23 Burst results for "Working Co"

"working co" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"working co" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Eastbound ally in Queens, right past Casino Boulevard. Left lane down. So the life here quickly building up our next traffic. Updates in less than 10 minutes on WCBS Craig Allen's forecast calls for a repeat of last night. Tonight's going to become cloudy and damp with fog and drizzle again, the overnight low near 60. Tomorrow. A lot like today a drizzly, foggy start, then some partly cloudy skies in the afternoon. Tomorrow's high, a little milder near 75. Right now it's partly sunny 72 Yonkers up to 70 and Belmore and where it's 70 here in Hudson Square. For 39 at WCBS PM today today unveiled a new digital map of the city's subways. WCBS is Marla Diamond reports. It's the first major upgrade of that map in over 40 years. Designers took the best of the iconic big Nellie and hurt subway maps and merge them into an easy to read digital map that uses the MTs own data streams to update riders in real time. They have simplified and incredibly complex system in a way we've never seen before, says New York City Transit Interim president Sarah Feinberg. No longer will people have to decipher a range of in station signs. You can plan your commute from the palm of your hand. The digital design firm Working Co. Of Brooklyn did the map for free as the MD struggles with an unprecedented drop in ridership. Without funding. We could see the reality is we could see lines on this map vanished before our eyes and that's something that no one wants to see. At the Fulton Street Station. Marla Diamond WCBS news radio 8 80. There's a dispute over a new study on Mt. Workers and the Corona virus. WCBS is Peter Haskell has that story study shows one in four Transit workers had cove it This was based on an employee survey. Dr Robin Kirsch on his head and colleges to lead the project. She believes many workers were sickened on the job. We found that more people in the lower city codes were intended to be positive. And that was significantly higher than those ones who lived in the hybrid code. But the PTA is questioning the findings. It believes fewer than one in 10 was infected. Transit presidents here of Feinberg, So it's unclear to me why the numbers are so different At this point. Dr Kirsch on is concerned about the potential PRA PTSD. You're Haskell W. City as his radio. Closing numbers on Wall Street this afternoon were higher on hopes that the White House and Democrats in Congress can agree on a temporary Corona virus stimulus deal. The Dow is up 113 today. NASDAQ In 37. The S and P 500 was up 16 introducing touch free payments from papal a safe way if your customers to pay whether you're a market.

Dr Robin Kirsch Sarah Feinberg Marla Diamond Craig Allen City Transit Interim Haskell W. City WCBS PM Queens Peter Haskell Fulton Street Station Belmore Brooklyn New York Hudson Square PTSD Mt Working Co White House
MTA launches first real-time digital subway map

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

MTA launches first real-time digital subway map

"Unveiled a new digital map of the city subways, WCBS reporter Marla Diamond says the first major upgrade of the map in over 40 years. Designers took the best of the iconic big Nellie and hurt subway maps and merge them into an easy to read digital map that uses the MTs own data streams to update riders in real time. They have simplified and incredibly complex system in a way we've never seen before, says New York City Transit Interim president Sarah Feinberg. No longer will people have to decipher a range of in station signs. You can plan your commute from the palm of your hand. The digital design firm Working Co. Of Brooklyn did the map for free as the MD struggles with an unprecedented drop in ridership. Without funding. We could see the reality is we could see lines on this map vanished before our eyes and that's something that no one wants to see. At the Fulton Street Station. Marla Diamond. WCBS news radio 8 80. York

Marla Diamond Fulton Street Station City Transit Interim Sarah Feinberg Reporter New York York Working Co Brooklyn President Trump
"working co" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:38 min | 4 months ago

"working co" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Bulls have found their round Billy Donovan, their new coach, after a successful five year run with Oklahoma City, David W. G in sports and time for the forecast Now from the W G in Chicago when they're saying good morning we start up this morning with temperatures in the fifties and sixties and we'll see that again tomorrow morning. Clear and calm early on, we will get when winds westerly 5 to 10 MPH with plenty of sunshine once again today. Fights are well above the normal were typically in the low seventy's this time of year. And I think we're close to 80 today. Upper seventies lower eighties for high temps through the afternoon again, Plenty of sunshine Tonight we'll see temps fall back into the fifties and sixties and tomorrow back to the upper seventies with a few more clouds. From the WG and Weather Center. I'm working co choir 61 over here. 62 at Midway is 63 at the lakefront and Romeoville 56 your money now and W g And Here's Orient Samuelson. The S and P. 500. The Dow opened higher today, with Nike hitting a record high following a strong quarterly earnings report. But now we find only one of the indices trading higher. The Dow in its up 17 points of 27,003 of six. But the S and P 500 up nine points at their down nine points and 33 05 and the NASDAQ is down. 53 points at 10,009 10. And checking the oil market this morning. Oil.

Billy Donovan Orient Samuelson Nike Oklahoma City Weather Center David W. G Chicago
"working co" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:19 min | 6 months ago

"working co" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Experience to get yourself a mortgage. And I'm going to give Hannah and I keep saying that event more 100 bucks and give her mortgages. Well, all right. Mortgages for everybody. Sean, how's that mortgage working out? I got you. I love it. On that first mortgage and I couldn't have done better should feel interesting. Think Tommy doesn't have a house, but you just have more right. But he loves it. He loves it again. It's an albatross, like 30 years. He's looking at that, even at 30 30 years. I didn't mean it. I meant I said, 30 minutes 30 30 30 year one. All right, Here we go. The childcare crisis will distort the economy for a generation. Great story. Fascinating story couldn't really find any holes in it. Basically what happens is that women and men are both stuck at home. The guy the the guy starts to go backto work. You had a choice between the two. Let's say the man makes more money than a woman. Well, let's say they're about even The woman decides she's going to stay home to take care of the kids, and by doing that it pulls her out of the workforce for just how many years they say that it would affect Well, it could be. It could be 2 to 3. It could be up to five. It depends on how many kids you have, obviously, because that will double the stay. And it depends on how long you feel like he'd have kids. Usually once kids hit school like five years old once they hit kindergarten. Onda. First grade. They're on their way. So it's that first, you know, 234 years that air crucial and then what you see. Now, is this and begin these air just predictions that would could happen. Yes, if things continue as they are, And if women drop back to take care of the kids because of covert in, they're not going to school. Then they down the road will see their incomes being reduced in overall income by household Also being reduced. Yes, it's fascinating. So you might think. Okay, Well, if you and the reason this is a of such pertinence right now is that most cup 2/3 of couples. Both work. You know, a parents both work and then you obviously you have all the single parents. And so what's happening with the with the cove? It is. It's shutting down a lot of the child care setups, but it's also making it tough for both men and women at home to keep their jobs up. So what happens is one of them decides that well, you know what? I'll stay home and teach. The kids are in the work with the kids and you stay whichever one it is, And they said, you know, societal standards or whatever tend to still I think the woman the woman will do it. And they say in actual fact, it is the woman that often defaults to, But it's not just taking, say, $30,000 hit a year or I don't know how much you know. $45,000 or $60,000 hit for a couple three years. They say that it impacts The re entry, they said. There are a lot of off ramps for our jobs, You know, economy, but they're no on, you know on ramps. And so this is if a woman takes herself out of the job market for for 3 to 4 years. Then she will be on a downward to direct trajectory for the rest of her career, most likely because she's already kind of missed that elevator that's been going up, and so now she's on this different trajectory. And so you really have to add the that's could be like a 20 year, 30 year consequence for the parent. Who do you know who ends up trying to stay home? So the argument that this person is making because of that is We gotta look at childcare as something that government Khun do to help these parents both single parents, but also you know, Coco He called working co parents, I guess would be the idea. Shipped them off to government. Childcare. Yes, well, tio pay for that or to allow for that We can do one of two things that could make up. What the woman was. If the woman or the man decides to stay home, they could get reimbursed for that work. Or they wouldn't be allowed to be able to continue their work and make a lot more money and have have you give up in return You give up the love. On the experience of a young child needing you, but tooth Yes, yes, but it is and on. It is really a beauty of a young child who loves you fully and unconditionally at home. But see, you could stay home if the government would be willing to pay you for the job loss that you are putting up to pay for these kids, and the argument is, it's an interesting argument. We we were hell bent to say the airline industry and we spent billions to do that. So it wouldn't go under during the spend Emma crisis and yet we didn't do what we gave to a single airline. You know was Mohr than we gave to the entire childcare crisis in this country in these care packages or whatever you know, cares, packages the stuff the kind of financial bailouts that we were giving right and and this person's argument I can remember is a man or a woman. Is that we all value those years, those air crucial years they're going to impact not only the kid but also the economy. And then we ought to think about that. In fact, the most radical, then I'll let you took for John. The most radical ideas, he says. You know what? Maybe we ought to think about the educational process the opposite of what we do, like right now. We're trying to get kids into college. At least community college, though, for free, he says. Come on. You have an 18 year buildup for that. Why don't we help the parents work with the kids at that? You know those crucial 0 to 4 years That would be that might be of more value and then Because that's when it hits the parents the hardest, and that's when they're in their youngest years where they're beginning their career trajectory that that really might be a better, you know, infusion of money than farther down the line like high school and all that. In fact, he proposes. Imagine that what if high school was the thing that we're now trying to cover instead of childcare? Okay, well, if the if the parent decides wants to stay home, that's the parent's choice, decide to stay home. The parent wants to go to a send a kid to day care. Well, then your your choices are limited because it's either unbelievably expensive. Yeah, because they can charge a lot of money because people want to put their kids in good day care. Or you can get the government and unions in cahoots to be able to create all sorts of restrictions.

Hannah Tommy Sean Mohr Emma John
Coronavirus: How Companies Around The Globe Are Responding

Squawk Pod

07:17 min | 9 months ago

Coronavirus: How Companies Around The Globe Are Responding

"First up today on the PODCAST. The troubled travel industry and what it could indicate about the way. Large companies find their way out of the economic crisis presented by the corona virus internal memos from United Airlines forced to park jets. Do the extreme lack of travel demand. Show that the company plans to cut about thirty percent of its management jobs later this year and united warned pilots to prepare for what it calls a displacement that will impact about thirty percent of that workforce. United has accepted. Us government aid and as a result agreed not to make any job or pay cuts before September thirtieth. Remember that date white collar job cuts are coming. The United Airlines Syllabus joins us now with more good morning bill. Hey Joe this is the first what we will see likely for the entire airline industry. Play out over the next several months yesterday united told all of its management and administrative employees about eleven thousand in the entire company. That at least at least thirty percent of those jobs will be eliminated starting October first. Now the rest of the company and other ninety thousand were also receiving a memo and essentially in that memo. They said there will be changes. There also reports that separately. The pilots were told it could be as many as thirty percent of their jobs will be cut in the fall remember. It's just a couple of weeks ago. That United Airlines received approximately five billion dollars through the cares act that is included in there was three and a half billion in a grant money that was given directly to them from the Treasury Department in addition to a loan that they took off from the Treasury Department the condition on that loan and on the money that was given to them as part of a grant was. You can't fire anybody. You can't have mass layoffs before September thirtieth but to be clear united and really every single airline has been forecasting that there will be job cuts down the road so they needed this money to keep everybody employed at least September thirtieth but after September thirtieth united is now saying at least thirty percent of the white collar jobs going you'll see thousands more in terms of frontline employees as well and they're also trying to as much as possible. Cut The cost here. They told the machine Friday. Your hours are going to go down twenty five percent which is contractually allowed going from forty hours a week down to thirty hours a week. Guys this is what the airline industry is doing right now. It has the money in place to at least keep operations and employed through September thirtieth. But unless things change and it's not expected to anytime soon there will be other airlines announcing similar types of job cuts in the weeks and months ahead. Hey fell just in terms of being able to cut ours. Does that count to to to. Can you take the money and then say okay? We're not laying anybody off. But I'm GonNa take away twenty five percent of everybody's hours that's contractually contractually allowed and there are a number of people. Senator actually allowed the by the by the contract with airlines consecutively. Between while you're now you're getting into the spirit of the law. The spirit of the Law United said at the time when they took out the cares look. We're not going to be cutting hours or cutting pay and jobs. Well they certainly have not cut the jobs in terms of the pay. You're getting into this gray area in terms of what's allowed under the contract collective bargaining agreement between the machinists union and United Airlines and. Clearly united believes that. Look we're allowed to this contract to go from forty hours a week. Guaranteed could go as low as twenty two hours a week. We've told the union you're going to go down to thirty hours a week so They're they're certainly many machinists. Who are not happy about this. I reached out to united over the weekend. And they said look this is contractually allowed and what you have is an airline here. And they're not the only one guys I know of everyone's saying well. Why is you doing this? You will see this almost with every airline that they are doing whatever they want to cut their costs as quickly as possible. Phil but this goes to me. This goes back to the debate we had when we were. We were providing these loans right. Who's to say at the time? Even internally inside these airlines there was an expectation that they were going to have to lay people off even as they were taking the loans and so yes as we were saying and we sit on there many times. This program really saves the shareholders but doesn't necessarily shea saved the employees and the whole goal of course was to save employees. More than anything else. We were trying to keep employees in business. They airlines could have gone through bankruptcy. Gone out the other side and still kept the planes in the air obviously with less employees and so the question I have is. How do you think airline execs are going to respond to the public? When ten twenty percent whatever percent we think are going to employees are no longer on the payrolls. Come this fall. I think the executives will do the same thing that been doing from day. One Andrew Weaver at the White House when all of the airlines. Ceo's were called in every single one. Every single one said the same thing. Which is we need to make dramatic changes in fact while we were there united was saying. Look we're going to be having a number of employees thousands of employees taking unpaid leaves of absences because we need to cut the cost dramatically immediately and they even said at the time Andrew Kid. The money is appreciated. It is to keep the operations to keep going into bankruptcy immediately but we unless things change we will need to make changes in how many people work for each airline so yeah. Is there going to be backlash? Absolutely will people sit there? And how yeah? The airlines are not beloved anyhow by many people. I mean people criticize them on a number of fronts. This will be one more where they say they took the money and now they cut the jobs but to be clear. They warned all along. These job cuts are going to be necessary. It was it was known six weeks ago. It was known at the very time. That's the only point known is trying to get. It was known as they walked into the White House. It was known as they walked out of the White House. Exactly okay thanks. We have some other news in sort of high profile corporate personality category we works CO founder. Adam Newman filed a lawsuit last night against Softbank in its Vision Fund over that failed three billion dollar tender offer last month. Softbank said it would not move forward with the tender offer because several preconditions not the mad that frustrated minority shareholders including as you might imagine newman who were expecting a payout. Adam Newman expecting that. Pay Out of a billion dollars if you really read through the lawsuit and it's very similar to the same. There was another suit that had been brought against the company by the Special Committee of we work which was representing the minority shareholders. Did your boasts joins us with more on that story. Deidra Andrew dramatic and of course just the latest in this ongoing. We Work Softbank Saga. Now Adam Newman's complaint alleges that Softbank quote doubled down on their abuse of power and argues that its deteriorating. Financial position influenced its decision to renege on its obligations net. One remember that would have seen. Adam Newman receive nine hundred seventy million

United Airlines Adam Newman United Airlines Syllabus White House Softbank United United States Machinists Union Treasury Department JOE Andrew Weaver Deidra Andrew Senator Andrew Kid Special Committee Shea Phil
The Role of Design in Business

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

09:56 min | 1 year ago

The Role of Design in Business

"I'm Jackie FRY senior director of design operations at mail chimp. We essentially run the business of design and based on the theory that design China's great for business I often think that design or are separated in their silos. I'm a product designer. I'm a brand designer and at Milton we wanted to bring these people together so that they could get to know each other more see each other's work influence each other's work these people being together getting to know each other it. It offers a lot of great benefits to our customer experience in sort of that harmony of touch points. Saint how all of that design comes together male chimps all in one marketing platform allows you to manage more of your marketing activities. All in one place so you can market smarter and Dan grow faster now. What male chip? That's what learn more at Nelson Dot Com. I'm curious about what you think of the Solo Universe and its possibilities around inclusion. Are you finding people who are solo practitioners or vision vision. Who are finding ways to work? In this way that they wouldn't in an less welcoming corporate environment the event the PAT just described Solo event took place at District Hall all here in Boston and the Innovation district and At one point I went out to. I forget whether I had go to the bathroom or get some water or something and are there were three young guys. They're tech is still had like Chino's ill-fitting she knows and stuff and that was what the districts designed to be at work co working space base for young tech people and They They said to me. What are you guys doing? And I explained to them what we were doing and they said this is the first time we have ever seen anybody buddy. WHO's not white in district hall NatWest true? I mean they attracted a lily white audience which is representative of the business community in Boston. Unfortunately the mainstream business community. What we had done was 'cause early marketing efforts actually did not reach a broad enough audience in terms sued versity. We went to Roxbury and got a couple of local business activists and said we'll give you a table invite local soloists and so they they did and immediately they came in and they felt as if they were part of this community. If we had not done that that would have been an all white audience. We live in a capitalist a society that benefits getting big and getting big fast. Do you see any benefits in the idea of scale at all I think about when we launch fast company right we. We were a lot about changing the way big companies work. It was. It was a magazine for people in big companies not entrepreneurs and not soloist. Louis and we didn't know where that was ultimately with the long path was for that but ultimately big business took over the learned their lesson. About what talent wants and a lot of them have changed the way they do business pretty dramatically but I do wonder if Biz will come along again as the Solo. The world grows to kind of say. Okay we understand now what people want. And we're GONNA adjust again and maybe maybe it is the end of large organizations physically physically but you know. I just wonder if they're going to sort of see an adapt through our normal economic and societal benefits to organizations that scale. Well absolutely and were not arguing. that the solar independ- dependent life is for everybody. I have a bunch of brothers who are extremely successful all of the big company guys and when we sit around and talk I think they'll look at me and think why would you not want to work on a global scale. You know they were. At and T. and pricewaterhouse coopers and they loved working at that scale. I understand that So we're not talking about everybody but I do think that Scales the enemy of creativity period. End of story. I couldn't agree more but let me. Just add a footnote to that the so the four of us are sitting around talking and we would all argue that by virtue of our profession where creatives. Yes but you down to Washington. DC and there's a law firm down there call the Potomac group and it's one hundred lawyers. None of them are employees. They're all indies and there is a firm and what the firm does is it makes a market between clients that have specific needs that can be satisfied legal needs on a project basis and these lawyers who have left often the most prestigious law firms in Washington and New York to work with Potomac because they want flexibility. They want to work on projects. They don't want to work full time. And so and their creative there are creative attorneys their creative consultants and I think there are people who who WANNA WANNA be able to do Exercise the creativity and the way in which they approach the law or they approach accounting or finance. And I believe me. I'm not ignoring the fact that there are lots of people primarily women but not only women who are attracted to this life for purely practical reasons schedule reasons scheduling scheduling companies. Say they can offer more of that in God knows they're trying but you can't. There's really woman entrepreneur now runs you know. I don't know it. Forty Billion Alien Dollar Company. Who said to me and my last days and ink in two thousand twenty set to Maitland simple truth matters? Large companies require and demand obedience. They you just do. I mean these companies often have employee manuals that are as long as the Russian novel for God's Sakes and they have an entire department that's really frankly designed to protect the company from employees. They call it. Hr but that's really what they're doing there and so I'm not. I'm not being cynical about them. I think that's required. That's required when scale and there are companies that do that really well and there are people who flourish in that environment. I was wondering if we could generate a list of things things that we as a society could care more about advocate for. That would make possible this kind of work with some sort of legal protections something about student loans loans. I'm thinking about the kinds of structural barriers that prevent people from being liberated in this way portable health insurance. Yeah the one thing I came out of that event with in what I don't even know if it came up specifically but it was I remember telling you solo has to launch a lobbying arm. We gotta get to Washington and we gotTA start. There's no protection for soloists whatsoever but just isn't and insurance is unbelievably cost prohibitive. So the world doesn't really help you pursue this line of work. Do you have a sense of the psychological profile of the solo worker. ill-fitting Chino's you were talking. They don't they don't here's here's a here's the statistic where well aware of the fact that A significant minority of people who are now in these started out not voluntarily but they were they were laid off and so they did it often thinking it was temporary and out of desperation and after bring some income in so I'll do some projects while I look look for another job and there's a company down in. DC called embryo. Descend some research that says if a typical person like that lasts as an Indie for between eight and twelve months. The chances are eighty percent. They'll never go back and get a job again. So it tells you something about On the one hand the incredible fear that people feel about making the transition out of the world of regular Panja Film. And on the other end and the fulfillment on the other rant for people who are looking to build us an economically sustainable life around interesting work. The future is brilliant Ryan and possible and possible really practically possible. It's challenging it's difficult is especially challenging for people who have inflict Ed Glass. We grew up in as as participants in a traditional workforce not easily. Leave that behind. But once you get involved in this world it is exhilaration. What is your best advice to a big organization who are more likely to hire even on a temporary basis these wonderful solo workers there's To become more comfortable with them and to be able to hire them in places where it would have a big economic impact. I'm thinking all all kinds of places including the rural worker who with high speed Internet is now living the dream of being creative to all kinds of places that are still emerging economies across Africa and Latin America and Asia. It's it's I don't have the answer to that but the question is so funny because as you're asking it I'm thinking unless they're one hundred percent committed to supporting the solo world their inclination is going to be identified talent and want to hire them right so that I think the question is. How do we find someone so committed that? They won't try to hire right that they're going to respect that you've chosen this way of living your life trying to invent an AI. Around work around I can give you an example company really very traditional mainstream company pricewaterhouse coopers. They built a platform for indies. And it all you go on the platform. So let's say you're a consultant assault. You go on the platform and you can search anywhere in the world any project. That is Available right now for contract work and you can search it by industry specialization The economic value the project and I think the logic behind this was that they felt that increasingly. They're relying line too much on indie consultants who were in heavily socially networked communities their global firm and he wanted to figure out how do we make consulting work for P. WC MUC- accessible to population of indies globally. And kind of take down the barriers. If you will.

Indies DC Boston Potomac China Pricewaterhouse Coopers Washington Nelson Dot Com Jackie Fry Natwest DAN Senior Director Chino District Hall Versity Roxbury Representative Louis
SoftBank seeks help from its COO to turn WeWork around

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

SoftBank seeks help from its COO to turn WeWork around

"Softbank and its head Masayoshi son is hoping the former CEO of sprint can help to fix we work softbank is we works largest investor son has tapped Marcello chlorate to help turn it around all that according to a source we works co founder and chief executive officer Adam Newman was removed earlier this week clearing has a track record of fixing companies he still chairman

CEO Sprint Softbank Marcello Chlorate Co Founder Adam Newman Chairman Chief Executive Officer
SoftBank to commit $40 billion to second Vision Fund

Bloomberg Businessweek

06:22 min | 1 year ago

SoftBank to commit $40 billion to second Vision Fund

"Arguably one of the most influential investment firms out there right now one of the most influential funds is softbank's right vision fun well they got another one coming yeah this one isn't enough one one one hundred billion dollar fund isn't enough Ellen Hewitt is started reporter for Bloomberg she joins us for our nine sixty studio out gives me in San Francisco so Ellen bring us up to date what's going on with masa and the gang well there's a lot of anticipation in advance of what could be and what our reporting suggests there may be an announcement of a launch of a second vision fund as soon as this week and as you mentioned yeah this would be a follow up to an absolutely enormous hundred billion dollar original vision vision fund which has completely reshaped the way that mentor capital has worked in Silicon Valley and around the world in the last couple years and some details we don't know you know we don't know exactly the size of this potential vision plan to but it does seem like we may be getting is about it soon that's the latest reporting alright just quickly whenever you headline crossing the Bloomberg terminal president trump suing to block the house from getting his state tax returns that's following some action here in the New York State Legislature black that opened up the possibility for that president trump suing to block the house of representatives the US house of representatives from getting the New York state tax returns what more on that as we go along so Ellen let's talk about this because I mean the first find talk to us about the types of investments are they're the kind of money that's often can actually make in a company and what kind of returns how do we know about it that gives it kind of leverage to start a second fund yeah so the first vision fund has been a massive deployer venture capital completely reshape being some of the valuation so we've been Sam in the valley some of its biggest investments include uber which not public and we work in which it has put more than ten billion dollars I believe a serious financial forms over the last two years ash they started investing and we work in twenty seventeen so single handedly the vision fund and other softbank capital can change the valuation of up to the company that they've decided to sort of make as the king of a particular industry so their strategy tends to be to look at an industry say food delivery and decide okay we want to make one of these companies really equipped to wipe out all the other ones and we're going to give them hundreds of millions of dollars if not billions and that is going to be their strategy to proceed forward it's often about growth growth growth in food delivery for example they have put a bunch of money behind door dash and you've seen in the last year during rush is actually moved up the ranks in prevalence of food delivery and and often outstripping other competitors such as post mates that's based on data that you can see from credit card transactions so it yeah they just they tend to exert a heavy hand well and it's interesting to as you point out I mean they they play the role of kingmaker not only owing to size but brand obviously so well known Masayoshi son I mean one of the things that's interesting here too is who's underneath it who's contributing here and you've got some of the names that were in before and presumably are coming back again tell us about that absolutely their biggest backer single backer for the first vision fun was the Saudi sovereign wealth fund put in something like forty five billion dollars it seems like that is anticipated to maybe be a major investor in the second vision fund along with the sovereign wealth fund Abu Dhabi is a big players who are very interested in getting access to some of the returns the division fund has already shown you know we reported that in June the the first vision fund you know my sushi son had already said that the returns are somewhere in the sixty percent range not even having to put all of the capital in the hundred billion dollar somewhere in the they've deployed something like sixty four billion dollars and today they're using that momentum you know it seems like they're using that momentum to then go out and maybe officially start fundraising for a second yeah makes it easier right when you can show this return I do wonder about though the ability for Masayoshi son with the vision find to kind of squeeze out other smaller tech investors because his ability to put so much money behind a company does you know drive up their valuations really has kind of upended the I feel like the investment space and so in the venture space yeah and it we've seen a fax you know we're companies talk about like you know masa comes in and says I would like to give you or you know invest I'd like to buy a four hundred million dollars worth of equity and maybe the company was only looking for half that but the check often comes with a take it or leave it sense so so you see start ups who are maybe not even looking to grow quite as quickly don't must have known for having this incredibly ambitious vision on how quickly companies can grow this is something that that we work COS talked about you know he would lay out his vision of mosses okay dream ten times bigger and and and you can see that a factor also softbank would often come in and write checks that were even larger than the companies had been anticipating raising hi and then yes it has effects on valuations while so many many other pieces have of like discussed maybe not openly but behind doors about the topic of fact evaluations going up there not being any space left in the round so they wanted to invest in it's just when you have something that's maybe an order of magnitude bigger than other funds you're gonna see effects that are are throwing the regular bounce out of whack Ellen Hugh it is started reporter for Bloomberg she joined us from our Bloomberg nine sixty studio and services go talking softbank police to announce a new technology vision find it's second that first one hundred billion dollars and is Alan really nicely laid out really up ending just the way the the investment yeah works in Silicon Valley and beyond a king maker for sure Wilson remember you put at twenty million into Ali Baba and last month the company recorded an eleven billion dollar profit from selling just part of the stakes so yeah those are some

Softbank Hundred Billion Dollar One One One Hundred Billion Do Four Hundred Million Dollars One Hundred Billion Dollars Forty Five Billion Dollars Sixty Four Billion Dollars Eleven Billion Dollar Ten Billion Dollars Sixty Percent Two Years
"working co" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"working co" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In this economy that is venture capital backed not publicly traded company is generally agreed to be the shared workspace company we work something like forty seven billion dollars valuation and that's why a report in the Wall Street journal caught our eye the paper says we works co founder Adam Newman has been using his stake in the company to raise cash seven hundred million dollars in cash he's been doing it by taking out loans against his equity in selling some of his own stock which is interesting because we work scaring up to go public this year perhaps and a founder trimming down its stake ahead of an IPO is not necessarily a great look but as marketplace Justin how reports the economics of going public or change investors in private companies want to see the company founders hold on to their stock ahead of an IPO this is Kathleen Smith at renaissance capital we'd like to see founders have skin in the game space renaissance capital invest in newly public companies and she says of a founder holds on to their stock ahead of an IPO inspires confidence if the founder cells investors might worry about what could happen after the company goes public because they'll see a founder who has very little downside if things go wrong but we work site PO is happening when the economy is strong the stock market's been on the rise too so for we works co founder Adam Newman if he has to take out money I guess this is the right time to do it that's Santos Rowlett Manhattan venture partners he points out that we work leases space to other companies in the real estate market it's been doing very well interest rates are low vacancy rates are low the practice of selling stock in a private company before it goes public is becoming more common the founders of snap Zynga and Groupon did it ahead of their IPOs companies are waiting longer before going public which makes the incentive for founders the cash out even stronger plus Jay Ritter at the university of Florida says there's a growing interest from investors who want to get in early there's so much money from venture capital funds sovereign wealth funds to invest in these private companies but that private company stock it's only available if someone's willing to sell it in New York and just in hell for marketplace more than two million.

Wall Street journal Adam Newman founder Kathleen Smith Zynga Groupon Jay Ritter New York co founder Santos Rowlett Manhattan university of Florida seven hundred million dollars forty seven billion dollars
"working co" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"working co" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In this economy that is venture capital backed not publicly traded company is generally agreed to be the shared workspace company we work something like forty seven billion dollars in valuation and that's why a report in the Wall Street journal caught our eye the paper says we works co founder Adam Newman has been using his stake in the company to raise cash seven hundred million dollars in cash he's been doing it by taking out loans against his equity in selling some of his own stock which is interesting because we work securing up to go public this year perhaps and a founder trimming down its stake ahead of an IPO is not necessarily a great look but as marketplace Justin ho reports the economics of going public or change investors in private companies want to see the company founders hold on to their stock ahead of an IPO this is Kathleen Smith at renaissance capital we'd like to see founders have skin in the game space renaissance capital invest in newly public companies and she says of a founder holds on to their stock ahead of an IPO inspires confidence if the founder cells investors might worry about what could happen after the company goes public because they'll see a founder who has very little downside if things go wrong but we work site PO is happening when the economy is strong the stock market's been on the rise too so for we works co founder Adam Newman if he has to take out money I guess this was the right time to do it that's Santos row at Manhattan venture partners he points out that we work leases space to other companies in the real estate market it's been doing very well interest rates are low vacancy rates are low the practice of selling stock in a private company before it goes public is becoming more common the founders of snap Zynga and Groupon did it ahead of their IPOs companies are waiting longer before going public which makes the incentive for founders the cash out even stronger plus Jay Ritter at the university of Florida says there's a growing interest from investors who want to get in early there's so much money from venture capital funds sovereign wealth funds to invest in these private companies but that private company stock it's only available if someone's willing to sell it in New York and just in hell for marketplace more than two million.

"working co" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"working co" Discussed on KCRW

"In this economy that is venture capital backed not publicly traded company is generally agreed to be the shared workspace company we work something like forty seven billion dollars valuation and that's why report in the Wall Street journal caught our eye the paper says we works co founder Adam Newman has been using his stake in the company to raise cash seven hundred million dollars in cash he's been doing it by taking out loans against his equity in selling some of his own stock which is interesting because we works gearing up to go public this year perhaps and a founder trimming down its stake ahead of an IPO is not necessarily a great look but as market place Justin how reports the economics of going public or change investors in private companies want to see the company founders hold on to their stock ahead of an IPO this is Kathleen Smith at renaissance capital we'd like to see founders have skin in the game space renaissance capital invest in newly public companies and she says of a founder holds on to their stock ahead of an IPO inspires confidence if the founder sales investors might worry about what could happen after the company goes public because they'll see a founder who has very little downside if things go wrong but we work site PO is happening when the economy is strong the stock market's been on the rise too so for we works co founder Adam Newman if he has to take out money I guess this is the right time to do it that's Santos row at Manhattan venture partners he points out that we work leases space to other companies in the real estate market it's been doing very well interest rates are low the vacancy rate so low the practice of selling stock in a private company before it goes public is becoming more common the founders of snap Zynga and Groupon did it ahead of their IPOs companies are waiting longer before going public which makes the incentive for founders to cash out even stronger plus Jay Ritter at the university of Florida says there's a growing interest from investors who want to get in early there's so much money from venture capital funds sovereign wealth funds to invest in these private companies but that private company stock it's only available if someone's willing to sell it in New York and just in hell for marketplace.

university of Florida Manhattan Santos founder sales co founder New York Jay Ritter Groupon Zynga Kathleen Smith Justin founder Adam Newman Wall Street journal seven hundred million dollars
"working co" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"working co" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Next decade about a third of us. We'll be working in so called flexible spaces. That's according to an estimate by J L L a commercial real estate company that I really hope is wrong. Now, flexible spaces mean everything from home offices to public libraries to places like we work co working spaces, Scott Homa is the director of office research at jail L, and he says the concept of co working spaces is not new. It's been around for decades, but the business has never seen anything remotely on the scale of we work. We work is the largest private sector occupier.

Scott Homa J L L director
"working co" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"working co" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"A crash the car off the roadway. CHP is on the scene, and then Santa Cruz highway one northbound Morrissey boulevard, a crash in the right lane with HP also on the scene, there time is five forty eight. This is KABC. You. This is marketplace. I'm KAI Ryssdal. Back in the day, conventional wisdom, was that you didn't bring religion or politics to work this just in times have changed, and those bright lines, they are not so bright, anymore, ios, a big companies are weighing in on everything from LGBTQ rights to immigration and people who work at just a name to Google. Amazon have rallied recently to change their companies policies on defense, contracts and climate change from the workplace culture desk. Marketplace's Meghan mcardle Carino has more now on how business is getting personal walk into any. We work co working space, and it's like a design magazine come to life that we work in downtown. Los Angeles is all blonde woods. And trendy patterned rugs, there's the trademark fruit water. This one's cucumber pineapple and in the lobby a glass sign that reads do what you love the aspirational work. Workplace is what we work is all about living your best, work life, not just with Instagram ready interiors. But with corporate policies to we decided as a company that we were not going to use company money to buy meat. Lindsey Baker is the head of sustainability for we work. She says the meatless rule doesn't apply to clients in the co working spaces, but rather employees and company events. We really wanted to put our values into practice in the company and take a stand for something that we believed in a meat free corporate culture is one example of a broader trend personal beliefs are moving front and center in the professional world. That includes politics, your political identity is a more clear signal of what your values in worldview, are, that it wasn't the past Neil Malhotra is a political economist at Stanford. He says, increased polarization is changing. Hell Americans, think about work, people are increasingly. Wanting to work for places that share their values and we'll put their money where their mouth is to do it. In a study Malhotra found online job seekers were willing to take a pay cut to work for a like minded boss. And in a survey from staffing firm, Ron Stott more than a third of worker, said they would leave a company over political disagreements. That was the case for investment advisor. No Pinson of Leland Virginia who says he felt like a lonely liberal in his small, mostly conservative office. I just felt over time just more and more that little voice in the back of my head screaming at me that you're not living your values working here. So he decided to strike out on his own several months that I had without income. All this was happening, right? As I was having a baby. Most workers aren't taking such bowls actions instead summer, making change from within J Hong is the CEO of online retailer boxed, which sells groceries and household goods in bulk. He says a female employees once confronted him in the hallway in demanded. He addressed the pink tax. The premium often charged for women's health and beauty products estimated to cost each woman upwards of thirteen hundred dollars a year and I was like, I don't know what the pink taxes, but let me get my coffee, and we're gonna talk all about that in about ten minutes long listened and decided to rebate customers for taxes paid on feminine goods. A movie says has cost the company more than a million dollars over three years, but inspires loyalty among his workers helpful in an industry where it's hard to keep talent we can't match the cash compensation say that an Uber or Google pay, but yet it actually has helped a lot on the retention research shows sharing values can help workers bond increase in organizations productivity. But that makes holding a minority view. All. All the more difficult. My viewpoint is right of center free market, liberty oriented. If Garrett Johnson sounds a little shy about identifying as a conservative. It might be because he works in Silicon Valley. A bastion of liberal activism Jonathan is a co founder of the Lincoln network, which connects conservative leaning tech workers, the group released a survey earlier this year with almost two thirds of respondents, politically active tech companies saying employs would be ridiculed or ostracized for expressing opposing views causes people to pull back to not speak up. Not offer their perspectives, which is not good. Johnson believes there can be benefits to greater political expression in the workplace. The companies need better training, to promote constructive dialogue, something that will surely come in handy, as we gear up for another grueling election season in Los Angeles. I'm Megan McCurdy Carino for marketplace. One of the things about non renewable sources of energy is that the jobs that come with those industries coal oil eventually are non-renewable, as well. So one community in southwestern Wyoming is being forced to imagine life without.

Lindsey Baker Neil Malhotra Los Angeles Google Garrett Johnson Meghan mcardle Carino CHP KAI Ryssdal Santa Cruz Pinson Instagram HP Stanford Megan McCurdy Ron Stott Amazon co founder advisor Silicon Valley
Uber drivers are contractors, not employees, U.S. labor agency says

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Uber drivers are contractors, not employees, U.S. labor agency says

"Meeting. Just got a lot harder for gig workers such as Uber drivers to unionize as KCBS reporter, Holly explains and the National Labor Relations board has decided that those workers are not employee's. So they are not protected. Under federal labor law. This is the second Trump administration agency to take this position. The Labor Department said something similar not long ago. William Gould is a Stanford America's law professor and former chair of the NFL RV independent contractor, you have virtually nothing you have no ability to we'll get into a union as in this case, you have no ability to have a minimum wage of restrictions on overtime the right to work co workers compensation in the right to be protected against discrimination all protections provided under federal law, which is why university of Illinois labor relations. Professor Michael ROY says gig workers need to press their case at the state and local level. But he admits it's a win for Uber to have to realize that they have a long term fight on their hands with Uber drivers. And interestingly, this particular ruling does not come out of San Francisco. It comes out of three be regional offices Saint Louis Chicago. Ago and Brooklyn, and what that signifies to me is that drivers are organized, and they are impatient across the country. It's it's not just a west coast

National Labor Relations Board Professor Michael Roy Labor Department Saint Louis Chicago William Gould Reporter Holly San Francisco Professor Stanford America Brooklyn NFL University Of Illinois
"working co" Discussed on The Overwhelmed Brain

The Overwhelmed Brain

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"working co" Discussed on The Overwhelmed Brain

"That you can ask yourself so that these states can come up in you more naturally instead of you just thinking about a time that felt really good and then you feel good in that moment and then it kind of slithers away kind of disappears because real life comes back what questions can you ask yourself that might make the shift a little bit more sustaining a little bit more or less a permanent you know i don't know if this is going to be permanent for you or not but it could be at least a step toward permanence i mean nothing is really permanent but you know what i mean more indefinite so where i like to go with the questions is i like to sydor everything that's in my life right now to consider all the people that exist that are alive or even dead i like to consider where i live i like to consider what i live in a house an apartment like to consider where i work i like to consider the air i breathe i like to consider what the weather's like all these elements all these components that make up your life if you to draw like a mind map nearest those mind maps and you put yourself in the center of piece of paper and you write your name in that center you make struggle and put your name in it and then you have one line or one tether that goes to a component of your life and that could be spouse or significant other or dog or not not necessarily in place of significant other but it can be that way too house car our rainy weather pizza place work boss at work co worker at work and you start making all these lines from the center out amazing you have to this but you can imagine it and you'll notice all these components are connected to your life.

"working co" Discussed on The Model Health Show

The Model Health Show

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"working co" Discussed on The Model Health Show

"Stretch and sleep right so you don't even notice you don't even notice i my international bestselling book sleep smarter yes i'm all about the sleep tooth so yeah that's that's good yes and i've learned that lesson myself there was a time where i was training no joke six hours a day while i was working co britt so my house or crazy in getting maybe or an off alice late five i was luckier of an after months of doing that completely burnt out like so like flabbergasted as the wire will not seeing the results of everything else putting in and then as idiot you're not allowing your body to rest and recover and replenish and repair congratulations you played yourself wasted three months of my life with dj callie pops in as myself so yes late but you know stretching too many a little older these days i'm finding great value on a good stretch so strength gotta move the buddy sleep stretch mark goodness oh good and it's so simple you know people will get this these are the big those three things are the big hormonal movers of our bodies you know especially with the strength training that elicited so much anabolic hormone activity like you get so much more bang for your buck the movement in of itself is really geared towards like balancing you out you know muscle imbalances homing your nervous system getting you more pair sympathetic when you need to especially if you're doing some walking and then of course the rest and recovery that's when we produce the most most human growth hormone is doing sleep young very missed part of the equation people overlook at all it's up it absolutely l folks.

growth hormone three months six hours
"working co" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on The Jump

"I'm telling you wake up in the middle of night like i candidate we lost that game by the way utah's los atlanta not once a lot of people lost also i come out of people fleiss twice that's the trap game move on because this is you gotta help me something he and chauncey were on the show yesterday and they were talking about donovan mitchell from you chocolates and ben simmons in philly and they've both said they should be co rookie of the year a washes today oh he's nothing personal it's ridiculous king i'm like you give vote for two people with the way the voting works co put a one two and three you get certain each guy gets points for how many first place that conveyed third place votes there have been corookies of the year but that is because of math because the number it's because the numbers the numbers all came out that equal amount of points rookie year you have to pick one like a person these two right here actually remind me a lot of simmons and donovan mitchell grant hill jason kidd and nine people vote and have the people voted one way or the other half of the people go the other way so just came out to go rookie of the year i can't pick one man ranches branch oh chocolate so here mix about man now i've can't pick one they're gone with simmons thank you.

utah atlanta chauncey donovan mitchell ben simmons philly jason kidd
"working co" Discussed on Undisclosed

Undisclosed

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on Undisclosed

"That would be a no then i guess philippine radio silence on walter o'gara okay well you know we're not we we we don't have any updates you that's the that's the case where he is another klein of the pennsylvania innocence project rexy talk with him by a posse presenting on the podcast spee he's on death row there was a book the came and i think last year the year before making clean for his innocence and we'd we'd talk with them but for a variety of reasons decided not take the case i'm not sure if there's been any updating his legal status i actually had a question okay sean thomas emily bc were represented by the pennsylvania instance project but turns lewis and chester holman weren't uh what now why was it was just home and able to find a lawyer work pro bono was that how that worked yesterday actually always had on amazing representation paid for by his family on justice case is slightly different from a lot of the wrongful conviction cases that might come across the daca the as he was an from the inner city he wasn't from the project she was in i'm he wasn't raised in poverty he was raised in the suburbs with a very very working family with both parents is dad works co two in three jobs on and financed chester's defend assistant tire time so chester always did have um you know paid legal representation throughout his case on it was just you know a little bit if he in the earlier years it is his current representation peters razor probe ruining um i believe he started paid i believe but i think at this point he's working on the case pretty much pro bono because he believes so much in chester's innocence um at this point chester's father is in his 70s and retired and you have to feel some sort of a great sense of empathy for that family whose pretty much been bankrupted by the system it would have to figure legal representation for this length of time which would be a crushing a financial blow.

walter o'gara lewis chester holman chester sean thomas emily pennsylvania
"working co" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on WLOB

"But the fact of the matter is there are no rules governing such conduct i contend there ought to be but um but there are no rules conduct concerning a taking any on in during a national football league game so more roles more regular work co mayor this right where we don't like rules and regulations but we want rules regulations if we disagree with we'll look that the nanjing the nba they have a rule in uh in the rule book that says it went whenever the the national anthem is played you got to stand at attention no protest i don't i don't think either play basketball but if you're ever cricketing knee while carrying short hardwood it is very very uncomfortable so there's a reason why you're not sandy while you're not kneeling during the afternoon while you're playing basketball steve again i have no idea where you're coming from with with this nonsense and if you if you are a time listening to this program you know that i am very passionate about college football and i do have a problem i do have a problem with the national football league not taking a stand for america it's not right you know what but they do have a right they've got a right to decide if they are going to if they're not going to force the players to stand for the national anthem that's their right but we have a right to we have a right not to watch we have a right not to support steve thanks to the telephone call debbie thanks for the telephone call um and the the the visuals their sweet mercy nudity nudity that was amazing i i was i was following bat i was following that line of logic bear debbie that'd be brings up an interesting point good was gracious right.

nba basketball football america debbie nanjing steve telephone call
"working co" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Power and he is well well he's a big reason why another big reason why the dodgers are onto the world series and they exact some revenge against the cubs of course it was a year ago wrigley field that the cubs eliminated the dodgers squashed their dreams by winning in six games of the championships theory so congratulations to the dodgers near that final call with charlie steiner on the dodgers radio network we'll get into all of the nuts and bolts of this particular game and is theories their work co mvp's which was interesting clayton kershaw on the mound gets his second win of this series and he allowed just a solo homer ryan to chris bri it only three hits over his six innings pitched the dodgers meanwhile gave him more than enough runs support and this was a sweet moment for the dodgers fan base as well as dave roberts and his clubhouse again it's after hours with amy lawrence on cbs sports radio i just wanted to hear clayton on tbs after the game because i was still watching i want to see the celebration i wanted to see the interviews and clayton was the first person that same ryan caught up with on the tbs post game show and the second she brought up world series he got all joke and you can hear the emotion in his voice he almost couldn't get the words out world series and why not why not be emotional when you've been a part of some teams that have gotten so close but just couldn't get over the hump this is an early nerd alert for the show but the dodgers stretch of 10 playoff appearances without a title now that does not include this year they are the world theories but they may not win we don't know their opponent yet so this very well could stretch to eleven playoff appearances without a world series title but right now it's ten and it's a major league baseball record and it doesn't meet all of.

dodgers world series cubs charlie steiner mvp clayton kershaw dave roberts amy lawrence ryan wrigley chris bri baseball
"working co" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"I bought issue reid he'd up when he comes to work at a dumping them it is funny that's great that's great how old my car and there than all the money on last night at 11 am district of object gan of waiting for the end become all right well good luck with that rene edge see the thing is in colorado you can pretty much do whatever you watt these days apparently they're sir very gov if you're going to be at the end of the world it ugh colorado's the place to be let's go to mike in west virginia mike you're up next on coasting a man the man you get the best show on wdbo radio period uh mike due to bad okay which undermined mike okay i got a couple of course that level that area i would medic promote ears in in we work co in you know get there in people compound bill cpr on people's you down we work co well it'll go all the way back well a couple gay deputy it would go with the patient in a room in the war questionable but i ask what do you see you okay what about everybody that i've ever air at old navy ally right now fouled biggest ally in there but one thing you what is your belief do you really believe victory i mean you really believe i i don't mean of course i do i've seen them at your without no i want to believe will you know i'm a really good don't bring iraq there are thought credit law bright note inter alia one uk he deported friday natal on right right right well all of that is that that is somebody's own experience mike bunches let me say this if you ask me do i think aliens exist i don't think i know i know i've seen i've seen the crazy he is stuff that you can imagine i've talked about it enough i'd coast to coast to my other show fade the black talk about an live tv radio i i.

reid colorado west virginia iraq mike
"working co" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The answer that i got over and over again i never got a day bordenave of a family or you know a which is what everybody's is searching for but ultimately the answer that i got over and over again the more that now that i know would idaho it is certainly a it all comes down to chasing the body and his simple as that sounds that is the answer to almost everything that is evil there's no question about it and if he were too frightened zhu it comes down to that let's go west of the rockies renee in colorado where they you're up next on coast he may i do a rene how are you oh i'm great it's going to the world think and not have come at a better time man let me tell pay i broke up with my girlfriend of eleven year right oh q a deal with nagged man uh always talking about marriage like wanted that about you know oh account on my bachi issue reid he'd off when it comes to work at the dumping them it is funny his great that's great coleman how old my car and then than all the money on one last night 11 now i'm district applejack dan of waiting for the end become all right well good luck with that win today and see the thing is in colorado you can pretty much do whatever you want these days apparently they're very gov if you're gonna be at the end of the world it colorado's the place to be let's go to mike in west virginia mike europe next on coastal a man have the man you get the best show on wdbo radio period mike you too bad okay which undermined mike okay i got a couple of quick but love what to tell you i was the medic promo thank you and and we work co you you know get there in april compound bill cpr on people you down we work co well we did our hearts but when we come back well a couple gay that you there we go into the pace you in a room in the.

colorado coleman west virginia idaho reid mike europe eleven year
"working co" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"working co" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And the answer that i got over and over again i never got a day keyboard name of a family or you know a which is what everybody is searching for but ultimately the answered that i got over and over again the more that now that i know would idaho it is certainly a it all comes down to chasing the body and as simple as that sounds that is the answer to almost everything that is evil there's no question about and if were to frighten zhu it comes down to that let's go west of the rockies renee in colorado rid a europe next on coast hit mary kaddu rene how are you um great it's and the world think and not have come at a better time man me pay i broke up with my girlfriend of eleven year right oh qe be with nag man oh always talking about marriage like wanted that about you know all the count them bought issue reid he'd off when it comes to work ethic the dumping them it is funny whose great that's great kobe how old my car and now than all the money on one last night of levin now i'm just drinking from jagannath waiting for the end become ri well good luck with that rene ed see the thing is in colorado you can pretty much do whatever you want these days apparently they're sir there you go if you're gonna be at the end of the world it colorado's the place to be let's go to mike in west virginia mike europe next on coasting a man the man you get the best show on alert yo period mike gouda bad okay which undermined mike okay i got a couple of quit that love what looked area i with the medic for almost two years and in we work co well you know get there in it will confront doing cpr and people you don't we weren't co well we did our hearts but when we come back well a couple gay that you they're going to pay thinner room in the war course ill but.

colorado europe reid levin west virginia mike gouda idaho rene ed mike europe mike eleven year two years