33 Burst results for "Workforce Development"

Fresh update on "workforce development" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:37 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "workforce development" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Hour. Unemployment brought on by the pandemic has created an opening for fraud. I'm Eric Berman, Indiana's weekly new unemployment claims jumped about 30% 3 times in four weeks at the end of June. Beginning of July, the Department of Workforce Development says. It's suspect some of those claims are phony. There aren't any numbers available on how many claims have been denied. Eric Berman, 93 IBC Mobile News. Finally, I m P D officers are being equipped with body cameras. It started Monday. We know that body cameras Are only one part of a larger effort to improve trust between our community and our law enforcement personnel. Mayor Joe Hogg said. The officers will get their cameras incrementally until 1100 are wearing them. Rochester Community schools in northern Indiana has announced an abrupt change all classes switching to e learning Rob Con. It explains why the school corporation released a statement Monday saying they were making the changes because students attended end of summer celebrations and then tested positive for Corona virus He learning will go until at least August 24th. In addition, all athletic activity has been suspended until the 24th School Corporation said they worked hard to make in class learning possible, but the actions of a few have prevented that Rob content. 93 W A B C Mobile news on the level on the go on Twitter at 93 W I, b. C and w II be si dot com. Now. Here's the.

Eric Berman Rob Con Indiana Ibc Mobile News Fraud Department Of Workforce Develo Joe Hogg Rochester Community Schools School Corporation Twitter
State unemployment offices overwhelmed amidst covid economic crisis

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 2 months ago

State unemployment offices overwhelmed amidst covid economic crisis

"Many state unemployment offices run on tiny budgets they have out of date computers and sometimes just a few dozen employees and suddenly these little offices are a lifeline for thirty six million Americans who are out of work Stacey Vanek Smith from our daily economics podcast the indicator brought us the story he won Ellison and her husband were laid off from the Subaru factory in Lafayette Indiana back in March they played for unemployment right away and then they waited a week one Brian right okay I have some savings save the two weeks went by on line okay start to get a little bit ridiculous now and now it's like okay it's Maine now we're gonna have to take right next month it's been more than six weeks since they applied and killing her husband still have not gotten their unemployment checks meanwhile kills husband got sick with covert nineteen some of her kids have been showing symptoms so she is trying to quarantine people care for people cook clean and keep the kids doing their school work keep everybody inside and on top of that she is spending hours on the phone every day with Indiana's unemployment office just calling the one eight hundred number which I you're just waiting and waiting and waiting okay let's try to email thought maybe that would be faster email ninety different claims eight and I only got a response back from one of all the ninety people online what is going on my name is Josh Richards and I'm the chief of staff at the Indiana department of workforce development we operator states unemployment insurance program Josh has been working there for more than a decade he was there during the Great Recession when things got so bad they had nearly thirty thousand people applying for unemployment in one week so when Indiana announced a state wide shutdown there's this one thought that went through his head how do we possibly staff out to process benefits that people need and the time frame in which they're going to expect them and need them just a few months ago in the end it was seeing record low unemployment the staff was lean but was more than adequate to handle the two thousand odd people filing for unemployment every week and then the claim started coming in three thousand people five thousand people ten thousand people Josh couldn't believe what he was seeing and the numbers kept climbing yeah I was like a hundred twenty hundred thirty hundred forty eight hundred and forty thousand people filing for unemployment in one week that's almost five times with Josh had seen it during the Great Recession this was just really different than what we are expecting and what we were built for in last week's Josh's brought on hundreds of people you now is roughly six hundred and fifty people working with him but they're trying to assist six hundred and forty thousand Indians who've lost their jobs people like Kayla to go from being not only backbone and our only source of income Sir just waiting you don't know when it's coming I was I was very light I was at my lowest yesterday I was over I quit Josh Richardson says his team are working as fast as they can he says he knows that for a lot of people people by Kayla it's just not fast

Stimulus checks and other coronavirus relief threatened by old technology and rocky government rollout

Planet Money

06:52 min | 2 months ago

Stimulus checks and other coronavirus relief threatened by old technology and rocky government rollout

"But in between these trillions of dollars and all of the people waiting for relief there. Are these middlemen who just in the last? Few months have gotten saddled with this new totally unprecedented task. Getting all of this money to the people who need it fast. There are all these small banks trying to process millions of loans that they've never dealt with before and their state unemployment offices many of which are running on shoestring budgets sometimes with just a few dozen employees as of last month. These little operations have come a lifeline. For THIRTY SIX MILLION UNEMPLOYED AMERICANS. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith. Today on the show two stories from planet money's sibling podcast. The indicator hosted by me looks inside systems. That have sprung up to push these huge heaps of money from the government to the individuals who need the cash basically like trying to smoke a fifty foot pile of money through a ten foot doorway. Greg you right the planet money music me. What you're covering during the crisis price-gouging powder save jobs. Why the Fed is sending billions of dollars all over the world and y remote work sucks. I miss our chat Npr to or exhaust pointed money newsletter debts NPR Dot Org Slash Planet money newsletter. Face masks have become the new normal as we continue to grapple with the ongoing pandemic. But when did we start wearing masks for our health and safety this week on through line the origins of the n? Ninety five mask and how it became the life saving tool it is today through line from NPR. The podcast where we go back in time to understand the present Kayla Nelson and her husband have been waiting for their unemployment checks for six weeks. Meanwhile Kayla's husband got sick with covid nineteen. Some of her kids have been showing symptoms so she is trying to quarantine people care for people. Cook clean keep the kids doing their schoolwork. Keep everybody inside and on top of that when we called Kayla last week. She told us she's been spending hours on the phone with Indiana's unemployment office every day. Just calling the one eight hundred number which is great. You're just waiting and waiting and waiting and then once you finally get on the phone with them either one they hang up on you. The call is dropped or two. They don't have any information to give you KAYLA. Tried email. Thought maybe that would be faster. Emailed different claim and I only got a response back from one our family. We are really in crisis and I didn't run around where unemployment my name is Josh. Richardson on the Chief of Staff. At the Indiana Department of Workforce Development. We operate the state's unemployment insurance program. Josh has been working there for more than a decade. He was there during the great recession. When things got so bad they had nearly thirty thousand people applying for unemployment in one week so when Indiana announced a statewide shutdown. There's this one thought that went through his head. How do we possibly staff up to process than if it's the people need and the timeframe in which they're going to expect him in need them just a few months ago? Indiana was seeing record low unemployment. The staff was lean but was more than adequate to handle the two thousand odd people filing for unemployment. Every week they had about fifty people answering phones and around two hundred people processing claims but Josh thought if we get up to the great recession high of nearly thirty thousand people a week filing for unemployment. We're not going to be able to handle that with our little staff. And then the claim started coming in three thousand people five thousand people ten thousand people twenty thousand. Josh couldn't believe what he was seeing. And the numbers kept climbing to fifty thousand one hundred thousand people and then it kept climbing was like a hundred and twenty one hundred and thirty one hundred forty one hundred and forty thousand people filing for unemployment in one week. That's almost five times with Josh. Seen during the great recession just realizing that this was just really different than what we were expecting and what we built for hundreds of thousands of people were calling and Josh had fifty people answering phones. He started hiring as fast as he could. But people had to be vetted and trained and in the meantime all of these weird problem started cropping up news reports people saying well. I've been waiting for hours and I was hung up on. And so you. You start to investigate. How in the world are people getting hung up on? Josh looked into it and it turns out a lot of cell phone. Carriers have called time limits. Most of them. I think that we've seen many with four hour hold limits and so if that person on hold for four hours they are on hold for four hours and it's an extraordinarily long time and even all the longer when you've been waiting for four hours into call automatically gets dropped. They're also all these reports of people calling and the number just not working at all turns out. There are actually limits on. How many calls per second one phone line can accept so even when we had the recording to say sorry? We can't answer the phone. The number of calls per second exceeded our ability to connect them with the recording. They were getting more than sixty calls per second in the last eight weeks. Josh's brought on hundreds of people he now has roughly six hundred fifty people working with him. But they're trying to assist six hundred and forty thousand Indiana's who've lost their jobs Josh's whole time is down to around two hours and he says he's working all the time he doesn't take breaks. He says whenever he tries to all he can think about are the people who haven't gotten their money yet. People like Kayla who says her family situation is getting more desperate by the day. We barely have enough to pay the rent and still have money left over to support our family. If we don't get any really. Everybody is dependent on the government right in. My husband never had to depend on the government. We've been working for years so to go from being our own backbone in our own source of income to just waiting. You don't know when it's coming I was I was very like I was at my lowest. Yesterday I was over. I quit was over Josh. Richardson says he and his team are working as fast as they can trying to get money out to the people who so desperately need it still. He says he knows that. For a lot of people people like Kayla not fast enough. We sort of get the. Hey you guys should have been more prepared. You should have seen this coming in. There's no point in arguing that out. All we can do is try to get better.

Josh Kayla Nelson Indiana NPR Richardson Stacey Vanik Smith FED Indiana Department Of Workforc Greg Chief Of Staff
Can stimulus billions buy hospitals out of shortage crisis?

Hidden Wealth

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Can stimulus billions buy hospitals out of shortage crisis?

"We've been talking a lot about hospitals and health care workers and the shortages that they face with masks and other protective equipment what does this bill do for that thing and that a lot of Democrats had pushed for an initiation but to get more money direct hospitals provide more money to some of the supplies and resources that hospitals and communities across the country are you sure that Johnson will inject a hundred billion dollars in two hospitals and the country's health that's not and provides billions in the ministry sources like PP if people call it the personal protective equipment for health care workers more money protecting the pies more training and workforce development I needed to do things I mean if you go to the value he is there a lot more in aid and defining exactly what different if you know your nurse your doctor there's a lot more there for you but these are the kind of broad scope of what they're getting to the health

Johnson
"workforce development" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

American Fashion Podcast

11:50 min | 5 months ago

"workforce development" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

"Go to multiple languages and I'll just add You know from the Urban Manufacturing Alliance Vantage Point. There are organizations with varying degrees of capacity as they train industrial sewers. Some that are entirely craft focused. Some that are more focused on preparing the next generation of sewers for the tech adoption. That's coming And so We sit in a really beautiful and unique spot where we can connect the dots between somebody likes Sarah and Shimane Technologies that has developed this technology. Anna Sewn Trades Organization. That's just getting started and building their curriculum In so we can do that. Sort of matchmaking. That's so critical as these groups are getting off the ground in their communities often with little sort of support or institutional buy in behind them At least at the very beginning. So we're we're in this place where we can start to make the matches interesting when you talk about technology and new technologies coming up How technical our sewers going to have to be? I think we should look at you know automation in the US. Market right as libby pointed out. There's definitely a demand for quick turn and small batch production But we also need to think about larger bat stuff. That doesn't have a lot of changes in design so things that aren't exciting but curtain no offence to anyone listening. Who's a curtain designer? But you know. Curtains are mattresses or sheets work. Wear uniforms things that don't change. Their design. Very often are great candidates for automated production. So I think we'll see investments and factories that are producing those things And the automation would come later. I think for for smaller batch. Just because you don't get the payoff for all the programming you need to set up in order to that. This is like an assembly line for for manufacturing Like a hard hard good where you'd have the machinery drilled and it's got the tooling the exact shape of the product and then if you change the products lately you have to throw all of that out and restart and it's thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars to do that and it's very similar in the fashion business. If you're automating things now we've got these nimble automation systems that are coming but the soapbox breakdown pretty often and you got to have people there to to keep an eye on them at even when they're making a t-shirt so when you start to step up to something that's never been spit out of machine before where you designed on the computer and then it's just gonNA print. That's that's GonNa take a while the the automation won't be there for a while. If we keep thinking about it a so box yes but we need to. Also think about the distributed automation. That's coming by automating a belt loop or something like that you know. That's that's a workforce so partial automation is something that you think is possible because I'm not seeing that small. Lots can actually go to complete automation and yet for a large part of the industry and sustainability. Small audibility is what we need and I would say that's what we're seeing in other areas of manufacturing so as particularly in New York City where you know we can't really have huge factories here. We don't really have the space so the you know. The size of New York City manufacturing companies is smaller than in other parts of the state and other parts of the country but steinway. Pianos are made in New York. City and You know they have a robotic arm that they just invested in the last couple of years. It's the first step. He's really a big piece of automation that they put into their process. Because really those pianos are made by hand but It can take away some of the redundant repetitive tasks that can really you know? Cause injury to workers and health issues and You know has been a great solution for them. Whereas many aspects have to be handmade in the apparel industry I think in New York City shines in creating really high end complex garments which even some big name designers still make a New York City because we have the skill level and the level of expertise. Here the other thing I would add is the way we characterize advanced manufacturing across sub-sectors. I think most of the time when you imagine advanced manufacturing and textile doesn't come to mind food doesn't come to mind. Banos don't pop into one's mind But really sort of embracing the fact that fashion is going to become part of this high tech ecosystem. is going to be critical as we designed policy to support manufacturing broadly I think Economic developers often are attracted to well. How do I bring advanced manufacturing into a city and they completely overlook initiatives around a parallel textile? And so I think the hope is that that can change the other sort of separate point that I'd add. Is I think if people felt that automation was going to wipe out these jobs. In apparel and textile none of us would be sitting here doing what we were doing I think the way I personally see it is that we may have fewer jobs in apparel and textile For an individual business but we're GONNA have more innovation and we're going to have higher quality jobs with career ladders And we're going to have an opportunity to To rapidly and get things to market quickly and that's going to lead to actually A net positive number of jobs even though the factories are going to get smaller and some of the jobs that require lesser skill or lower degree of skills are going to be replaced by some form of technology. At least that's that's my perspective on it so generally with the automation coming in on the repetitive tasks. That means sewing is going to be a more interesting job. Precisely hoping yeah right right with career ladders right in a way to move up and we're excited. So Lisa invited me to join the The C. T. Panel that she was talking about earlier and I went to the Brooklyn Steam Center which was a fourteen million dollar project in the Navy Yard and I went to the room that was looking at construction manufacturing in setting up stages for for films. And what do I see? But industrial sewing machines included in their stem and steam curriculum. So I think even educating folks. The technical design is as difficult as mechanical engineering and it should be part of that curriculum. I think we'll bring a lot of new folks into our industry. He has no sorry stem and steam before we move on shore so it depends on who you talk to you. So steam includes art in science technology engineering art art and the mathematics in his. Okay maybe we should do it service. Was it about the show? I believe there is a I believe. There is a skill shortage in Like backstage roles including repair of costumes. costume production. So that's a whole other area Where people may not realize that there could be really interesting. Exciting roles that involve. Well I think Sarah mentioned But more technical there's technical design skills that are incredible skills and are absolutely needed. And what I was going to ask you is from the apparel industry. What other requests are you getting for skills outside of sewing Well so every factory visits using different equipment so many of them will have specific pieces of equipment where they've got one person knows how to operate it so. I'm not a technical expert on the different pieces of equipment that I've seen apparel factories. But each factory will tell you they have totally different. Needs from another factor. I just visited a factory that needs advanced. Buttonhole equipment and training for workers on you know how to use that So it real-. It really depends Factory to factory because I do see a couple in a number of just the few small factories that I've been in lately. The managerial piece is is needed. Also I think and also the the coaching piece on. If something's wrong is it only the owner? Who's working with the sour or the powder maker in terms of what the issues are. There are a lot of challenges facing particularly in New York City some of the factories as I mentioned earlier. A lot of them are in survival mode so They're just not able to take the time to train. Their workforce train them in sometimes English language and invest in English language Skills Training Managerial Training Supervisory Training But I think there's a lot of opportunity and there's some companies that are doing that great that really are addressing those things but there are many That are just battling the real estate crisis. I'm here and so help that they get from entities You know that can provide some funding support or access to training opportunities are really needed by the industry. One skill need I am. I do hear about fairly often. Is apparently they're laying one or two people that know how to fix all the industrial machines? I hear that over and over again. So that's a good apprenticeship Perhaps her future apprenticeship. Also the sewing Robin is the best. I remember talking with a soft goods manufacturer in Baltimore. Who said that? If they're sewing machine repair person ever went out they'd be done And they really identified that as a gap in their in their ecosystem. So I think this is true in New York. It's true in cities across the nation. American fashion podcast is a bit like a community radio station for the fashion industry. That's what it was intended to be from the start. We do it for you and we want you involved in the conversation. We all need the fashion industry community to continue the conversation. When we do our interviews each week this is a beginning. And if it's to do any good now it has to spread if you like something someone says here if some concept resonates with you let your community and colleagues know. Reach out and share. This is a community thing. We are at AF pod on twitter and on instagram. Were at American fashion show. If you really like an episode please take a screen shot and tag US so other people can learn about the things we talk about. Not Enough people are exposed to these important conversations. We need your help to spread the word. Tell someone or a lot of people about this show about what we discuss on this show.

New York City US Sarah Urban Manufacturing Alliance V Anna Shimane Technologies twitter libby Banos Brooklyn Steam Center Lisa Baltimore The C. T. Panel
"workforce development" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

American Fashion Podcast

15:21 min | 5 months ago

"workforce development" Discussed on American Fashion Podcast

"Everyone and our guest in the studio there were of them We have Libya modern from course of trades the founder of course trade high liberty and allow Libby you've been on the show before me Mel's Can you give us a short Review of what course of trade does source so of course if trade is an industrial sewing training program We're in Brooklyn New York when Sunset Park and we pay students to go through one hundred and twenty hours of industrial sewing training and then we place them jobs in the garment district wonderful and Sarah Crossley is the CEO of Shimmy Technologies. Hi Sarah Hi Sarah. Tell me a little bit about Shimmy Technologies. We're a BB SAS company. Were also based in Brooklyn but in the Navy Yard and our focus is preparing the apparel sector for the future of work so we really look at. How is the industry automating? And how do we make sure that the workforce is prepared and ready to assume those roles? Okay and we also have Lee Wellington. Who's the executive director of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance? Highly Hello Tell me a little bit. About the urban manufacturing alliance sure so the urban manufacturing alliance is an organization that lips up making and manufacturing in cities all across the nation And our members are actually much like The other guests on your show right there. The organizations that are helping to make sure that not only businesses can thrive in cities but also that people in communities can connect to those businesses and have on ramps to those businesses and a growing segment of our membership are actually sewn trades organizations so those that are actually training around industrial selling or Thinking about how you connect garment and textile businesses to one another so so pleased to be here today. Interesting And Lisa Futterman is the regional director for New York City. For the Workforce Development Institute highly saw and as our listeners may be suspecting This is an episode about workforce development so Lisa tell us a little bit about the Workforce Development Institute End Workforce Development in general. If you don sure so. The Workforce Development Institute is a nonprofit organization headquartered out of Albany and troy but we cover ten regions of New York. State So I I cover. The New York City region are broad mission is to help. New Yorkers obtaining keep good jobs So we do that in a number of ways. We're a convener for a great conversations that help of Industry Job Seekers We connect Entities to one another for sources of technical assistance and funding We're we provide grants in some cases to both manufacturers and Don Profit organizations that train job seekers As well as supporting unions so In my role as the New York City regional director in my in the piece of my work that focuses on supporting manufacturing I kind of naturally focused on the apparel manufacturing sector because there were many many needs Facing those companies but really we help Manufacturers across the board and get involved in lots of different workforce initiatives. Your question about what is Workforce Development For for the Fashion Business was workforce development. Sure will I think we're I think it applies to generally as well as for the fashion. Business really workforce development is looking at both the skill needs of employers to be able to remain competitive and You know produce. In the case of manufacturing produce their product sufficiently and it's also the need for skill development for job seekers and training programs that address those needs and allows people to earn a living wage and have a good quality job. So it's really both both those things in the apparel manufacturing sector there are lots of challenges around that A lot of that related to the store. Ecole offshoring of the industry And then some such subsequent growth in some reassuring but really different challenges and needs a major real estate crisis here in New York City and so I think a lot of apparel manufacturers are in what I would call survival mode They're not really able to focus much on training their incumbent workforce as they probably would like to. They're wearing so many hats they're juggling so many things they're dealing with a rising rents many of them have to move multiple times because they're Leeson's and they try to fund a new lease so they're just many many pain points for Apparel Manufacturers in particular and that's an area where I've tried to focus on providing some assistance to those companies. Now is it normal for a state to provide this? Is this something. That's in all fifty. It's actually really unusual and when I meet with people in other states there especially manufacturers. They're kind of jealous that. Wd exists in New York state. So the way our funding works is that we We're funded by the state Senate and so- senators Put Our budget request into the state budget every year and hopefully Nine Times edits ahead and we. We don't get cut at all and the GOVERNOR OKAYS OUR BUDGET. And so that's that's how that works but we are an independent nonprofit but we do rely on The state legislature who CNN. For the work that we do and so have continued to push for that support for us. We're grateful for that. So many of our listeners are from other states. Would it be possible for another state to also fund your organization and and get your resources into their? I mean we are very much near state. Focus but certainly We DO GET INVOLVED. Nationally in some initiatives so we we look at Look workforce strategies and we some of our staff do attend conferences and other states and kind of share our lessons learned here in New York. Stay so we're Very happy to share expertise and You Know Lease Organization of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance Was at their conference in Pittsburgh a year and a half ago. And so I you know we. We do kind of collaborate with folks in other states that are doing related work and try and share best practice and this may be pretty obvious question but why does the fashion business need workforce development. What's why do people need to be trained for for new jobs in the fashion business? Well for anybody sure. Why don't someone else someone else can weigh in? And I can jump in after that. I think when we talk about made in. Us initiatives in this country You know trade union professionals manufacturers all talk about the bottleneck being just a labor shortage in general and I think very simply put. That's because a lot of people don't WANNA working garment factories. They they have the vision of that as like Norma. Rae Standing on top of the you know the the spinning machine. And it's not that anymore so I think that's one problem and I think the second problem is that there's new equipment coming into factories and that requires people to have different skill sets than they might have had being a traditional sewing machine operator or cutter on a factory floor. The other thing I would add is much of the sustained job losses that were faced by the manufacturing sector came from a parallel textile. And still there are families that over generations watch watched opportunities get washed out So that's I think fueling in part the perception gap that there aren't opportunities Associated with the sewn trades and then additionally when you have job losses of those Of that magnitude You have a workforce apparatus that gets dismantled and so we have a lot of rebuilding to do as a city And really this is true of cities. Nationally To reinvigorate Not only the hearts and minds of people thinking about opportunities in this own trades but also the underlying workforce infrastructure that supports those firms. And I think also we're seeing right. Now is a resurgence of small lot production which is really where. New York City thrives. We've ton of small factories can get quick production into the market. And what we're faced with right now is a generational gap. We have sores. Were aging out of the workforce. And nobody's coming up behind them so if we're going to continue to be able to keep up with the demand of small production we do need to be looking forward. The people who are going to be retiring and replacing them in the workforce. And if somebody goes into this as their job if they get the training is it going to be a good paying job for a long time? Because I think that would be a question most people would have. I won't I'm going to be trained to be a professional sewer that is is that a career absolutely. It's a great job and the sewers. I mean at me mill so me Mills. I work within the Millennium Mills Office in Sunset Park so we are kind of a for profit nonprofit partnership and our soldiers have been with us for fifteen years and they're amazing they get paid well and they get benefits and I think that's increasingly becoming the norm. I feel as if there needs to be new value or renewed value. Put on sewing pattern making and just the trade in general. So what made you was it? What made you identify this need and start to train. And how did you? How did you even start the training? Can I call it a school or kind of all came about when we moved out to sunset park and you know I had been working in a garment production factory before this bridal and then moved over to handling Molina's production and I really wanted to open my own factory and I I couldn't find people to so and I was trying to navigate this very complex way of word of mouth trying to find through our sewers and other sewer who might know someone who might know somebody else who needed a job for a week you know. It's this really really cumbersome process and what I realized was the people who were hiring were in their sixties and they WANNA and worked for two days a week and that's not really what we needed. We needed a full-time sour and we need multiple fulltime sewers. So I came up with this program I it's built in modules and it's in three languages currently so I can train in Spanish Mandarin and English in part. Because of the millennials team We Have Cantonese Mandarin and Spanish speakers on staff so they really helped me a ton and it's been incredibly gratifying to see how people take to selling and the confidence that comes with it and how factories where we play students are responding to it. I think people are really excited to get new people in and help them and foster their development and I just like to add that so. Wd I funded Course of trade. Because we saw that I mean I've been visiting garment factories for the last four years and I'm consistently hearing about a need for skilled sewers In my kind of investigations into this Really students aren't learning those industrial skills anymore. And even at the C. T. E. Highschool secured at technical education high schools. Students are learning some of those skills. But they're really really. They're all choosing to go into a career as a fashion designer for the most part so there hasn't been that emphasis on those industrial skills as much as there was in the past. So there's been a real lack of training programs. I spent a couple years trying to look into. What are the training programs How could we put something together? Is there a factory that would loan their space in the evening or could we do it at the high school? Fit's labs are so oversubscribed. It's very difficult to schedule. Training programs they are for adult learners. So got introduced to Libyan heard about the training that she had developed and we were really excited to put some funding toward that to be able so so that she could train more people and fill more of those open roles. Lisa helped us get sixteen new machines which is amazing because you can want to train. But then it's like what? Techniques are what innovative Techniques are you using and Actually Sarah. Maybe just talk about what you had discovered in terms of learning. Yeah so we've started our work in Asia and really the thing that we're focused on is how do you take folks who are working on the factory floor and leapfrogged them into doing the highly valuable work that's needed in the industry later so in Asia automation already coming into high yield factories? And it's not like big hulking systems like you'd find in a car factory. It's just quiet little features that are being introduced a new sewing machines. And then poof. You have a layoff of about thirty workers in department. So we've used gaming as a way to get workers who have never even used any technology whatsoever in assists feeling confident And and moving into learning things like digital pattern may gang laying out markers and putting pieces together to form the basis of Three D. Assembly. Because we know that they're going to need to be more workers who can make digital designs who can look at them and use them to tell robot what to do and to also power these customization labs that we know are coming down the pike eventually. So this isn't I mean it's incredible because I mean there are times where we're thinking that people just can't get over the block. Yeah of being able to learn. Yeah and gaming is like genius yen similar to Live Approach. Our our software is multi lingual. So we've taught an AI Ah Power Related Vocabulary in multiple languages and we built that architecture so we can quickly scale and.

New York City Workforce Development New York Urban Manufacturing Alliance Workforce Development Institut Workforce Development Institut Fashion Business Lisa Futterman Sarah Crossley Brooklyn Shimmy Technologies Navy Yard executive director Lee Wellington Apparel Manufacturers Asia regional director Sunset Park Libya
Workforce Development For The American Fashion Industry

American Fashion Podcast

11:04 min | 5 months ago

Workforce Development For The American Fashion Industry

"The Workforce Development Institute is a nonprofit organization headquartered out of Albany and troy but we cover ten regions of New York. State So I I cover. The New York City region are broad mission is to help. New Yorkers obtaining keep good jobs So we do that in a number of ways. We're a convener for a great conversations that help of Industry Job Seekers We connect Entities to one another for sources of technical assistance and funding We're we provide grants in some cases to both manufacturers and Don Profit organizations that train job seekers As well as supporting unions so In my role as the New York City regional director in my in the piece of my work that focuses on supporting manufacturing I kind of naturally focused on the apparel manufacturing sector because there were many many needs Facing those companies but really we help Manufacturers across the board and get involved in lots of different workforce initiatives. Your question about what is Workforce Development For for the Fashion Business was workforce development. Sure will I think we're I think it applies to generally as well as for the fashion. Business really workforce development is looking at both the skill needs of employers to be able to remain competitive and You know produce. In the case of manufacturing produce their product sufficiently and it's also the need for skill development for job seekers and training programs that address those needs and allows people to earn a living wage and have a good quality job. So it's really both both those things in the apparel manufacturing sector there are lots of challenges around that A lot of that related to the store. Ecole offshoring of the industry And then some such subsequent growth in some reassuring but really different challenges and needs a major real estate crisis here in New York City and so I think a lot of apparel manufacturers are in what I would call survival mode They're not really able to focus much on training their incumbent workforce as they probably would like to. They're wearing so many hats they're juggling so many things they're dealing with a rising rents many of them have to move multiple times because they're Leeson's and they try to fund a new lease so they're just many many pain points for Apparel Manufacturers in particular and that's an area where I've tried to focus on providing some assistance to those companies. Now is it normal for a state to provide this? Is this something. That's in all fifty. It's actually really unusual and when I meet with people in other states there especially manufacturers. They're kind of jealous that. Wd exists in New York state. So the way our funding works is that we We're funded by the state Senate and so- senators Put Our budget request into the state budget every year and hopefully Nine Times edits ahead and we. We don't get cut at all and the GOVERNOR OKAYS OUR BUDGET. And so that's that's how that works but we are an independent nonprofit but we do rely on The state legislature who CNN. For the work that we do and so have continued to push for that support for us. We're grateful for that. So many of our listeners are from other states. Would it be possible for another state to also fund your organization and and get your resources into their? I mean we are very much near state. Focus but certainly We DO GET INVOLVED. Nationally in some initiatives so we we look at Look workforce strategies and we some of our staff do attend conferences and other states and kind of share our lessons learned here in New York. Stay so we're Very happy to share expertise and You Know Lease Organization of the Urban Manufacturing Alliance Was at their conference in Pittsburgh a year and a half ago. And so I you know we. We do kind of collaborate with folks in other states that are doing related work and try and share best practice and this may be pretty obvious question but why does the fashion business need workforce development. What's why do people need to be trained for for new jobs in the fashion business? Well for anybody sure. Why don't someone else someone else can weigh in? And I can jump in after that. I think when we talk about made in. Us initiatives in this country You know trade union professionals manufacturers all talk about the bottleneck being just a labor shortage in general and I think very simply put. That's because a lot of people don't WANNA working garment factories. They they have the vision of that as like Norma. Rae Standing on top of the you know the the spinning machine. And it's not that anymore so I think that's one problem and I think the second problem is that there's new equipment coming into factories and that requires people to have different skill sets than they might have had being a traditional sewing machine operator or cutter on a factory floor. The other thing I would add is much of the sustained job losses that were faced by the manufacturing sector came from a parallel textile. And still there are families that over generations watch watched opportunities get washed out So that's I think fueling in part the perception gap that there aren't opportunities Associated with the sewn trades and then additionally when you have job losses of those Of that magnitude You have a workforce apparatus that gets dismantled and so we have a lot of rebuilding to do as a city And really this is true of cities. Nationally To reinvigorate Not only the hearts and minds of people thinking about opportunities in this own trades but also the underlying workforce infrastructure that supports those firms. And I think also we're seeing right. Now is a resurgence of small lot production which is really where. New York City thrives. We've ton of small factories can get quick production into the market. And what we're faced with right now is a generational gap. We have sores. Were aging out of the workforce. And nobody's coming up behind them so if we're going to continue to be able to keep up with the demand of small production we do need to be looking forward. The people who are going to be retiring and replacing them in the workforce. And if somebody goes into this as their job if they get the training is it going to be a good paying job for a long time? Because I think that would be a question most people would have. I won't I'm going to be trained to be a professional sewer that is is that a career absolutely. It's a great job and the sewers. I mean at me mill so me Mills. I work within the Millennium Mills Office in Sunset Park so we are kind of a for profit nonprofit partnership and our soldiers have been with us for fifteen years and they're amazing they get paid well and they get benefits and I think that's increasingly becoming the norm. I feel as if there needs to be new value or renewed value. Put on sewing pattern making and just the trade in general. So what made you was it? What made you identify this need and start to train. And how did you? How did you even start the training? Can I call it a school or kind of all came about when we moved out to sunset park and you know I had been working in a garment production factory before this bridal and then moved over to handling Molina's production and I really wanted to open my own factory and I I couldn't find people to so and I was trying to navigate this very complex way of word of mouth trying to find through our sewers and other sewer who might know someone who might know somebody else who needed a job for a week you know. It's this really really cumbersome process and what I realized was the people who were hiring were in their sixties and they WANNA and worked for two days a week and that's not really what we needed. We needed a full-time sour and we need multiple fulltime sewers. So I came up with this program I it's built in modules and it's in three languages currently so I can train in Spanish Mandarin and English in part. Because of the millennials team We Have Cantonese Mandarin and Spanish speakers on staff so they really helped me a ton and it's been incredibly gratifying to see how people take to selling and the confidence that comes with it and how factories where we play students are responding to it. I think people are really excited to get new people in and help them and foster their development and I just like to add that so. Wd I funded Course of trade. Because we saw that I mean I've been visiting garment factories for the last four years and I'm consistently hearing about a need for skilled sewers In my kind of investigations into this Really students aren't learning those industrial skills anymore. And even at the C. T. E. Highschool secured at technical education high schools. Students are learning some of those skills. But they're really really. They're all choosing to go into a career as a fashion designer for the most part so there hasn't been that emphasis on those industrial skills as much as there was in the past. So there's been a real lack of training programs. I spent a couple years trying to look into. What are the training programs How could we put something together? Is there a factory that would loan their space in the evening or could we do it at the high school? Fit's labs are so oversubscribed. It's very difficult to schedule. Training programs they are for adult learners. So got introduced to Libyan heard about the training that she had developed and we were really excited to put some funding toward that to be able so so that she could train more people and fill more of those open roles. Lisa helped us get sixteen new machines which is

New York City Workforce Development New York Workforce Development Institut Fashion Business Apparel Manufacturers Don Profit United States CNN Senate Albany Regional Director Troy Leeson Ecole Offshoring Nine Times Sunset Park Lease Organization Pittsburgh
Los Angeles: Housing Secretary Carson Awards $1.8M For Public Housing Jobs Program

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Los Angeles: Housing Secretary Carson Awards $1.8M For Public Housing Jobs Program

"Della county gets in nearly two million dollar boost from the feds for public housing grants money is part of the department of housing and urban development jobs plus program that supports for job readiness and connecting public housing residents to employment as well as education and financial empowerment services hud secretary Ben Carson made the announcement and sign to the check at the Carlito's public housing development in Long Beach which has been around since nineteen forty it's owned and managed by the LA county development authority acting executive director Emilio Seles this is really and very important for a for this community because it provides workforce development activities one of the things that we try to strive for here is to try to make sure that this is not a landing space for folks that this is just a transition on to something else he says the grant money will be used to help residents at Connelly does get better paying jobs so they can become self sufficient the development has more than two thousand residents living in more than seven hundred

Della County Ben Carson Carlito Long Beach Emilio Seles Connelly Department Of Housing Secretary LA Executive Director
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

06:48 min | 6 months ago

The State of Indian Nations

"You're tuned into native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood from misled a Pueblo. We're listening to the State of Indian nations address today a day New National Congress of American Indians President fond sharp from the Cornell nation gave the speech earlier today in the first part of her speech. We heard her disgust threats to native nations including challenges to tribal decision making and the Indian Child Welfare. ACT WE PICK UP. We're sharp left off in addition to these existential threats. We have threats caused by federal inaction and indifference difference take severe chronic underfunding of the federal government's trust in treaty obligations to tribal nations powerfully illustrated in the recent broken promises MRS report. This report is a trebling. Glimpse into the pervasive impacts that federal budget shortfalls have on the health and vibrancy of tribal tribal communities. It comes fifteen years after another. Congressional report came to the exact same conclusion that the United States is failing to hold its end. The Grand Covenant is struck with tribal nations in exchange for hundreds of millions of acres of tribal lands invaluable resources they contain needless interruptions and delays in federal funding also pose a significant threat the two thousand nineteen government shutdown. The longest longest in history is the latest example of an incompetent federal budget process jeopardizing travel nations ability to provide vital services to our citizens from law enforcement to healthcare to emergency response and just once in the last twenty two years has congress passed a fiscal budget on time time an inexcusable sign of a broken system in addition tribal nations must compete with one another for federal grant programs a gross gross violation of the federal government's trust entreaty responsibilities to us. Meanwhile Congress left Indian country completely out of the two thousand seventeen seventeen tax cuts and jobs at despite years of hill advocacy by NCI and our partners in promoting Indian countries tax reform priorities priorities. That will clearly boost tribal efforts to build sustainable economies and grow local job opportunities. Congress has also neglected its responsibility sponsor ability by failing to pass legislation that reaffirms the inherent right of tribal governments to regulate Labor permanently reauthorized. The remarkably effective special diabetes program for Indians. reauthorize is the native American Housing and self determination act to curb Indian countries severe housing shortages. And take long overdue steps to curtail the missing and murdered indigenous women epidemic. That is ravaging so many of our communities and families but federal connection and indifference is perhaps no more destructive than with a current failure of the administration and some in Congress to address press the rapidly accelerating impacts of climate change or even acknowledged that it exists as chief. Seattle went said what we do to the earth we do to ourselves. The damage human beings have done and continue to do to this planet disrupts every facet of tribal life from our subsistence life. Ways to our ceremonies to our continued stewardship of the natural world. My nation of quilt is already feeling the brunt as ocean shen sea level rise are forcing us to permanently. Relocate are two main villages to higher ground when it comes to climate change and sustaining humanity humanity on this planet. We have no time left to lose and yet our government is nowhere to be found finally tribal nations face threats from an administration ministration that appears committed to obstructing the express will of Congress take the Indian Trust Asset Reform Act while ratified nearly four four years ago the administration has refused to implement key provisions notably the creation of an under secretary for Indian affairs to protect an advanced it's tribal interests within the Department of Interior and the establishment through a meaningful dialogue with Indian country of trust asset management. Plans eagerly. Disgraceful is the inner agency. Mo Way the administration develop to implement the new four seven seven tribal workforce development law that that law is specifically passed to expand the successful program and play self-determination squarely at the heart of Indian country workforce development yet the MOH was purposefully written to ignore the law by allowing federal agencies to veto individual programs that tribal nations have every right to include in their four four seven seven plans. A dynamic law is explicitly designed to stop despite these darkening storm clouds tribal nations continue to shine brightly. We do so much with so little because our people count on us to find a way no matter what we devise advise innovative solutions to the greatest challenges facing our communities. Because that's what governments do from the sled of the Pueblo of a sled. A WHO's innovative partnership with the State of New Mexico is reducing arrest in incarceration rates among Pueblo youth by providing them culturally appropriate diversionary generic services services designed to set them on the right path to the Miami tribe of Oklahoma. WHO's Miami Awakening Program is bringing back the tribes language wage from the brink of extinction and the strengthening of its people's cultural identity and kinship ties with one another in the process to the court? Elaine Elaine tribe. In Idaho whose education pipeline approach identifies and fill gaps in the systems of academic support for students which has dramatically atakli decrease the tribes highschool dropout rate and increase. The percentage of tribal members pursuing college degrees. Tribal nations are doing amazing things things and we could do so much more. If the federal government would finally once and for all abide by the timeless pack it made with a so long ago to create the country that we share today. We have upheld. Our end of this arrangement is long past time. The United States upheld its end of the agreement meant

Federal Government Congress Pueblo United States Indian Child Welfare New National Congress Of Ameri Miami Tara Gatewood America Cornell President Trump Seattle Elaine Elaine Idaho Department Of Interior New Mexico NCI Oklahoma
New Jersey Adds 6,500 Jobs in December

Steve Trevelise

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

New Jersey Adds 6,500 Jobs in December

"New Jersey's unemployment rate ticked up to three point five percent from three point four though the state added sixty five hundred jobs in December new data from the department of labor and workforce development shows the reading Cree slightly because more residents entered the labor market looking for

New Jersey Department Of Labor
Rising from Bankrupt and Divorced to Thriving Entrepreneur

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

08:38 min | 7 months ago

Rising from Bankrupt and Divorced to Thriving Entrepreneur

"I'm an international generational expert. That goes way back You know currently Fifty seven years old but I started the current company that I have about twenty ninety. Four years ago I've been a single dad of To millennials who are today thirty and thirty two years old. I've got two grandkids and I've got a very successful business and I'm an International Speaker bestselling and award winning author I keep running all the time and I'm probably I'm booked about a year in advance on all the consulting time and things things I do with organizations across North America so I love what I do every day. It's a it's a challenge but a fun challenge so with that. What would you say your favorite thing to do? Is I have a feeling. I know what your answer is going to be but I always like to hear the answer you know I i. It's it's a great question My favorite thing to they do these days is Is To do what I'm doing. I love to speak in front of an audience I you know I. I write over forty articles in national publications. And like I said Eh seventy keynote speeches a year so I just have such a passion for that because back in nineteen ninety six. When I started this company I was I was not doing well financially and I said said I'm GonNa build the life that I wanna live and I'm Gonna I'm GonNa create the job I would love to have and when I really ended up creating over that you know twenty three twenty. Four year span is I've created the adventure that I've always wanted to have. So you know. Every day is unique to make a difference in people's lives lives in educators and employers and and teaching them how to unleash passion purpose in performance and younger generations. And so I do that through a myriad of ways and I I just have such a passion for it in fact tells you people ask me all the time you know you know. Mark Your fifty seven years old you know like do you have an eye on retirement. You want to retire and I kinda laugh at them and I go guys. It's taking me fifty seven years to become an overnight success. I am not in a hurry to to to wish this away. So I'M GONNA I'm GonNa enjoy this for everything it's worth you lost over something and a lot of times when people are Are experts they just kinda take things for granted so I'm going to back acas up a little bit. You said that you decided to build the life you want it to live. Yup You have got to dig deeper on. Yeah back in nineteen ninety six I I was going through a tough year is one of the toughest years of my life. I had gone through Through bankruptcy Went through a divorce. became a single dad of a nine and seven year old Wait over four hundred pounds and I wasn't making nearly enough money each month. It was a tough tough time and so so You know I I took the time to kind of refocus my life and I was able to ask the question you know what what would life look like if I really really wanted to build it. In a way that would allow me to thrive and and I decided you know. I love to speak in front of people so I wanted to be. You know I wanted to be able to do speaking and I I knew I had to take care of my kids and I and this was the time to start building a business that would serve. You know me through the rest of my life and then ultimately one based hopefully serve them as well So I lost one hundred seventy five and thirteen months. Lost One hundred and seventy five pounds. I started this company and in twenty three years you you know become an international speaker. bestselling and award winning author Become a thought leader on the topic of younger generations in the workplace and education. And the home You know all of these things are happening You know just just last week. I was invited by Forbes Dot com to become a regular contributor with them. Ah to write articles on this subject so you know it's it's remarkable. What happens if you start building towards the the life that you want to? Have you know things end up falling into place. Now it's taken me twenty three years but But I'm at the point now where US every failure that I've had in my life life To help me you know truly appreciate it. Be Grateful for things are today and and I'm just I'm a mumbled I'm honored. I'm very grateful grateful. So you mentioned in your answer that you've had failures and that you've overcome challenges. What how you approach challenges to overcome them With every we'll see I you know I guess the easiest way for me to do. This is what I speak about on the road and what I wrote into my book answering why I call it the branch creek moment of life you know if you can imagine yourself going up in a tree and just climbing a tree. This happened to me when I was ten years old. I went up very high up into a tree when out on a really firm limb and while I was standing on the limb the limit or niece meet cracks. I mean if you can imagine what that feels like you know when you when you hear it underneath you and you almost feel it like pitchfork through your body as the branch starts to give way. Hey well you know at that moment of peril. There are three things that happen and this is a metaphor. I use for everything in my life and I teach this to audiences three things that happen number. One you become singularly focused doesn't matter what stresses and challenges. You had getting into the tree or not focused on the task at hand. Second thing that happens. Is you start strategic. Planning how you're going to get out of this. And how do you get back to the safety of the trunk. What are you gonNA grab where you'RE GONNA fall? Third thing that happens is you take action And all three of those things focused planning action happen literally in the blink of an and I or I you know I believe that. The branch creeks in our lives many times anytime. There is a fear of loss or a sense of urgency. The branch creeks underneath us a little bit and it forces us to focus the plan and to take action and I believe that those are the moments that make all the difference in the world. Because it's at those moments that we actually become uncomfortable and I believe that the growth in our lives happened when in fact we're uncomfortable almost never when we're comfortable so I I welcome those times and so in Nineteen ninety-six and I had the biggest branch creek in my life with all of those things that were going on and it forced me to focus the plan and to take action and that's made all the difference in my life now when I am ever you know Faced with a challenge or something in my wife isn't going according to plan today or this week or this month or whatever I always take a step back and I go. Oh this is a good thing. There's something positive here I have to focus. I have to plan. I have to take action and every time I do that. It gives me a new perspective on the challenges oranges that arise each day. Some awesome so switching is just a tad bit And I love s asking this question just because of the different answers that I get If you could meet anyone in the world who would it be and what would you say to them. Wow what a great question I would love to meet and have dinner with Ron Howard. I just I'm a big Fan. I think he's a remarkable storyteller and And he's He was born on my birthday. He's just eight years older than me but I would love to meet him and talk about some of the the remarkable stories that he's told on Film we've learned a lot about you the branch creek moments in your life. Tell us about your business. What do you do so I own a company called T. The F. S. Were a You know an international communication and strategic initiatives company. I you know I work. I do a lot of consulting with educational organizations and business organizations on how to recruit engaged retain and increase performance in the younger generations. So I'm constantly working in to try to get people to understand that you know the younger generations are the most incredible generations to come down the pike. Which is why I'm in so demand today because I have a different view than most people? We'll do In America today most people think that young people are lazy and entitled. I go completely the other way. I think anyone thirty nine younger in this country and the most incredible generations to come down the pike like. I think they're the most intelligent resourceful and pit bull like generations that we have ever seen in this country when they see a want to in their life they will move heaven and earth to get to that want to our challenge of course his parents educators employers is getting them to want something so what I work with with organizations and you know whether it's educational or or workforce development is. How do you understand what they're thinking you know? Wh Why do they think what they think what makes them tick. And then how do you best engage. Connect an answer there. Why As to why something is happening so that they can come along for the ride you know they need to see the vision. They need to see the purpose in order to be able to move forward. So that's what I do do every day. I've got twenty three roughly twenty three people now that support what I do across North America and and we are we're we're we're crushing it out there. I got an amazing. The team of people that are constantly giving one hundred percent And they they actually push me further and faster some. I'm very fortunate to have brought wonderful people on

North America International Speaker United States Forbes Dot Ron Howard Strategic Initiatives America
"workforce development" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

05:09 min | 7 months ago

"workforce development" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"Then they're earning grants at a level that that would be really attractive to to someone. That's say a post doc applying sore trying to discern do I want the or is research experience or do I WanNa take a post doc experience somewhere else. I'm GonNa his shamelessly plug or I should say. Look at us because of what what's happened in the past in the thing that we can certainly say about the arise experiences. You're going to do the research you're GonNa you know we're going to do the publication. You're you know you're not gonna just be sitting in someone's Office Coffee Violin. The papers and giving them coffee. You'RE GONNA be at the band's doing the work which is if I were Ross minded. That would be the Drennan during that that to me that you're absolutely correct. That's the dream. There's a level of independence. Attendance that one will gain during these appointments but at the same time. We're we're starting to move towards multidisciplinary teams across so many different disciplines with with so many different trains of thought of diversity. Diversity of thought within those teams in that structure that's built built at these national laboratories in these other research centers that it just makes for such a positive environment and experience so he walk away way not only learning something new publishing and creating scholar works but you walk away understanding more about disciplines that you didn't yeah no about without experience and making those connections. I mean those are invaluable connections that you're making you know with the top tier scientists around the world that there's there's really not many other places that offer you that the availability to to be that close and you know and work side by side with people of that caliber. So I'm not sure I can say it. Any better than reemphasize is the fact that when you're here. Networking is a key component of each of these appointments and that's networking with peers. That's network could the other students that could be other post. Docs that's networking with your mentoring. Team or or your team. That's networking with other administrators at the laboratory or at conferences and other events that you're going to be exposed to but I think the key thing to take away is networking. It is something. It is a part of the experience that is very invaluable. And it makes it. It makes an arise and Ori- you experience one of my favorite speaking about neck networking one of my favorite kind of experience. Hearing about that was when Bo oh cumberland and I were in Athens Georgia talking to participants at the FDA and international students who are working with the guys who wrote the textbook that they were reading back home into them. These guys are rockstars arms right and they're working their labs and they're thrilled to death to be there because they're doing amazing work that they would have the opportunity leading to do otherwise. I couldn't agree more. I'm I'm a bit of if I can say you can edit this science nerds when it comes to these things things I think we use the term rockstar incorrectly. Read this is not someone on stage but it should be a different topics opposite. The stage should be the laboratory the amount of innovation that they're pushing out of these national labs research centers that end up and this is a lot of people. Don't no no that. Maybe the general public don't know that's transferred that innovation is transferred into our everyday lives in some form or fashion is is To me where the real rock stars are earning their money day India. Yup absolutely we could seriously all all day but we hope there are people sitting in their cars at home listening today. Aw kind of hoping we wrap up Craig. We will have you back absolutely. Is there anything third you want to say right now before we close. Well it's I would be happy to come back anytime you will invite me. It's been my pleasure to be here. I'll look forward to talking to due to in the future and once again if you are someone listening that is interested in looking at the various positions that we might have. We need you to go. Oh visit ours. Intellect website correct leased uses dot com into looked with Aziz. Thank you thanks. You're welcome thank you. Thank you for listening to the arise.

Drennan Craig India Aziz Ori Bo FDA Athens Georgia
"workforce development" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

10:13 min | 7 months ago

"workforce development" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"Is so good. Was Everyone's workforce. We can't plan mio. Machines can't program themselves Theories can't be supported. Research papers. Manuscripts aren't authored individually right there authorised teams in group. So when you look at what we're trying to do you look at how we're trying to do it begins at the grassroots level. It begins you know K.. Through twelve it begins exposure to concepts it begins with you know that that that understanding with With the teachers that give so much of their time not just nine months out of the year ten months out of the year and then they take off for two to three months in the summertime. But they're giving so much of their time twelve months a year I I would over-exaggerate by saying twenty four hours a day seven days a week. I'm sure they feel that way right rights because they're so impassioned about what they're doing if these learners but it begins there it begins with things that were doing with our K.. Through twelve activities. Our teacher workshops and our our summer camps were passionate as you know about about teaching Teachers about exposing teachers to the latest technologies and tools. That will make their classrooms successful so the teachers will have something in their toolbox to pull out to ignite that stem spark that that. We've we all know that's out there for for these young learners. So I truly believe begins K. through five not just Six through eight or twelve high school. Think it begins K.. Through five I think he begins with the Denna fine and training Passionate teachers not so sure how much you can train compassionate to a teacher right. Maybe somebody can argue with me or debate with that one but I think teachers are very much needed. If you're not going to train you know passionate. The teachers probably not possible. You train you train them. How to teach stem you? Give them the tools else to teach stem. And that's something that we're incredibly passionate about here as well. The summer camps for kids is something that we do. We do a lot of them. Thomas specially during the summer and then off number two other events that were that were going to do for the kids. It's Tennessee Signs Buller National Science bowl or any the other top events that we do. Those are the ways to begin this process and then we hope this process carries over when they get to post secondary education as well and that's really where we need to retain them through the pipeline to not see the leakage from undergraduate to graduate school onto onto their post doctoral studies. If there's going to be post post doctoral studies or simply out in the workforce in general so so I guess I guess I have to say it begins with well-qualified passionate staff and learners. That WanNa take that extra step that want to engage in that next level discovery that this nation will need and really the world will need in the future. What I think is amazing? About what our K.. Through twelve staff does you can see how passionate they are. Absolutely I believe in passion ignites passionate. It's like you know lighting a candle with another candle right so our folks are so passionate about teaching other teachers and even other students other teachers can't help but by the and I also think think we are have been lucky. The teachers that take our courses during the summer I I feel like the majority of them have that spark for learning and they want to be here. And there's a reason here and they're already if you talk to them. After the first day they're already thinking of ways they can go back and implement what they've learned in the first four hours of their class. How they're going to take it back and how much their students are going to love it so I think we're lucky because we get more contact with those passionate teachers that you were talking about? I feel like we see them. Maybe a lot more than than others and and we're around them a lot more which is cool and they're passionate also rubs off on us when we get to talk to them and interviewed them about their classes and how they plan to use what they learned and you know what how they feel about their students it just kind of comes full circle you know. Let me say something better cases so staff and is our staff in general but I really just want to illustrate their creativity. Do that until this small story. Well I'm not sure when this podcast is going to air but I will say that. We are in October right around the Halloween timeframe well. One of our staff members is not K.. Through twelve on our research participation side her name Sarabeth so she came up with this idea to host a Halloween in decorating cube Party right and so she came to this idea. I thought it was a wonderful ideal is one of the ways ways that we can be tomorrow. Cliche one that we know well there for further together and we can empower our employees and make our workplace replacement a little bit better. She came with his idea. And so The staff started decorating their offices. There's cubes and if you haven't had a chance to walk around on the second floor. We would advise to do that if you're so badge to it would help but it so people started decorating their their their cubes and their their offices. So two days ago I walked past the space where the K.. Through twelve staff sit and so three or four there decorating their offices and I walked up to with them and I said I knew it was only amount of time before your creativity and your competitive spirit emerged and I knew everyone else was in front that that that really illustrates the Jennifer for tyrel and Kayla Canarian Chris Nelson and Pi Mu and care in all the team. And I'm sorry Misdee- one but all a team that personified Saana Fai that passion that goes into their job every single day because it day in day out with K.. Through twelve their mission is to better in to help someone else's life whether that's a child or that's a teacher that's going to impact that child one of these days and that it's truly an honor honor to get to work with this team into into watch them work as well and so with that. Said I'll also say that statement data can also be said about our research participation staff because they clock in every day and they help administer the will they have recruit identify a talent for the federal agencies. They help administer appointments in Minister Professional Development and evaluate the programs and they they put a lot of effort into the learning objectives and the mentoring aspects of of these programs and every single day they. They are impacting. Someone's life and that person gets to participate in a research experience. They get to learn about the latest technologies technologies and the latest research areas in the latest areas of innovation. That that this world is engaged in not just this nation but this world and they're learning from some of the most outstanding brightest best researchers scientists principal investigators gators at delays national laboratories and the other federal agencies laboratories. They're learning from them. They're applying practical concepts. CBS and knowledge that they were taught at university. And they're doing it in experiential setting a hands on atmosphere that that allows them to think creatively thoroughly about their projects and they're solving wicked problems. Right they they are exposed bows to wicked problems and they're solving some of the biggest questions energy related questions national defense related questions and food and and drug and safety questions that are you know that this nation in the world are exposed to our staff. Play a key critical role in that and they see it every day and they clock in every day knowing that they make a difference for that next generation. That's going WANNA make a difference for us so that actually brings up a really good point when you were describing what what participants is actually get to do if someone doesn't know what that looks like what. What programs are we managing? What does that mean so someone and undergraduate or postgraduate? What do they get to do? What is the experience like for somebody that is thinking about applying for this kind of a program you know that is? That is a great question We will host and place nearly ten thousand research experience across hundreds of hosting facilities annual inside the house. It is an insane number. And so that's why people need to know where to go to fund this so I'm going to shamelessly say.

Denna Buller National Science Tennessee Thomas Sarabeth Misdee Minister Professional Developm principal CBS tyrel Chris Nelson
"workforce development" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

Further Together the ORAU Podcast

10:45 min | 7 months ago

"workforce development" Discussed on Further Together the ORAU Podcast

"Join your hosts Michael and Jenna for conversations nations with arise research program participants and their mentors as they talked about their experiences and how they are helping shape the future science welcome to the arise feature cast. Well it's another Wednesday and it's another fantastic episode of for the together. Oh are you podcast. My My name is Michael Holtz your host with my co host and friend. You're GONNA see your favorite co host. Only yes my name is this Jenner Hartman. Thank you friend inconvenient. Very seriously though I appreciate So welcome hope. You're doing well so I know again. Yeah we say this every episode. We're very excited and it's fresh and yeah it's a fun thing to talk about so genuinely talking to one of the most passionate people I think in our organization Dr Crack Layman who is very. He's the Associate Director of Workforce Development for arise in our am and he's exceedingly passionate about what he does. And I always love love chatting with him Dr Craig Lehman Welcome. Thank you thank you for having me. It's my pleasure. Glad to have you here so crag Eric tell us a little bit about who you are how you got here all of that. Fantastic stuff you're also like superstar teacher emeritus murder or University of Tennessee. On every time anyone asks me that question. There's a song that always goes through my head because it it can kind of defines me and how I've gotten to these places but it's a song by a gentleman by the name of John Cougar. Mellencamp you've heard of him right. I'm not showing age right. I think he's just called Mellencamp. Now it's called small town. Do you know the song is GonNa sing this the small town boy right. It's it's that's you know that's that's who I am. I have a strong agrarian agrarian as a root system of growing up Grip on a farm. Didn't think I would be in this position today to talk to you but it's it certainly certainly my pleasure to be in this position. I have spent my entire professional career in and out of academia in some way and while we don't award degrees or certificates of completion here and we certainly impact higher education occasion and we impact the lives of thousands of learners across the United States and abroad. So I'm I'm taking that as my my continued leak to academia prior to my arrival here. I I did spend time both in the classroom in Assamese straighter as well so again. Thank you for having glad to have you and again I any time. We have a conversation about workforce development and research participation programs and even K.. Through twelve. I always come away excited and having learned something new you about the work that we do and we know we've talked about this. A little bit before workforce development is about ninety percent of what what we do as an organization. And there's so much involved in that I mean we truly do this sort of almost birth birth right right graduation slash faculty process of bringing people along instant education and then filling the research pipeline and and all of those amazing things that we do not to say. Talk about the other important role depar- we we have such an incredible credible role to play in were privileged each day to be a part of our nation's economic system as it relates to science technology the engineering and mathematics mathematics education. What's really incredible about what we do? As an organization as a company many at Oak Ridge Associated Universities is we have been doing the same thing for seventy three years. It always gives me so much. Pleasure stand in front an intergroup that I'll talk to him and say I'm working for one of the best. Not for profit agencies in America doing the same thing we were chartered charter to do for the same people that we were charged do it for. And that's because and I don't mean to sound overly prideful by saying it is but that's because this organization does it well. Yeah and part of that. Is Our staff our team that we have here. You're is an incredibly bright. Some are very brilliant to be perfectly honest with you team of subject matter experts. This certainly understand. Stand what they're doing work comprised of scientists of engineers of educators both K.. Through twelve and post secondary the education is as well business people. Brilliant business people that understand how to make a business decision. Even though we're not for profit we used we still still have to make business decisions. veterans former military people. We've just got such an empowered staff that you it's easy to implement and execute our mission. Now it's not really what you I have to talk about the staff. Because they're so good but you ask about her mission. While we do workforce development such a broad term right completely related needed to economic development. I mentioned earlier. That our mission is is to positively impact the workforce worse for all of our sponsors and also gave a hint. This at seventy three years. We've been doing the same thing for some of the same people will. What does that mean? And and who are these people right. So the Department of Energy there are federal government really is what I'm saying. The Department of Energy being one of our main sponsors but other Other agencies across the executive branch our our sponsors as well and so when we say workforce development we we are engaged with ensuring that the department of Energy and the other agencies have a scientific and engineering. Technical ICAL workforce that's primarily research based that will serve their needs for not only today but for future generations to come and you ask. Why is that important right? Our nation's I don't mean I don't mean to solve sell this in fact hopefully they flex for my voice and we'll come off that no saw Our nation's economic independence relies on. So when you think about innovation through the centuries and I'm going to give a very simplistic the example here because I'm not sure who your target audience is. Maybe maybe it's K.. Through twelve or or anybody right tomorrow. We live in a world of micro targeting literally every episode of the PODCAST. Edu is probably tailored tailored a little bit to a different audience because we talked about everything from Nuclear Safety Golf Shirts who Renate Howell who was last year's extreme classroom classroom makeover winners. So it's it's on some level it's any and everybody but in this case it's probably going to be people who are interested in workforce development. Maybe it will pay twelve and people just want to know what the heck are organization. Well you know with our primary. Focus being stem workforce development in stem majors and stem disciplines. Being so incredibly important. So I'll set up my example by saying this when you look at innovation through the years. Sometimes it's hard to see innovation right sometimes. It's it's hard to see the growth of what one might consider innovation now thousands thousands of years ago when we began creating tolls to help with You know you're shifting culture culture at the time for more hunter type cultures to gathering top cultures. We start creating tools when we started. You know that you know that's a part of innovation we we didn't think of it as stem based innovation because our our educational systems were modernized developed to the way that they are today but when you think think about the pace of stem based innovation innovation today in the in the fact that we must continue to cultivate of a an build those that can cannot only keep pace with with what we're doing in industry academia and other places says but we've got to be thinking fifteen twenty thirty years in advance as to how we're going to shape the pace of innovation. Our role is is to ensure that those agencies and that industry and that our nation has the workforce that can keep pace with with the speed of of really change. We live in an unprecedented time of of of speed of change. And it's it's almost if it's almost hard hard to understand At the rate of which things are changing and how we have to keep up with this rate. So how do we we do that. How do we? How is it that we're able to look at ten twenty thirty years down the road to ensure that that workforce's thanks for asking that question? That's really good and you didn't. You don't have a list of questions and we didn't. We didn't plan so one of the reasons why I wanted to set up the fact that our workforce.

Associate Director of Workforc Department of Energy Michael Holtz Mellencamp Jenner Hartman John Cougar United States Oak Ridge Associated Universit Dr Crack Layman Dr Craig Lehman murder Eric Jenna America University of Tennessee Edu Nuclear Safety Golf Renate Howell executive
Kristen Blessman: CEO and President of the Colorado Womens Chamber

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

06:24 min | 8 months ago

Kristen Blessman: CEO and President of the Colorado Womens Chamber

"I am honored to introduce you to Kristen. Glassman the CEO and president of the Colorado Women's chamber welcomed Extraordinary Women Radio Kristen. It is great to have you join. Join US thank you thanks for having me. I'm so excited. I've heard great things. I've seen lots of interviews so so happy to be included. Well I'm excited. Added to include you in. It's been fun to get to know you this past year as we've I think I remember who introduced us. I think ours might have introduced us so it was fun to get to know you. Yeah Yeah let's with your grandkids. Youtube thank you. Let's start with your journey to join the Colorado's adults Women Chamber of Commerce as the C. L. and president which I think was about three years ago right right. Yeah it'll be three years in January. Yes I know unchartered top from it wasn't something I mean. You know now saying this. In retrospect I you know I didn't join the women's chamber because I was beating the drum for women but you know it just so turns out that I had been in so many industries dominated by men and had experience so many of the things that we're fighting to change at the women's chamber that I you you know I think it's it's the perfect organization for me to be a part of because I'm so passionate about change and you're eating change and so I think that that really ultimately the path that led me here yes you were the the CMO of goodwill industries right right and a lot of people don't know that the retail organization so you know it's got a great business strategy but they also do really wonderful things with the money that they make in the stores and I think that that's where I really got addicted to sort of you know witnessing not and I think that's working in nonprofits nonprofits. In general I worked for a university. You know prior to good well and so I think you know watching individuals. Turn their life around and workforce development programs. You know coming out of these crazy scenarios of you know one women one woman that I was working with when and with that goodwill she had an addicted to math lost dollar head went to prison got clean got out of prison and then dedicated her life life to helping others do the same thing so you know you witnessed from like that making change and you know. Learn the habits that they use you can make that kind of amazing change and you learn a few things from it and you also learn that possible and you become less fearful of it and I think that watching that over and Over again and watching individuals turn their lives around is what kept me at nonprofit but I also carry that with me from a business aspect and you know especially especially with everything that's going on for women in business right now in the systematic change that needs to happen in organizations and in the systems for women. I'm really really passionate about but also knowing what I know and knowing how change possible. I know that that it can happen. And so when you started to see the opportunity and fold with women's Chamber and was it the Spoke t that said you know. Come come look at this. The toss talks about that part of it. You know that that place of going right. That's an interesting raw cost more about that. You know I think for me me you know. I was the chief marketing officer at goodwill before I came to the women's chamber so I think for me would drill to the women's chamber wasn't what ultimately kept neither either so what drew me. There was sort of a marketing. You know aspect of it. I thought you know this is an incredible organization that has has you know that you know Donna the previous EEO has done such an amazing job. Creating what it was you know several years ago. I just felt like with with my marketing BA background and my sales background I could you know sort of Polish it up rebranded and relaunched it out to the community with with some different messaging. I and I thought that those were the gifts that I was going to give to to the women's chamber and when I got there I found out that our business model hadn't changed in though many years and that was what really drew me in and started me on the path of of really turning the organization around and it was a turnaround situation when I got there so it was a turnaround situation. It was time for it to really move in a different direction. Yeah and I mean. It's no surprise that membership organization these days. They're struggling because you really have to work hard. Hard to create value many amendments chamber. Yeah and and trying to figure out how to choose what to choose and and I think for me you know with the women's chamber particularly we weren't focused on our mission. I think that we had lost track of that right. I think that we were much. It's like you know other Chambers that were serving small businesses and becoming a place for small businesses to exchange goods and services with each other with the marketplace. I said I saw and the need that I was hearing about from women in business. Weren't that at all. In fact putting all women in the room together with small businesses to exchange goods and services was what was hurting us. But we really needed to do with access are powerful group of women and men that Ah really were seeking to advance in business we need better roll right right not enough. CEO's to are women were almost last in the nation for a number of women on publicly traded board less than one percent of women owned businesses in Colorado. Get over a million in revenue. And that what I was seeing that really needed to change and so shortly after taking over I think it was about six months. After taking the helm I quickly realized that we needed to scrap a lot of our programming and developed completely new programs

Adults Women Chamber Of Commer Colorado CEO President Trump Kristen Youtube Glassman Chief Marketing Officer Donna EEO Chambers C. L.
Chicago Proving Partnerships Are What It Takes To Find Jobs

WBBM Programming

00:53 sec | 11 months ago

Chicago Proving Partnerships Are What It Takes To Find Jobs

"The Chicago area's top job development official says her agency is approving partnerships or what it takes to successfully find jobs for those looking for them the Chicago cook workforce partnership is work with more than two thousand employers finding candidates for the large number of one fill jobs in this area and it's helped more than sixty thousand people of all education and skill levels and partnerships C. E. O. cara Norrington Reeves says this all started as a joint effort between County Board president Tony practical and then mayor Rahm Emanuel who famously did not get along having been a part of the city and county government then morph into a nonprofit organization to now becoming the largest workforce development system in the country it is indeed a success story especially for the job seekers who been helped Craig della more newsradio one oh five point nine FM

Official C. E. O. Cara Norrington Reeve President Trump Rahm Emanuel Chicago County Board Tony Practical Craig Della
Biden leads Trump in hypothetical matchup, poll shows

Overnight re-air of day's programming

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Biden leads Trump in hypothetical matchup, poll shows

"McAuliffe someone put up some polls here in the from from fox news in general election match ups here and it Joe Biden ten points and then in descending order their Sanders warning Harris in check out the president's numbers by way they don't budge they really don't budge thirty nine to forty two is that range whether it's buying Sanders Warner I tell you a lot obviously the range of the democratic side is a much wider one goes from fourty for Harris to forty nine for fighting but the big picture here Terry is that Joe Biden standing basically is back to exactly what was the day before the first debate right why is that most people think he has the best shot of beating Donald Trump and that is the biggest issue is we go for Democrats want to be taught and they're all going to call us he has to have a good debate it wasn't as strong as performance at the first debate he has to show that he's the one that can be on stage when Donald Trump spiritually in all the insults Adam and he can punch back twice as hard how how devastating with a second sort of performance that that low worries I'm out of time all that stuff how how much without her scandals would hurt I mean because I think there's a lot of expectations on this debate I don't want this debate all about me the past what happened forty years ago he's got a provision out where we go from here in fact I would say check for all the candidates I want to hear a little bit more on K. twelve on infrastructure and cybersecurity workforce development we can as Democrats spend all our time revealing it in the past we've got to go forward and Biden has to show he can lead taking this country for you know Helene it's July of nineteen and yet there's only five candidates of the twenty that feel like have already made it to the next round whatever the next round is is going to be fifteen desperados yeah they're going to it's that that'll be a free fall it'll be interesting to see just how much they come in and who they target whether they these these people the people who were polling yeah yeah whether they they go after after Biden or whether they go after Elizabeth Warren who is you know the presumed other big big person on the on the ticket it's funny that we're not talking about Bernie Sanders as much as it was going on there Sanders Elizabeth Warren will have their own night they basically no offense to the other eight but that will be seen as the phone is off does Bernie Sanders attack Elizabeth Warren and if it does how does he do it does it yeah we know she's not she doesn't need to this is and in this it it's that you mention this is really interesting because if you think about who's been debating since the debate and mixing it up that's a good way pride and Bakir Heris Sanders who would win who's not in this mix one she's a very good job staying above the fray she's all about the policy she is all about the issues staying out of it let it be seen as a food fight all of them which is a great place to be if you're caught another brother actually not being with my absolute that's interesting we're sorry the one candidate I think may not attack Biden's come on hers this time right well I mean she had a great now the last time I which you mess it up by the deadline not having you want to run the same place twice because they might stop at the second I was responsible what's notable about obviously is just you think nothing happened the last two months but even though that speaks the status I think still there's fluidity in this race and someone by the time there is snow on the ground in Iowa will catch fire maybe it's one of the top tier candidates now maybe someone would discount I was just going to say is there anybody outside of the fight feels like we're sorry sitting on a Biden Harris worn Sanders good a judge and then everybody else there is there anybody we should we should not be overlooking other than those five at this point I always argue he should pay tens of the governors I have not had a they get others had not gotten track they have it in their seat owns that you're only billed rose the cleanings we create jobs if the balanced budgets no offense to senators and Congress folks they get to talk all day that was gonna live every single day the problem is they don't have exposure you have about our hearing or capital hearing more hearing the senators and congressmen they they referred to tens of millions of people when I was governor of people when I you're not calling me chopped asking me about you know my thoughts on I sixty six and my work we were talking about national party leader stuff some of your right just as he gets an exposure and it's hard but you know they're the ones that actually you know the CEOs listen there's a lot of debates coming up and I was the chairman I started these debates in two thousand three we didn't have before I started the party debate to give everybody a shot of getting on a stage to make your case and they're all televised and so someone could break out there could be a breakout moment I wanna go head but there was a break out movie moment for doing Castro the last debate and we haven't heard anything about common sense I mean that you you just all the reason why the governors are not going to be breaking I hope is that you look at you know at a big break out in terms of fundraising yeah you know it's really counted by just one with him whether because people look at south and they're like come and press the present United States you know I don't know we didn't even talk about him he's in the Warren Sanders night I'll be curious to see if he can make an impression outside

Mcauliffe Sanders Harris President Trump Joe Biden Forty Years Two Months
"workforce development" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"workforce development" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Welcome for him as well coming up on the program tomorrow. We will be broadcasting live from. We're going to be in Bismarck, got a couple of different places one. The workforce Development Council is meeting mile, and they're doing some really good work on meeting the workforce needs of North Dakota and talking about all the things that we need to do to get that in place. We'll be there for that. We also are going to interview some of the folks that are presenting some best practices from unique and innovative things that are happening in workforce, so we look forward to that. And then also there's a big announcement downtown MandA tomorrow at a gift, it'll be announced from energy transfer partners to, to mandates. We'll be there for that. Well, and we're going to of places we conclude ING. Wolford North Dakota for the hawk museum antique show. Tell you more about that. As we go throughout the program today right now, we want to celebrate a little what's not a little, it's a big success story. It's really I I like it. Here's what here's what a track my attention about this story. Three NDSU dropouts build this incredible company. Now, just think of that, you guys that many children college, there at NDSU, and they end up that not to do are going to go there, and all of a sudden, they're building a headquarters now a company that just launched this new headquarters in Fargo, which is full of fun. We'll tell you about that Senator Kevin Kramer was he actually gave me a call right after he was there. And he said, if you heard the story about being g I said watching that big building. I just thought all I know is this big building. And he said, I'm telling you, you can't even believe it, and he had a great time with their kickoff party and told me the story about these guys going to school together, and dropping out and then building the company and I said, I need to know more, because this is the one I think a great story and inspiring story. And also, hopefully a little, you know, motivation for folks out there that might be looking for the perfect thing that you can find it no matter what a joining us today in studios is the owner, the CEO of B N G Brady national Brady. Hey, thanks for having us. All these guys. Our owners actually, the president Ryan Goodman, to my right over here. Thanks got. You bet and vice president and owner as well. Tyler. Bigler. Hi, tyler. Thank you, all for being here. So tell me the story we're going we're going to start with the Brady, just tell g come to be. Yeah. Well, first of all, I was going to NDSU I didn't know what I wanted to do. I was, you know, one of those small towns class b five sport athletes, growing up from Lidgerwood. And when I realized I wanna be a pro athlete. But I wasn't wasn't that good. What do you wanna do? I had no idea to my parents kind of convinced me go into the medical field. Convinced me, hey, you should go look at look into nursing who I'm married to a nurse. And she informed me that I would have made a terrible news. I wanted to do broke college kid was donating plasma at the time to try to make a couple extra bucks and ended up re recruiting people to play poker. I'm not a partier. I don't I've actually never had a drop of alcohol in my life, but have always loved people in a love hanging out. And so I was looking for guys to get together have pizza pop in play poker on a Friday night. And I met these guys my freshman year at the wellness center, they were lifting and just kind of went up and said, hey, how's it going, you guys interested in playing poker cards, and we kind of hit it off? And these guys pitched me on. You know, hey, you interested in making any extra money and being a brokerage kid, I didn't have any job or anything, I'm like, yeah, what do you got going on, and it really pitch? And Richard me, for at the time was a network marketing company around marketing technology had never heard of it, but the concept made sense, recurring, revenue made sense marketing services that people pay for. On a monthly basis made a lot of sense. And if we could help save people money doing that, for things that they already pay for, and I can make some money put myself through college. That was kind of the beginning of the dream. So the, the crazy thing was, I was a freshman when we dropped out, these guys were fifth year seniors in their last semester. So did a lot more. I was. So this idea started when you were a freshman. Yes. Wow. Incredible. So that, that's, that's pretty darn young. You guys were obviously, you know, down the road, a couple of years starting to think about what's next. So tell us a little bit Ryan about how you, you know, cooked up this idea. Yeah. So had a little more invested at that point in college. But we we had we had big dreams in recurring revenue. Once we had the once we had that taste of the, the concept of doing work, one time getting paid over and over again, being able to parlay that into other investments. I said, well at the end of the day, what, what am I looking to do? And from a very young age. I was lucky to have some entrepreneurs in my life. That taught me a lot of lessons early. I also owned a contracting business really young. So I knew the power of. Being able to be self employed and the freedoms that allowed as well as the money, you're able to make as well as the risks you take. So trust me. There's a lot of fear and trepidation making a making a decision to leave college early. Well at the same time, I felt like had a lot of bets hedged. Because I had already bend down that road to a certain degree. But what I didn't know that. And so we were we were maybe more ambitious than smart. But I do think the pirates of team we were able to we were able to push through the early years and continue to make a transition to payment processing services, which is really the basis of our, our business today. And so those same concepts that held true, something that people need to pay for, but we felt we could do a better and cheaper and fill niche in the marketplace. And then as we continue to, to grow things just expanded and, and the team grew and, you know, I really, I really leverage our success on on our people as well as us getting us through the hard times early because it would have been very easy to give up, you know, imagine leaving school alone without other people in the trenches with you. It would have been very easy to get give up at certain points. And so we're a testament to our team, a testament to one another. Supporting each other still tough time when they asked me if I wanted to make some extra money it didn't know he meant going backwards in credit card debt and doing for the next several years. Couple of six. Those in the fine print was it tough leaving school. Was it a tough decision at the time? Honestly, it was it was a hard decision. But at the same time, it was also an easy one. And the reason I say that is because that's what a lot of people are just ingrained with growing up in our heads. We thought we're going to go to school in that's going to start our careers. That's going to be our path. I thought that was going to be the case for myself going to school. And then we saw the network marketing company and got into business. It was a whole new direction. So it was really exciting. As Ryan had said, we had all the umbilical in the world, even though we didn't have the knowledge of being on preneurs and business owners. But we had the desire, and so it was really exciting and we were really eager to do it, but at the same time it wasn't a wracking because it was a huge life change for us. It was leaving behind something that we'd invested Ryan myself anyway. So much time and energy into it already, you know, Brady, early dabbled. I don't know if I'd even say he went to school. He was when we got into it. I make decisions faster. But that's why I say it was both because it was really exciting. We saw the path that we knew our lives. We're going to take we didn't know how that would go exactly. But we were excited and we knew that entrepreneurship was going to be the path that was for us. We always wanted something different and you know what we were doing before that wasn't quite getting us there. We just weren't real happy in the stuff that we were doing, even though we were trying to find our did you ever Ryan say what have we done at some point? Oh, yeah. There have been several gut. Check moments throughout the years. As an entrepreneur, even yet today. Right. With the stability of the business in the size of the organization. You're still taking calculated risk. Right. So they're still are those times. You're just like okay guys. Well, let's, let's look at every scenario here. Let's let's not move as fast as me. We used to. Let's, let's think through this in the building when the frames were just going up. What have we done? This is going to cost a lot of money. By the way, the frames turned out pretty darn good. The you know, the that building came off the paper pretty nicely. And absolutely. What the guys tell you about their, their headquarters, which is certainly in this day and age of attracting workforce, something you need to think about, especially when you're in the technology world, for sure. Civil tell you about that until you a bit about their product as well. And that when we continue talking about the team today on what's on your mind..

Ryan Goodman NDSU Brady North Dakota Bismarck workforce Development Council Tyler Senator Kevin Kramer hawk museum Richard me Fargo vice president Lidgerwood president CEO wracking self employed B N
Amazon reportedly weighing alternatives to New York headquarters

America's Truckin' Network

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon reportedly weighing alternatives to New York headquarters

"The Washington Post reports that Amazon maybe reconsidering their second headquarters project in New York City local opportunity or rather local opposition to the Long Island city project has been vocal with some politicians vehemently against it. Amazon has agreed to invest fifteen million dollars in workforce development, targeting public housing residents in the nearby queens, Brian houses, people living in those buildings are not sure what to think about Amazon's moved to Long Island city, honestly, speaking if they were to ditch to deal, I wouldn't feel too bad. I'm in favor because I want to know further. What do they have isn't entails the type of jobs that they have a training? Amazon CEO. Jeff Bezos owns the post which quotes to people familiar with the tech giant's thinking in saying that they're exploring alternatives to New

Amazon Long Island Washington Post New York City Jeff Bezos Brian Houses Queens CEO Fifteen Million Dollars
"workforce development" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"workforce development" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Seven twenty five time for New England business Massachusetts a hot place for jobs the state unemployment rate ticking down a tenth of a point in November two three point four percent. The state adding some Forty-six hundred jobs last month, state, labor and workforce development secretary Rosalinda. Costume says unemployment here is at its lowest rate and more than fifteen years. This is the lowest rate that we've had in the unemployment rate since may of two thousand and three. And and we've had we've been below four percent for thirty one consecutive amongst a tough day a tough week a tough month on Wall Street, the Dow was down four hundred fourteen points today, Dave Caruso at coastal capital. If we might see some improvement next week. I don't think we're going to see a lot. I think most people are going to be taking time off. I'm going to take a day off for two. And I I think we're going to take a look and say, okay, what's happening. If we look at the data. We got today to third quarter GDP was okay. Consumer. Spending was okay gestures doing fine. But I still think we've got these overlying issues which is trying to create issues they continue to bubble up. And even when we look at stocks. We saw a Nike. They had some good results this week as a financial stocks like Goldman Sachs. They got hit pretty hard Facebook again back in the hotseat dealing with some of those interesting Rambutan is thinking about should we promote products that we don't make money. So a lot of new things are happening is we can accrue into this last week with. No, I don't think there's a lot happening. I'll be amazed at my hope is you know to get back. We're dealing with sentiment that we're dealing with feeling, and I go back to my friend in the cartoon character pogo, we have found the enemy is us were afraid afraid Musso. Dave Caruso, coastal capital. That's New England business. Gary LaPierre year. I've been speaking for the Commonwealth advisory group for several years now because they can save your house and money from the nursing home. How do I know they helped me von very often people wait to call us when a loved one get sick. And they received that monthly Bill from the nursing home of fifteen thousand dollars, they panic and worry about losing their house and everything they've worked so hard for it would have been so much better. If they had everything in place before this happens, don't wait for a crisis. I'm eldar. Attorney Phillip Meru what those people should have done was come see us long before the crisis. If they had they would have had a plan in place that protected their house their savings and inheritance they would have stayed in. Troll in everything would have been safe. Aren't you worried about running out of your money? Don't.

Dave Caruso New England Massachusetts Gary LaPierre secretary Goldman Sachs Nike Facebook Phillip Meru Commonwealth Musso Rambutan Attorney four percent fifteen thousand dollars fifteen years
"workforce development" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

11:43 min | 1 year ago

"workforce development" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"To offer an initial five million in workforce development. And a host job fairs in New York City's housing authority developments with the city and the state taking in an additional ten million. But the maranda didn't give any specific target for local hires. Jose Ortez executive director of the New York City employment and training coalition said fifteen million for workforce training is a drop in the bucket for what's needed even a tenth of the subsidies offered to Amazon Amazon would have even better director would have been better directed towards city run job, training and development that number is shockingly low. I don't think it comes close to what would be required to adequately train people. To take on those jobs, referring to the to New York City housing authority apartment complexes near the plan Amazon campus, Amazon says the average salary of employees at the queens campus will be a hundred and fifty thousand dollars, but community leaders doubted, whether any local residents would get any of the high paying positions how you train people for a hundred and fifty thousand dollar a year jobs that Amazon will be offering well income people. Right. I mean, you know, they're they're going there for talent that qualifies for that. Yes position. You those aren't entry level jobs. You're not going to get that training from any government program. So then college and then job experience said the CEO of urban up bound Bishop Mitchell Taylor a job training program in Long Island city. He said we have to make sure that the opportunities that Amazon affords are evenly distributed or accessible by at least accessible by all. Excuse me. One moment here, right? Yeah. Well, they want in other words that everyone has a right to these jobs equally, and that's false. That's not how it works. I'm I'm I'm not laughing at his concern to make sure people get jobs, I'm laughing if he actually believes that that is the goal of Amazon, well that you should what are there should be some kind of lottery on the jobs. Right. And by the way, I'm not criticizing Amazon for that. That's not Amazon's goal is not to equally distribute employment throughout the community. No, no. You find the right people for the for the jobs. That's it. Amazon which promised to invest more than two point five billion in the construction and operation of its new campus has pledged infrastructure upgrades to Long Island city, including parks, offering space for new public school and improving transportation. Critics said the deal doesn't commit Amazon to helping with improvements to the city's deteriorating subway system, which is run by the metropolitan transportation. Authority. The absence of such a provision prompted the executive director of the permanent citizens advisory committee to the MTA to urge agency board members at a meeting Tuesday to ensure that Amazon would fund transit investments as part of the development deal. What's good for Amazon's should be good for transit, New York City and Long Island city. So there you go. Then going through the actual numbers when you're going through the numbers and roughly forty eight thousand dollars in incentives, how much of that is actually cash we know the cash from taxpayers goes into hundreds of millions of forty eight thousand per per per job. Yes. Per per job is in in New York, and it's twenty two thousand in Virginia. Yes. And that's incentives and subsidies, including cash payments that will go a according to the Wall Street Journal and other publications which comes actually from Amazon. Here's the problem with Democrats right now. Look you see New York state. You've got Andrew Cuomo. You got the Blasio revolt liberals, right? Cory Booker, New Jersey was also part of the bidding for their state. And so what you have. And you've got a case of Cortes outrage is what the citizens feel you have a lot of these other groups that are run by liberals stating. No, here's the problem. Liberals understand that in the real world. You have to have the jobs. They understand a New York taxes were too high. If you don't give massive incentives. There's a reason. That the incentives in New York City is giving is way over but any other part of the country will give because Amazon wouldn't touch it. Because taxes are too high which means what you have other companies thinking to themselves. We can't get these kind of incentives in New York City. Okay, we're moving Amazon gets it. We don't get it were gone. Because that's where they're getting this kind of thing for for for that. Right. Really? And you have on one hand. And this is a liberal split on one hand, the fact that the left hates big business. They do not like Amazon. Yes. Trump hit Amazon soda Bernie Sanders. Big time. And even though Trump hit Amazon, there are fewer people on the right that view, Amazon as an evil entity as on the left. Yeah. I think you you see the hypocrisy on the left. You know, being part of the bidding process, those local leaders, and you know, again, ocasio Cortez. She can have it out with the mayor and the governor of New York. And and also have the debate with Cory Booker. Over in the Senate. That's this is what they were. You look at the major cities that were vying for this not run by conservatives for the most part. No, they're run by liberal, certainly a New York. So you're Beavis with the local leaders that made that happen local leaders that made that happen. I I'll I'll say this looking at the numbers city is the top twenty finalists were really considering vast majority are liberal debt run government subsidies and everything that had been talked about came from the left, right? And so there's one hand it it's sort of like when when Andrew Cuomo, I became governor of New York. Remember, the millionaires tags memory actually said I'm paraphrasing here. But he said he can't afford to be a liberal here. Right. We understand that these high. These these millionaire tax payers pay a significant portion of the actual budget of New York state. We can't lose them. And finally, he realize the left's not gonna go along with it. And he realized he couldn't win it. And so he reversed himself on that in this case, they look at it. And they say we got to do something. Because companies were the New York has constantly viewed as one of the worst two states to do business. So there's a reason as you and I asked yesterday, what did you have to offer in order to get this offer, man? Massive. And we found out they offered massive subsidies sherve or anybody else that that one they had to write they really didn't have a choice. I if you wanted to be competitive, and that's how they want. And so what happens is other companies are saying, well, we're not getting these breaks. We're getting taxed like crazy Amazon the big on cable. Why should why should we stay here? What are they do? They go to the areas that have. That have as policy low low low taxes right across the board. Now. Yes, there are incentives offered in other low tax states that makes it even sweeter depending on the size of the company, but not every company has that kind of leverage. There is no company that can really compare to the size of Amazon at least right now. Now, it's interesting because the company I was telling you about this Turner appreciable meeting new new era, which makes baseball caps all the major league baseball players where it brighter they had they have manufacturing plant in derby, New York few miles from where my parents live. Right. Well, they the same Amazon announced it they've said, we're closing our manufacturing plant here in in in derby, New York now, they're based in in western New York. That's why the bills stadium is new era field fries because they're right there. And so they they did that. Well, the local politicians went crazy. They just went. They're going crazy over miss because they're losing two hundred jobs, and what they're gonna do is. As I look Amazon at probably has nothing to do with it. What they found is. They are subcontracting aldermen. They're getting out of manufacturing. They're paying somebody do their manufacturing right there pain 'cause they're playing paint companies in China Bangladesh, Vietnam in Haiti to build their manufacture their sixty over sixty million hats a year, they're only keeping one they have a print. They got a small print factory in Miami. They're going to do the hats for the major league ballplayers because under the contract had stipulated that those hats must be made in America for major league baseball. So we're going to keep that down there in Miami. But that's it doesn't even matter. Probably doesn't matter to them whether they lose money on that or not they just want that because that was that's part of their marketing and selling point. But as they said, well, we're not going to be manufacturers anymore. We're just going to be a brand we're going to be a brand let others do the manufacturing. They take the responsibility we pay per hat. Right. You know, we. We pay per had made they take care of it. They do it all we're getting out of manufacturing completely or into marketing e commerce, and the branding customer service marketing, and and the brand, and that's what a lot of companies are doing, and I was the whole thing because western New Yorkers more liberal. It's the terrorists the tariffs and the company owner said it's got nothing to do with incentives. Got nothing to do with anything. It's the fact that we're getting out of manufacturing. But it didn't matter the whole talk was look what they're doing for Amazon. Well, I know the company owner saying it, but if they would have if they treated them the same way that they treated Amazon, so you ready C N B going back and short that they got something that we didn't get and that's part of what the democrat party has to deal with right now that split economically speaking that there is a hatred from the left, which is taking slowly taking over the democrat party the hatred. The they don't even care the case, yo Cortez's, we don't care. I pay for it just pay for it. We don't care about how things really work. And then there's actually the the. The more adult children closer to adult children in the the democrat party who realize guys we gotta have business. We look we need to demonize them. But we still need to cater to them at the same time. They're trying to play that you know, that walk that tight rope. A demonizing private sector businesses, while realizing we have to hand habit because they understand the system as you said about Andrew Cuomo Andrew Cuomo was plane liberal because he realizes that's what keeps them in power. But he understands economics. That's why when he came any wanted to get rid of the millionaire's tax. And the white changes mind is realized why can't keep my job and stay in power. If I don't think this way. So it's not about what's best for my state. It's about what what's best for me. Staying in power, right? So that's that's where they are. So the demonization of Amazon now that the deal has been announced just unbelievable yesterday. And we figured it would happen. Eight six six ninety redeye..

Amazon New York City Andrew Cuomo Andrew Cuomo New York Long Island Cory Booker executive director baseball New Jersey Bishop Mitchell Taylor Wall Street Journal Jose Ortez CEO director Miami Virginia
"workforce development" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"workforce development" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"This is episode two hundred seventy six the AWS podcast released on November fourteenth twenty eighteen. However on a welcome back to the Oedipus podcast some Lucia with you great to have you back and we have another episode in spatial series. This is out workforce development, easing, Abbas educate. This is series of dogs into how customers have used the Oedipus educate program to better educate, the workforce, and I'm joined by special guest today. I'm joined by the CEO of L hub, Mr. quick coca Kwong better. Not as k k which makes it easy for me. Welcome to the podcast. Okay. Yes. Thank you so much apologies for massacring your name. The I wish I had done better. So K K. Thanks so much for joining us today and telling us a little bit about what your organization has been doing. Maybe I would you like to introduce what the learning hub Eason, and the the organizations that you that you laid thank you so much for having been a this morning. I've been the CEO of MTC learning hub for about six years learning hub, our parent companies parent organization is essentially the anti stands for the national Trade Union Congress. So essentially is the trade union in Singapore is the apex organization for all unions here in Singapore. And in Singapore, we believe in tri-partyism. In other words, the treat union works very closely with the government and as well as the employers. So you have a tree of organisms kind of relationship to ensure that the workers interest is. Taken care of and at this point in time at one of the most pressing needs for us in Singapore is to ensure that the workers are transformed to meet the demands of industry for zero moving forward. So one of the key imperative that we have in the national Trade Union, Congress is to obscure our workers to serve their interests. So that it can get a better job and better life at the end of the day, essentially, we are social enterprise responsible for upskilling and re-skilling of the Singapore book false, and we were incorporated in twenty zero four and today, we are about fifteen years now ever since then we have trained two point two million trading places over the fourteen years of history, and and essentially are going to this because I personally like learning, and I want a most of our institute learn through their lives to ensure that they get a better job and eventually enjoy a better life. I used to joke with my friends that thirty.

Singapore national Trade Union Congress CEO national Trade Union Abbas Lucia Eason MTC fourteen years fifteen years six years
"workforce development" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"workforce development" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Hoping that they would make and they closed on the very first day of enrollment more than one hundred days out before the start a fall a year ago. And that's when we sort of realized that we were in the middle of I say a tornado it seems more like a hurricane now. But it's really it's really been fantastic. It's it's I just can't speak highly enough about all those different parts on Amazon its customers really been wonderful the engagement. There has been tested. It's great criterion. It'd be really pleased to be able to be a part of Cosmas bay part of it to Tricia to come to you. You're very focused, obviously on that workforce development piece for the for the community at large the impact of technology on jobs, the future of work. It's clearly that's a big focus view had a causes lock these impacts the way we prepare Luna's of the future for those jobs of the future. Yeah. You know that that's the sixty four million dollar question. Right. Like, how do we? Predict what the jobs are tomorrow. We're going to be. That's you know, that requires those you know, that are in the space to really look at the trends and see what's happening in the world of work and how how the college can participate in that. And and so about and I was saying about twenty ten so, you know, right about the time. I took over you know in this division. We saw a huge influx of tech companies coming onto the Westside of Los Angeles, which is right around where Santa Monica's situated, and that growth started within five years there were five hundred companies, and and then those five hundred thousand and so this area is as become known as silicon beach because it was, you know, area of boom, you haven't heard that expression of. Although I recently visited Santa Monica anything's a wonderful age. So it makes nothing but since. So so silicon beach started in Santa Monica, and is now grown to encompass just about everything in Los Angeles in Venice and other parts of Los Angeles. So when when we saw this growth, we started to engage been than industry from a high level from the president, you know, to the dean level just to really look at you know, what kind of businesses were going to the opening not which is already opening what we're going to be opening in the future. What kind of tech Intech? Here's a little bit different than in other areas. We have a, you know, a large ecommerce, you know, in social networking also growing here with Snapchat being headquartered here, so we saw the trend and really tried to sponde- to it and for being a community college. I think we did a pretty good job of attracting Amazon as Howard mentioned about four years ago. And really I think that would attract the down on his. Yes, Santa Monica has, you know, a great reputation, a great, you know, global brand, but it was really the the possibility of partnering with more than just one college. So the ability to scale the workforce and trying to get diverse population into the open unfilled jobs in the tech industry. So we've been keeping our I on the pulse in terms of the growth of the industry. But you know, we've got companies, you know, big companies like Hulu and snap and others like that. But I think that going back to your question, I think the the attraction to Santa Monica college. Also, besides having world faculty was the fact that we could bring the other nineteen community colleges on board..

Santa Monica Santa Monica college Los Angeles Amazon Howard Cosmas bay Hulu Luna Tricia Intech president Snapchat Venice sixty four million dollar one hundred days five years four years
"workforce development" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"workforce development" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"Great to have you back for special series about workforce development using editors educate that I'm doing about you very special guests, both from Santa Monica college firstly, I'm joined by Tricia Ramos who is dean of Santa Monica college. Welcome to the podcast Tricia, okay. And I'm also joined by how'd stole who's the head of the computer sauce department. Welcome. How it oh. Thank you so much great to have you on the podcast. So it's MC you lost a clad competing certificate. All the triple say instead of the April mytalk VCR in twenty team which had five courses that were infused with items educate. I'd really like to understand fifty disciple. Why you decided to do this and what you're trying to tackle? So maybe Tricia as as from the perspective of the dean of the college. Can you give us some perspective of why this was important to your college? Well, I- aiding at the college, I'm making workforce and economic development at Santa Monica college, and I had the privilege of working with all of our wonderful career technical education program, and there has been in California, a widening income gap. And so the state legislature has been investing in community colleges on the career technical education. Side for the purpose of having us grow programming in high-skill high-wage areas. And so when we brought this idea to create more certificates that would allow students to earn degrees in shoulder amounts of time that will allow them to get in the workforce Amazon web services without wonderful partner. And our faculty were able to take on that challenge. To learn the curriculum and to be able to bring it to the college in a I think a relatively quick turnaround for for education at least. And so the reason why we did it is is because we need to ensure that our, you know, our local residents are able to go into jobs. They need middle. Skill jobs that community colleges are well positioned for and nimble enough to be able to really respond to the needs of industry. Did you talked about those those I guess those nixed? Generating jobs. Those jobs that are really important for people in the future. One of you'll collagen college in that area does serve a really broad and diverse population of students, doesn't it? So so maybe global audience maybe you can share a little bit about what the population use. It looks like sure why don't have the demographics right in front of me in terms of a global audience and Howard to probably speak to this a little bit more in terms of what is the populations in his department, but the college actually has the second largest international student population than any other community college in the nation. We've got roughly thirty five hundred international students, but we have about thirty thousand students taking programming at Santa Monica college and in terms of the demographics. We are very diverse in terms of ethnic demographics in terms of you know, gender. There's a there's a equal distribution of of genders. And and but we have a a a growing. Hispanic Latino population and this infusion of funding coming from the state legislature coming into the colleges is really to create more equity in funding colleges that serve under served populations. So letting all students like Mexican American and other Latino populations are very prevalent here in Los Angeles like some somewhere between eighty and ninety percent of our high school, incoming population are Latino, those populations tend to be the hardest to serve so we've got seems from one hundred different countries. We've got ethnically diverse populations. And with that is a good thing. But it's challenging as well because they didn't really come to college less prepared than Asian or their white counterparts. So to be able to have a program like AWS that allows us to attract for generation college students, not ethnic college student is a big plus it's been testing. So how it might be tell us a little bit about. The the cost that you credit, and you and the team credited, so I'll sure so we we built a curriculum. That is a four and now soon to be five five classes, it's a set of courses that enable students to, you know, start and then once they complete they actually are prepared to take.

Santa Monica college Tricia Ramos high-skill Los Angeles California partner Howard ninety percent
"workforce development" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"workforce development" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Or solutions to every problem. So before anybody in our company from the bottom to the top brings a problem or some situation to us. They have to I think of an option alternative or solution. And we want not just one but three because if they're going to spend the time to vet that and to spend some of their interests in time in finding solutions to the problems, then you can get a seat at the table. Then we'll take you serious. But if you're just gonna complain and whine and think that we're going to give you the due course, it's not gonna happen. You have to invest in your own solution. And so those critical thinking in those problem solving skills sets are developed at the lowest level. To me, by the way, that was a member record that put that mapra sticker without that's at. So absolutely, right. I have this thing about personal individual responsibility and all this and that many times we project on others as to the reasons why I do it myself again, myself doing it. But when it comes down to running an operating a business too, which have to spoil yourself, your family and others depend on income revenue career path at cetera man that complete transparent honesty is absolutely it. It does sound very political to me because of all these business consults that we've done together government is ever came up. Not one. It's always cash flow workforce development. Yeah. And optimize. It's just the usual suspects saying, the usual things complaining about the usual, and it goes on everywhere in the world. This is the Sierra everyplace same problems, everyone has someone to blame. And the thing is is go look in the mirror. You're gonna find the source of all your frustration. All your problems staring right back at you. Do I challenge anybody to do that? Well, they do they're they're going to have a long day. You yourself out as the problem. Then then now you have to really look for the source, and that is it. So all of this discussion conversation, everybody protest signs on all this business this and that has it's the Republicans will give you the best. It's the Democrats against Democrats that'll help you all of that is just BS a distraction. It's a distraction was gonna reach over for the dump button. No, it's true. It's. You know, the more opportunity you get people to complain and whine and look outward instead of inward, you're going to keep finding the same problem. We are on maker of kings radio, and we are going to return in a moment because this conversation has yet to be completed, but you're a big part of it..

Police search for thieves who stole 2 royal crowns before escaping by speedboat

AM Tampa Bay

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Police search for thieves who stole 2 royal crowns before escaping by speedboat

"The Benatti spine institute ten thousand enthusiastic supporters gathered at the Florida state fairgrounds to see President Trump who gave his endorsement to Jacksonville congressman Ron Disentis. For governor welcome to Florida Mr President We thank reading from the candidate President. Trump rallied, for Rhonda Santa. Susana tough primary race for the GOP, gubernatorial nomination the president called the Santa later a proud veteran. My great friend a tough brilliant cookie Disentis seeks to fill the chair now held by Rick Scott who was also recognized by the president in his race for Democrat Bill Nelson's Senate seat, the Florida primary is set for August twenty eighth Grenell Scott, Fox News it was a blow to agriculture Commissioner and Paul county resident Adam Putnam who is the front runner and so Trump endorsed. To Santa's earlier in the day Trump addressed students. And supporters at Tampa Bay technical high school Trump says. The nation needs to invest even more resources towards job training whether you're a high school student or a late, career, worker, there's never been, a better time to learn Trade Honus skill or pursue your dreams never been a better time we've never had a better time for hiring in this country last quarter GDP, has you know grew to four point one percent and I, think it's going to go a lot higher Trump also signed into law a workforce development Bill the, devotes more funding for stem education President Trump's former. Campaign manager is on trial for Bank and tax fraud highlight of day one was the opening arguments by the. Government and by Paul manafort's defense prosecutor ZOA Sonya maintained that the former, Trump campaign chair knowingly falsified tax returns over a several year period then lied to banks about, his, income in order to fraudulently apply for loans to cover his, debt defense attorney Thomas Zony. Maintained that co-defendant gates is to blame as manafort's business guy court resumes at nine thirty this morning Bill Rakoff CBS news. At US district court in Alexandria Virginia. Northern California's deadly car fire is widening its path of destruction but. Firefighters are gaining ground Cal. Fire says the blaze burned through roughly another seven thousand acres. Overnight for a total, of about, one hundred ten thousand this is, Steve Futterman in Redding California the car fire is now Thirty percent contained this is fire crews take, advantage of much calmer winds for hundreds of families though it comes too late more than. Nine hundred homes have. Been completely destroyed nearly two hundred others. Have suffered some damage and six people have died the fire does continue to burn but it has slowed down considerably and fire officials are hopeful the worst is over firefighters helping for a break in the high winds, that have been fanning the flames under Florida's stand. Your ground law someone who claimed self defense is not required to be arrested and jailed while the investigation continues. Manila's sheriff Bob Galtieri held a news conference to address the growing outrage, over his decision not to arrest Michael Drako in the shooting death of marquees mcglockton Beasley thing, in, some respects would have been for me to arrest Drako and, kick it to the state. Attorney the easy thing is not the right thing or the legal thing to do based upon the application of in this. Case I've never done anything because it's. The easy way or what Mike call the politically expedient thing to. Do and I'm not going to start. Doing it today while Terry says the investigations far from, over and it could be weeks or months before it's complete when the tax. Bill comes next year you might be in, for a shock some thirty. Million Americans could be in for, a stressful experience next tax season that's according to congressional auditors. Who predicted twenty one percent of US taxpayers will discover their employers failed to withhold enough money from their checks under the tax laws the, GAO report says even with the changes in tax law an estimated twenty seven million Americans would be affected, Jim Chenevey CBS news Swedish police are looking for the thieves who made off, with the Royal family's crown jewels the highest went down on. Tuesday at a cathedral west of Stockholm the thieves escaped in a motorboat moored outside the nine hundred year old church. Police launched a search by land CNN air but as of now the culprits remained enlarge large the jewels to crowns and, a Royal orb date back to the early seventeenth century itself Thirty-five at NewsRadio nine seventy WFL a weather is next Some.

Donald Trump President Trump Florida Bill Nelson Rhonda Santa United States Ron Disentis California Attorney Paul Manafort Benatti Spine Institute Bank Rick Scott Congressman Tampa Bay Adam Putnam CNN
"workforce development" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"workforce development" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Business discussion about the. Detroit bankruptcy filing which happened five, years ago today involved in the discussion was, former city councilwoman Sheila Cockrel attorney Doug, Bernstein from. Plunkett Kuni John, nag lick, the deputy chief finance officer for the. City of Detroit and Pat O'Keefe who represented some of the pensioners. Involved in the bankruptcy I think? The, focus, on workforce development and on education are really really critical I think the the the financial planning. For the city is going well but there's this persistent social. Issue, that needs to be addressed. In terms of race in the region also think additionally now I think there's some is in some of the suburbs that companies, that left Detroit are now choosing to come back so there's this city, suburb tension issue, that I think needs to, be addressed why don't you think people are talking about that issue listen my I am seventy years old and it is the elephant in, the room for the entire lifetime people in, this region do not want to talk about. Race now white people not black people we need to get past it and we need to have the conversation because it's holding the region back And Pat tell me your thoughts, on what the city needs to focus on to make sure we don't go backwards I think public. Education right now, is, really the main one because I think there's a ripple effect to that I think you'll see residential development which will. Further property tax base which is needed and it's hard to develop retail within. The city unless you've got rooftops and so I'd like? To, see, a more robust for sale program for housing and that is not going to happen unless public. Education gets fixed and public services keeps to continue going on. The, trajectory that it is you. Think we're making any progress because I mean we've been saying for decades probably that education is the problem I do. I am buoyed by the fact that we appear to have good leadership with Dr, v and Mike Duggan this doing one heck of a job dealing with. A lot of issues and it really giving people optimism and reason to move, forward and I think optimism is a force multiplier so I think you know as long as he continues to be positive and surely it's on the sideline people will grab them through zero-some, and do some great things, for the what do you think Outside of education which we know. Is a big one a lot of the millennials are loving living downtown. What do you think Will help the city get families to come. Back outside of education That's a tough one because I think a lot of people that are willing to live within. The city tend, to educate their children outside of the city. Detroit so, for me I think that that's number one public services I mean garbage needs, to be picked up light sign within the streets and a family friendly environment. With parks and recreational activity to really promote. A, city, like atmosphere it's going to be needed. Feeling dot.

Detroit Pat O'Keefe Plunkett Kuni John Sheila Cockrel Doug deputy chief Mike Duggan attorney Bernstein officer seventy years
Woman survives seven days on spring water after California cliff crash

KCBS Radio Morning News

04:02 min | 2 years ago

Woman survives seven days on spring water after California cliff crash

"Of posing as a driver for a. Ride hailing company. Picking up women outside, of bars and assaulting them San Francisco police suspect him at least four rapes going back as far. As twenty thirteen officers spot him on the street earlier this month this is police commander Greg McEachern observed. An individual whose behavior and Emo matched the description from the four previous sexual assaults there was a traffic stop made on the individual and we were. Able to obtain DNA evidence from. Him he's From Peru and here illegally according to the immigration and customs. Enforcement which is why if what a hold on gimmick county. Jail except. Under sanctuary law. The jail doesn't honor ice detainers. Lonzo has no previous criminal, history but his case is expected to stir more. Criticism of the city's refusal to cooperate with federal immigration agents. Meanwhile ride hailing service lift has acknowledged that Lonzo had been registered driver but was deactivated when the company found out about the arrest it says, it, has no. Reason to believe any of the crimes occurred while he was working as, a lift driver reporting live Holly Kwan KCBS there are words, like amazing miraculous and astounding being tossed around as veteran first responders talk about the case of the young Oregon. Woman whose car. Went down that cliff, in Big Sur she managed to survive for a week before she was discovered and rescued KCBS mad. Bigly reporting on the case that involved life threatening injuries and water gotten through drips from a mossy Bank. Matt I gotta tell, you Angela is an, amazing amazing young, woman Monterey County sheriff Steve Brunell is one of many officials who are in. Our of Angela Hernandez the Twenty-three-year-old Portland woman who'd last week plunged two hundred fifty feet down a. Cliff in Big Sur she survived, but suffered broken ribs a broken. Collarbone and brain hemorrhaging someone was watching over her not only during that two, hundred fifty foot plans but. The whole seven days she was. Down there on Facebook Angela writes that she used a radiator hose from her Jeep to collect water from cliff moss while hoping desperately to be found on the seventh day help finally arrived in the form, of two beach hikers. Chad and Chelsea more they, tell KOA n they I stumbled. Upon Angeles crumbled vehicle you turned around and Angela's right there in the. Racks just the hell and To really happy to, see us, Angela's now at a local hospital she is expected to have a, long, recovery she says she accidentally drove off the cliff after swerving to miss a, small animal in. The Silicon Valley bureau, Matt Bigler KCBS, the mayors of, rich Richmond and Stockton are teaming up to train people how to take advantage. Of the gig economy KCBS Doug sovereign says they want the under employed to do more than just. Drive for Uber or deliver groceries, it's an all day training session. For those with no job or maybe not enough of jobs learn how to, thrive in the new environment. Of casual independent contracting are already. In that economy and they they wanna make sure that they're using best practices or their people who want to get into it or maybe they're already into it but they wanna look for you know look, for a more lucrative. Or more satisfying job in, Richmond mayor Tom but says the. Digital workforce development initiative helps people think beyond Uber or Amazon we're talking. Freelance Writing. Graphic design web development but says it's in the interest of cities like his to help people enter this new economy if we can get people into good jobs it'll cut down our crime rate and, of course homelessness Richmond had a training day last Friday Stockton will take it's turned embracing the gig economy July twenty eight cheer and, that's the way that's why, a lot, of people live Doug sovereign KCBS just ahead on KCBS Jeffrey shop, at, Muir woods we're attendance is down ever since they started putting it a reservation. System for parking KCBS first for traffic let's see what you ride to. Work looks like we check in with Kim Wunderle and. Your local Honda dealers.

Angela Hernandez Kcbs Holly Kwan Kcbs Cliff Lonzo Big Sur Greg Mceachern Angela Commander Richmond San Francisco Cliff Moss Doug Sovereign Mossy Bank Matt Bigler Kim Wunderle Peru Monterey County Matt I Honda
"workforce development" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"workforce development" Discussed on WJR 760

"Doing the job for our region and we also hear it from our employees is big employers so twenty three of us came out and that produce some effect but two hundred twenty wow employers banded together to say look we need a regional leaders to get together and solve this regional way it's not working for us some of the most interesting input was from the four big hospitals who who together employ a huge number beaumont henry ford where they both play about thirty five thousand all saying our people work all over the region and our patients come from all over the region and not having transit is not working for having an employer's for transit coalition i hope we'll be finally what makes it happen because we've been talking about it for years let's hope about workforce development for energy we've got a couple of things going that i'm excited about one of them is we've been working with the mayor and summer youth employment he has a program obeyed program yeah great program and we've been working hard with him and other companies to get eight thousand young people employed in detroit at dt we're going to be in one way or another responsible for fifteen hundred young people and other thing i i am really excited about the work that we and other companies are doing with career and technical education so about a year ago we took the randolph school which is where the skilled trades happen skilled trades training hamilton public schools it was broken down dilapidated school at a time when we needed young people coming into the trades and a group of companies banded together race ten million dollars along with some foundations put that school back on its feet and we're not doing the same thing with the bright help school so we've got quicken loans in with a lead gift of a million dollars we've got four gm and penske putting their arms around the automotive training at that school and we're going to do the same thing we're gonna raise on the ten million dollars put another one of these technical schools back on its feet beautiful young people flown back into work that's great news jerry and finally anything else that going on i know you've got maybe how an environmental initiative update something about that you know we had a you may have followed had a ballot initiative proposed that was by man for california billionaire from california when he proposed it i was really surprised because we're working hard at renewable energy and so forth here in the state just passed legislation but to make a long story short rather than turn this into a kind of fractious partisan ballot campaign we sat down with them and talked about what we're doing and about two weeks ago he agreed to stand down and we agreed to make public what our plan is and that publicly said that we're headed to twenty five percent renewables by twenty thirty a good business decision for as well it is our business decision that we're doing this because it's the right business decision.

ten million dollars twenty five percent million dollars two weeks
"workforce development" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"workforce development" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"They did a workforce development campaign actually in australia and their campaign was how do you make construction sexy again so they took a construction and made it cool again right so it's it made a quarter like date someone in construction and they made it fun so we're gonna steal steal from australia in america right i mean that's like what we export our bags experts entertainment we we're living with the australians i got that's rough man that is but it's changing and i think the biggest hang up his mom and dad and i think as a parent it's i think really and talking to my peers and i mean there's a bad way i just think how how this is what we learned is i can't the only way to get a good job is to college right because our parents our grandparents and probably them to working with their hands and it was tough labor back in the day that's hard work you know you're breaking down by age fifty you're back albums it's different today it is different today there's a ton of technology involved in everything especially that we do as a company i'm with the jorgensen companies i'm executive vice president there and everything that we do all of our equipment has the latest greatest technology in our guys are using technology out every single day and are almost like computer science people right because they have to do programming and different machine controls that lincoln to everything we do that will direct the equipment i wasn't a machine shoppers.

executive vice president australia america lincoln
"workforce development" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"workforce development" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"You know i noticed that has two black is could you tell me why and they were like well in the bathroom you slipped in fall and listen he was totally sober when he did that only sober oh sober i feel like that would make a reporter the caliber of chabad say why is it that your pointing over unprompted you know exclamations that somebody was sober when whatever happened usually makes me suspicious i had just like very quick i thought process where i was thinking about do you i was thinking about you potentially working for an administration is that something you'd want to do or are you prefer to go from campaign to campaign i did i worked for the administration forgive me in the executive officer leaving workforce development i mean thirteen wasn't wasn't a long time though that was interesting i mean it's you know it's hard to find to the point where i only worked for campaigns for candidates i really like which is a nice sort of that is nice terrible business where you're going job a job at all it's a nice luxury of sort of where i'm at that i can i can pick to work for people i like so it's hard to do that when you know you want to work for an administration but i i really don't think so i i found that it's i'm always sort of inclined to be an advocate right i think i wanna advocate for people i like for ideas i like you know when you go into administration even if you're partisan i mean you know like charlie baker's got republican people around him but they work for the state and their job is to accommodate everybody and be nice and i'm not the most diplomatic person the the the the pace is also very very slow i think when you oh i can't even imagine i cannot imagine actually i learned a ton of labor and workforce development which is you know this is patrick administration reorganization they put all the secretaries in these executive office of things and labor and workforce development is the worst name it's it's hard to say the acronym is l wd which i feel like i need peanut butter off my gums right but it's part of that secretary oversees the.

reporter executive officer secretary charlie baker executive
"workforce development" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"workforce development" Discussed on 1A

"As tax cuts create new jobs let's invest in workforce development and let's invest in job training which we need so badly that was president trump during this year state of the union address preceded by president lyndon b johnson announcing his administration's war on poverty back in one thousand nine hundred sixty four nisha wonder if you could chime in on that comet we got from the listeners enquiring about education especially as it relates to automation the potential impact of innovation on jobs that are mostly done by the working poor sure absolutely education super important but it is not enough right it won't address all of the structural issues that we talked about but specifically on the automated question so to a certain extent yes part of the solution is helping workers increase their skills about their skills for the jobs that exist today and will exist and automated and ai artificial intelligence has become quite the hot topic on i think particularly out on the west coast and silicon valley are robots going to take their jobs as sort of the soundbite and the answer is not necessarily i work with a group of fantastic communists and i think many of them would say there won't be a shortage of they may just be shortage of good jobs and i think that's the way we started this conversation one of our partnership members larry cats economists at harvard has set an discussions robots don't yet you empathy and it's one of my favorite quotes and this is why for if you have a job right now that requires empathy particularly the fastest growing job sector in the country i believe terrence talked about his fiancee being working in home health that is one of the fastest growing sectors people who are doing care work providing care for our most precious resources are young children are seniors people with disabilities robots aren't going to take those jobs anytime soon they're not going to be outsourced the challenges those are not jobs that we convey a lot of dignity on respect on we don't value them with the wages that people get paid and so if we could transform those jobs into jobs at offer career pathways that's that's part of the solution right dave in florida writes the answer to financial freedom is rarely just more income in conjunction with smart updated minimum wages there have to be programs that help folks get out of the mindset.

president lyndon b johnson harvard terrence florida president dave
Congress rushes to pass funding bill before Friday deadline

Rush Limbaugh

02:06 min | 2 years ago

Congress rushes to pass funding bill before Friday deadline

"Are six seventy k b o i boise a cumulus station it's eleven o'clock tbo i knew starts now trump's tough tariffs legal team shakeup michael toscano the trump administration cracking down on chinese trade taking action to restrict chinese investment and put tariffs on chinese imports president trump making it official moments ago with china we're going to be doing a section three hundred one trade action it could be about sixty billion dollars but that's really just a fraction of what we're talking about china is threatening retaliation wall street is reacting by sending stocks plunging investors fearing chinese reaction and a trade war the dow was off over five hundred points for awhile now about three hundred and seventy points lower with similar value losses on the sp five hundred and the nasdaq john dowd president trump's lead lawyer defending him in the russia probe has resigned john dahl grew frustrated that president trump was not willing to follow his advice and stay quiet and let the lawyers do the talking that's the underlying story emerging over doubts decision to step down as one of the top attorneys for the president with regard to the mueller investigation mr trump recently hired former prosecutor joe digenova for the team after degen made tv statements blasting the muller probe bob costantini the white house the house of representatives has moved a step closer to getting a budget as the clock ticks closer toward another government shutdown down at midnight friday night the house has just passed a one point three trillion dollars spending bill it's approved by the white house according to budget director mick mulvaney it funds national defense it funds opioid funds school safety from mendes increase in workforce development something that doesn't get a lot of attention for this administration has been pushing since we got here it actually starts taking a look of a at funding infrastructure and it also does a lot of what we wanted not everything we wanted but a lot of what we wanted on immigration a high school in oakland no milwaukee wisconsin north of milwaukee is mostly empty this our students evacuated and sent home after what me gas leak students getting lightheaded and.

Milwaukee Wisconsin Budget Director Prosecutor Mueller Russia John Dowd Official Michael Toscano China Oakland Mendes Mick Mulvaney Degen Joe Digenova Mr Trump President Trump John Dahl