area in other news here in massachusetts a judge strikes down the state's voter registration deadline wbz's bernice corp who has the story i said this if you're court judge has ruled that the state's twenty dave voter registration deadline is unconstitutional the plaintiffs in the case believe the arbitrary cutoff date was quote a giant barrier for voters but secretary of state bill galvin believes removing the deadline would lead to chaos you'll end up with an administrator chaotic situation and i could give every wants to make sure their voters and cancel go or somebody who doesn't do something wrong but maybe it administrative we've made the wrong choice to go wrong line of something like our our weekly beer the actress port is world galvin plans to appeal the ruling bernice corpus wbz newsradio 1030 occasional explosion ends have rocked a leafy cul de sac in hannover this summer and it's not over yet wbz's lennick joe's tells us a munitions manufacturing and test site that close forty years ago is being cleaned up a century ago national fireworks produced firecrackers at the site during world war two at converted to a munitions plant making explosives until the end the vietnam war the land is now owned by the town and town manager troy clarkson says a recent analysis found more explosives than expected the federal government in the state and the successor company to the national fireworks company are the responsible parties that are working together to both analyze and come up with a final remedial alternative and to fund this cleanup when it's done walking trails and other recreational uses are expected to follow in hannover leinna jones deputy busy newsradio 1030 in new hampshire manchester police are cracking down on panhandling authorities say it's a dangerous practice and they're putting signs up around the country the city that read your agenda ross it he could lead to a fifth talabani they argue that panhandle money is likely being used to buy drugs or alcohol a chinese national was in federal court in boston charged in an alleged international plot to smuggle exotic wildlife products to asia we have more for wbz's doug cope federal investigators are accusing ron's on gem also known as graham chan of smuggling seven hundred thousand dollars worth.

graham chan asia manchester bernice corpus galvin administrator bill galvin secretary of state voter registration massachusetts ron wbz boston talabani troy clarkson vietnam war world war bernice corp seven hundred thousand dollars forty years
"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"world galvin" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Weather forecast tonight with eric fisher the fourday wbz accuweather forecast a soaking rain and chilly temperatures for july many towns a falling back into the 50s for the afternoon will hold the 50s overnight as rain is tapering off to use mary's of drizzle and fog now tomorrow mainly overcast skies ob chance for some spotty drizzle in the first half of the day or light showers but it will get a chance for some sunny breaks in the afternoon evening high temperatures mainly in the middle 60s that has pretty chilly stuff for summer a payoff on wednesday lots of sunshine very nice highs in the upper 70s thursday brings a mix of sun and clouds and highs near eighty two another round of heavy rain potential on friday i'm wbz tv meteorologist eric fisher wbz newsradio 1030 cranking the heat in your car is kinda funny after all that he eat right now in milton though only 55 degrees they're seeing some more rain it's a little bit warmer in boston but not by much fifty nine and now just overcast did you not wbz news time 606 eligible voters in massachusetts no longer have to register at least twenty days before and elect action wbz's bernice core pools with more on today's ruling sophisticated court judge has ruled that the state's 20day voter registration deadline is unconstitutional the plaintiffs in the case believe the arbitrary cutoff date was quote a giant barrier for voters that secretary of state bill galvin believes removing the deadline would lead to chaos you'll end up with a ministry we chaotic situation and i think every wants to make sure the voters and cancelled off or somebody who doesn't do something wrong but maybe it ministry we've made the wrong choice to go wrong line of something like our our weekly via the receive your port world galvin plans to appeal the ruling burmese.

eric fisher accuweather mary milton boston massachusetts wbz voter registration secretary of state bill galvin twenty days 55 degrees fourday milton 20day