36 Burst results for "World Economic Forum"

"world economic forum" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

03:33 min | 10 hrs ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

"To moscow tv ad taking second weekly When i'm chris cubbage on the director with more security media and this is somewhat of a special episode where crossing between sydney australia and switzerland and vienna. We're gonna be joined by albert. I if accounta-. I'll decipher nine correctly. She's the lead strategic initiatives at the center of the cybersecurity with the world economic forum. So it's great to be crossing to switzerland and this came would not gonna go into great detail about the cyber attack on the water treatment. Plant in florida. You yusei but this was the sort of this discussion as to these tops attacks on critical infrastructure. So looking forward to speaking to al good eye out. Good i typically are hype. I'm saying her name correctly. And i'm sorry i'll just use the australian accent as excuse al. Thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me and you sound like a through lithuanian..

florida switzerland albert vienna nine lithuanian chris cubbage second australian sydney australia
Fresh update on "world economic forum" discussed on The News & Why It Matters

The News & Why It Matters

00:36 sec | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "world economic forum" discussed on The News & Why It Matters

"Vaccine passports is just the latest now. Israel is kind of doing this already but the world economic forum has put forth a video kind of advertising. the use of a vaccine passport The world health organization is apparently looking closely into the use of technology and how it can work with member states towards an e vaccination certificates. Oh so wait from the. Who a completely trustworthy organization and the world economic forum Well i feel safe and cozy. Yeah yeah it's great. So let's let's watch this clip.

Israel
WHO looks at possible 'e-vaccination certificates' for travel

The News & Why It Matters

00:37 sec | 14 hrs ago

WHO looks at possible 'e-vaccination certificates' for travel

"A vaccine passports is just the latest now. Israel is kind of doing this already but the world economic forum has put forth a video kind of advertising. the use of a vaccine passport The world health organization is apparently looking closely into the use of technology and how it can work with member states towards an e vaccination certificates. Oh so wait from the. Who a completely trustworthy organization and the world economic forum Well i feel safe and cozy. Yeah yeah it's

Israel World Health Organization
Putin signs extension of last Russia-US nuclear arms treaty

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 weeks ago

Putin signs extension of last Russia-US nuclear arms treaty

"Russian president Vladimir Putin has signed a bill extending the last remaining nuclear arms control treaty between Russia and the United States president Biden Russia's leader had discussed an extension of the nuclear accord the new start treaty was going to expire on February fifth president Putin signed a five year extension that had been passed unanimously by both houses of Russia's parliament looking at that no surprise on the part of the dressing the World Economic Forum via video link on Wednesday Putin hailed the decision to extend the treaty while warning of global instability that he compared to the situation of the nineteen thirties the treaty limits each country to no more than fifteen hundred and fifty deployed nuclear warheads and seven hundred deployed missiles and bombers arms control advocates urge the countries to start negotiating follow up agreements Jennifer king Washington

President Biden Russia Putin Vladimir Putin World Economic Forum United States Jennifer King Washington
Biden and Putin Agree to Extend Nuclear Treaty

All Things Considered

01:01 min | Last month

Biden and Putin Agree to Extend Nuclear Treaty

"The Russian Parliament has unanimously ratified a five year extension of an arms control treaty with the United States one day after Vladimir Putin spoke with President Joe Biden by phone. From Moscow. MPR's Lucy and Kim tells us the future of the last agreement between the countries to limit their nuclear arsenals. Renewing the new Start treaty was the main topic of the first phone call between Presidents Biden and Putin. Which the Kremlin says lasted a little more than half a Knauer. Putin, speaking to the World Economic Forum via video conference today warned that the system of global security is falling apart. It was alone at the shark spray them, He said The new start extension was a step in the right direction. Still, Kremlin officials say a reset in U. S. Russian relations is unlikely. The phone call Biden Press Putin about a cyber attack on U. S government agencies, Russian election interference and the poisoning of opposition leader Alexei Navalny with a chemical weapon. Lucian Kim. NPR NEWS Moscow

Russian Parliament President Joe Biden Putin Vladimir Putin Biden Moscow Lucy Kremlin KIM World Economic Forum United States U. Alexei Navalny Lucian Kim Npr News
Biden and Putin Agree to Extend Nuclear Treaty

Forum

00:58 sec | Last month

Biden and Putin Agree to Extend Nuclear Treaty

"Washington The Russian parliament has unanimously ratified a five year extension of an arms control treaty with the United States a day after President Vladimir Putin's first phone call with the Biden White House from Moscow. MPR's Lucian Kim has details on the future of the last agreement, the U. S and Russia made to limit their nuclear arsenals. Renewing the new Start treaty was the main topic of the first phone call between Presidents Biden and Putin, which the Kremlin says lasted a little more than half a Knauer. Putin, speaking to the World Economic Forum via video conference today warned that the system of global security is falling apart the phone at the Nash explained, And he said the new start extension was a step in the right direction. Still, Kremlin officials say a reset in U. S. Russian relations is unlikely in the phone call. Biden Press Putin about a cyber attack on U. S government agencies. Russian election interference and the poisoning of opposition leader Alexei Navalny

Russian Parliament President Vladimir Putin Lucian Kim Biden Putin U. Moscow White House Washington Kremlin United States World Economic Forum Russia Nash Alexei Navalny
"world economic forum" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 2 months ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We'll do what we can in New York we're going to extend the commercial addiction moratorium. President elect Joe Biden is considering Governor Cuomo to be his attorney general that, according to a person familiar with the matter. Cuomo is a former attorney general of New York state, and he joins a small list of other candidates who Biden, his wing. Include Alabama Senator Doug Jones, U S Circuit Court Judge Merrick Garland and former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates. Global News 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg Quick, Take Howard by more than 2700, journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg. This is Bloomberg. Best Bloomberg. Best is about the insight in the context that we get from our guests. It's a great way to catch up on some of the stories you might have missed on the Bloomberg stories you're not going to find in any other news organizations. Bloomberg best Bloomberg's best stories of the week Howard by 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries around the world. Met Baxter and I'm Denise Pellegrini on this weekend edition of Bloomberg best. You have to be a decision maker, what it takes to get invited to the World Economic Forum. We can shapes the future in a positive way. If you have also new, innovative ideas, the founder of the World Economic Forum says some slots get held open for young, unheard of innovators. I was one of the first principles to see him when he came out of prison, and 90 and Klaus Schwab uninviting Nelson Mandela all this and more coming up in the next hour of Bloomberg best. And going.

Bloomberg Bloomberg Quick Governor Cuomo Joe Biden New York World Economic Forum Deputy Attorney General Judge Merrick Garland Howard attorney Susanna Palmer Senator Doug Jones Klaus Schwab Sally Yates President Alabama Nelson Mandela Baxter Global News founder
Uber Sells Its Autonomous Vehicle Research Division

All Things Considered

02:41 min | 2 months ago

Uber Sells Its Autonomous Vehicle Research Division

"Out of the self driving game. The ride hailing giant has sold its autonomous vehicle research unit to a startup. It hasn't quite given up on the idea of robo taxis, but it is recognizing it can no longer afford to spend billions of dollars on the technology. NPR's Camilla Domina ski reports. Uber has always aimed big. It wanted to operate around the globe. It wanted to replace personal car ownership. And when it came to self driving technology, uber wanted to play a starring role in that revolution and make a fortune off of it. There's a huge huge Like positive impact of society when driverless cars become a thing that was uber co founder Travis Kalinic at a World Economic Forum event in 2016, and after Kalinic was pushed out of uber because of numerous scandals, new CEO Dark Khazar shot he was still optimistic. He spoke at Davos and 2018. We will have Autonomous cars on the road. I believe with him that the next 18 months not as a kind of Ah test case but as a real case out there just a few months after that remark, a self driving uber on a test run, struck and killed a pedestrian and Tempe, Arizona. After that deadly crash, Uber pulled its test vehicles off the road for a while, but research into self driving software continued. The goal was to eventually offer rides without needing to pay drivers. But while self driving technology has been improving, it's not close to making uber any money and that research is very expensive. They put a lot of money. It's in the billions. Daniel Ives is with Wedbush Securities. After all these years, Uber's recognizing its limitations. It's never turned a profit and the pandemic has it. Bleeding money. Self driving could still be part of Uber's future and years to come through partnerships, but the company won't be developing the technology in house. This is a shitty jik vision, but ultimately going to really play out. They were gonna need to sell this business. They could not support that level of our he needed to make this successful. All that expertise is heading to a startup named Aurora that's working on self driving trucks. Uber isn't getting any cash in exchange. I have says this transaction is all about getting a money loser off the books. It's a sign the company that always dreamed big is narrowing its focus. Uber is doubling down on ride hailing and food delivery as it chases that elusive profit. Camilla dominates key NPR news

Camilla Domina Travis Kalinic Kalinic Dark Khazar NPR Daniel Ives Wedbush Securities Tempe Arizona Uber Aurora Camilla
Who should get the coronavirus vaccine first?

The WIRED Podcast

09:30 min | 2 months ago

Who should get the coronavirus vaccine first?

"I i mean story this week. Where at the end of twenty twenty starting to think about twenty twenty one. We've got a little bit of positive news on the covid front coming through with all the sort of steps forward in terms of developing a vaccine and we might be starting to think about actually meeting together in person in the office we could do the cast in the office. Perhaps who knows it seems like years ago that was a thing but maybe things will return to normal or at least normal ish. Natasha you've been looking into what the vaccine new means for how we're going to work. Yes i you're right vicky. This week we've had some really exciting news about coronavirus vaccine so the uk has become the first country in the world to prove the pfizer biontech rhinovirus vaccine for widespread use. Vaccinations could start as early as next week. For people in some high priority groups with eight hundred thousand doses. Say four hundred thousand complete treatments arriving in the k. In the first delivery now this is the end of the tunnel for many people who have suffered in this year throughout the pandemic in the world of work may mean exactly what you were saying. Vicky that we soon might be heading straight bites and the office to the sounds and smells of our colleagues. This is obviously when you've got news. But i've been looking into. This is exactly that what what does that mean. So the pandemic has largely proved that working from home is possible in many cases maybe even good for productivity do you think companies are going to urge workers particularly white collar workers people who may be able to do their jobs remotely to trudge the office soon as they can necessarily very true. The coronavirus crisis did that. Many people able to work from home really effectively. Before the pandemic companies were hugely work from home. So that was really bad. Perception in fact most business leaders told the world economic forum in two thousand and nineteen survey that they expected homeworking be negative for future productivity. Even though there's plenty of research demonstrate the opposite opposite so they've been proven wrong basically but what is true. Is that throughout this crisis. Companies have struggled to solve marietta. Problems come from having everyone. Working bosses are really worried because they can no longer see if you're working or how hard you're working. They struggled to know how to evaluate people's performances remotely. And they worry about whether working from home. We'll have hamper people's creativity. There are mental health issues concerning employers to so people are feeding isolated and lonely. And it's getting worse over the period of time that we've seen the longer we work from home. The worst gets their reporting high levels of stress anxiety and depression mental health issues and finally the pandemic raised cultural issues to such people feeding left out of work conversations. That would have happened in an open plan office and now taking place on private messaging channels or people were afraid that they'll be overlooked for promotions and opportunities at work. So it's a really big problems. They haven't actually managed to solve yet so given all of that. It's likely that companies will want work to combine the office if they can but the big question here is whether they're going to be set up with social distancing which means that people are able to sit next to each other and have to wear masks when they walk around basically similar to what was happening over the summer when the i look down lifted or whether they'll go back to normal and wait for that so it's said they can come back to a situation that was exactly the same as before the coronavirus so the way reopened offices operate in practice will impart depend. Who gets the vaccine. I with current plans. Favoring a staggered approach where all the people and those most medically vulnerable our head in the queue on paper that would mean that if officers wants open as normal they could wait until the employees age groups have been offered the vaccine and could theoretically opened the doors looking exactly as they did before the pandemic so as you as you mentioned There are of like there are different priorities. A different people Getting vaccine Based on their risk in their age and various other factors the of the world health organization has issued guidelines on but countries are interpreting in their own way. Doesn't mean if we are seeing and people who are older to begin with getting getting vaccines will Companies of encourage those. That have had vaccinations to be back at work. I will abuse of like staggering of like people with innocent adrian to have returned to the office to begin with and then so it rolls out like that or what was going to happen there. Yes as is in theory. If you think about the way the plans have gone from government. It looks like older age. Groups are going gets it earlier as well as people with medical conditions. That need if i so the most vulnerable and then it will go so slowly closer and closer to the younger people the population. So we'll get staggered of opposite way. I i guess. I in theory if you have an older working level of employees so if my employer over the age of forty or fifty they might be vaccinated sooner and they might be able to come to the office earlier in theory but i is. The answer not really happened that way because there were really two specific reasons why that won't be the case. If if older employees allowed to turn over younger employees age discrimination could be on the card. So it'd be very easy for people whose age groups still haven't been offered the vaccine to say look really unfair for older people in my group to be able to return to the office and for meat not be given the opportunity simply. Because i haven't been given the vaccine i legally right now. The uk also can't make vaccine monetary. So there might. It might be the case in those age groups where you assume everyone's had the vaccine they might be built haven't had it at all and decided that they're that they're not going to so the uk government said that it won't make a vaccine mandatory anyway so employees can never really assume that one hundred percent of employees will have taken the vaccine to go back to normal and those that do really really thin ice so companies could face human rights challenges as well as potential liability if employees suffer side effects as a result of being forced to vaccinate if they feel like they're being pressured by employers who wants to go back to normal when they say look. We don't have social distancing. Want to go back to exactly the way it was are you. Are you vaccinated. And they feel bad pressure to do so. That could be a big problem. And also there's a second thing which is employees can refuse to tell their employees if they've had vaccine to it's not their obligation to disclose that information so the nicholas southern the employment lawyer who we spoke to this piece said that companies that demanding more bums on seats will likely be more led by commercial needs than anything else when deciding who to bring back to the office but there other people who being clients bring vaccinated employees back i so she says that companies should tread carefully. Some employees will not want to be vaccinated for religious philosophical or health reasons and companies. Could face discrimination claims as a result of that but we can't forget her is so second. Take time for people to feel safe coming to work again. Regardless of how many people were vaccinated and their safety remains the biggest hurdle to a full return to the office so who's linked study of uk c. level executives from mid sized companies which found two fifths expect employee resistance to go back to the office when they reopen all. These things has taken into consideration when planning returned to the office which is likely in springtime if not sooner if the roll out with the vaccine goes well but with a more flexible feature on the horizon the biggest challenge that companies will have beyond safety concerns is how they can create inclusive workspace and cultures that worked for remote workers hybrid workers and office workers. I think it's tempting to think of the vaccine is like it's going to be this single moment where we rush rush out into the streets hug complete strangers like va day. But it's not going to be like is going to be like the congratu snipe excessive everyone a vaccine. So i mean we're going to be in this weird hybrid situation for awhile don't we. Yeah that's that's what it sounds like at the moment gonna be really hard to tell what implausible decide to do until we start to see more people going back to work in the uk probably in spring twenty twenty one as i said before when the vaccine becomes a bit more wide spreads. But you're right. I mean there's not going to be breakthrough wrestler. Everyone's had the vaccine. We're all cured. There's no parallel toll. Everyone lick the handles on the doors of your offices all safe again. You ever do that. Good but look judging going my serious. Judging by the survey data coming in recent months this is kind of a break from what's happened before people do enjoy working from home part time i love them. Do miss the office. But it's not because they miss being a building or they missed. The commute is because of their colleagues and the social aspects of work. Those are the kind of things that they missed the most. And so it's likely that companies will listen to that and even if they do want people to come back because of the concerns about their productivity and about creativity or their or their mindsets. They're still probably will factor in that feedback and offer a hybrid type workplace since working from home is proven to have no downside on productivity.

UK Vicky Natasha Pfizer Marietta World Health Organization Depression Adrian
Digital Health: A CVC Perspective with Sean Cheng, Investment Manager at Phillips Ventures

Outcomes Rocket

06:11 min | 5 months ago

Digital Health: A CVC Perspective with Sean Cheng, Investment Manager at Phillips Ventures

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw marquess here and today I have the privilege of hosting a Dr Shawn Chang He's a PhD in engineering and then investment manager at Phillips Ventures of the portfolio of promising early stage companies includes baby scripts, Zell Might Tani to drive the Phillips Health Tech Vision he's interested in early stage investment opportunities in digital health, medical devices and imaging based diagnostic prior to ventures. He drove key strategic decisions for the Phillips leaderships on topics, including wearables, health, cloud digital transformation, and data interoperability. Previously, Sean held positions at the Boston Consulting Group, the US FDA and NASA SEAN also. Serves on the board of directors of the Professional Center for child, Development Board of advisors at. Johns Hopkins University. And the Advisory Board of the World Economic Forum's Global Shapers Community Sean holds his PhD in engineering from the University of Cambridge England where he developed expertise in medical device design simulations and optimization algorithms. I'm privileged to have him here on the podcast with us today to chat about innovation in how we fund it, and how we view it within today's Environment John such a pleasure to have you here with us face for having me salt and that was a mouthful, but a takes the intro. That's Hey listen I mean for the things that you've done in your career it's like a the tip of the iceberg. So certainly going to be a fun talk today before we dive into the nitty gritty of you know the investments and an innovation I love to find out more about what inspires your work in healthcare yes. Sure So I think. Ever since I can remember you know is one of these professions where it was always going to be around rice on my my father's. Told that to me when I was very young. People are always going to get sick and you know this is something that is near and dear to everyone's hearts and something they worry about. So I, you at a very young age looking at healthcare is something worthwhile doing not to say that everything else is in November and? Certainly in the healthcare side, there's always relevance and and There was something that's from impact side of very worthwhile in a you know a few years ago. I, say. My Dad also. got into a bit of the healthcare trouble and I was in consulting time the generals consultant and having done engaged. She focused on cardiology and the more invasive procedures within cardiology like artificial hearts and L. Ads. I've felt You know I was almost blind sided when he was you know going in for a quadruple bypass and you know I I should probably rely and and it will come back to industry a little more. So something more personal more recently. And I can appreciate that greatly, Sean, you know a mixture of your dad's advice and life experiences you just kind of gravitated to the the field and and I mean, you've just done extraordinary work love to park a bit for a second here on the venture business and and how exactly you guys are looking at your your early stage companies and investments. What exactly are you looking to do with those? Are they adding value to the to the ecosystem? Yeah. Sure. You know I think. There's many aspects of this love to talk at length about all of them, but I'll just spare you that give you the highlights here. So from a corporate venturing point of view, it's always been cyclical as an industry and You know in the last ten years, we've seen a revival of you know corporate venturi with new formats approaches, and this is a will be really try to carve out as ventures. So we started a around twenty-six teen in the intent was to create a team and find that can provide that early stage reconnaissance as well as know how in working with founders, and so the given an idea of what was happening to pass our emanate folks was dealing with. The early stage investments as well, and so they would take a similar approach as an acquisition of a let's say, a two billion dollar company to a post money valuation but ten million dollar early stage startup, and so that combined with a lot of the various functional corporate requirements like in privacy security insurance etc was really a lot for any you early stage coming to handle, and so we WANNA do is provide a center of excellence as well as a team that can go and negotiate these deals and streamline the process, and so we were able to reduce a deal flow time live from. Don't call me on this, but you know nine months to a year down to route three months. And so that was one of the. Young one is just You know mutual benefit. So I. Think we were allowed unnecessary terms into the term sheets that you know we never really exercise and so Knowing that, moving the future, making a judgment call on you know, how can we help the founders succeed and then help them scale? The company's best is sort of where we really emphasize that those ventures in I know everyone says this, but we try to be more founder friendly than the typical CBC, which has a stereotype over the years, and so that's I think you know where where our value add would be you know bringing the resources in channels and infrastructure of fields, corporate the mothership, but also being. Venture and founder friendly as well. And then we can sit there work together with the companies over time to help them succeed for both sides and think that's awesome. Shine. You know you'd think about a lot

Sean Phillips Ventures Phillips Founder Johns Hopkins University Dr Shawn Chang United States Boston Consulting Group Professional Center Investment Manager Development Board FDA Zell Nasa Advisory Board Consultant L. Ads University Of Cambridge Englan
With Glaciers Melting And Temps Soaring, Pakistan Pursues Big Action On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:53 min | 5 months ago

With Glaciers Melting And Temps Soaring, Pakistan Pursues Big Action On Climate Change

"Pakistan has been experiencing extreme weather events for years and the government's consensus is that climate change is to blame as NPR's had deed reports. It's responded with an ambitious program I'm here in a park in the northern Pakistani city of Madan beside me is labor a taker and she scrapes this grab ground with a small trial. She's to plant dozens of pine saplings with the health of a few friends. But. What she really needs is a shovel. She'll bring the showers. Labor might be a teenage rookie, but she's clear on why she's doing this. It's our duty as a citizen to implement that can make planet a better place to live in labor. Got Her baby pines for free through government project called Plant for Pakistan the goal is to plant ten billion trees ten, billion within four years to combat deforestation. This is the prime minister Iran con speaking about the project at the World Economic Forum diverse Switzerland in January. Why is it important? For us to grow trees. For two reasons by thunderbird global warming. In our cities. Aleutian has become a silent killer. The massive tree planting program is just one part of Pakistan's broader environmental ambitions. This summa cum government announced a new electric vehicle policy and said it would get two thirds of its power from renewables within the decade from solar wind and hydro. Pakistan is not a high amidror of hate trapping greenhouse gases. But as the prime minister said, it's feeling the effects of global warming to the north. is a melting faster than ever before in its southern cities residents live through searing heat waves. This is a nutshell as the unfairness, the inequitability of climate change magnified in a place like history. That's Rachel cletus climate expert at the US based Union of concerned scientists she praises Pakistan's efforts but Pakistani environmentalists say the government's ambitious plans a hobbled by corruption the tree. Planting Initiative for instance exists alongside illegal logging the would sold to the construction and furniture industries. It's so widespread that residents coal, the loggers, the timber Mafia. Besides corruption activists, office alarm says Pakistan's ruling party is under the sway of powerful business interests back is what makes it so frustrating do even support units offer very good things that they do the government for example, has reduced taxes on electric motorbikes, rickshaws, trucks, and buses, but not cause and critics say powerful gas vehicle lobby carved out the loophole. And then there's coal. While, Pakistan aims to have two thirds of its power from renewables within a decade. The remaining third will come from coal powered plans. Back in that park and Martin a young student. Muhammed facility helps lay tika plant baby pines and he's already worried they won't survive the timber Mafia. Album. Labor Tika won't be discouraged. A climate activism is unusual for goal in this conservative town. When many women wear burqas, she says, her mother encourages her she says that we an example to the goals, and if you set a very good example than other people also permit there sisters and daughters to go out and do such prestigious works as Labor works. A little goal runs up and grabs a baby sapling she wants to plant it herself. But outside the park, an open jeep filled with logs trundles down the highway. Delayed NPR news.

Pakistan Government Prime Minister Labor NPR Thunderbird Muhammed Climate Expert Iran Switzerland Rachel Cletus United States Martin
Rana el Kaliouby  AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

The Tim Ferriss Show

13:33 min | 11 months ago

Rana el Kaliouby AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

"And I'll keep this short going to jump straight to the guest. My guest today is a pioneer in emotion. Ai will define what that means. Ron L. CALL UB PhD. Who's also co founder and CEO of Affect Tiba and author of the new book girl coded subtitle a scientists quest reclaim our humanity by bringing emotional intelligence technology. A passionate advocate for humanizing technology ethics and diversity. Ron has been recognized on fortunes forty under forty list and as one of Forbes top fifty women in Tech Ron is a world economic forum young global leader and Co hosted a PBS Nova series called wonders. And she's also appeared on and appears in the youtube original series the age of a hosted by Robert Downey Junior Rahall PhD from the University of Cambridge. And a post. Doc It's doctorate from. It can find her on Lincoln Kelly. Ub TWITTER AT K. L. O. U. B. Y. by the way instagram at Rana Website Ron L. DOT COM Rana. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited I'm excited to have you on and if so much to cover and I thought I would begin with a question that will hopefully open up a whole different doors. A whole different set of doors. I think is the proper English expression that could potentially walk through. And it's related to a book. This is affective computing crime if. I'm getting any of the pronunciation wrong by. Rosalind Picard A. R. D. How did this book come into your life so I am concerned? I grew up in Cairo and around the Middle East. But at the time this is like nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I had just graduated from computer science from the American University in Cairo and my career plan at the time was to become faculty like wanted to teach and so. I knew teach had to do my master's in it was all very calculated and so I was looking for a thesis topic and my fiance at the time went on Amazon and he said Oh. You know there's this really interesting book by this. Mit professor called. Rosalind Picard Called Affect of computing and. We ordered it through Amazon. It took about three months to shift to Cairo. It got held and customs for reasons. I don't really understand but eventually I got hold of the book and I read it and I you know. I think it's safe to say that it changed my life because so so the thesis in the book is that computers need to understand human emotions just the way people do and I read the book and I was fascinated by this idea and it you know I made that my research topic and it became my obsession and it just really changed the trajectory of my life. What besides the thesis in the book had such an impact on your was it just that that world view that perspective or was there more to the book or more to the author. Yeah a great question. Soon let's talk about the author. I so rise is one of the few and I mean this was true back then. It's still true today. She's one of the few kind of female you know. Computer Science Machine Learning engineers professors in the space. And you know I kind of learned about her over the years I've eventually actually. She ended up being my co-founder many years later. But there's a story around that but but essentially I was just fascinated by her and she you know she's a mom she's three boys. I just thought she was like a Rockstar. So that was kind of one part of it but just the way she wrote the book and how she you know. I'm very expressive as a human being and I just really like. I think emotions really matter and are in the way we communicate. Non Verbally is very important and it struck me that when we think of technology that piece of how we communicate is completely missing and I was like. Oh yeah like it seems so obvious so I just got fascinated by the thesis. I got fascinated by the implications. Like what happens when technology becomes kind of clued into how we that's going to open up a whole new world of possibilities and I was intrigued by that. So let's travel back to that point in time you were with your then fiance and this book is ordered at the time. You're planning on becoming a teacher professor. Why were you on that track? To begin with I mean was it. Take us back to Egypt at that time were there. Many women striving to be faculty members in similar departments. I'm assuming computer science or or perhaps it was a different department. Maybe could tell us more. Yes so I went to the American University in Cairo and I study computer. Sciences an Undergrad. At the time most of the faculty were were guys except for one female faculty Dr Hulda Husni which became my role model and my mentor. And I just wanted to be like like she was awesome. She was you know. Very smart. Very approachable very fashionable. And I was like Ooh I like that and and I just wanted to be like her and so devised a plan also geek. I'm a geek and I'm proud of it so I I kind of devised a plan. I was like okay. I'll graduate top of my class which I did and then I was like okay. I'll go get a masters and PhD abroad. Because that's what you do and then come back and I'll join joined the faculty and so at the time because I was getting married to my fiance and he had a company based in Cairo coming to the. Us was not an option because it was way too far so he was like a let you go study in the UK. Because it's close enough so I applied to Cambridge and got in. That was kind of the impetus for going abroad and doing this. Like focusing on this research. So when did you then end up going to the? Us was that a difficult conversation with your family or your then-fiancee walk us through how that happened because it doesn't sound like that would have been just a hop skip and a jump to second conversation so walk us through that experience. Yes okay so then. I moved to Cambridge Right Cambridge University in the UK not not Cambridge Massachusetts and I will Cambridge Cambridge original Cambridge And we got married so basically I got married and got the scholarship to go study at Cambridge and my house. So He's now my husband right. Well he's my ex now but at the time he was my husband he was very supportive. He was like you gotta go. This is your dream. I'll support you will have a long distance relationship now. My family. My parents and his parents were horrified. They were like what you can't do that so so I do like to give him credit for for for making this happen and being supportive so I ended up in Cambridge and he was in Cairo and we did that for five years and towards the end of my PhD Ros Picard was visiting Cambridge UK. To give a talk there. And I ended up meeting her in person and we totally hit it off and she said why. Don't you come work with me at MIT as a post doc and I was like Oh my God. This is like a dream come true. I've been following you like forever and this is why you know like I told her my story. And then I caveat it I said that just you know I've I've been married for the last five years and have had a long distance relationship so I have to go back to Cairo otherwise and I actually really said that. I said otherwise in Islam because I'm Muslim my husband can marry up to four women and if I don't show up eventually he'll just like Mary more women so I said half jokingly right so she was like that's fine just like commute from Cairo and I commuted from Cairo Boston for a good a good three or four hundred years going back and forth between MIT and Cairo. How often did you go back and forth. Or how often did he go back to Cairo? Maybe is a better. What else get so. Initially I would spend a couple of months in Cairo and then go spend like a few weeks and Boston and then I would move with my kids to Boston over the summer so summer break we just all go there and so initially. That was okay. So this was between two thousand and six to two thousand and nine was okay Things began to kind of really follow parts when I decided to start the company so we started to get a lot of interest in technology and displaying. It they really encourage you to spin outright. So in two thousand nine united started affect. Eva and I was literally spending two weeks in Cairo in Boston. Two weeks or two weeks in Boston. It was insane and that was when like just goes out of balance everything was out of bounds unless tough it was tough and and and you know. I'm divorced now. Imagine how that didn't go very well. It was just it was I think. In retrospect it was not a very healthy lifestyle. And I I. I wouldn't want to be in that place again. I wouldn't want others to be in that. I talked publicly about that time yet. Let's let's hop around chronologically a little bit. We're GONNA come back of course to starting the company and that decision but for people who don't have any real firsthand exposure to the Middle East much less. Egypt for instance What was it like growing up in in Egypt and based on at least some of my reading you for instance wore a hit job for quite some time. We're not talking short period of time. Maybe you could also speak to that. Yeah yeah and it sounds like you've spent some time in the you've you've you've been to Jordan. It's time in Jordan of spent some time in a few places in the Middle East but not in Egypt never met each and when I was we chatted a little bit before start recording only have a few words here and there in Arabic but it's Levin Arabic right. It's it's what what you'd run across in Jordan or or the Lebanon and I remember though having many people recommend that I not study the sort of standard Arabic textbook Arabic but that I study Egyptian Arabic because all of the as they put all the entertainment and movies that I might WanNa consume would-be an Egyptian Arabic. Needless to say I didn't get that far but I haven't spent any time in Egypt. Well your Arabic spreading goods and you're right about Egyptian accent. That's kind of the most common but but I think the key thing is like there's no one Middle East. There's no one form. I grew up in a family. That's kind of an interesting way quite conservative but also quite liberal so my parents were very pro education. They scientist the They put all their money towards our schooling and they made a point during the summers that we travel abroad and experienced kind other cultures. And I think that's why like I was so comfortable moving from one country to another and ending up in the United States. Your parents do certain interject. But what is your parents do professionally okay. So my parents met. So my dad taught computer programming in the seventies and my mom was probably the first female programmer in the Middle East. He attended his class and he hit on her and they ended up getting married so so I guess I should give them a little bit of credit for ending up. Being a computer signed sub. Sure they had something to do with that. That's so so they both. My mom was a computer programmer at the Bank of National Bank of Kuwait. So we were in Kuwait for a while and my dad is. He's always worked in technology and culturally. What was it like where you grew up Or or within the family. You said that they were for instance on one hand very lesser with the right a cosmopolitan. Perhaps in their perspective and Dr Related to education and and what what were the other ingredients in the household there was there's definitely like clear gender role so even though my mom worked her entire life. it was always. She was not allowed to ever talk about her job post. You know she would leave work at three. Pm Be home like whatever for pm when we got back from school and that was it. She was never allowed to take a conference call at home. The evening never allowed to travel for work and I didn't realize that until I was an adult like I just assumed this was the way it was but it did hamper her career progression and it was this implicit understanding. That's does your. Oh this is my role and we all stick in our lane so that was interesting We were for example. I have two younger sisters.

Cairo Middle East Egypt United States Cambridge Ros Picard Boston University Of Cambridge Cambridge Right Cambridge Univ American University Professor Ron L. UK Youtube Jordan Robert Downey Cambridge Cambridge Rosalind Picard A. R. D. Lincoln Kelly
Jack Welch, GE's legendary CEO, has died at 84

Marketplace

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Jack Welch, GE's legendary CEO, has died at 84

"Jack Welch died yesterday the long time chairman and CEO of General Electric one of most celebrated executives of his day was eighty four years old the legacy well sleeves is complicated it will be debated and case study to four years in particular the way he changed what American companies do profits above all shareholder value first in line marketplaces Katong has them General Electric once upon a time explicitly serve many masters workers research labs and last of all shareholders that's according to company documents in the fifties by nineteen eighty one in came a new boss Jack Welch he slashed underperforming divisions and workers he spoke at MIT in two thousand six you bring a man you say look this isn't working you're in the bottom ten United again in my money here let's over the next year get your move on my then cutting costs and pleasing shareholders was in vogue in Wall Street and work for G. its stock way out perform the market during the Welsh decades of the eighties and nineties Nicholas Heymann is long time G. analyst at William Blair she had no problem redefining the landscape and what would work and in that sense standout became kind of the Paul Bunyan of shareholder value creation shareholder value often came at a cost to workers it undid the post war corporate social contract says Rick warts but not the Drucker institute his book is the end of loyalty G. and vaporized about a hundred and seventy thousand jobs under Welsh up until that time only the term downsizing it really entered the American vernacular yet these kind of huge mass layoffs were still seen as pretty scandalous when will step down in two thousand one jeep your allied heavily on its finance arm GE capital which will build up and when the financial crisis came years later the company got hit hard law professor Margaret Blair at Vanderbilt's is that's when we'll just tone seem to change as the company got into trouble he conceded that maximizing share value is not always the smartest thing to do D. adage suggests that he changed his mind over time he must have begun to see if there were big problems in the underlying business well she may have been on to something today leading groups including the business roundtable blackrock and the Davos World Economic Forum are rethinking the shareholders first model in its

Paul Bunyan Professor Blackrock Vanderbilt Margaret Blair Ge Capital Drucker Institute Rick Warts Jack Welch William Blair Analyst Nicholas Heymann MIT Katong General Electric Chairman And Ceo
Jobs and Skills of the Future

Automated

11:54 min | 1 year ago

Jobs and Skills of the Future

"To get into today's core idea. I WANNA start off by referring to a two thousand fourteen questionnaire by the Pew Research Center so here. Some two thousand experts in the field of technology both those building the actual technologies and businesses as well as those who report on. It responded to questions about the impact of automation technologies so this was actually quite a high level questionnaire and some of the experts for the chief scientists of say for example SALESFORCE DOT com. There's also the vice president of Google. Even the principal researcher for Microsoft. So I wanted to refer to this questionnaire as I think it really highlights the goal of these last two episodes and the podcast as a whole so we can start off with The first group so forty eight percent of all the experts envisioned a future in which robots and digital agents have displaced significant numbers of both blue and white collar workers with many expressing concern that this will lead to vast increases in income inequality masses of people who are effectively unemployable and breakdowns in the social order. But on the other side of this the other half some fifty two percent expect that technology will not displace more jobs than it creates by at least twenty twenty five to be sure. This group anticipates that many jobs currently performed by humans will be substantially taken over by robots or digital agents by twenty twenty five but they have faith that human ingenuity will create new jobs industries and ways to make living just as has been doing since the dawn of the industrial revolution. But does this second group of experts have any lakes stand on so we know that through history jobs and the skills required for those jobs have been changing drastically due to the technological advancements bringing about large changes so you can think about the large changes that we as a species have gone through from hunter gatherers to use an agriculture to the first industrial revolution electrification computerization and the start of the Internet as well as today's fourth industrial revolution. So each of these epochs or eras are I think easily visualized having massively different jobs and tasks and of course the different skills attached to them but have these shifts created more or less jobs. I think that the answer is quite apparent but The net impact of new technologies on employment can really be seen as strongly positive and this is shown in a two thousand eleven. Study by Mackenzie's Paris office and they found that Looking at one of the main technologies that was Believed to destroy Significant amount of jobs the Internet had destroyed five hundred thousand jobs in France alone in the previous fifteen years but at the same time had created one point two million other jobs. This is a net addition of some seven hundred thousand or two point. Four jobs created for every single job destroyed so furthermore one third of new jobs created in United States. In the past twenty five years were types that did not exist or barely existed and these were in areas including It development hardware manufacturing APP creation and IT systems management so think that the argument is quite similar anywhere. You look and is really based on historical fact as mentioned during this podcast if you follow this historical perspective the future has new and emerging technologies constantly creating new jobs that humans will need to do. But what is predicted about how? Tomorrow's jobs and skills and how they look like so. There are dozens if not hundreds of reports out there looking at trends and predicting what these changes will be so I specifically looked at a number of reports ranging from two thousand fourteen till eight two thousand nineteen made by some of the big hitters like the McKinsey Global Institute the World Economic Forum the European Commission the Pew Research Center and others as always links will be in the show notes. If any of you want to look more into depth in these issues I will attempt to point out. The main issues presented with a focus on two ideas. What are going to be. The main new jobs of the future and to what specific skills will be required to perform them so new jobs related to the development maintenance and upgrading of AI. Or artificial intelligence as well as big data infrastructures are among those expected to grow. Significantly so digital technology can also enable new forms of entrepreneurial activity workers in small businesses and self employed occupations can benefit from higher income. Earning opportunities and this leads to a potential. New Category of knowledge enabled jobs becoming possible as machines imbed intelligence and knowledge that less skilled workers can then access with little training. So I've used this podcast even a number of times to illustrate a similar point for example I am putting together a monthly newsletter that I hope to have ready in a few weeks rather than having to design every single part of it online tools with prebuilt templates make the process significantly faster and allows someone without any design experience to produce something with a good level of quality or at least I hope granted this is a very simplistic example without any embedded intelligence but I hope it helps to illustrate the standing on the shoulder of giants picture. This future scenario is trying to push so one of the central themes that runs through many of these future. Job Scenarios is how much emotional intelligence and human to human interaction is in the changing environment so as the routine and Monday jobs are more and more done by automated systems. This will open up the opportunity to have more human interaction than we do today or at least this is what it's forecasted to be so cognizance feature of work reports have actually been quite interesting in this regard as they build this idea into a future scenario. Where over forty new jobs are imagined up to around twenty thirty so you can look at the show notes for links to the two reports. That will list all the jobs but some of the more interesting ones. I'll list right here. So the first one is something called an augmented reality journey. Builder and this future job is envisioned to collaborate with engineers to create the essential elements for customers to move through any sort of augmented reality experience. The second one here is the genetic diversity officer and they are envisioned to construct and encourage adherence to a company wide genetic equity policy that includes an kind of forces genetic diversity The third one is something called a data detective and they will uncover meaningful business answers and recommendations by investigating data through sensors devices and biometric monitors as well as other things that are used in organizations one of the last ones is smart home design manager and they will help customers design and integrate technologies into their smart homes of course. But then again with this increased digital connectivity there is also the increased hacking and security threats and thus positions around this are bound to increase in number as well as in type so one possible Position for seeing that I thought was quite interesting. Something called a juvenile cybercrime rehabilitation counselor and their jobs will be to help the convicted cybercriminals to redirect their online talents towards ethical behavior for the betterment of society. So I think it'll be really interesting to see whether any or all of these envisioned positions will be created over the next ten years. I'm pretty sure that very few people were able to guess the new kind of positions and jobs that are created through the internet or through Ai. So I'm happy to see that cognizant was able to creatively come up with some potential jobs of the future but this leads us to the next point regarding skills if we assume that new jobs are continually created but also significantly change. Do we currently have the skills needed to take on these new shifting roles so the OECD two thousand nineteen future of work report estimated that thirty two percent of all jobs will change significantly in the future though it was quite unspecified as a half that timeframe extends to McKinsey estimates that globally. Three hundred and seventy five million workers may need to switch occupations by twenty thirty but many adults do not seem to have the right skills for these changes. And they say that six out of ten adults lack basic. Ict skills or even have no computer experience which was quite shocking for me to hear. This is compounded with the fact that out of all jobs that are done in the OECD. Highly skilled jobs have increased by twenty five percent over the last twenty years. And this is further compounded by fact that the jobs that are most exposed to automation appear to be those that require relatively low levels of formal education those that do not involve relatively complex social interaction and those that involve routine manual tasks so the World Economic Forum actually highlighted a list of the top ten skills needed in twenty twenty as compared to twenty fifteen. So list will be fully available on the website but all Name a couple the more interesting ones here so these actually fit quite well in what was talked about above so A number one. There's complex problem solving followed by critical thinking and third being creativity. Then four five and six. I'll have to deal with interaction with people so you have people management followed by coordinating with others and the six one being emotional intelligence so I think this is kind of interesting especially in taken. In contrast to the top ten skills that were listed in two thousand fifteen although a number of them are still the same. There are some like active listening or quality control. Which don't even make it into twenty twenty at all and this is just an a five year period of time. Which I think is quite astonishing as you would need to be constantly learning in order to keep up with ever changing New Skills that are needed and I think this is a good segue into one of the last point of this podcast episode in that in all of these Studies and reports that went over for this episode. One of the main central ideas that is pushed forward is that a constant lifelong attempt at learning new skills. new ways of dealing with people is perhaps the most important thing as we go forward into this new and constantly shifting future so to sum up those jobs growing the most by twenty thirty appear to be those that require higher education intensive use of social and interactive skills and at least a basic knowledge of

Pew Research Center Google Microsoft Vice President Principal Researcher Mckinsey United States Paris Oecd Mckinsey Global Institute Mackenzie France Twenty Twenty Self Employed Officer Design Manager European Commission
U.S. says 34 troops diagnosed with traumatic brain injury after Iran strike

News, Traffic and Weather

01:09 min | 1 year ago

U.S. says 34 troops diagnosed with traumatic brain injury after Iran strike

"The Pentagon now reports more U. S. servicemembers suffering from traumatic brain injuries after the airstrike carried out by a wrong ABC's Julia McFarlane at the foreign desk in London with the update the announcement contradicts initial statements from the Pentagon that no Americans will harm to the attacks early this month now we know thirty four service members suffer traumatic brain injury related to the January eight attack when around five missiles into the other side have a seat in a wrong now hall for the injured have returned to what the remaining seventeen service members have been flown to Germany and the US for further treatment the updated figure is more than three times the reported number when the Pentagon acknowledged that eleven service members was suspected of having concussion related injury reacting to the news while doubles for the World Economic Forum president trump said that he had they had headaches I can report it is not very serious adding that he did not consider the injuries as severe as those suffered by troops hit by roadside bombs in a rock a lot of press conference pensions chief spokesman said the symptoms worsen with concussions adding that some had worsened

Pentagon ABC Julia Mcfarlane London Germany United States Donald Trump President Trump
Trump Talks National Populism in Davos, Switzerland

The McLaughlin Group

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Trump Talks National Populism in Davos, Switzerland

"Addressing the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland this week president trump double down on his guiding principle of national populism nations rather than global architectures are best placed to sub human interest trump said many others at the summit disagree they say the concerns such as climate change can only be addressed by global action an editor I should clarify that that video with the music was a White House but you're not not mine but do you see how do you see double sometimes of the truck nationalist populism buses this sort of more global stock well New York times one of the headlines was the Davos solar guards flocked to trump calling and the cold and the Davos man me two years ago he I think he was there and he was you know widely disdained he seemed to come across like a bit of an ignorant fool in their eyes well now they like the economy they like power they think he might be reelected and so again just as the impeachment trial is all about raw power so is Davos and so the president knows how to play that game he invited a number of the Davos elitist to his signing of the reason outside of the of the trade agreement with China and he's kind of loving the fact that the markets are doing well and says you know give my best to Jamie diamond but there's a big cleavage there in terms of of climate in particular Jim do you have how serious do you think president trump is about shaping a legacy narrative all of you know a return to the nation state on on how much of this is trumps effort to mobilize a domestic base that that likes that idea I mean if you go back in and watch interviews with Donald Trump the date back to the nineteen eighties the most consistent theme of his political flight which is involved in a in a lot of different ways in other areas is the idea that the United States is being screwed over taken advantage of by foreign countries by foreign governments and that there needed to be some powerful figure elected who would put a stop to that and trump's election coincided with the trend of of national populism throughout the western world to varying degrees different political parties having different degrees of success of pushing that message and and I think the visors and aids close to trump of tried to own that political instincts that basic instinct and connect it to an over arching populist philosophy and so I think there is an element of of one is a legacy and show market is quite strong that sentence sounded as from the Democratic Left and very opposed to free trade is skeptical of some of this globalist architecture is actually quite close to president trump well he certainly is and I think his message of it populism is is not a ideologically specific term it's a term that could arise on the ideological left as it has on the ideological right now I think that's why you seem sustenance I was senator Sanders and look I I think it's not just the doors in the Midwest I think if you talk about African Americans in the south who have seen global legislation impact their communities a loss of jobs as manufacturers have either moved or have decided to hire a cheaper labor south of the border and so this is an issue that I regardless of race impact people's so I think Sanders message of social economics which is very similar to president trump's early on it

Switzerland Davos
Greta Thunberg Joins Climate March on Her Last Day in Davos

Pat Farnack

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Greta Thunberg Joins Climate March on Her Last Day in Davos

"And three climate activists Greta tune Berg is brushing off criticism from U. S. tries to treasury secretary Stephen new chin in Davos at the World Economic Forum minu chin dismissed Thunberg claim that governments and companies need to drastically cut back on fossil fuels Meijin set him on other things if you the chief economists and Burke said his comments of course have no effect on her and her fellow

Berg U. S. Stephen New Chin Davos Thunberg Burke
CEO of Dubai's DP World sees growth in Africa, India

BTV Simulcast

03:20 min | 1 year ago

CEO of Dubai's DP World sees growth in Africa, India

"Either by base force operated DP world sees growth opportunities in Africa and India to be the kind of office insult and I'm a bit soleil and spoke to Bloomberg at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week because sure was a good times overruled look at the gym for example with the right policies for some policies and that's no no extension refunding double bed the competitive or port in NASA managers are wonder that as he did in two thousand and two to four four million dollars over if the I a small container for one to be open to the forced to allow for wanted to become a hub for cargo that could come from data set a minimum Basra shouldn't bring cookies how worried are you that to do politics in the Middle East was really at the forefront since January second of this year that that actually these two political concerns eclipse the trade wars this is not something permanent it is something that happens and it really get excited people want I believe that it's a three three message ID it is very important and that is why your state is negotiating because since it open market for everybody to export to unfortunately other marks and they have to be a fair thing to do that gives a fear of commitment to each other how you doing with China as part of the building of the mischief but also just in general how much investment does China want with us we have another time but just China I mean this agreement gives in my opinion a comfort as to the fate as who want to export from import will import from China knowing they could be a custom you had not the board that's a lease this card will come to general picture things getting better when and why we announced from the corner you sick **** with the supplied to in in addition and how he with an efficiency how do we utilize restricted by the airport which is very busy link probable export the from the Far East Africa Latin America what you have to be going for that we do have another decision with the course of time and we have identified that and actually one of the three those who started this whole twenty just thought that when is he origin this is a convertible today Amazon highly Bob this survivor because the differences in fact how many jobs designs actually what made the call me lose and does that go back to populism that you need to retrain you know when you talk about jobs lost in my opinion maybe jobs lost in a lower key but in higher today as it was today business we have a commission the recognition for in the past if you assume you make more money because you can have it today if you have an idea you can hear more money so the machine will do the work the

Trump's impeachment trial

Fresh Air

04:45 min | 1 year ago

Trump's impeachment trial

"You're listening to special coverage of the Senate impeachment trial from NPR news we continue to have White House correspondent Tamera Keith with us and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas with us and from Capitol Hill NPR's Kelsey's now thanks so much for staying with us I want to play another clip from earlier today this is congressman so Lofgren and one of the issues here what was the question of whether the president did anything wrong this is something that was a big part of the the testimony the presentation both yesterday and today it was this government accountability report that said that trump the trump administration violated the law when they held up the Ukraine a the report has come out since the house passed the articles of impeachment and here's house managers Lofgren of California arguing that it bolstered the house Democrats case now as G. A. O. explained the constitution grants the president no unilateral authority to withhold funds from obligation and they further explained faithful execution of the law does not permit the president to substitute his own policy priorities for those that Congress has enacted into law Wendy with held farms for policy reasons which is not permitted under the impoundment control act and quote the bottom line president trump froze the aid to increase the pressure on Ukraine to announcing investigations he wanted he violated the law he violated his constitutional duty to take care of the laws be faithfully executed Kelsey has there been any reaction from Republicans to this report not necessarily today but since this report was released yeah the past several days we have heard from some Republicans who basically said that this is not a crime that he may have that the president may have chosen not to execute the the wishes of Congress but they say it's not a crime and certainly not impeachable also often times is part of a larger argument that we hear from a lot of Republicans they don't necessarily deny that trump has done something they just say that the things that he that Democrats are saying he has done are not impeachable offenses and that's where they draw the line they said they say that there's a difference between doing something that Democrats find distasteful and something that is illegal and it and it justification for removing a president from office and here's the ten K. it's not just Democrats that found the hold on funding distasteful there were many Republicans who were pushing put trying to put pressure on the White House and others to release the funds to Ukraine up before the funds expired and at the end of the fiscal year so there there are many Republicans that were also concerned about those funds being put on hold one interesting fact about the impoundment control act which will often was referencing it's a nineteen seventy four law that was passed after Watergate as part of this large group of laws that were passed by Congress to try to wrest control back from the executive after what he'd seen it had been seen as an abuse of power by Nixon attend while we have you how to talk about how the White House has responded to this is what the president has been you know very actively tweeting I think many people who follow this may know that has he responded to today to what we have heard today what's he been saying it so the the White House has sent out talking point after talking point after talking point email and including some about the government accountability office report saying well you know Obama disputed some GAO reports to in terms of the president himself as you say there have been a lot of tweets there's been some sort of running commentary at one point during the presentation from Democrats that one of the house managers put up this graphic showing that president trump and vice president Joe Biden in a hypothetical head to head match up in the polls and and Biden was always higher than trump well you know like an hour or two later I've lost track of time today but suddenly president trump started tweeting about polls multiple tweets about polls kind of randomly up or maybe not that randomly at all well he did joke during a press conference in Dallas he was in Switzerland World Economic Forum about he joked about showing up and sitting in on the trial and US senator Lindsey Graham who were speaking about him earlier said he didn't think that was a good idea I think we have a clip of that thirty five he has told me when they're not he wants to come but in case you're listening don't come Donald Trump if you're listening yeah and and and the reality is that

White House Senate NPR
Highlights from impeachment managers first day of opening arguments

Pacifica Evening News

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Highlights from impeachment managers first day of opening arguments

"Prior to today's trial session democratic senators spoke of the results of the first two days of the trial as would be expected praising the performance of the impeachment managers from the house senators are not permitted to speak from the floor of the chamber during the trial proceedings and they're not supposed to leave their seats for any length of time except during recesses the placement of the two television cameras in the chamber doesn't really show the positions of individual senators part of the special restrictions on the media imposed for the impeachment trial but there have been persistent reports from the floor and the gallery of sizeable and lengthy absences of senators and small groups of them conversing even as the house managers hold the floor some Republican senators have been complaining about the proceedings saying they're boring with the impeachment managers repeating evidence that's already been presented both in the trial and earlier in the house impeachment inquiry hearings Hawaii's junior democratic senator Maisie Horana we've all heard that our colleagues are saying well why don't we have new evidence which by the way we spent twelve hours of thirteen hours on Tuesday of the suspension of shutting down so that's totally hypocrisy on their part for that they are getting restless most of us get restless when we are presented with information we don't want to hear right and you want to hear what the president did and if they were to absence of other just a simple question of is it okay for the president to have shaken down the president of another country a very vulnerable country who need it our support and almost four hundred million a taxpayer money so his troops can fight against Russian and aggression and he in the present use our taxpayer money to to buy that president just ask themselves that question they want to face that is so there's for me why because the truth hurts new Mexico's democratic senator Tom Udall had strong words about president trump's behavior and Davos Switzerland at the World Economic Forum during the opening days of trump's impeachment trial president trump has leadership Maria said he is all over in Davos over in Davos number one what he's doing in Davos which I find outrageous he's he's playing with the jury jury intimidation he said as they are in Davos at the camera he says don't coal balls in there so with us he said could hurt our national security I think that's a very very dangerous role did go down to say that Congress cannot handle the national security issues obviously Fulton has a lot to say in public just about what went on in the meetings but we can handle the National Security park in our secure facilities and I think we're willing to do that the other thing that I found was really upsetting in terms of president trump's behavior over in Davos was he and this is his quote honestly we have all the material and we don't he says honestly we have all the material and they don't have the material here years scolding Goldie over the fact that he has the documents he's not turn them over to Congress he's violated is that is that special relationship article one article two where Congress is supposed to be able to subpoena documents and we do offer site and here he is gloating in S. quality sitting over in Davos president trump is threatening to use national security concerns to block John Bolton's testimony if in the unlikely event the Senate voted to subpoena him as a witness if that doesn't work Republican senators reportedly have a backup plan to depose him in private and then to classify his testimony as secret on national security grounds Karen Greenberg director of the center on national security at Fordham University school of law and author of the book rogue could just as the making of the security state told KABC phase Mitch gesture at the national secrets and security the growth of the security and police powers of the executive branch and the presidency especially since the September eleventh attacks on the US are all involved in the impeachment trial and it's Ukraine affair it is so obvious that what they don't want to do is to bring forth witnesses because the witnesses will say things not because they compromise national security but because they compromise the head of state and head of state and the people in his circle and that's just not what we seen this before we've seen the term national security used to be a real quick for not just protecting the national interest but making sure it doesn't get certain people either embarrassed or in trouble with the law we've seen this in the war on terror and numerous instances and we seen elsewhere we know this this playbook and it would it's important for the country not just for this trial to say now we have a process this is a these are the rules of the process and you can try to obstruct them in any way you want but ultimately we're gonna get those witnesses we need to get them the ring of a very important point now there are some government watchdog groups have you know created these charts showing the amount of times that national security has been invoked in order to keep information from either getting to the public or at least at the very minimum to Congress and if you look at these charts there's just this explosion this exponential growth that really begins at two eight you know right around nine eleven but even even before that even in the nineties but still continuing more so and here we are kind of leads us to the moment that Donald Trump may not have created concerning this use or over use of classifying information he hasn't created this dynamic but it's led us to a point where now he is in that same vein doing which I think is pretty remarkable and even pretty dangerous and for me is like one of those really important things that may not be as talked about as much as it should be during this impeachment trial and that's doing a blanket refusal to cooperate with Congress at all in this investigation right another way of saying it is this was a logical it's a little bit amped up foreseeable consequence of what emerged from nine eleven afterwards and again was built on earlier things as you say and you'll notice that in the the statement about this trial you've seen national security claimed on both sides national security is claimed by the trump administration and his to his lawyers as we can't give out these witnesses or these documents because of national security and on the other side you have individuals Adam Schiff another saying look this is a matter of national security we need to know this and so in national security is the magic words for the whatever it is you want to claim and I think that's also something that has led to this moment in time that we've been dealing with for the past two decades as you say since nine eleven did in this trip to what we consider in late but I guess Arthur Slesinger once called the imperial presidency which other people which people are now using frequently this term exactly let me say one other thing that are sure it's lasted you said though for this lesson you said that you know it and his father that history moves American history has seemed to move in cycles and you know from being very simplistic about this from more conservative errors to more liberal errors and that the cycle was about thirty years which is just about generationally you know in a little more and the real question here is are we what we are are we in the cycle or we done with the idea of cycles in American history have we entrenched ourselves so much in a way of thinking about the presidency and particularly when it comes to it's tied to national or its claim to national security have we escaped those cycles and so on what do you think question what is your title I don't think the pendulum swinging back I think that that so much yeah because we had a democratic president a liberal president who brought in some very much more liberal minded folks into the national security state with the presidency of Obama and the truth was it proved almost impossible to change things either because of how they read the national security global security landscape or because it was just too hard to give up the powers that had accrued but I do not think as we used to think ten years ago that the pendulum is swinging back in office another reason I think this impeachment is so important because it needs to it's not just about Donald Trump it's about what's happened to the country what is allowed to be claimed in the name of national security and now we've seen it at the ultimate where it was claimed in a national security the president's powers have now become clearly about personal interest and you notice yesterday that and today both ship and now they're use national security and then right after national interest and I'm committed to personal interest sort of is the relationship with these these things that are at stake Aaron Greenberg

Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: 'They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds'

Mac OS Ken

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Trump demands Apple unlock iPhones: 'They have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds'

"You might think impeachment would be the only thing on president. Trump's mind this week if if so you would apparently be wrong police was on CNBC Wednesday morning spending at least part of the time talking about Apple How oh proud he is of its innovation. You ask of the jobs that creates in the work it does greening at supply chain. Actually he seems to have been talking about about the need for a back door in the Iowa s though watching the one minute and sixteen seconds devoted to the topic well let me just share with you what CNBC NBC wrote President. Donald Trump on Wednesday stepped up his pressure over Apple's refusal to unlock iphones. Authorities in criminal cases apple has to help us and I'm very strong on it trump told. CNBC's squawk box co host. Joe Turner from the World Economic Forum in Davos Switzerland. They had have the keys to so many criminals and criminal minds and we can do things and and the state monopoly said it provided gigabytes of information mation to law enforcement related to the Pensacola case. But that it would not build a back door or specialized software to give law enforcement elevated access trump told. CNBC on Wednesday. They could have given us that information. That would have been very helpful. The president said he's not concerned about his relationship with Cook Oracle because the stakes are so high you're dealing with drug lords and you're dealing with terrorists and if you're dealing with murderers I don't care. Trump said so. I'm guessing breakfast. Didn't go. Great

Donald Trump Cnbc Apple President Trump Joe Turner Davos Switzerland Pensacola Cook Oracle Iowa NBC
"world economic forum" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Continuing coverage the World Economic Forum in devils, Switzerland. Let's turn now to Davos and the World Economic Forum there, we are joined by John Philippe, Courtois Microsoft, vice president for global sales jumped lead. Thanks very much for joining us. Let me first ask you. What you make of the global slowdown debate economic slowdown debate the tapping their at Davos, what's your view from your position at Microsoft is good morning. Davos, we're having a lot of discussion is CEO's, but also NGOs and governments. It would say. Beyond the economy consideration of a potential slowdown. There's a very strong desire to truly enable transformation of the academy's society leveraging digital technologies, and I think that's that's a big lever, which he's not just talking to be gross in productivity, but also talks about reskilling and developing capabilities for countries and economies to stress it of at times. But that's being actually a key thieves of the last couple of days. Yeah. The digital transformation has certainly been a theme in the last few days, and I would also in previous editions of the World Economic Forum in Davos, but I'm just kinda wondering I just want to dig into whether or not you as vice president for global sales are seeing sort of signs of any soft patches. Emerging signals here of sales perhaps sort of softening up. A public quarterly numbers we trust by obviously end of September. Because we have not yet release. The second quarter commercial cloud business was growing by forty seven percent, which is super strong. And we keep seeing a lot of gross again driven nut jobs by cloud being really adopted across the economy, we see actually you love industries being trustful good example of that retail. Some major power. She is companies. I wo- malt. The media wants to the most advance artifical intelligence capabilities commercials IOT to truly respond to the biggest in Eire's. And here's another example, Kroger retail with which we actually building developing call the service, a fully automated store that he can operate across the US, but also resell globally on the back can of all, Azure, cloud. And so I could go on and on, but we see across many industries staffing industries as well. You know companies like Adecco digitizing, basically this killing process the assessment process for candidates for jobs seeking and getting in foul efficient way to connect to get demand and supply. So this is the reason why we. Davos, I see it becoming a reality. Because you're writing to pass these betas world. No, it's becoming reality. But he's also Eddie emotional because we are talking about the way businesses, and he tweets and people are the center of that view. You're obviously responsible for global operations. So you've got all of the countries regions under your purview. But I want to ask specifically about the US. How is Microsoft experiencing this shutdown? How has that affected your global sales marketing and operations in this first quarter to be honest. We don't see any really impact because of that. I think we're continuing working boasts, obviously, the public authorities and the private sector on the US which is continuously again. Driving more productivity gains more. All digital innovation. And so to be very Frank. I think they are all seeing beyond that arise and that is being discussed today. I mean, you've been talking a lot about the digital transformation. And there's also been this ongoing discussion regarding artificial intelligence as well. And what that might bring us. I'm just kinda wondering though, there's also been a lot of talk within the tech sector recently of for instance, iphone sales slowing down that's been ructions in the semiconductor space regarding sales going forward is that something that sort of makes you sit up and wonder about the outlook. I'm wondering about is. Well. Remember, really confident about the future. As well. Because as I said across the world both in the US all across Europe in Asia. We see more and more very innovative projects to truly dry for again the economy, and we see that everywhere. Let let's take another example. Example agri-business right agricultural business. What are the leading food processing company Buller Swiss company innovating again, injecting vision services to salt, the contaminated grinds with toxins as the process grads, which is incredible impact as well. Because you've got health billion people in the world being actually contaminated by the wrong toxins. And so we see a lot of that happening. And that's where we we stay really confident. About the gross across the world that economies John Philippe. Thank you so much for joining us. Really? Appreciate your time. I know you must be incredibly busy at Davos Jean-Philippe court of Microsoft, vice president for global sales. Of course, I'm sure he's incredibly busy anyway, just with his job. But there in Davos, it's probably meeting after meeting after meeting after meeting. Yes, there's a lot of discussions there in the Swiss Alps, I can probably see that. Now, we have plenty of more coverage. Of course coming up today when it comes to Davos, we'll be speaking to a lot of different guests and a lot of different voices, including Jess stay lead. The CEO of Barclays he's coming up in the next hour hair on both the Bloomberg television as well as on Bloomberg radio. So it's gonna be interesting to see what he's got to say. It'll be interesting to hear what he's got to say about the start of the banking year that it's twenty thousand hundred as. We saw a lot of concerns towards the tail end of two thousand eighteen Matt. Yeah. Absolutely. By the way, we're going to continue to bring you great coverage out of the two thousand nineteen World Economic Forum. The CD you general secretary crop. Karen Bauer is going to speak to Bloomberg this hour. I'm very much looking forward to that here out of Berlin. In the seven o'clock hour, we'll hear from Barclays CEO Jess daily. No doubt. A lot of employees will be tuning in for that. Then later in the morning and exclusive with Turkey's finance minister Bharat buyer. That'll be.

Davos US Microsoft vice president CEO Bloomberg John Philippe Barclays World Economic Forum Switzerland Jess daily Adecco Swiss Alps IOT Kroger Turkey Buller Swiss Karen Bauer
"world economic forum" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"You go punching the kid in the face, you want to check and make sure that this is a legal contract if it is a legal contract to which she must be held. I think maybe this young teenager should agree to allow like forty guys to gently punched him in the face. And then they can all go over to Sarah's house. What are you thinking and bring some quail lutes 'cause you know, how that goes. Also, the good liberals at Davos, it's the World Economic Forum in Davos this week and the headline from France twenty four of all people French liberal news outlet. You see the the the lips are going into Davos, and that's where the the elite to conspire against the world and liberals love it because they're pawns their ponds and game of life. The headline is never mind climate change Davos prefers private jets turns out that out do at Davos all the people that are very concerned about the environment are flying in on their private jets. They've had to make all kinds of new room new space for all the jets. They're expecting more than one thousand five hundred private jets to go into Dabo's for the World Economic Forum this week, and they don't have nearly enough room for all the jets. That would be up from the more than one thousand three hundred private jets the movement had at last year's for despite climate change registering as the top risk factor. Identified for the global economy in a survey of W, F movers and shakers last week. Not for double standards, liberals would have no standards at all. Oh, no, the oh the environment. We've were very concerned about the environment. You're taking your jet. Right. Yeah. I'll take mine. Well, we'll see you in the air. We'll see on the ground. Fifteen hundred private jets for the people. Who are they're very concerned very concerned about the environment. All right. Let's wrap up. Let's get it over to soundbite. I still just love this. It was very aggressive standing there. There's something aggressive about standing there. Isn't there? Something about. Standing there. Yeah. He's the aggressor say the sixteen year old boy the child. Barely Pugh Bessette. He's the villain of the story at NBC news with all these adults. They're shockingly corrupt, and of course, reminded Victoria, and Michael piercy who are younger than I of a an episode of SpongeBob squarepants that's cartoon for children..

Davos World Economic Forum Dabo Pugh Bessette Sarah NBC France Michael piercy sixteen year Victoria
"world economic forum" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"To which she must be held. I think maybe this young teenager should agree to allow like forty guys to gently punch him in the face. And then they can all go over to Sarah's house. Do you think? And bring some quail lutes 'cause you know, how that goes. Attention. Also, the good liberals at Davos, it's the World Economic Forum in Davos this week and the headline from France twenty four of all people French liberal news outlet. You see the the the libs are going into Davos, and that's where the elite meet to conspire against the world and liberals love it because are pawns there. But ponds and game of life. The headline is never mind climate change DeVos prefers private jets turns out that out do at Davos all the people that are very concerned about the environment are flying it in their private jets. They've had to make all kinds of new room new space for all the jets. They're expecting more than one thousand five hundred private jets to go into Davos for the World Economic Forum this week, and they don't have nearly enough room for all the jets. That would be up from the more than one thousand three hundred private jets. The movement had at last year's for him despite climate change registering as the top risk factor. Identified for the global economy in a survey of W, F movers and shakers last week. Were it not for double standards, liberals would have no standards at all. Oh, no, the oh the environment. We've were very concerned about the environment. You're taking your jet. Right. Yeah. I'll take mine. Well, we'll see you in the air. We'll see you on the ground. Fifteen hundred private jets for the people. Who are they're very concerned very concerned about the environment. Let's wrap up. That's yeah. Let's get it over to soundbite. I still just love this. It was very aggressive standing there. There's something aggressive about standing there. Isn't there? Something aggressive about standing there. Yeah. He's the aggressor say the sixteen year old boy that child. Barely Pugh Bessette. He's the villain of the story at NBC news with all these adults. They're shockingly corrupt. And of course reminded. Victoria, and Michael piercy who are younger than I a an episode of SpongeBob squarepants. That's a cartoon for children. I think..

Davos DeVos World Economic Forum Pugh Bessette Sarah libs NBC Michael piercy France Victoria sixteen year
"world economic forum" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Business executives gathering in Davos, Switzerland for the annual World Economic Forum, and Bloomberg radio and television will also be there, of course, Jonathan Ferrell and Tom Keene will be broadcasting live all next week. And they join us now with more. Thanks, bob. Looking forward to a week of full coverage at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, alongside my good friend, and anchor mystics, home Kane, and Tom it has become a who's who adapts and before we've even arrived that every year job but ever more. So this year, I've never seen it like this. It all your come off of Brexit in the continuing story will cover at Davos on Brexit. You come off the shutdown is well, guess what there's eight or nine other original political stories that backup globalization. We're going to see and Sean protests over in France as well. So let's talk about who's not going to be there because of these dmed. Issues the prime minister of the UK won't be able to attend because of Brexit issue. The French prime minister, the French president Emmanuel Macron will not be there in the United States. President Donald Trump. Consumed body partial government shutdown for a moment, Tom. We thought the US delegation headed up by Treasury Secretary, Steve Mnuchin, we thought secretary Mnuchin would still be that he won't be there either. So we go ahead to the World Economic Forum. And I think one thing stands out for me that has stood out for me for a long long time. I've always thought what the World Economic Forum was grateful with the bilateral meetings on the sidelines between individual is an individual CEO's. I've never thought it was a great forum to get together for some kind of multilateral effort. And I think that's the reality of this meeting to totally agree in this'll be my fifteenth year there, John, and there has been a shift a profound shift from Davos is an event, and you know, I mean, I know a guy like you John would have gone skiing on Tuesday, take a rest Wednesday. Go skiing after the show on Thursday. About eight years ago, it shifted to where it's not much different from plumbers convention in Las Vegas people. Go there is you is you say correctly to meat and meat and meet and greet meeting. After meeting through the whole four days. That's the stuff that people don't really get to see Tom. What's interesting about the event from the outside looking in. You see these big panels? You see the elites of global business. Politics and economics sitting around tables talking about big themes. It's the stuff behind the scenes that always interests. So we come into this event. And it's called globalization four point zero what it means, and how it could benefit all I just wanna Tom how much we actually going to be talking about the events theme of globalization four point zero. I now want me talking about it that much. Well, I find it. It's a touch point. And then you move on and you move on rapidly. And of course, there's always the excitement folks Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday, and with our simulcast through all of this in our normal hours. John on television, and radio worldwide is the simple idea that the theme changes as you go on you. And I were there that moment where the Swiss intervened on the Swiss franc in the entire meeting shifted in two minutes. Yeah. And for me, Tom, if it's about anything what the world is increasingly being driven by for the last ten years is central Bank policy and the importance of policy, and I think central Bank policy once again is going to be a big big issue for the Federal Reserve are they able to back away. Even if the US data is still good, whereas the left in all of this, the we're talking about raising interest rates twelve months ago. I can't find a single person that thinks the can hike writes this year, a big central Bank challenge in the mix too. I can remember John when there was. Discussion should we ban cell phones from Davos from the meetings of the World Economic Forum? And then there was a first year where a few people had cell phones. And all the CEO's are an uproar by the next year. The CEO's realized this was the future. Yeah. Everybody was glued to them. And by the third year, the CEO's were telling the World Economic Forum. This is a social media Centric event. And now the yoga had spice crew or attending the World Economic Forum town to what we should put put aside our phones, Tom we should free our minds, but our fans down at she wouldn't it be nice. If at this World Economic Forum they did fan smartphones. So everyone could take a mental break. Wouldn't that? Be nice. Would you enjoy that a mental break from connectivity to the rest of the world? No. I don't think. So I think you know, it is beautiful seriously, John when the snow starts falling. It's absolutely gorgeous. Yeah. This is in southeast Switzerland. Folks,.

World Economic Forum Tom Keene Davos John CEO United States Switzerland Steve Mnuchin bob prime minister Brexit Bloomberg Donald Trump Las Vegas Jonathan Ferrell France Tom Sean
"world economic forum" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Involves financial risk. Is not suitable for all investors. A new study says people across the globe should limit their intake of red meat and switch to a more plant based diet, which is better for humans. For the environment. Just one hamburger a week for eggs and seven servings of dairy the rest of the time people should be eating whole, grains, beans and vegetables. That's the recommendations from a panel of experts in nutrition agriculture and the environment who contributed to a report for the group eat, which is calling for a major food transformation by the year. Twenty fifty they say less meat will help improve people's health and the health of the planet by reducing greenhouse gases. That are linked to raising cattle. I'm Jacky Quin the company behind Snapchat is losing its second financial chief in less than a year as the social media service, confronts declining user base and stiff competition from bigger rivals. Breaking news and analysis at townhall dot com. Organizers of next week's annual gathering of business and political leaders in the Swiss ski resort of DeVos say worsening international relations are hindering efforts to resolve resolve global challenges in its annual global risks report the World Economic Forum says darkening economic outlook in part fostered by geopolitical tensions between the US and China looks to further reduce the potential for international cooperation in two thousand nineteen. The report also found that eighty eight percent of respondents expect a further erosion of global trading rules and agreements the report is based on the views of around a thousand experts and decision makers from around the world, that's correspondent Jeremy house with that report the trade spat between the US and China set to be a key point of discussion in Davos this year. Los Angeles, ticker teachers, going back out on the picket lines for another day. However, both sides agreed to meet at city hall today to.

US China Jacky Quin World Economic Forum Los Angeles Davos city hall Jeremy house Snapchat DeVos eighty eight percent
"world economic forum" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"An explosion struck near a patrol of the US led coalition in northern Syria than town of Manby killing in wounding more than a dozen people that Brits based Syrian observatory for human rights said several civilians were killed and several Milwaukee. We ended in the blast. There are reports that US troops were among the casualties. Techy? State. Run news agency said a number of US soldiers were injured in the blast. And that the US, but it tree evacuated soldiers by helicopter. These state group claimed responsibility for the blast saying one of its members carried out a suicide attack and detonated his best. With explosives reports have emerged saying that the blast occurred near a restaurant near the town's main markets. The attack comes as the US has begun the process of withdrawing from Syria. I'm Karen Thomas. January sixteenth nineteen Ninety-one. The White House announced the start of operation desert. Storm to drive Iraqi forces out of Kuwait allied forces prevailed on February twenty eighth breaking news and analysis at townhall dot com. Organizers of next week's annual gathering of business and political leaders in the Swiss ski resort of Davos, say worsening international relations are hindering efforts to resolve global challenges in annual global risks report the World Economic Forum says a darkening economic outlook in part fostered by geopolitical tensions between the US and China looks to further reduce the potential for international cooperation in two thousand nineteen. The report also found that eighty eight percent of respondents expect a further erosion of global trading rules and agreements the report is based on the views of around thousand experts and decision makers from around the world correspondent, Jeremy house reporting the trade spat between the US and China said to be key point of discussion in Davos this year, the company behind Snapchat, losing its second financial chief in less than a year is.

US Syria Davos Manby World Economic Forum Milwaukee Karen Thomas Kuwait Jeremy house White House China Snapchat eighty eight percent
"world economic forum" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Study says that robots will occupy most of today's jobs by what year its next on the move. Zuma. I look up in the rooms, man. Say again. Able to me. According to a study by the World Economic Forum.

Zuma World Economic Forum
"world economic forum" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And that's the point. You've got to ask yourself. The question is my portfolio filled with stocks designed for success in the twentieth century. Or does my portfolio also consist of stocks built for success in the twenty first century? I'm not suggesting it's all or nothing that you should be doing all of one, and none of the other. No by not at all by. Any stretch. But I am saying is you should have proper diversification. Your portfolio should have some exposure. I say you should have your portfolio for most people should have some exposure to exponential technologies. Now, whether you want to do that broadly with a highly diversified fund that invests in a wide array of technologies three D printing. Artificial intelligence nanotechnology biotechnology material science. Blockchain. I mean, you name it you can go with a fund that invests in a broad array of all of this stuff or you can say, you know, what I'm really interested in cybersecurity. I wanna pick an investment theme just on that. Or I want to focus on energy such as solar energy. Or I want to focus exclusively on payments, or I want to focus exclusively on water based technology, whatever you decide, but my point is you should decide because this stuff's not going away. The future is coming at a rapid pace. And that's what a lot of folks don't understand. And this not only applies to your investment strategy it applies to your career strategy. The World Economic Forum. Has just produced a massive report. That says at the moment machines are doing twenty nine percent of all the work in the world. Humans. Do the other seventy one percent. So it's roughly seventy thirty humans to machines. But in just four years it's going to go from seventy thirty. Two fifty eight forty two and by twenty twenty five according to the World Economic Forum, seventy five million jobs will be lost to machine learning and digital automation. Is your job at risk might your job become obsolete. As a I machine learning and robotics, improve their ability to do your job, faster, more, accurately and cheaper. But wait all's not lost. According to the World Economic Forum, although seventy five million jobs will be lost by twenty twenty five. A hundred and thirty-three million jobs will be created by twenty twenty five. In other words, it's not job loss that we're talking about its job disruption. We're talking about millions of Americans tens of millions will have to become retrained because the job.

World Economic Forum twenty twenty seventy one percent twenty nine percent four years
"world economic forum" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"And that's the point. You've got to ask yourself. The question is my portfolio filled with stocks designed for success in the twentieth century. Or does my portfolio also consist of stocks built for success in the twenty first century? I'm not suggesting it's all or nothing that you should be doing all of one, and none of the other. No, not at all by. Any stretch. But I am saying is you should have proper diversification. Your portfolio should have some exposure. I say you should have for your portfolio for most people should have some exposure to exponential technologies. Now, whether you want to do that broadly with a highly diversified fund that invests in a wide array of technologies three D printing. Artificial intelligence nanotechnology biotechnology material science. Blockchain. I mean, you name it you can go with a fund that invests in a broad array of all of this stuff or you can say, you know, what I'm really interested in cybersecurity. And I wanna pick an investment theme just on that. Or I want to focus on energy such as solar energy where I want to focus exclusively on payments, or I want to focus exclusively on water based technology, whatever you decide, but my point is you should decide because this does not going away. The future is coming at a rapid pace. And that's what a lot of folks don't understand. And this not only applies to your investment strategy it applies to your career strategy. The World Economic Forum. Has just produced a massive report. That says at the moment machines are doing twenty nine percent of all the work in the world. Humans. Do the other seventy one percent. So it's roughly seventy thirty humans to machines. But in just four years it's going to go from seventy thirty. Two fifty eight forty two and by twenty twenty five according to the World Economic Forum, seventy five million jobs will be lost to machine learning and digital automation. Is your job at risk might your job become obsolete as a machine learning and robotics improve their ability to do your job, faster, more, accurately and cheaper. But wait all's not lost. According to the World Economic Forum, although seventy five million jobs will be lost by twenty twenty five. A hundred and thirty-three million jobs will be created by twenty twenty five. In other words, it's not job loss that we're talking about its job disruption. We're talking about millions of Americans tens of millions will have to become retrained because the job.

World Economic Forum twenty twenty seventy one percent twenty nine percent four years
"world economic forum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"And that's the point. You've got to ask yourself. The question is my portfolio filled with stocks designed for success in the twentieth century. Or does my portfolio also consist of stocks Bill for success in the twenty first century? I'm not suggesting it's all or nothing that you should be doing all of one, and none of the other. No, not at all by. Any stretch. But I am saying is you should have proper diversification. Your portfolio should have some exposure. I say you should have your portfolio for most people should have some exposure to exponential technologies. Now, whether you want to do that broadly with a highly diversified fund that invests in a wide array of technologies three D printing. Artificial intelligence nanotechnology biotechnology material science. Blockchain. I mean, you name it you can go with a fund that invests in a broad array of all of this stuff or you can say, you know, what I'm really interested in cybersecurity. And I wanna pick an investment theme just on that. Or I want to focus on energy such a solar energy. Or I want to focus exclusively on payments, or I want to focus exclusively on water based technology, whatever you decide, but my point is you should decide because this does not going away. The future is coming at a rapid pace. And that's what a lot of folks don't understand. And this not only applies to your investment strategy it applies to your career strategy. The World Economic Forum. Has just produced a massive report. That says at the moment machines are doing twenty nine percent of all the work in the world. Humans. Do the other seventy one percent. So it's roughly seventy thirty humans to machines. But in just four years it's going to go from seventy thirty. Two fifty eight forty two and by twenty twenty five according to the World Economic Forum, seventy five million jobs will be lost to machine learning and digital automation is your job at risk might your job become obsolete as a machine learning and robotics improve their ability to do your job faster, more, accurately and cheaper. But wait all's not lost. According to the World Economic Forum, although seventy five million jobs will be lost by twenty twenty five. A hundred and thirty-three million jobs will be created by twenty twenty five. In other words, it's not job loss that we're talking about its job disruption. We're talking about millions of Americans tens of millions will have to become retrained because the job.

World Economic Forum twenty twenty seventy one percent twenty nine percent four years
"world economic forum" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"In this greatest nation on God's green earth a great day for the American economy. Not because of something the market is doing down back and forth. Okay. Fine. No a great day for the American economy because we are number one not just in terms of manufacturing. We are not just in terms of gross domestic product, we are. But number one in competitiveness for the first time in a very very long time. We will get to that story. There's also very good news just broke moments ago from the White House about fulfilling something that I had been pushing for for while on this show. And I'm very glad to see it. It's called across the board budget cut spending cut for every federal department that President Trump is apparently planning to demand and as president he can demand it starting tomorrow, and that is appropriate meanwhile, continued ramifications about this horrible murder in Turkey, and it appears pretty obvious that it was a murder is Trump responsible. That's what a lot of people on the left and in the media. Sometimes means the same thing are saying, plus we we really do need to go to some of the other. Media stories about media malfunctions, including an attempt to slime a great American just moments after he died, we will get to all of that on the Medved show. One eight hundred nine five seventeen seventy six is our phone number. First off this very positive story. And again, it's a story not based upon a conservative source. It's based upon the World Economic Forum. Which every year does a rating in terms of the most competitive countries in the world. And the US had not been doing badly compared to most other countries in the world, we've been fairly competitive, but we moved up very dramatically, and we are now number one. The story is it's covered in online. And the Wall Street Journal is US's world's most competitive economy for the first time in a decade. The last time we were the world's most competitive economy was two thousand and eight what is two thousand and eight have in common with a two thousand sixteen Republican presidents, and yes that does make a difference. When you have a pro business guy in charge. The US is back on top as the most competitive economy in the world regaining the number one spot for the first time since two thousand eight an index produced by the World Economic Forum, which said the country could still do better on social issues. Okay. America climbed one place in the rankings one hundred and forty countries with a top five rounded out by Singapore, number to Germany, number three, Switzerland, number four and Japan. Number five all five countries scores rose from two thousand seventeen with the US notching the second biggest gain after Japan's now all of this is good news. It is good news for us that Germany is more competitive that Switzerland is more competitive, particularly that Japan is more competitive. These are American allies. And I know Swiss Switzerland's supposed to be nonaligned neutral, it's effectively because of trade and economic matters. It's American ally. It's tied into the west. The top spot hasn't gone to the US since the financial crisis of two thousand and eight stalled output and triggered a global economic slowdown economic recovery is well underway with the global economy projected to grow almost four percent. In two thousand eighteen in two thousand and nineteen said the report that was published. Last night by the organization that produces the DeVos conference on global politics and economics. Okay. You may say, well, what does this have to do with my life, everything because a more competitive economy means more jobs? It means higher wages and means more prosperity. It means more freedom because frankly, if you have more options in terms of the jobs, you look for in the way that you are in your living in the way that you can invest whatever dollars you can save. If you have more choices that is the equivalent to more freedom. And then there's this President Trump actually just talked about this at a White House meeting. And this is what what President Trump meeting was just held. He announced an advance that he was going to make a demand from his cabinet secretaries. And here is what that demand sounded. Like just moments ago, I'm gonna ask each of you to come back with. A five percent budget cut from various departments. Whether it's a secretary and administrator whatever would ask everybody to.

Trump US World Economic Forum president Switzerland Japan White House Wall Street Journal Germany Swiss Switzerland murder Turkey Medved DeVos America secretary cabinet
"world economic forum" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:41 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Now, the data show on news ninety six point five WDBO said they in America where the president of the United States calls a woman horseface Donald Trump should be ashamed of himself. I don't care if you're on the right, the left or the centre. No man, should call a woman horseface, especially the president of the United States. I have two daughters. I think it's a disgrace. I don't care what your political persuasion is you should condemn it as well. Well, that's Michael avenue. The porn lawyer. He has a walking SNL Scott. He's a walking get. So I I mean, we could sit here and talk about whether or not the president should call someone horseface half of me is like that's not statesmanlike. We shouldn't do things like that. We need to fix ability for for crying out loud. People. Fake it till you make it come on. Let's pretend to like each other for crying out loud. We're stuck on this flying rock in space. Just tell me where the detriment is an American lives because he said horseface on Twitter, like our people now be able to put less food on the table making fewer dollars are there less jobs because like stop making hay out of things that really don't matter. That's I think that's the big lesson for a lot of these S GW's today. Yeah. I agree. I completely agree. I just I don't know. So I'm like, I'm like half and half. I think that half fake, you know, don't don't say that kind of stuff don't say it and then at the same. And then, you know, I think. Well, I mean, I don't know. Do we really have to go over all the names? I also has been called. Thank you. Because I mean, they called Malania. Well, I don't want to tell you what they call them. I can't say what they call Malania. I don't think that you should meet bad behavior with bad behavior. But I also stopped carrying a little while ago. I think I stopped caring when I was told that I was a racist because I believed in and not in the government, not running healthcare. And that's when I was like, yeah. I don't care about you any more. I'm done. That's when I turned. I had my full on conversion to read Forman Kane. I don't know if you're aware. That's when I completely became same people that are complaining about it at the same people that call him names and don't respect the presence. He's like they say, oh Trump's should respect the office of the presidency. But they clearly have not been doing that. They've either you lead, by example, or S T you. Yeah. I agree. So there we are. Let's see a couple of things here. Some very good things, by the way. Or concerns the economy? Now, we have him in pull up by two stories here for you. Because we've this is going to be an economic election. Also, just as much as it is. It's actually a just as much as it is a sort of like a Cavanaugh fat election. You know? So the two things I the World Economic Forum conducted a study, and they say the United States rinks closest to ideal state. But I thought that we were all supposed to be like Europe. Right. Wasn't didn't everyone? Didn't everyone wants to think that we're supposed to be like Sweden or something or Norway or something to that effect? So according to the World Economic Forum study of global rankings the United States leagues for the first time since the two thousand eight financial crisis under the new framework for competitiveness released Tuesday, the US achieve the closest to competitiveness frontier or ideal state with a score of eighty five point six Singapore had Eighty-three, okay? Germany had eighty to Switzerland had eighty two Japan had eighty two and they're talking about really economic freedom as well. And they the tools map competitiveness through a bunch of indicators. They look at infrastructure. They look at institutions the adoption of information communications technology macroeconomic stability, health, skills, product, labor, our product market labor market financial system market size business innovation etcetera, etcetera etcetera. All good things. Right. All great. And it's we are the most competitive economy for the first time in a decade. That's what this means. It is now the most competitive country in the world number one. The who the World Economic Forum. Did add a little caveat. They said, well, we could still do better on social issues, and you can kiss my double snakes because I think everything's just just the way it is people are free to do what they want. And if you don't like it mind your own business. I just don't understand why freedom is so hard to get for people. Like, the government does not have to socially be in your lives. And you don't have to do. People don't understand freedom people. There are people out there who are willing serfs. Yes. They don't understand freedom. They think that freedom means that the government guarantees your right to happiness, not your pursuit of happiness. Government doesn't even guarantee that you can pursue something that you all you want to. But there's no guarantee that you're going to be happy. You just have the freedom to pursue it. People think. Freedom means comfortableness, anything freedom means everything is perfect and nothing's wrong in my life. And I think that some some of these people I just don't think that they have an idea of what reality or freedom is freedom. Is you do what you wanna do? Someone else is going to do what they want to do. But died the idea that freedom that some of these individuals have is if someone else is doing something that I don't like the nets not freedom because they're not doing what I want because they don't believe how I think they should believe because they don't talk. How I want them to talk. They don't use the pronouns that I want them to us. They don't recognize the things that I recognize that's not freedom. That's that's that's oppression. That's tyranny, it's fascism. And I just so I really don't give a flying rats behind with the world. Thinks about our social issues is good on two fronts. This is good. Not only because as a competitor in the world, the United States is number one. But number two for all those globalist that want this global economy wannabe global, this this this is the World Economic Forum. Why don't play this represents? I just think that they really don't care who they are. But they just they just measure of the data. That's out there. They're the only organization on that level that does it. So my point is is that Mike scam. Even if you're a globalist. This is something good to look at. So you really have to hate Trump if you'd spent something negative out of this thing. Oh, yeah. I mean, I don't I don't get why people would would do that. But that's that's the thing that they say they talked. They warned about a brewing brewing trade war between the United States and China. They say there's still room for improvement. We're number one. If you ain't I your last shaking bake. So that goes on the best movies ever. We wanted to. We'd name our kids. Dr Quinn medicine woman. Amount. Do I can quote literally like watched that movie? And everybody's lines more entertaining than the news cycle. My Katie Couric anyway, so the aside from the little caveat that they had where they think well, we need to you know, aside from your social issues first off, we're doing great economically. I think we're pretty good on social issues as well. Their idea of had been free with social issues is government regulation of people's behavior beyond don't murder people. That's that's that's what they believe is freedom, which is completely the opposite. Sometimes I feel like the world is just one giant black mirror episode. You know what I mean? I.

United States World Economic Forum Donald Trump president WDBO Malania Twitter Scott Katie Couric Trump Europe Forman Kane America murder Dr Quinn medicine Germany Singapore Sweden
"world economic forum" Discussed on Business Scale Insights

Business Scale Insights

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Business Scale Insights

"Device. Come real close to your your radio. This is the, this is the problem. Listen to me. They're few and far between and they're few and far between because people just don't know. I fundamentally believe because if you know better, you do better healthy prosperous. Humane businesses give life to people and they give life to places. So this business scale insights episode and quite frankly, every single episode is all about promoting information and research, and interviews and resources about how to develop healthy. Spruce, humane businesses that give life to people and places. So part of all that is trying to get the word out on, you know, terms and vocabulary and concepts. Because like I said, this recurring theme of this show is if you don't know better, you can't do better if you don't know what scale is all about, you can't do, but if you don't know what high impact entrepreneurship is all about, you can't. You can't aim for that. You know, it's kinda like having blinders on thinking, you're going to get to a destination. If you don't know better, you seriously won't do better. And so in the past several episodes we've defined scale versus growth scale, is about multiplication growth is all about addition and high impact entrepreneurship and high end packed entrepreneurs really impact their communities and technology and hire people. They. Do things on a different dimension there beyond just kind of your mom and pop organization, but they are organizations that actually helped transform industries, and sometimes they can actually transform societies, but you don't get there by accident. You don't get there by accident. So there are four elements of high impact entrepreneurship that were detailed in a report by the World Economic Forum in twenty fourteen high impact. Entrepreneurs are definitely innovators. They are critical to the advancement of innovations and customer benefits. They may commercialize benefits of research and development and invent new business models or solve.

World Economic Forum
"world economic forum" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This is the bbc cities complete range of programmes bbcworldservicecom but would slash podcast welcome to the latest global news recorded at fourteen hours gmt on friday the twenty six of january i'm glamoc donal with a selection of highlights from across the bbc world service news today coming up president trump has told the world economic forum in davos that the world is witnessing the resurgence of a strong and prosperous america that will restore integrity to the international trading system i'm here to deliver a simple message there has never been a better time to hire to build to invest and grow in the united states america is open for business and we are competitive once again also in the podcast dozens of migrants have drowned off the coast of yemen in an overcrowded boat that capsized heading for africa china has announced ambitious plans to extend its influence into the arctic and later the mountaineering world pays tribute to the female chronicler of the himalayas i admire uh very knowledgeable and very shop person whom you everything about him online climbing the chest president trump has addressed the world economic forum in davos he told the meeting that he was there to represent the interests of the american people and to affirm washington's friendship and partnership in building a better world mr trump added that america first doesn't mean america alone over the past year we have made extraordinary strides in the us were lifted got forgotten communities creating exciting new opportunities and helping every american find their path to the american dream the dream of a great job a safe home and a better life for their children.

davos america yemen china washington mr trump american dream bbc president united states africa fourteen hours
"world economic forum" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"world economic forum" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This is the bbc cities complete range of programmes bbcworldservicecom but would slash podcast welcome to the latest global news recorded at fourteen hours gmt on friday the twenty six of january i'm glamoc donal with a selection of highlights from across the bbc world service news today coming up president trump has told the world economic forum in davos that the world is witnessing the resurgence of a strong and prosperous america that will restore integrity to the international trading system i'm here to deliver a simple message there has never been a better time to hire to build to invest and grow in the united states america is open for business and we are competitive once again also in the podcast dozens of migrants have drowned off the coast of yemen in an overcrowded boat that capsized heading for africa china has announced ambitious plans to extend its influence into the arctic and later the mountaineering world pays tribute to the female chronicler of the himalayas i admire uh very knowledgeable and very shop person whom you everything about him online climbing the chest president trump has addressed the world economic forum in davos he told the meeting that he was there to represent the interests of the american people and to affirm washington's friendship and partnership in building a better world mr trump added that america first doesn't mean america alone over the past year we have made extraordinary strides in the us were lifted got forgotten communities creating exciting new opportunities and helping every american find their path to the american dream the dream of a great job a safe home and a better life for their children.

davos america yemen china washington mr trump american dream bbc president united states africa fourteen hours