36 Burst results for "World Bank"

Fresh update on "world bank" discussed on Bible Prophecy 4 Today's Podcast

Bible Prophecy 4 Today's Podcast

01:45 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "world bank" discussed on Bible Prophecy 4 Today's Podcast

"But all this stuff read romans one read romans one and you will look at the united states and you will look at the world he said. Oh my gosh. The bible said it and you'll see it. I'm telling you scenario the article continues and says says the seed ideas says the seed ideas. Virginia twenty thirty began with president. Woodrow wilson league of nations in his fourteen points. At the end of more woman a community of nations could up bring pressure for peace in the world in the treaty for long treaty orleans system could not dukes at show mother. I will war while this idea. Dacoven europe another country it was unable to gain sufficient traction the us as it met with republican resistance in the us senate on the grounds that it would lead to a dilution of the us sovereignty. Of course it would so says with bitter twenty twenty dollars at all right thanking persons can see that would roll since first giants detrick. Globalism was rightly rejected. The league with complete failure in terms of bringing peace to the world to the german nazi government. Lee was joke of the japanese. The league after their invasion of china was repudiated yet. Republicans sway over. Us governments became diminished by the ford. Tom elation franklin roosevelt as president united states in the the democrat party for twenty years from nineteen thirty three to nineteen fifty-three three after world war two union was conceived of as having duties and functions of the league did not have the you in with sustainable in real ways with establishment of the international monetary fund. Which is the i m f to strengthen kersey's worldwide in the world bank world bank folks to finance in endorsed ask construction project these institutions would together foster peace end quote community In our fragmented world whispers of it or of the it takes a village. Cliche of that would take decades later after all. It is not true that property is ultimately because of conflict in our world so really is not true. Genuine goes on yes the. Us and the other illogical Throughout the west any other parts of the world bought into the marxist idea that world whoa sorry that wars are caused by fierce competition for scarce resources so it goes on talk about all that good stuff in brings up to the talk. All this up brings us up to the agenda. Twenty thirty this agenda put forward a plan for a new soft world government by year. Twenty thirty it was a plan of avignon illsley. But you ain't on the twenty fifth fifteen in his nine hundred sections..

Woodrow Wilson League Of Natio United States German Nazi Government Tom Elation Franklin Roosevelt Orleans Virginia Democrat Party Senate Europe Kersey International Monetary Fund LEE Ford China Illsley
'You Will Be Assimilated' Author David Goldman on China's Contempt for the U.S.

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:44 min | 5 d ago

'You Will Be Assimilated' Author David Goldman on China's Contempt for the U.S.

"China is not an enemy. And I think that's important for people to clearly understand. China is a rising power, China has been a rising power since Deng Xiaoping in 79. And they are going to develop themselves in our developing themselves into a great power. That is not to say, however, that they are an enemy. They're not an enemy. They're just a great power. That's according to the chairman of the joint chiefs when he was speaking in his private capacity as chief of staff of the army. The NATO summit, maybe that explains a lot about Mark Billy. We'll discuss the realities of what China thinks they are to us and how they're eating our lunch with the man that we always rely upon to tell us about the geo strategic reality in Asia and in Beijing. He's the author of a fabulous work you must check out right now. It's you will be assimilated. China's plan to Sino form the world. David Goldman. Welcome to one on one. A sub gorka it is an honor and privilege to spend fine with you, sir. Thanks for the invitation. I just realized I'm looking at the cover of your book that the Chinese dragon has a pair of iPhone ear pods in. That's a very nice little touch there. I missed in the past. David, we'll talk about Millie. We'll talk about the truth of China Beijing. Xi Jinping and everything else. But first, I have to ask you. The imagery of these super cargo ships off the port of LA, the president of the United States saying, oh, no, don't worry about it. And then Jen Psaki saying, oh, that's a high class issue. People having the Christmas present. So that's, you know, the pipes don't worry about that. Let me ask you, let's think like the Chinese Communist Party for a moment. What does China think of the fact that America can't unload its cargo ships? The Chinese have contempt for us. They think they can take us. We just published an a four times an excerpt from a book by Chinese economist used to be the chief economist of the World Bank Chicago university PhD. Who says, look at history. Look at the United States versus England at the end of the 19th century. The English were lazy complacent and the United States come from behind, took them out and ate their lunch. That's exactly what we're going to do to the United States now. We've got the people. We've got the supply chains. We've got the technology. We've got the will to do it. America's lazy and feckless and their right for the

China Mark Billy Deng Xiaoping Joint Chiefs Beijing David Goldman Jen Psaki Nato Xi Jinping Chinese Communist Party America Army Millie Asia World Bank Chicago University David LA England
Report: Climate Change Could Move 200 Million People by 2050

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Report: Climate Change Could Move 200 Million People by 2050

"New research from of the World Bank warns climate change may lead to major movements of people the study by the nonprofit ground swell for the World Bank finds climate change could push more than two hundred million people to leave their homes in the next three decades increased migration hot spots unless urgent action is taken to use global emissions I'm bridge the development gap the research also examines how the impacts of slow onset climate change such as water scarcity decreasing crop productivity and rising sea levels could lead to millions of what the report describes as climate migrants by twenty fifty I'm Charles collect as mom

World Bank Charles
Water Strategy and Future Thinking

Future Cities Africa

01:16 min | 4 months ago

Water Strategy and Future Thinking

"Michael waste is executive director for water and waste at the city of cape town will be discussing. The city's water strategy. They thinking and future plans but before we get into that mike. Welcome give us a briefing action to your role and background. Thanks a lot dan. it's great to be with you when free said he's africa. This is the topic. I care a lot about something. That i've with unprofessionally for most of my career i'm currently executive director and water and waste for city of town and i've had that johnson's December the twenty one thousand nine hundred prior to that. I was director warren sanitation. This makes me accountable. The which and sanitation department is whether the southern waste department in the city. It's a big department. We've got four million customers of cape capetown. Twenty thousand kilometers of pipeline of the four thousand stores seven ran budget a prior to this position. I worked for the world bank for sixteen years in Eastern europe saab asia. Africa have twenty five years experience in the sector But originally a civil engineer from uc team with a postgraduate qualifications from left brand the uk and princeton university. And the us.

Michael Waste Cape Town Cape Capetown Mike Africa Johnson Eastern Europe Asia UC Princeton University UK United States
"world bank" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:27 min | 4 months ago

"world bank" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is supported by personal capital. Who can help you take control of your finances no matter where you are. Download the personal capital app or start today at personal capital dot com to get free professional grade financial tools including a retirement. Planner and fi analyzer. Want to talk. Personal capital has registered advisers by phone or online for qualified users personal capital. There's no place like financial confidence. Is it wrong. Sometimes retail spaces are important to us and we miss them. When they're gone today's listener. Contribution for are vanishing america series comes from beatrice hog of west sacramento california a thrift store. What am i famous stores. They closed down last year. Was fresh store called thrift. How it was just a cool place to go. I've never found anywhere that has the same ambience and the same friendliness as thrift town. Has i probably shop at thrift town. Since the mid nineties there were three thrift towns in the sacramento area. At that time. I lived near the el camino store. Which is the store that was featured in the movie lady bird. That particular thrift town was about the size of a supermarket and they had a lot of close. They had shoes jewelry furniture. This a lot of different things i mean. You never knew what you've gotta find their. I would spend hours there sometimes. I would just go. They're not even intending to buy anything. But just to look around. And i own a t shirt that had the name of a musician on it. They mena keti whose guitarist and singer for the band. Wi t knew. I was going to see why thiessen so i bought the t shirt when i went to the show and i got a chance to meet dave medicaid. He was very impressed. I got a picture taken with him. And i sent it to thrift town and i won the find of the week and they published by picture under a thrift website. I really miss that store. They decided on june eleven that they were reopened after stores closed down for the pandemic and i was just heartbroken has certain friends that we would meet their spend a few hours at thrift town to lunch. It was a way to go shopping and not spend a lot of money but it was a way to to socialize. I mean i got to know some of the people that work there and it just had like a family atmosphere. But i have so many things that have that thrift store tags still on them and it just makes me really happy that i was able to be a shopper. There for so long. And it just makes me sad that the stores are no longer in california listener beatrice hog of west sacramento thrift. Still has a few stores left. You're in there but no plans to reopen. Its california shops. Do you have a feature of the american economic landscape. That was important to you. But no more i want to hear from you. Email us at morning report at marketplace dot. Org morning report at symbol marketplace. I'm david brancaccio with the morning. Report from apm american public media molly would host of marketplace tech a show that helps you understand the digital economy. How a more of the country get access to better internet. What new jobs will official intelligence create or destroy and what tools will help us. Survive are already changing climate. We tell the stories behind the technology in our lives and every weekday. Our podcast brings you insight. You won't hear on the radio checkout marketplace tech. Wherever you get your podcasts..

david brancaccio sacramento last year california today june eleven mid nineties el camino store west sacramento beatrice hog personal capital app west sacramento california marketplace dot. Org apm personal capital dot com three thrift towns thrift town america lady bird dave
World Bank Sees 5.6% Global Growth in 2021, Best Since 1973

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:17 sec | 4 months ago

World Bank Sees 5.6% Global Growth in 2021, Best Since 1973

"He's the strongest rebound in 80 years, The bank says emerging market and developing nations will continue to struggle with the Covid 19 pandemic and its aftermath. Even as a few major economies for the strongest post recession global growth in 80 years,

Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

Can We Talk?

01:58 min | 5 months ago

Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

"Judy. Human is a legend in the disability rights movement. The fruits of her labor everywhere. Sidewalk curb cuts accessible public transportation. Equal access to public services from fighting for the right to live in her college dorm. To leading major initiatives at the world bank and state department. Judy has been a lifelong activist. Her activism often includes telling her own story her book is called being human an unrepentant memoir of disability rights activist. Judy was born in brooklyn in nineteen forty seven. She got polio when she was eighteen months old and it left her. Unable to walk we spoke over zoom about her activism. In her early years growing up in a world she had to fight to be included in. She started telling me about the time when she first realized that people saw her differently. It was an incident that happened. When i was about eight years old in my neighborhood and at that point when no motorized wheelchair so that's why people were having to push me and my next door neighbor arlene and i were going to the store to the candy store and on our way to the candy store some boy came over and asked me if i was sick and that incident really made me feel quite undressed in as much as i really had not seen myself until that moment as being consciously different from other people and the word that this boy used with me was are you sick and so the use of the word sick still today And now we're talking sixty. Some years later is still. I think a prominent where that people think about and use his

World Bank And State Departmen Judy Polio Brooklyn Arlene
How the COVID-19 Pandemic Will Impact the Future Of Work

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

How the COVID-19 Pandemic Will Impact the Future Of Work

"Of the Federal Reserve says the U. S economy is headed for a strong recovery post pandemic, but Jerome Powell warns people won't find the same labor conditions as businesses embrace new ways for employees to work. They've spent a lot of time since the pandemic arrived, looking at ways to have more effective technology and perhaps fewer people. So you're going to see some of that in these public facing job so There will be millions of people who have a hard time finding their way back into the workforce and recovering the lives that they had just a year ago. PAL spoke yesterday to the International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

Jerome Powell Federal Reserve U. International Monetary Fund An
Fed's Powell: US Nears Full Reopening to 'Different Economy'

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Fed's Powell: US Nears Full Reopening to 'Different Economy'

"Federal reserve chair Jerome Powell says the U. S. economy is heading for a strong recovery but not for everybody we're not going back to the same economy this will be a different economy Powell says some industries will likely be smaller than before the pandemic in other cases employers have spent the pandemic finding ways to use technology instead of workers wherever they can there will be millions of people who have a hard time finding their way back into the work force and recovering the lives that they had just a year ago in remarks to the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Powell said the piece of virus vaccinations am signs of rapid hiring or putting the US on track to allow for a full re opening of the economy fairly soon Sager macaroni Washington

Jerome Powell Federal Reserve Powell U. International Monetary Fund World Bank Sager Macaroni United States Washington
U.S. Begins Indirect Talks With Iran on Reentering Nuclear Deal

Forum

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

U.S. Begins Indirect Talks With Iran on Reentering Nuclear Deal

"To try to revive the 2015 Iran nuclear deal which lifted sanctions on Tehran in return for limits on its nuclear activities. Jeremy Bowen has the details. There's strong evidence that the original deal in 2015 stopped to steady slide towards a war over Iran's nuclear plans. But the deal known as the J C P O A has bean in intensive care since President Trump pulled the US out of it in 2018. Iran insists it does not want nuclear weapons. Now the U. S. And Iran both want to revive the deal. They need to find a way for the Americans to live Trump sanctions. On for the Iranians to return to agreed limits on the enrichment of uranium, which can be used to make a bomb. Iran says it won't meet the Americans face to face until that happens. Report by the World Bank has

Iran Jeremy Bowen President Trump Tehran U. United States World Bank
Janet Yellen Calls for Minimum Global Corporate Income Tax

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:58 sec | 7 months ago

Janet Yellen Calls for Minimum Global Corporate Income Tax

"We heard from Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen today and she called for a global minimum corporate tax rate. She laid out a new multilateral approach in virtual remarks to the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. President fighters proposals announced last week called Bull domestic Action, including to raise three US minimum tax rate and renewed international engagement. We're working with G 20 nations to agree to a global minimum corporate tax rate that can stop the race to the bottom. Now. At the same time, Yellen singled out China, saying the U. S needs a strong presence in global markets to level the playing field, yelling by the way, is participating at her first I M F and World Bank meetings as U. S Treasury secretary. These meetings, by the way, will focus on climate change. And helping to boost I f I m F resources to help poor nations cope with covert

Janet Yellen Chicago Council On Global Affa Yellen Treasury United States China World Bank U.
How vaccine inequality is endangering the world

BBC World Service

05:23 min | 8 months ago

How vaccine inequality is endangering the world

"With that anniversary one year ago today when the World Health Organization officially declared the covert 19 outbreak, a worldwide pandemic when a year on and 2.6 million people have died worldwide, and the economy is in tatters. There is also hope, because Kobe vaccination drives under way more than 100 countries with more than 300 million doses of ministered, but who gets vaccinated, for example, there around 80 million refugees, asylum seekers and displaced people worldwide. Will they be included in vaccination plans where they live? Filippo Grandi is the U. N High Commissioner for Refugees and his current in Uganda. When I spoke to him, he started by telling me what impact the pandemic and lockdowns have had on refugees. Where I think the impact is severe and will be even more severe is more on the economic side and in lockdowns, which prevail all over the world. We've seen an escalation off poverty if you wish in refugee and displaced community all over the world from Lebanon, Toe black in America, the Venezuelans toe Afghans in South Asia and so forth, So this is really the key challenge that we have to face now. We know that the key to getting out of the pandemic. His vaccination aren't refugees at the end of the list of people who are going to get vaccinated or too often, well, that was very much our concern, especially refugees. Refugees are not nationals off the country's they're in, and we were worried that because of that they would be marginalized. You know, there's been some good developments. I am in Uganda is speaking to you from Kampala and here, for example, today the vaccination begins. I was with the acting prime minister this morning He was going to be vaccinated and he was keen to tell me refugees will be included. There's no question about that. You can the host 1.5 million refugees. Almost the pandemic has the underlying the inequalities that disparities Throughout the world on one of those is that the richer Western countries of vaccinating at a much higher rate than poorer countries, and yet so many of the world's refugees, Aaron places Like where you are right now, you can do that slower roll out in places like Uganda is undoubtedly going to effect refugees, isn't it? You're absolutely right. George. Vaccination programs have to exist and to be rolled out to include refugees, and this is where really the enormous inequality of the international system has appeared. Very carries. The tent of March is the first day that you can to a nation of more than 40 Million people is receiving its first vaccine when in rich countries. This has been going on for several months. So this inequality is blatant. This needs to be corrected. We are active as an organization in those initiatives that aimed at securing a minimum amount of doses. For poor countries and our role there is to ensure that some of those does is go to the refugees as well. But frankly speaking, that effort is not enough to correct that huge imbalance which is really short sighted. It's not only wrong, it's shortsighted. It's a bit like refugees and nationals in the country if people in poor countries do not get vaccination. This is a global issue. It will backfire everywhere else so then more vaccines and needed and more needs to be done to deal with, as you say, the social impact of the pandemic on Refugees in particular. He's a difficult questions, and there aren't presumably easy solutions to them. But what are a couple of things that could should be done to make progress in this sense from the very beginning off the pandemic? I've reached out personally to the leadership of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. These institutions have led The establishment off economic rescue packages for countries impacted by Corbett and lockdowns, and my message to them has bean first of all to accelerate. The disbursement of those packages so that this country's are more protected, but also to ensure that vulnerable groups are included actually are considered as a factor to increase those packages. In other words, take Uganda again. Uganda is negotiating. If I understand with the I m F one such package and the message that I will pass through the eye, meth and other similar institutions is remembered. Uganda has what 40 45 million people. It's national population. It has almost 1.5 million refugees. These needs to be factored in, especially in countries like you can that that are very inclusive that include refugees in education programs in health programs that extend to them efforts to create livelihoods. This additional burden that these countries have needs to be considered when this economic packages are rolled out. This is not always the case. Look at Lebanon, for example, where one in four people is a refugee. This huge political tension in Lebanon over this refugee issue. I'm very worried that rescue packages being rolled out and Lebanon has many challenges may not include refugees, and this would be catastrophic for this huge, vulnerable population in that particular country, And this example is valid in other countries as well. So yes, More complex, I would say even then the vaccination inclusion.

Uganda Filippo Grandi World Health Organization Lebanon Kobe South Asia U. Kampala Aaron America George International Monetary Fund Corbett World Bank
Okonjo-Iweala begins first historic day as WTO director-general

The World

01:36 min | 8 months ago

Okonjo-Iweala begins first historic day as WTO director-general

"A lot of work to do. So I feel ready to go motivating words today from the new head of the World Trade Organization, the arrival of an go Z or condo, a whale A and a six month leadership void at the W T o International body based in Geneva, governs trade rules between countries. Okonjo you wail. His candidacy had been held up by the Trump White House on her first day. She's making history as the first woman and first African to serve as w. T O director general absolutely do feel on additional burden. I can't lie about that being the first woman and the first African means that one really has to perform. That was a con job away. The last month. She's a Harvard grad on economist and dual citizen of the U. S. And Nigeria with a 30 year career in international development, including Time is managing director at the World Bank. Biden administration announced its strong support for a condo you, Ella. Still, there was controversy. Senior African leaders of the United Nations recently complained about what they called racist and sexist media coverage of her appointment. For her part to conjure you. Ella has said that she remains focused on making the changes needed at the W T O. It's led to me that deep and wide ranging reforms are needed. And as I said, before, you cannot be business, as usual at the W. T O in her first speech is head of the W T o today and go Z and conjure you. Ella reiterated that point she said she can on Lee deliver results if members except that we can do things differently. Most urgent priority, she said, or to address the impact of the cove in 19 pandemic and climate change

Okonjo Trump White House World Trade Organization Biden Administration Geneva U. Harvard Nigeria World Bank Ella United Nations LEE
World Bank threatens to suspend vaccine funding to Lebanon

Not Too Shabby

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

World Bank threatens to suspend vaccine funding to Lebanon

"Corona virus vaccines in Lebanon over what it said were violations by members of parliament of the Agreed vaccination campaign. Lawmakers were vaccinated in parliament. Without the approval of the officials running the campaign, the World Bank's regional director said. Everyone had to register for the vaccine and wait their turn. Electoral Commission. Indonesia's

Lebanon Parliament World Bank Electoral Commission Indonesia
Escape from Warsaws Ghetto: Memories of a Child Witness

UN News

05:21 min | 8 months ago

Escape from Warsaws Ghetto: Memories of a Child Witness

"Halina wallow and her parents. I've safely on the shores of south america in nineteen forty eight as jewish refugees from their native poland. The month long voyage by boat from italy's port of genoa was but one stretch of a lengthy journey from surviving. The warsaw ghetto to eventual immigration to peru just a toddler when the nazis stormed her. Family's confining living quarters in the warsaw ghetto halina says the smell of fabric left lingering reminder of the lifesaving moment. Her grandfather hid her between textile goods as women and children were piled into german trucks and taken to death camps following her grandparents deportation. Her father organized a successful escape from the ghetto. One of many times their fate would be defined in an instant speaking to us from her home in capital city. Lima halina explains how her family's escape from persecution. To safety was helped by demonstrations of humanity by the unsung heroes of the holocaust non-jewish europeans and other rescuers who risk their lives to protect juice eighty four years. Old halina says fulfilling. Her purpose of survivor means telling her story. This interview was conducted in spanish and has been translated seeing but saw via. I was born in warsaw poland in the year. Nineteen thirty six. My full name is kalina stein and then all once. I was mary it. If you could briefly describe your first years in poland. What was your childhood. Like your comment you. Well i practically didn't have a childhood. Unfortunately because we was for years old the second world war started the nicest took my parents apartment. Ally grandparents bernie. I'm buddha's in the. Because i was on. I was four or five years. What i can tell you is what my pardons told me on allie. He's have eat the ones who saved my life winds. There was a moment when your grandfather hid you correct. Could you tell us about that moment. They won't sign us. My grandfather produced jackets and coats beginning several years before arriving to the ghetto. And that's had a lot of five hundred in addict so the day. The nasty came in their tracks. You realize day came to take all the world bank and children that will work with sewing machines so my grandfather grabbed me shall between the fabric material. Seen these were how he saved me so the german square taken these life. Mama one do you remember. You felt in that moment. Lord i remember by this mellow no. That is most often make us remember. Even now at age eighty four and just short eighty four. Every time i go into a fiery shop. I remembered the mommy it's part of my life say i will never forget. Of course life in the ghetto was very hard. They had asked without food without medicine and they were know how to work for a very very har life in nineteen forty two businesses. Took my grandparents on my uncle rev linka after the after my father decided to organize escape from the ghetto. And we did so. He taught us to pray. The lord's prayer in portage is big perfect polish until today. We keeping to deny as christians. Luckily my father had a lot of non june's france in the area and part of our so. He arranged to have each of fast leaving in three seventy one jewish homes while for my mom. Another for my father another for me. I was taking get off by a friend of my father's a good woman who told me read that right. I was with her until nineteen forty five when the war ended in neon depose. Where order to tourney eighty jew. There was so my party squid and visit me much. They bissett me the one able to mind. This is how we save ourselves.

Halina Wallow Poland Halina Lima Halina Old Halina Kalina Stein Genoa South America Peru Capital City German Square Italy Warsaw Allie Bernie Ally Rev Linka Portage France Bissett
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 9 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:57 min | 9 months ago

South Africa halts AstraZeneca vaccine rollout

"South africa has halted its rollout of the oxford astrazeneca vaccine just a week after the country received. Its first million doses. It seems the vaccine offers limited protection against a new variant of the corona virus. That's now dominant in the country. Salim abdul karim co-chair of south africa's ministerial advisory committee on covid nineteen spoke to a world health organization briefing yesterday. We don't want to end up with a situation where we vaccinated million people too. Many people would have vaccine that may not be effective in preventing hospitalization and severe disease in total more than one point. Two billion corona virus doses have been allocated for the continent. But it's not clear when all those jobs will arrive. The longer any region remains unvaccinated. The greater the chance that more variants arise vaccines though can be tweaked in a formulation of the oxford vaccine targeted at the south african variant could be going into arms by autumn. What scientists cannot address is the long run damage to africa both in human and economic terms so far continent to have been spared from the worst case scenarios predicted early on in the pandemic but the longer term picture remains bleak many ways the impact of the pandemic and africa is worse than it appears on the surface around the official numbers. Kenley salmon is one of our africa correspondent based in dakar. It is the case that having a young population has to some extent protected the continent from the virus africans and died from it that americans europeans but the true scott of infection. Death is really hard to gauge. Studying sudan recently showed the perhaps only two percent of all the covid desk for a quoted in the official tally and the economic impact is worse than it looks last year. The region's economy shrank for the first time. In twenty five years tourism has been badly hit as have commodity exporters things like oil in nigeria and taken together. Gdp per capita fell below twenty ten levels last year so things are perhaps not quite as bad as some other parts the world but certainly still very tough and things may get tougher house. What are the particular challenges to africa. Africa faces quite a number of challenges in the next few years as it tries to recover from the pandemic but the biggest i of the really is vaccines. Some african governments have perhaps failed to grasp the urgency of the situation in tanzania for example the populace president john food even casually cast out with a vaccine work but i do forgive aside claiming the postman precautions such as steaming nation were better than vaccines and even added that if the white man was able to come up with next nations then. Vaccinations for aids. Malaria and cancer would have already been found. So it's not so much a question than of supply. I mean given that quite a few vaccines have been essentially booked at the stage. A number of vaccines have been booked but the big question is when will they arrive because right now there aren't anywhere near the number of axes required forever on in the world and rich countries are of course the front of the queue for those vaccines have been produced africa's going to need perhaps two point six billion doses to vaccinate everyone and those are not being made locally so they have to rely on supplies elsewhere for the moment so that means joining the queue. All this means that whereas rich countries aim to vaccinate most of their people by the middle of this year the african. cdc a public health. Bali in africa's aiming for sixty percent of africans to vaccinated by the end of next year. But even that may be too optimistic. For the poorest countries. The economist intelligence unit sister organization estimates that in most african countries most people will not be inoculated until mid twenty twenty three or even early twenty twenty four and there must be serious consequences of it being that long until the continent is on average vaccinated. Africa is likely. It doesn't get those vaccinations into suffer. Further waves of the infection while after the disease may have amped in the rich world. And that of course will cause more death and more suffering. Doesn't risk that. Having the virus transmitting between people frequently africa could allow new variance to evolve. We've already got the south. African variant and these new variants could endanger people even in rich countries if they prove to be resistant to vaccines and then finally of course not having vaccines could force. African policymakers to continue with these very difficult economic lockdowns curfews even after many other countries around the world set free of those kinds of restrictions and if the public health concern lasts that long then surely the economic concerns will last at least that long. That's right in many african countries facing pretty severe crises at the moment just getting finance to pay their bills. Africa has very limited fiscal space on average countries in sub saharan africa. Spending more than thirty cents on every dollar. They raise and text revenue paying their debts. And that's up from twenty cents on the dollar before the pandemic on the debt side to over half of low income sub saharan african countries are now classed as in distress or at high risk of distress. According to the imf and what about countries with bigger economies the two biggest economies in africa nigeria and south ever both in pretty deep trouble nigeria for example was described by the world. Bank is being an unprecedented crisis. Recently the bank is not normally quite so blunt in nigeria. There has been a legacy of management for a number of years and pandemics really accessible that quite badly. Now focused suggested by twenty twenty three. Gdp per capita may go back as low as it was in one thousand nine hundred eighty time when the oil price was some high on so africa too is in trouble that have been in recession twice in the last three years before the pandemic hit of course now is dribbling itself with a particularly heavy toll from the pandemic so both countries in fact are facing a difficult road out of the crisis. And what about outside help in terms of financing has been quite a bit of outside help although the crisis of course is very big but in twenty twenty the imf for example provided sixteen billion dollars in loans most of that came with relatively few strings attached and this help frigging countries to respond to the pandemic to avoid some of the liquidity crises that were looming the world bank also dispersed another ten billion but many countries got that funding to if the imf under emergency allocations that came quickly and relatively easily and those allocations for many countries will soon be exhausted. The rich world has been trying to help when it comes to debt. They've provided liquidity to countries through some bits of suspension initiative that basically allows poor countries to put off debt repayments until july. Twenty twenty one. This is of course helpful but the trouble is that those payments just suspended and they have to be paid back with interest in about five years time so as the chief economist for africa the world bank put it to us. It may just be kicking the can down the road to. How do you see this playing out. Then how high could the human cost of all this be while the stakes are pretty high. The pandemic has already done lower damage to people's health and africa. it's hitting their economic prospects and they wealth and it's also affecting education of course. Hundreds of millions of students in africa have been affected by school closures. This increases the risk of dropouts and reduces the prospects for africa's largest every generation so overall the costs here really quite significant. There are some reasons for optimism. We may see vaccine rollouts accelerate. There's also hopes that commodity price rises could give africa real boost as the global economy recovers been on balance. The evidence probably points to at pretty difficult road ahead with several more waves of the virus hitting already struggling health systems and perhaps a form of economic long covert in africa. So you know africans have come through this showing remarkable resilience but it may be toughest years are still to come in. Thank you very much for joining us. thank you

Africa Salim Abdul Karim Co Ministerial Advisory Committee Kenley Salmon Nigeria Oxford South Africa John Food Astrazeneca Dakar Saharan Africa IMF Sudan Tanzania Malaria CDC
Sudan says it signs pact on normalizing ties with Israel

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Sudan says it signs pact on normalizing ties with Israel

"Sudan has formally signed what are known as the abraham accords to normalize ties with israel treasury secretary steven mnuchin was on hand for the event. Npr's michelle kellerman has details. The trump administration has been encouraging arab states to normalize ties with israel in exchange for separate deals with the us in sudan's case the us remove the african nation from the state sponsors of terrorism list in order to ease sanctions after sudan agreed to compensate victims of several terrorist attacks in africa. Mnuchin also says he signed a deal to provide a loan to sudan to help it clear about one point two billion dollars in arrears to the world bank that could provide much-needed international help four sudan which had been a pariah state during omar shears thirty year role. He was ousted in twenty. Nineteen michelle kellerman. Npr news

Sudan Steven Mnuchin Michelle Kellerman Israel Mnuchin Abraham NPR Treasury United States Africa Omar Shears Npr News
‘Conflict trap’ a growing obstacle to sustainable development - UN chief

UN News

01:11 min | 10 months ago

‘Conflict trap’ a growing obstacle to sustainable development - UN chief

"Greater international efforts unneeded to help countries breakout a conflict trap. That's holding back their development. The un secretary general told the security council on wednesday in a discussion on maintaining peace and security in fragile context. Antonio guitarist warned that conflicts have become more complex fueled by greater regionalization as well as by increasing numbers of non state armed groups with links to crime and terrorism misty guitarist cited world bank data indicating that one in five people in the middle east and africa lives in close proximity to a major conflict and that needs have reached their highest level since the second world war and it was no coincidence that of the fifteen countries susceptible to climate risks eight host a united nations peacekeeping operation or special political mission. The un chief said from the hell and central africa to the horn of africa itself. Mr guitarist noted that changes in rainfall had disrupted cattle herding patterns leading to recurring clashes between communities across national borders to break this cycle of poverty and conflict the secretary general called for more targeted and tailored investments to building and sustaining peace

Antonio Guitarist UN Security Council Africa Mr Guitarist Middle East
Moldova's Pro-EU President Sandu Sworn In

Fresh Air

00:53 sec | 10 months ago

Moldova's Pro-EU President Sandu Sworn In

"Of Moldova has inaugurated its first female president, NPR's Lucy and Kim. Reports. The Harvard graduate and former World Bank economist is pledging to forge closer ties to the European Union against Russia's wishes. Maya Sandu took the presidential oath of office in the Moldovan capital, Kishan now sure. Sendero? Yes, Sunder one in November runoff election against the incumbent, Igor Dough done who made dozens of trips to Moscow during his term in office. Moldova is ethnically linked to its neighbor Romania and NATO and U member. We also maintains close ties to Russia. Sandu has called for Russian troops based in a separatist region of Moldova to go home and wants better relations with the EU and United States. Lucian Kim.

Moldova Maya Sandu Kishan Igor Dough NPR Lucy World Bank Harvard Sunder KIM Russia EU Sandu Moscow Romania Nato United States Lucian Kim
"world bank" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:07 min | 2 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Children with little support in with the World Bank calls the poorest country in this hemisphere doctor Susan Bartels of queen's university in Kingston Ontario co author of the report and join just now October tells thanks so much for being with us thanks for having me do you know the numbers the purpose of our research wasn't to actually count the numbers of children fathered by peacekeepers but rather together perspectives of local community members about how women and girls in the community interacted with peacekeepers we have two hundred and sixty five near dense that happened to be about children fathered by peacekeepers we did not ask about sexual relations and you didn't ask for stories about children born as a result of sexual relations the two hundred and sixty five that you mentioned that this this came out of interviews with twenty five hundred Haitians correct there were a larger number of stories certainly about sexual interactions some more consensual with adults you should read them some were clearly violent traits many were transactional sacks and their sexual exploitation so there were many more stories about sex between peacekeepers and abuse of power let me understand this these are root for the most part we're talking about children who have been abandoned by the men who were responsible correct it seems from the data that we collected the when the pregnancy became recognized in almost all cases the U. N.'s response was to repatriate the implicated soldier and from the perspective of the women and girls who were affected and of their family members and community members this really seem to be to their detriment because they were no longer able to be in touch with the father of the child there were no longer able to access a port and to be clear when you say repatriation means and send it back exactly send them back to their home country which is also hugely problematic from the sense that justice in the case of crimes cannot be achieved after repatriation what else did you report fine I report really highlighted how the extensive and pervasive poverty in Haiti contributes to many of the interactions between local women and girls and peacekeepers so these are women and girls who are trying to meet their basic survival needs or trying to pay school fees and so with that very poverty that leads them to engage in transactional sex in the cases of those women and girls who then can see children poverty is exacerbate it because they're blessed with the financial demands of raising a child alone as the you and made any responsive they tried to fill responsibilities the US has a mechanism through which fraternity claims can be large and we know that the number of women girls in heating have gone through this process no one that we spoke to had been able to successfully prove paternity what to prove paternity they would what have to get DNA tests or something exactly and the number of women and mothers have brought their children sorry for paternity testing and it's something narratives indicated that they waited two years for the results of the paternity tests which have not been released by the way so the women are invited to participate in the legal process that is difficult and prolonged and doesn't seem to lead anywhere exactly and it's full of bureaucratic delays and some of these women certainly not all of them but some of these women are coming from areas of Haiti without much access to education was lower literacy skills and trying to navigate he went system is probably nearly impossible October tells him I'm I'm sure you run this through your own mind on on the balance to the U. N. mission help Haiti or take advantage of Haiti I think it's important to note that there were positive stories the US and improve security or you know financially our community is better off but the rates are women and girls the juxtaposition with very stark doctors number tells her research has been published on the independent non partisan website the conversation doctor thank you so much for being with us thank you and we'll know that impairs Carrie Kahn is in Haiti now and spoke about this with you and representative for non don't ever all don't cost you the U. N. has a system to make sure that responsibilities are found and the old cases our fall he said the winners received one hundred and sixteen allegations of exploitation and abuse including from twenty six women about thirty two children possibly fathered by you and forces and Catherine spares worked as an internal security engineer Google for two years part of our job was to write browse your notifications that notify co workers of employee guidelines and company policies like not uploading proprietary documents while they surf the web but when she posted a message about employees rights in the workplace one she says that Google itself and posted earlier Katherine spears was fired she is the fifty employee terminated by Google in recent weeks in a year of employee activism there that seen hundreds of Google workers protest controversial business contracts as well as claims of sexual harassment and workplace retaliation Catherine spears joins us from San Francisco thanks so much for being with us yes thank you so much for having me the message you passed on as I understand it read quote googlers have the right to participate in protected concerted activities why did you decide to post that message so I posted that message following news of Google hiring the I. R. I. union busting firm as well as four of my co workers being fired for organizing I thought that now was a good time to remind some of my colleagues about their rights and you felt it was important to post this message because because I think that actions a Googler taking are making it less transparent as a company and I think that this meaningful impacts the security of Google unless transparent Google is a less trustworthy Google and with access to billions of people sensitive data the world really needs a trustworthy Google in a way I gather this is what Google was inferring when they they issued a public statement obviously they they just reach your version of events and and say the content you passed along is a relevant the message violated the privileged access that you had how do you respond to that I would respond by saying that I went through the normal review process that I went through for all other changes during my time at Google that changes like that's our routine that my team lead it's sad that that what I did was entirely within standard operating procedure did the team leader know what the message was are just to prove the process the team leader didn't approve the process what the team lead dad was after the fact he's posted publicly in my defense that I got all approvals necessary you believe that you were let go because this had to do with with organizing activity absolutely did you feel at home there personally I loved working a Google for the most part I think that they treat their career employees really well and I think a lot of the queer in place would agree with me most of the concerns that I've heard from employees focus on their treatment of others and you knew what Google did to make money right yes I came to terms with the fact that I was going to work within that company and I'm still mostly fine with that I think it's very important to draw the distinction between the company only caring about money and googlers only caring about money I don't believe that Google there's only care about money I believe there are a ton of googlers who are still concerned with Google's mission and are either going to be scared into not speaking up or scared into leaving by Google's actions and other reservations that you have about Google's activities so I personally felt deeply uncomfortable with what was called project dragonfly which was going to be a censored search engine in China that alone would have made me uncomfortable the thing that really pushed it over the edge was executives a Google by passing the standard privacy review process to get this launched so you're looking for another job yes I'm looking for another job and I'm still trying to figure out exactly what I'm going to be comfortable with now one of the outcomes of this for me was watching how security tools can be used to harm organizer's and I am a lot more cautious and worried about how might work in tooling can be used to violate the rights of my coworkers Catherine spirits till recently worked at Google thanks so much for being with us thank you many towns and counties across the country fashion and usual Christmas deadline they need to decide by December twenty fifth if they're willing to welcome more refugees in Minnesota one county that's been divided over immigration policies has never the less said yes Minnesota public jury Minnesota public radio's we have fish here reports the city of Wilmer has a population of about twenty thousand and is can your high county's largest city unlike many of its neighbors this small town in west central Minnesota is growing with a third of its population made up of people of color that's largely because Somali immigrants have joined the Latino population that's been making this city home for decades back I met is among.

World Bank Susan Bartels queen Kingston Ontario
"world bank" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"The World Bank we now thank you to want to please the lady in the street but I'm in a band it's a the boys back you want to see one seven kids Alexis will play it like magic I mean the in this conversation no see store is this conversation this do you just me DM for whatever.

World Bank Alexis
"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Flash politics, policy, power and law continues. All right, Greg. Thank you. We are. Live from the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio yesterday, the president nominated David Malpass, a critic of the World Bank to run the World Bank for more on all of this. We're joined now by Andrew my ADA, a he is a Bloomberg news global economy reporter, he joins us from our Bloomberg ninety nine one studios in Washington DC and Andrew Bloomberg talked to David mouth pass this morning. What did he say about his plans? Yeah. It was interesting. He sounding more like he's going to be a renovator at the World Bank rather than a wrecking ball as some of his earlier comments suggested he said, he's a big believer in the World Bank's mission of reducing poverty around the world. He did say that under him the World Bank would cut lending to China. But he pointed out that this was already underway because reforms it agreed to. And he said that he and he said that he would like the Bank to sort of refocus on its core mission of lifting living standards around the world. So he did not sound like somebody who will be going in there kind of swinging sledgehammer around now slash and burn kinda guy. Okay. Well, let's just be clear to we said that the president nominated Malpass to run the World Bank. But this is not a Senate confirmed thing this is a he nominates him to the board of the World Bank. And then the board has to approve Malpass. Yeah. It's sort of a Byzantine process. But basically the way the works is the World Bank's executive board which represents the one hundred and eighty nine member countries run a search, and you know, any country gets nominate whoever they want the whittle it down to a shortlist and they're aiming to have a president in place by the spring meetings here wash. Just remind us how big is the World Bank. Now, how big is portfolio? It's pretty big. I mean, I think it employs around fifteen thousand people I might be off by by few hundred buddy committed nearly sixty four billion in loans last year. So it's certainly the biggest and most influential of the multilateral development banks, and again, they're giving loans to emerging markets and developing countries around the world are any countries. Criticizing malpass. You know, it's interesting. Nobody has come out. Nobody official government official has come out and said, look, we don't like this guy. You know, we don't think that he's supportive enough of international cooperation, some experts have said that, you know, the things he said in the past such as questioning globalism such as making some pretty blunt attacks on China should disqualify him. But we're not seeing any sort of concerted opposition to him. And you know, I think if if you're in a European capital right now, I mean who really has the time or the energy to have a fight with the with the Trump administration over this. The other factor is the IMF is traditionally headed by a European and the World Bank is traditionally headed by an American and if Europe somehow opposes Malpass, I think that they may be worth there. They would be giving up. There will be breaking that gentleman's agreement and the. Process. How long is the term of the World Bank president typically is five years, and there was some controversy because the previous Bank president split early. Yeah. That's right. So Jim Kim was nominated by President Obama in two thousand twelve as public health expert as former head of Dharma Dartmouth College. He came in. He shook things up actually quite a bit. He tried to kind of whittled down the size of the World Bank. And then he got reappointed I believe it was in two thousand sixteen or twenty seventeen for five years. So a lot of that actually created a lot of relief because I think a lot of people. Who are worried that the World Bank would have to be in this position of having somebody appointed by the Trump administration. They didn't have to worry about that. Because Kim was going to be there for five years. And then last month he abruptly said he would resign and join a firm in the private sector. Okay. So he put in a decent amount of time. He didn't you? One of the quick question on the funding for the World Bank. And and I believe the IMF it does take a congressional authorization to for the for the US contribution. And I forget how much that is the correct me if I'm wrong, but what I'm getting to is there are there any members of congress. Or the president who who are talking about cutting US funding to the World Bank or at the IMF. What you're absolutely right. I mean, congress has to approve US funding for both institutions the shareholders of the World Bank last year agreed to a thirteen billion dollar capital increase and a lot of times people kind of assume that the Bank already has that money that is not the case. And let me tell you. There are people inside the World Bank. Sweating right now about how to get that through congress. When to bring it forward to congress. I think that there still needs to be some work done internally there to figure out how they're going to sell that. But the president has an opposed that publicly yet he has not opposed that it's really interesting. I mean, he's attacked NATO. He's attacked the WTO. He has not directly attacked the World Bank, Ivanka Trump quite favorable to the World Bank. There's a fun there for women entrepreneurs that she actually champion. So it's interesting Donald Trump has not attacked the World Bank directly. You'll be watching it for us. Thank you, Andrew. My Bloomberg news global economy reporter, let's get back to Pat Carroll now for a check on the latest world and national headlines, Pat. Thanks, peter. The top democrat working on a border security deal to avoid another government shutdown says progress is being made but negotiations may go into the weekend. House appropriations chair Nita Lowey says lawmakers on a house Senate panel are acting in good faith, but may not be able to finish work by Friday. The Senate Judiciary committee is voting this hour William bars nomination for attorney general democratic whip. Dick Durbin says he's opposed because bar has not pledged to reveal the results of the Muller probe into Russia's interference in two thousand sixteen election. I believe the more inquiry. The investigation should be made available to the public and transparent. We should know at the end of the day. Whether they're finding some evidence that exonerates the president art reach a different conclusion. President Trump's choice to lead the world. Thank says the development lender should follow through on a commitment to lend less to China. David Malpass spoke to Bloomberg about his nomination. China is a is the world's second largest economy has ample resources in private sector markets. And so one of the things the world can help do is help China. Find a way that is not dependent on on multilateral organizations. One of our goals is to leave more resources for poorer countries that actually need the capital and can't get it. Elsewhere now pass has portrayed the World Bank has too big and inefficient democratic politicians are now waiting on the Virginia legislative black caucus to respond to the latest developments threatening to bring down the state's top three elected officials. Global news twenty four hours a day on air and tick tock on Twitter powered by.

World Bank president David Malpass Andrew Bloomberg President Trump China Bloomberg Trump administration Bank Bloomberg interactive brokers IMF Senate congress Jim Kim reporter Washington Greg Ivanka Trump
"world bank" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The loans are guaranteed by the US and other member countries and mall passes complained that much. Of the money goes to places that don't need it like China, and it doesn't make sense to have money borrowed in the US using the US government guarantee going into lending in China for a country, that's got other resources and access to capital markets. Mouthpiece has promised to bring what the administration calls pro growth reform to the World Bank. His nomination was immediately criticized by those who see him as hostile to the bank's mission. Tony Fratto who served in the George W Bush administration says mall passes nomination is toxic. You can scour David mall passes background for an interest in alleviating, poverty, and working on development strategies, and you won't find any whether the critics can do anything about the appointment is unclear Malpass passes nomination has to be approved by the World Bank's board, which can in theory appoint someone else. But Charles Kenny, a former World Bank employees now with the center for global development. Says the board has always deferred to the United States on who gets named president the rest of the world in the United States finding lots to disagree on it. The name I guess in the grand scheme of things who gets to run the World Bank is top of the list of issues to add to that one. World Bank official who didn't want to be named noted that in the treasury department mall. Pass had overseen a big injection of money to the World Bank last year that indicates he.

World Bank United States David mall Charles Kenny China Tony Fratto George W Bush Malpass president official
"world bank" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on KCRW

"Com. I'm David Brancaccio in New York, President Trump has decided on who he'd like to head the World Bank. A critic of the Bank, David Malpass this according to Reuters and other published reports marketplace's Nancy Marshall Ganz on the line from Washington. Nancy good morning and who's Mr. Malpas. Well, right now, he's under secretary for international affairs at the treasury department. He used to be chief economist at Bear Stearns before its collapse in the financial crisis. He's generally skeptical of. The international institutions for one thing. He for one thing he says the World Bank's should stop lending money to China because he says China is now wealthy enough to stand on its own. He says China doesn't need low interest World Bank loans. He also thinks salaries at the World Bank or too high. And given that we will we expect him to do at the Bank itself. Well, he apparently wants the World Bank to focus more of its lending on the poorest developing countries over the past few years when the World Bank asked its member countries for more money map is initially argue against increasing the US contribution the treasury department did end up agreeing to the increase, but only after the World Bank promised to cut back on lending to China and start to rain in salaries and Nancy short answer for us. What is the World Bank? Good question. It is an international Bank that provides low interest loans and grants to poorer countries. One of its goals is ending poverty with no more than three percent of the world's population living unless than a dollar ninety day by the end of the decade. Now, the US has traditionally chosen the president of the World Bank. But mouse would need to be approved by the bank's executive board. And he could face some challenges. Thank you very much. Let's check markets the footsie.

World Bank chief economist Nancy Marshall Ganz China David Brancaccio treasury department US David Malpass president Reuters Trump Bear Stearns New York Washington under secretary executive three percent ninety day
"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You're listening to politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Peter Barnes with June Grasso gone. The Trump administration is considering senior US official David Malpass and Mark green to lead the World Bank to maintain the tradition of placing an American at the helm sources tell Bloomberg joining us as Andrew data. Bloomberg news. Global economy reporter he is coming to us from our ninety nine one studios in Washington DC, Andrew tell us about the preliminary list of nominees the White House has. Yeah. That's right June. So the Trump administration is considering a number of candidates. They're having to do this because Jim Yong Kim resigned recently is head of the World Bank. And as you mentioned under sort of an unspoken understanding with Europe, an American heads, the World Bank European heads math and David Malpass. Here's a treasury undersecretary for international affairs is as we understand on the preliminary list as Ray Washburn who was a fundraiser for President Trump during his election campaign as well as Mark green who's head of US. And Dina Powell as we understand. I think is also named that's being floated she was in the White House deputy national security adviser to the president. About the World Bank its mission. How big is it? How much does it? Invest in the world. Yeah. So the the World Bank still pretty big. I mean, it was created during the second World War to fund the reconstruction of Europe over time, it's kind of evolved into a lender for poor and developing countries its mission now is to eradicate extreme poverty around the world. There has been some evidence that that extreme poverty actually has me falling and invest about sixty four billion dollars a year. Anywhere from from small countries in Africa to major emerging markets like China, so Andrew there's an informal agreement. An American runs the World Bank and a European runs. The International Monetary Fund. Is there any pressure right now to change that and have a European run the World Bank? I think that there is pressure. Among emerging markets countries like China, India, Brazil, the bricks basically to make the World Bank. More Representative of the shifting power in the global economy. You know, the the China and India some point the center probably going to surpass America in terms of just a pure size of air economy. So there's a lot of people inside the Bank who think it's time for someone from one of those emerging markets to lead the World Bank. Now, I think one of the complications is also really not a lot of appetite right now. Among some of these countries to get into a public fight with President Trump. I think if he nominates somebody that the other. Other countries. Don't find to agree judice? I think that he could probably get them through. We haven't heard the president talked very much about the World Bank. If at all, I haven't heard very much from anybody administration about the World Bank. What does how does he administration feel about the Bank? Does it want to push any reforms? They're make any make any other changes. Yeah. It's a it's an interesting question. I think that they have been kind of all over the place to be honest on the World Bank and the IMF on one hand they've been very critical of the World Bank, for example, as I mentioned, the World Bank lends to China, you know, I think Trump administration officials have said look, I mean, China's economy's pretty big. I mean, it can burrow on capital markets itself. Why is it a development Bank? That's supposed to be erotic aiding extreme poverty lending to this very large capable economy. I think it's a fair point. So but on the other hand they did approve a thirteen billion dollar capital increase for the World Bank last year. So the president has been very critical of multilateral institutions NATO, the UN he has an America first foreign policy doctrine, he's generally not very supportive of the idea of quote unquote, sending American money abroad to to to help other other countries. So I think that his general. Kind of hit brand doesn't really mesh very well with the Royal Bank. But you're right. He hasn't really targeted any really specific way to this point Andrew. So what's the time line here for choosing a new president? So the board of the World Bank. The executive board will make a decision. We'll have the final say they have given countries until March fourteenth to nominate a candidate. It is expected that the Trump administration will nominate a candidate. If there are multiple candidates than the board will narrow it down to three. And then, you know, if if there's a shortlist of three there will be sort of an open campaign stage probably not much longer than a month. And they're aiming to choose the president by the April spring meetings of the World Bank. Andrew, thanks. That's Bloomberg news global economy reporter, Andrew my ADA. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio coming up. How.

World Bank president President Trump World Bank European Andrew Bloomberg Royal Bank US China David Malpass Dina Powell International Monetary Fund Europe White House reporter Mark green
"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:46 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Dot com slash tax global news twenty four hours a day on air and at tick tock on Twitter, powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries. I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg. You're listening to politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Peter Barnes with June Grasso Joan the Trump administration is considering senior US official David Malpass and Mark green to lead the World Bank to maintain the tradition of placing an American at the helm sources tell Bloomberg joining us as Andrew Majeida, Bloomberg news global economy reporter, he is coming to us from our ninety nine one studios in Washington DC, Andrew tell us about the preliminary list of nominees the White House has. Yeah. That's right June. So the Trump administration is considering a number of candidates. They're having to do this because Jim Yong Kim resigned recently as head of the World Bank. And as you mentioned under sort of an unspoken understanding with Europe, an American heads the World Bank European heads, the math and David Malpass. Here's a treasury undersecretary for international affairs is as we understand on the preliminary list as. Is Ray Washburn who was a fundraiser for President Trump during his election campaign as well as Mark green who's head of US ID and Dina Powell as we understand. I think is also name that's being floated she was in the White House. Use a deputy national security adviser to the president. About the World Bank its mission. How big is it? How much does it? Invest in the world. Yeah. So the the World Bank still pretty big. I mean, it was created during the second World War to fund the reconstruction of Europe over time, it's kind of evolved into a lender for poor and developing countries its mission now is to radically eight extreme poverty around the world. There has been some evidence that that extreme poverty actually has me falling and invest about sixty four billion dollars a year. Anywhere from from small countries in Africa to major emerging markets like China, so Andrew there's an informal agreement. An American runs the World Bank and a European runs. The International Monetary Fund. Is there any pressure right now to change that and have a European run the World Bank? I think that there is pressure. Among emerging markets countries like China, India, Brazil, the bricks basically to make the World Bank. More Representative of the shifting power in the global economy, the the China and India some point this century are probably going to surpass America in terms of just a pure size of Eric Connie. So there's a lot of people inside the Bank who think it's time for someone from one of those emerging markets to lead the World Bank. Now, I think one of the complications is also really not a lot of appetite right now. Among some of these countries to get into a public fight with President Trump. I think if he nominate somebody that the other. Other countries. Don't find too. Agreed. Yes. I think that he could probably get through. You know, we haven't heard the president talk very much about the World Bank. If at all, I haven't heard very much from anybody administration about the World Bank. What does how does he ministration feel about the Bank? Does it want to push any reforms? They're make any make any other changes. Yeah. It's a it's an interesting question. I think that they have been kind of all over the place to be honest on the World Bank and the IMF on one hand they've been very critical of the World Bank, for example, as I mentioned, the World Bank lends to China, you know, I think Trump administration officials have said look, I mean, China's economy is pretty big. I mean, it can borrow on capital markets itself. Why is it of element Bank? That's supposed to be a Radic aiding extreme poverty lending to this very large capable economy. I think it's a fair point. So but on the other hand they did approve a thirteen billion dollar capital increase for the World Bank last year. So the president has been very critical of multilateral institutions NATO the UN. He has an America first foreign policy doctrine, he's generally not very supportive of the idea of quote unquote, sending American money abroad to to to help other other countries. So I think that his general kind of hit brand doesn't really mesh very well with the Royal Bank. But you're right. He hasn't really targeted any really specific way to this point Andrew. So what's the time line here for choosing a new president? So the board of the World Bank. The executive board will make a decision. We'll have the final say they have given countries until March fourteenth to nominate a candidate. It is expected that the Trump administration will nominate a candidate. If there are multiple candidates than the board will narrow it down to three. And then, you know, if if there's a shortlist of three there will be sort of an open campaign stage probably not much longer than a month. And they're aiming to. Choose the president by the April spring meetings of the World Bank. Andrew, thanks. That's Bloomberg news global economy reporter Andromeda. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power.

World Bank president World Bank European Bloomberg President Trump Andrew Majeida China Royal Bank David Malpass International Monetary Fund Europe Twitter reporter Mark green Susanna Palmer Jim Yong Kim
"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Peter Barnes with June Grasso, Joan it. Trump administration is considering senior US official David Malpass and Mark green to lead the World Bank to maintain the tradition of placing an American at the helm sources tell Bloomberg joining us as Andrew Majeida, Bloomberg news global economy reporter, he is coming to us from our ninety nine one studios in Washington d. DC Andrew tell us about the preliminary list of nominees the White House has. Yeah. That's right June. So the Trump administration is considering a number of candidates. They're having to do this because Jim Yong Kim resigned recently as head of the World Bank. And as you mentioned under sort of an unspoken understanding with Europe, an American heads, the World Bank European heads, the IMF and David Malpass, who's a treasury undersecretary for international affairs is as we understand on the preliminary list as is Ray Washburn who was a fundraiser for President Trump during his election campaign as well as Mark green who's head of US. And Dina Powell as we understand. I think is also named that's being floated she was in the White House us a deputy national security adviser to the president. About the World Bank its mission. How big is it? How much does it? Invest in the world. Yeah. So the the World Bank still pretty big. I mean, it was created during the second World War to fund the reconstruction of Europe over time, it's kind of evolved into a lender for poor and developing countries its mission now is to eradicate extreme poverty around the world. There has be some evidence that that extreme poverty actually has been falling and invest about sixty four billion dollars a year. Anywhere from from small countries in Africa to major emerging markets like China, so Andrew there's an informal agreement. An American runs the World Bank and a European runs. The International Monetary Fund. Is there any pressure right now to change that and have a European run the World Bank? I think that there is pressure. Among emerging markets countries like China, India, Brazil, the bricks basically to make the World Bank more Representative of the shifting power in the global economy. You know, the the the China and India at some point this century are probably going to surpass America in terms of just a pure size of Eric Konami. So there's a lot of people inside the Bank who think it's time for someone from one of those emerging markets to lead the World Bank. Now, I think one of the complications is. I think that that is also really not a lot of appetite right now. Among some of these countries to get into a public fight with President Trump. I think if he nominates somebody that the other. Other countries. Don't find too. Agreed. Yes. I think that he could probably get through. We haven't heard the president talk very much about the World Bank. If at all, I haven't heard very much from anybody at the administration about the World Bank. What does how does he administration feel about the Bank? Does it want to push any reforms? They're make any make any other changes. Yeah. It's a it's an interesting question. I think that they have been kind of all over the place to be honest on the World Bank, and the IMF one hand they've been very critical of the World Bank, for example, as I mentioned, the World Bank lends to China, you know, the Trump administration officials have said, look, I mean, China's economy's pretty big I mean, it can borrow on capital markets itself. Why is it a development Bank? That's supposed to be a radical and extreme poverty lending to this very large capable economy. I think it's a fair point. So but on the other hand they did approve a thirteen billion dollar capital increase for the World Bank last year. So the president has been very critical of multilateral institutions NATO the UN. He has an America first foreign policy doctrine, he's generally not very supportive of the idea of quote unquote, sending American money abroad to to to help other other countries. So I think that his general kind of hit brand doesn't really mesh very well with the Royal Bank. But you're right. He hasn't really targeted any really specific way to this point enters. So what's the time line here for choosing a new president? So the board of the World Bank executive board will make a decision we'll have a final say they have given countries until March fourteenth to nominate a candidate. It is expected that the Trump administration will nominate a candidate. If there are multiple candidates than the board will narrow it down to three. And then, you know, if if there's a shortlist of three there will be sort of an open campaign stage probably not much longer than a month. And they're aiming to. Choose the president by the April spring meetings of the World Bank. Andrew, thanks. That's Bloomberg news global economy reporter Andromeda. You're listening to Bloomberg politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. Coming.

World Bank President Trump president World Bank European Bloomberg Andrew Majeida Royal Bank US China International Monetary Fund David Malpass Europe White House Trump administration reporter Mark green Dina Powell
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"The World Bank has its fans and its detractors. I have to say it's hard to imagine that Jim Yong Kim can have too many detractors. She seems to bring so many talents to the job. He's smart plainly. Experienced compassionate is good executive. Don't forget he's an MD as well. So I know what you're thinking. That's disturbing. Isn't there anything he's bad at? Well. I am happy to report add he is not a very good singer. Time. This would be. Us. It's the truth. And I'll tell you that is from a student talent show at Dartmouth. When Kim was president there? But honestly, even a singing wasn't that bad also danced and wrapped wasn't that bad at any of those either. So what does the talent show really teach us? Peaches that Jim Yong Kim has something that very few others in official Washington. Have the ability to not take yourself too seriously. And so even though he is president of the World Bank. We asked him to go through a blitz version of our frequently asked questions, he agreed. Of course, Dr Kim if you would tell us in sixty seconds or less what you actually do in a given day. I spend a lot of time going through my briefing books, which look like real books, and I get one every day. I'm in meetings, all the time with all kinds of people, and I tried to one keep my mouth shut. When me saying something could influence a decision we make and then make a decision when no one else can make a decision. What's the best investment? You've ever made financial emotional education. What any kind of investment in getting to where you are today? I think one of them. It's it's rather simplistic but late in my life. When I was twenty four. I started learning languages. I I only really spoke English. She'll I was twenty four when I was twenty four I learned to speak Korean because I went back to create to do my dissertation research. And so now, I speak Korean which has been great especially in in all my work with the secretary general punky moon of the United Nations. It's been great to be able to have conversations in the middle of chaos, then later, I learned to speak Spanish, so really was worthwhile for me to do that. And I just desperately regret not having done more of that. When I was younger who's been the biggest influence on your life and work and why well fundamentally it's been my mother who is a Neo Confucian philosopher, but she's been so influential because at a very young age. I mean, I was reading the speeches and the writings of Martin Luther King when I was nine years old. So Martin Luther King has certainly been a huge influence and so people like Martin Luther King people who've taken an idea fundamentally rooted in moral convey. Actions. And then change the world are the people who inspire me tell us one thing you've habitually spent too much on. But do not regret. Oh, gosh. It's food. Eating at restaurants, all over the world fact. In fact, I have a rule when I travel to developing country for every meal, I want native food as opposed to thinking that I need French food that or western food. So I've spent a lot of money at a lot of different restaurants. Also with my children we love to eat. Do you cook as well? Not very well. I used to a lot more, but not much these days. Tell me one thing you own that you should probably throw out, but never will. I have a collection of putters golf putters that I just can't seem to throw away. You know, it's part of a Gulf the Gulf allows for a lot of magical thinking. And so I remember the magical putz I made with some of these putters. And so I I've kept him and kept him and kept them. Despite efforts of everyone around me to throw them out. The next question was what do you collect in? Why just asked and answered are answered without being asked. What's the one story that your family, maybe your kids? Maybe your parents always tells about you. Well, my brother likes to tell the story. My brother is a is a gastroenterologist in Los Angeles. And he always says that if he and I were to come to a wall with three doors he would quickly and in automatic go through the door that was open..

Jim Yong Kim World Bank Martin Luther King executive Dartmouth Los Angeles Gulf the Gulf United Nations Peaches Washington official sixty seconds nine years
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"It became part of the overall mental model that everyone used and it's now ubiquitous, and it was the truly the genius of a group of just brilliant public health professionals who realized that they had to shift the mental model and driving while drunk. You know, cigarette smoking is another one. And so we've done it in bits and pieces what we're trying to do now is to do it in a much larger scale, I'm curious as a trained MD, whether you see this kind of research is slower to be taken up in the areas where it's really needed and development in this case or faster than in medicine. You know when you look at innovations in medicine, it's not as if you have a new discovery. And then immediately everyone in the United States is implementing it. In fact, the lag time from having a really new discovery of something that's on the market. That's doable right now to a point when the vast majority of doc. Are using them is seventeen years. So I've with a bunch of colleagues in here now at the World Bank. We talk a lot about the science of delivery. In other words, let's not just focus on the basic research. That tells us about the molecular mechanisms, or for example, economic sat might be fundamental theoretical modeling based on mathematical models, and let's not focus just on the things that we can prove in scientific studies, actually work. Let's now focus on how you how you deliver. Those insights, let's focus and be as rigorous as we can be about how you take things to scale one of my good friends in global health used to say to me, Jim, I'm so sick of pilot project tala Judy when can begin onto the field of scale apology, right? That's gotta be our main focus because if we're going to end extreme poverty by twenty thirty every model, we have of growth suggests to us that with the pessimistic with sort of midway or the optimistic model of growth of economic growth. We're not gonna. To less than three percent extreme poverty by twenty thirty. So if our job is to fundamentally change, the poverty last two city of growth, we've got to be effective, and we've got to take affective solutions and scale them scale them more quickly than we ever have..

MD United States World Bank Jim Judy seventeen years three percent
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"So we're going to use this in the World Bank group. We're going to capture all of these great examples, and we've totally reorganized the Bank to do just that we now have what we call global practices, and their charge is look all over the world and find out how specific countries have had success utilizing these insights that come from psychology. And so in doing that, we hope that they will then take these examples and then adapt them for the local context one his anthropologist. Of course, you can imagine I'm going to insist that we respect local context, but we feel that we can make tremendous progress. If we capture these ideas and bring them to poor countries. But also, we're looking internally because our strong assumption is an automatic thinking, you socially, influenced thinking and mental models affect the way we assess project, so we actually did a study of our own staff, and we can we cream in the yes skin. And the and the minimum wage and ask them to use the same set of data. Of course, we adapted it to talk about the skin cream, and we had them assess whether skin cream A or B as better for skin rashes, and then using exactly the same data. But in the different context, we asked them to assess whether the minimum wage increase or decrease poverty rates, and they did much better and getting the right answer because there was based on the data that was clearly a right answer for both of these questions that it much better with a skin cream than they did with the minimum wage because of course, our staff came in with preconceived notions of mental models about the importance of minimum wages. So what were you going to do? Specifically inside the Bank is try to figure out ways. We can get them to do what? Daniel Karman called slow thinking, it can we get them to be more deliberative to be more focused on the mechanics of a particular project or particular intervention to really consider data first before they jump to a conclusion. Can we keep leaders like me? To keep their mouth shut, for example to not influenced socially where a group ends up landing on a particular decision. The report notes that the private sector has already adopted a lot of these behavioral approaches because and I'll quote win failure affects the profit making bottom line product designers begin to pay close attention to how humans actually think in decides. So Dr Kim why is it taken nonprofits, including the development sector, certainly so long to buy in you think that it's simply the absence of the market, and the needs that exist within the market is it the downplaying of ROI within the nonprofit sector is it a philosophical point. I think market forces are critical here. And sometimes people say, well, you know, the private sector does everything better. And I don't know that that's really the case so much is that the private sector entities that did it poorly. No longer exist. Right because they go out of business and public sector. Entities can stay in business for a very long time. A no matter how poor their performances, and so this is part of what I've been obsessed with for about the past twenty years. I've been I've been trying to understand in the absence of market forces. How can you improve execution? How can you raise temperature? So that people really focus on improving execution because in the public sector. Not only do we tolerate poor execution but often, unfortunately, we celebrate poor execution poor execution sometimes for people as a symbol of the fact that you're public and not private sector. Now, I do not at all think that the private sector does it all correctly. But the folks who do it, right? And if you were to go to Ogilvie or any of the big public relations companies, and and give them this. I mean, I think they would laugh at us in the sense that they have been utilizing these insights, very aggressively for a very long time, and in the public sector, there are some really great examples of having used this before one example comes from an institution that I used to be part of our school of public health. You know, they very. Consciously tried to get the notion of a designated driver into sitcoms in Hollywood. And once they got it into sitcoms..

Daniel Karman World Bank group Ogilvie Hollywood Dr Kim twenty years
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"We are talking today with Jim Yong, Kim, president of the World Bank. He and Sheikh by sue the bank's chief economist commission report that is meant to translate the best behavioral research macadamia in to real world solutions to address poverty. The most persuasive to me part of this. World Bank report is a table listing examples of highly cost effective behavioral interventions so I'd like you to to talk about a few of these with me your favorites. I guess whether it's addressing it hearings to medical regimen immunization rates traffic accidents, aspirations and investment, they really run the whole scope of humankind. So underpinning, the success of all of these to some degree through your view as a World Bank, president is poverty. Alleviating poverty would help all these things which most people might not connect necessarily with poverty. So again, this goes back to the brilliance of economists and how they have been focused on measuring. And how they've been focused in trying to get real evidence in real data. So one of my favorites is that in Jamaica. They had an intervention with stunted children. In other words, these are children who had low weight and height for age. And at a certain point stunting means that your brain literally has not been developing as it should. And it's really hard to get that back. It's it's hard to make. So that's hard to catch up. So there was a very simple intervention where they had a young students go and meet with mothers of stunted children, and they tried all kinds of different interventions income supplements. But one of the interventions was to just have young people, come and stress the importance of having mothers in very poor settings who had other stunted children. How important it was for them to interact with their children, and this was done once a week for two years, and then twenty two years later, they looked at these kids. And so they looked at all the different inputs and the one input. That had the biggest difference was that intervention where they went and told mothers to interact with their kids more, and that particular group of stunted children had incomes that were equal to the nonstop to children, and those that did not have it intervention had incomes that are. Five to thirty percent lower than the than the non stunted children. So it's just it's incredible. How these kinds of of interventions can have that kind of an impact. Let me just make sure I understand that the mechanism here. It's basically stimulating vocabulary and language and thinking that the idea of what's what's going on that moves things forward, right? In other words, these were not mothers who were deliberately neglecting their children. But over years they develop different practices, you wrap up the kids and put them on your back or whatever, and you don't have that much interaction. But if you specifically said, it's very important for you to interact your with your children, this way, the mothers did it and it had this incredible impact twenty two years later. And so this is a great lesson for us. We we have to in every now culture be sure that we're actually giving that kind of advice if they're stunting that first of all you've of course, tried to improve nutritional status, but this issue of interacting with children is also really critical and by changing these mothers, mental model it had this impact that was measurable economically. Twenty two. Slater. And there are others as well. I mean, another one that I love is one that had an impact on that affected. People's understanding socially of the importance of using less water. This was in Columbia in the late nineties, and they simply published in the newspaper how much water all the different people and companies and groups were using. And there was a an overall decrease in water consumption that persistent so in other words, knowing that your neighbors are trying to save or knowing that you're not saving, and they're gonna see it in the newspaper had huge impact on people's use of water. Similarly there were in trying to reduce the number of accidents on the road in Kenya. They put messages on buses that said if you see someone driving recklessly look out the window scream and yell at them and tell them to stop doing it and everywhere you are screaming yell at people who are driving recklessly it reduced insurance claims by fifty percent just to have the social pressure build in that particular way..

World Bank president Kim Jim Yong chief economist Columbia Kenya Jamaica Sheikh Slater twenty two years thirty percent fifty percent two years
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"You were active. I've read in the fifty years is enough movement that campaign to to shut the Bank as well as the IMF contending. They did more harm than good. That's the report. At least that I've read a tell me if that report is true. How true it is? And what led to your evolution in thinking about an institution like the World Bank? Well, it's it's true. And there's actually good evidence that it was true. I was one of the editors on. A book it's entitled dying for growth, a global inequality in the health of the poor. And it basically was critique of the approach that many of the international financial institutions had taken to health. And at the time what we are arguing was that an overly narrow focus on growth of GDP was really not the approach that we thought would lead to the kind of results that everyone seemed to want to have. In other words, there were arguments that you should restrict social spending, including on health and education. And so what we were arguing is that we should focus on more than just GDP growth, and we should really try to take a much more nuanced view of what are the factors that are important in lifting people out of poverty, and that's really the direction that the World Bank has gone major way in the last twenty years. And so I'm very glad we lost. The fifty years is enough argument because the institution is very different now than it was before. And I think that's what a made it possible for me to. Lead the institution. The ideas have changed, and partly and this is what you guys have done so beautifully in both freakonomics and super freakonomics as you've actually made hypotheses, but then you've looked at the data. So the data now are overwhelming in that investments in health and education, for example, are critical aspects of gross strategy. Larry Summers published a paper just a year ago showing that in low and middle income countries. Fully twenty five percent of economic growth experience between two thousand and two thousand eleven was due to better health outcomes. So we don't at this institution. And we have not for a long time thought about health and education is simply expenditures, we now think of them as fundamental investments in human capital that will lead to growth and so the institution itself. And this is what's great about the World Bank group, the institution itself has really looked at the data really looked at the evidence carefully. And we've shifted a great deal. Okay. So the World Bank released a world development report. Titled mind society and behavior, which after mitt does not sound right off the bat like a World Bank report from the past for sure, and it argues for really new view point or new mindset for attacking poverty. So if you could begin Dr Kim just tell me the background were you behind this who was behind it? And what was the impetus? Well, it was it came out of a pretty straightforward discussion that cost you Busu arch. Economists himself originally from India, but a celebrated professor of economics development economics at Cornell from years, and he and I were just sitting down one day, and we started talking about behavioral economics. So we started talking about some of the work that I had become fascinated with when I was Dartmouth about things like willpower, and grit and how they had an impact on success in life and development. And so, you know, he he suggested one day that we that we just take this on. And so. That's how that's how it came to pass. It was a recognition that we really needed a rethink of where we were going with development strategy. And we also wanted to bring into the discourse of the World Bank group, these thinkers who have been so influential in academia, but had been much less influential inside the World Bank interesting. Yeah. As I read the.

World Bank World Bank group Dr Kim IMF Larry Summers Busu arch professor of economics mitt Cornell India fifty years one day twenty five percent twenty years
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Okay. So here's the best part of the story. It wasn't just the Jim Yong Kim knew that president. Obama's mother had written a dissertation that was related to his development work. And then went and got it in order to prepare for his meeting with the president. That's not the way it happened. I was so fascinated by president Bomba dating back to two thousand and four that I actually bought her unpublished thesis of from the university of Michigan archives, and faithfully read the whole thing long before actually I went into that interview with president Vaughn. But let me say this the more you hear from kin the less surprised, you are anything. He's accomplished. And now he is taking the World Bank in very different direction, which will hear about. But first, let's begin at the beginning. My name is Jim Yong Kim. I'm the president of the World Bank group and our organization last year lent and provided grants of about sixty five billion dollars. And our mission is to end extreme poverty in the world. And to boost what we call shared prosperity, which is a notion that focuses on ensuring that the bottom forty percent of any developing countries shares in whatever economic growth, there is so World Bank is fairly impressive. I understand that your childhood dream is an immigrant kid than Iowa where your father was a dentistry. Professor that your dream was to be quarterback for the Minnesota. Vikings are Chicago Bears. So I'm sorry that didn't work. How are you? Okay. With where you wound up. I'm very happy with the way it worked out. But you know, that was in the middle of Iowa. Boy, the greatest thing you could ever become is a professional athlete for one of those teams in. So I was fully part of that culture. And I actually played a quarterback from high school football. Team. And although some people are impressed with that. I then also have to admit that our high school football team at the longest losing streak in the nation when I was quarterback. Okay. So that's still a record of some sort of your test. It's record it. Sure. Jim was also the chair of the department of global health and social medicine at Harvard Medical School. He's earned a MacArthur genius fellowship. And for the last three years. He has served as the president of Dartmouth College. I should also mention that after emigrating to this country from create h five Jim went on to become the president of his high school class the quarterback of the football team the point guard of the basketball team. I just found out. He is a five handicap in golf. I'm a little resentful about that last item. But he does it all becoming an MD. And then an anthropologist was not Kim's original plan. Well, let me tell you the story. Stephen, you know, my mother is a philosopher she's still alive still working on her writing and very involved in in her work on East Asian philosophy. And my father was a dentist. You know? Dentists are extremely practical people. And so I had these two influences in my life and one day, I came home from school, and this was a Brown one of my first semesters Brown and my father picked me up from the airport, which is about thirty miles from our hometown in Iowa. And he said, so Jim what he want to study? And I said, well, I think I'd like to study politics and philosophy. I think I'd like to become a politician. And so he slowly pulled the car over to the side of the road. Look back at me. And he said, look, Jim when you finish your, internship and residency you can do anything you want. So I have had this very practical. Author who said look, you know, you're an Asian in this country. No one's going to give you anything. And if you think you're going to make it as a politician, you better think again, you can do that. But first and foremost get a skill where you actually can help people. Now, let's go back when you were in nonprofits or NGOs, or whatever form they were in where you're trying to bring health care and bring, you know, deliver all different kinds of necessary and often very primary healthcare too, especially poor places around the world, you were not a fan of the World Bank..

Jim Yong Kim president president Vaughn internship and residency World Bank Professor Iowa Harvard Medical School Obama football university of Michigan Bomba Chicago Bears Stephen Minnesota Jim Dartmouth College golf basketball
"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Back in two thousand twelve Jim Yong Kim was minding his own business carrying out his duties as president of Dartmouth College. He was in his third year there and his phone rang. And he learned that the president of the United States wanted to hire him away. Quite literally on a Monday, a Dartmouth graduate from nine hundred eighty three Tim Geithner called me and said Jim would you consider being present at the World Bank? And this is the work that I devoted my entire life to, you know, develop ten in fighting poverty, and so you know, I called the chair my board right away. And I said, you know, the president's asking you to consider this. I have to do it. And so that was a Monday I flew down and met with President Obama on a Wednesday. Did you know him previously? I had met him once before. But my first sit down meeting with him was in the Oval Office to talk about this particular job. And then on that Friday, we were in the rose garden, and he was announcing me as the US candidate won a nation goes from poverty to prosperity it makes the world stronger and more secure for everybody. That's why the World Bank is so important. And that's why the leader of the World Bank should have a d. Understanding of both the role the development plays in the world and the importance of creating conditions where assistance is no longer needed. I believe the nobody is more qualified to carry out that mission. Then Dr Jim Kim. I still had to campaign had to compete for the job. But it will happen in the course of one week. So it was really quite quite a whirlwind. Now, most previous World Bank presidents were either former bankers, lawyers or government officials. You mean wiler physician anthropolgy PHD college, president spent most of your life in academia, nonprofits, not even say, not even an academic. Economist is though that were a higher credential, which I don't mean to imply. But what does it say about the World Bank or President Obama or you or the shape of the world, and especially the shape of development and new ideas in development that a guy like you wound up in a place like this. Well, I remain extremely grateful to President Obama unlimited. Let me tell you how that conversation went. Now, he put it right on the table. As you always does. He said, look, Jim, what am I going to tell the people around me who tell me that this is that I should appoint a mockery communist, you know, what what justification can I give them for nominating you. And so I started right off by saying well, President Obama have you read your mother's dissertation, and he can sit back and looked at me. And he said, well, yeah, I have. And I said, well, you'll remember that your mother argued that the entire world thought that the the artisanal industry in Indonesia would be wiped out, especially metalworkers will be wiped out by globalization. But what she show. Showed was it. In fact, that industry thrived a globalization actually gave a boost to then in history. And I said, you know, that's what I do. I've been doing development on the ground for the last twenty five years. And so while I'm not a macro economist, I do take a look at things like how incentives work and the reality of development efforts on the ground. And so I will always bring that perspective. And he looked at me. And he said, okay, I get that later in a more relaxed moment with President Obama. He said, you know, Jim, I have to say that's one of the best ploys I've ever seen reading. The president's mothers thesis is a good strategy. And we had a good laugh about it. Yeah. You know, as you were telling the story, I was thinking, I know this is meant to illustrate the strengths of economic thinking vis-a-vis development. But really I'm thinking most people out there when they hear this are going to take it more than interview tip. Certainly that went whenever possible if the boss has a mother who wrote some dissertation. You know, prepare that's the prepare, and especially if it's relevant which was much. You kind of lucked out on that you have to admit that it was it was very relevant. From Stitcher, and w productions this is freakonomics radio the podcast.

President Obama president Jim Yong Kim World Bank Dartmouth College United States Tim Geithner Indonesia Oval Office twenty five years one week
"world bank" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"world bank" Discussed on The mindbodygreen Podcast

"And you know, my my outreach is looking at the global impact of the messaging. So I spoke last year at the World Bank. That was simulcast to fifty locations around the world about the simple steps that we can take that can help reduce the global burden of this situation Alzheimer's disease, for example, and that is cutting as we mentioned we've got to have lower levels of sugar in the diet and increase the again, dietary fiber and dietary fat, those are just three bullet points. I mean, we have many bullet points from home assisting to exercise you name it. But if I can get that simple message to the biggest audience possible. I think that's important. And let's be very very clear that these same recommendations have leveraged across the. Platform of all chronic degenerative conditions, including diabetes, coronary arteries, and to a significant Greek even cancer just based upon a couple of parameters dietary sugar dietary fat and lack of dietary fiber so talk about segue away from the science gratitude purpose what role do gratitude in purpose play in brain health and implement it all these things, you know, there's the art and science to everything I look at. Here's all the science gratitude and purposes a little bit of art, but there's also science starting to support. Our mindset our belief system. I think you're listening should know that we just transitioned. I feel it that we've just ended a a a different level. Feels good. So. What's happening, you know, beyond? The the fact that inflammation, damages your brain cells damages the lining of your blood vessels, increasing crisper vascular events. Why inflammation is is so detrimental is because it actually changes the wiring of your brain, the higher levels of inflammation that are chemicals of information floating around in your bloodstream right now compromise the connection between your brain's amid Ella a primitive brain area and a more sophisticated area, the prefrontal cortex, which is really a unique characteristic of your being human that and the opposable thumb really differentiate us from other primates, and certainly other other animals as well. And it's that prefrontal cortex that allows us to experience. Gratitude empathy compassion understanding the implications of our activities in terms of future consequence as opposed to. When we're locked into the amid Gelo, where we're really based in terms of immediate gratification and impulsive behavior as an example, somebody says something to you that you don't like and either you respond immediately or you send out a negative tweet. I mean, that's what you could do as opposed to taking a deep breath and thinking about it and maybe getting back to that person. Tomorrow planning for the future is a prefrontal cortex function planning for the future in terms of the climate our actions today, what is how's that going to the the globe tomorrow and our children? So I think it's quite clear that we are developing society that functions from a more primitive brain center that we're all about immediate gratification. I want that product to be airdropped into my backyard this afternoon, I'm not even going to wait for prime and get it tomorrow. I want I I want my MTV the dire straits song. Yeah. But we want things. Now, we want to satisfy our sweet tooth I wanna eat sugar. Now, the problem with all this is the more. We do it through. What is called neuro plasticity the more these pathways connectedness to our primitive brain centers, become indelible and our mission moving forward is to distance ourselves from that level of brain control and seeing the world through those eyes and reestablish connection to our more human parts of the brain that let me care about you. And you care about me, the Dalai Lama said that to be happy practice compassion to make others happy practice, compassion. So it's good for me. And it's good for you. So if you were to prescribe a non diet related exercise for the prefrontal cortex without be compassion or something many things acting compassionately doing things. Things that demonstrate care for another person a putting a dollar in the tip jar..

World Bank Alzheimer's disease Gelo MTV Ella