18 Burst results for "Wordstar"

"wordstar" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

02:45 min | 7 months ago

"wordstar" Discussed on No Agenda

"Do a comeback with client server was there was a wang. Road was a wang a mini computer. Yeah okay the wang system. All right so then i know because we had the wang. Mtv when i arrived there in one thousand nine hundred hundred lang-hay dedicated word processor. You have a wang. Just a dedicated word processor from wings. Yeah that was their main. Sales was the prompter scripts. Okay well that makes sense and there are very expensive and they were the same way they could look at the you know as soon as this little machine started coming out and which had will word processing on 'em once you know Wordstar and things like that came on state. there's no made no sense to buy a wang. Can i have just a moment. i've told it before. I'll tell you my wang. Mtv store not. Everyone's heard this. When i came to mtv late eighty six eighty seven The way they did teleprompter in the studio was as follows up. At seventeen seventy five broadway producer would write your scripts and these scripts with them. Be on wang. The scripts would then be printed at the office And it was a stack. Maybe two inches high. 'cause it's teleprompter printout and it'll be sent with a car with a car service to my house to my apartment at the time in manhattan and it. It'd be this big meal. i'm on the internet. I'm i was already doing gopher when they're sending me scripts by community card car service. Then you go down to the studio the next day and this three more sets of these scripts and one said is for the teleprompter operator and just you know how it worked back in the day. The teleprompter operator we had to john was john was this kind of a blob of guy and then we had Christine who was a hot hot new jersey crazy chick and they would take each page. And as you're talking they would put each page on a conveyor belt sushi conveyor belt and they had a knob and they could turn that conveyor belt forward or backward at different speeds and it would roll underneath the camera and the cameras is focused on the paper and that would be shown on the television screen and the teleprompter that that was mtv. The hot new thing on the block. Nineteen eighty-seven seven bot right. No wonder they hated me coming in and tell them their wang's good. Actually i think they.

Christine mtv Mtv two inches manhattan each page one thousand john three more sets one six eighty seven Wordstar nine hundred hundred lang next day seventeen seventy five eighty late Nineteen eighty-seven seven bot
"wordstar" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

03:39 min | 7 months ago

"wordstar" Discussed on This Week In Google

"A few minutes okay. Open the tab again. Don't you change stacey. ub you serious. i will. i will continue to be my sincere unfunded. Love the way you are indeed. And that's the google chains on another word. The real funny is alipay. Jalapenos is funny. Funny yeah it. Does it surprising. I'm i'm i'm wishing i am not happy with either workspace which we use here twit. Although we use it really heavily getting rid of it would be hard. We use slack. And that's why at least they're saying well. Why are we paying for slack. We could just use chat in google workspaces. We already have it. It's where he paying for it Did you pay by seat. It's not cheap. Once you add up all the people it's probably you know. Was it five per seat per month or something but offices in You know that. I wouldn't especially for just a small business like yours. Stacey i wouldn't do office can. So what do you think about soho. Do you like so. We'll really all. I need it. If i look at my google services it's mostly email. I have google voice. I would keep that. I just wanna take email out of the equation. Which i could do with something like superhuman Because it's only me an andrew. Kevin is not on it because he doesn't want to be he's like i like to not have that astle in my life. I'm like so does all of that. So you wanna have your you would still use g mail but just something else for everything else is that well we yeah. We don't. I mean i write in google. Docs but i can do that anywhere personally. Yeah there have been which he's yeah we're doing i mean there's were i'm actually evaluating trello for trailers cool. Yeah the new version of trello looks really good for camps. You ever take a look at basecamp. Oh longtime ago yeah email email and yeah mostly. I was thinking of changing. They just announced base camp. Jason free just announced that you know there. Hey dot com e mail system. They're going to set up a blog that you can email us that email your blog and they would run the blog and i you know i love these. Simple blogging platforms. Why but i keep trying those out Still hard to right. That's why yeah if only lower true yeah like. Nobody writes nine. No it's hard writing is just hard I actually run a static. Blog that use imacs to write in. that's cool. it's pretty old school. It's okay it's okay. oh You get used to get the key strokes. And i've used it for a while. You kind of. It's kind of a natural flow but the real problem is not the tool. It's too right. That's the problem. I i'm gonna make mine in wordstar. Are you control h. Yeah yeah what did. I just read about where. Oh yeah i know what. I just read spotify doing a deal with wordstar so that you can take your words star. That wordstar wordpress never mind.

Kevin Stacey google dot com spotify wordpress Docs nine trello mail wordstar alipay stacey five per seat Jason free words star slack
"wordstar" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

05:16 min | 11 months ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"That's Wordstar to, and like you said, it's we'll get more in depth because there are some bone chilling findings of what happened here and I. You know I'll let you kind of take it gets the right amount. But when we get there, it's it's pretty jarring of what happens with the youngest daughter and Everything and I you know. Yeah. So like they were I, pretty disturbing like I said, but like they're all them, their hands were bound their legs bound. Some of had socks in their mouth and there was stab wounds on the mom in the neck. Four year old girl had severe injuries to the throat the ninety nine year old also had injuries the neck the dad had head injuries. All forehead skull fractures Ange, there were two hammers like lying on the ground, the bodies. Which were Clearly, used for the skull fractures was two knives that they found and they found a lot of anti wine bottles that they think we're used to as accelerate for the fire and I'm assuming they had a lot of wine 'cause they're having a party. But the weird thing was that there was absolutely no sign of a break-in no sign of a struggle or like a fight in the house was pretty much. Put together except the jewelry missing it like the rings for the were taken off the finger of the mom and the Dad So it was a little strange a look like navy the person who did s new them because they were like, oh, it looks like the they. came. Right in. So actually the guy who I talked about that came for the Party and call the cops he was he was the first suspect and he was a friend he played in the musician he was in the in the band West Dad Brian and they like called him in thought he was responsible I because like you. You could have just walked in they know you. and. I has also him in the Dad had written a really dark song for the band that they were like using against him like you guys stocks on you clearly have a dark side..

Brian Wordstar Ange
"wordstar" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

The Screenster Podcast

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"wordstar" Discussed on The Screenster Podcast

"Lines, I started watching it. So that, remind me 'cause Laura Haddock, who's in the in between his movie is the main character in white lines. Do you do you know the plot? I watched three episodes where she's gone to find out what happened to her brother, your? Yeah, it's. It's really good. Is GonNa let quite a twisty turny story because she never quite sure that the her brother's friends who is still out in the like, how much has the trace that actually telling her Erin? She's not quite sure to what level she can trust them, but also at the same time she so a finding out about herself as well. 'cause she's kind of. Slept walked into marriage with kids and stuff like that. Whatever without ever fully exploring who she was as a couple of different dimensions to the story, the already enjoyed it. So it's worth finishing it. Then you're definitely go back and finish it. So this is what happens. I get to a wit bit. I make a couple of our guys delay bed, and then I just like us that is the intimation and never come back. Yeah. I. Mean. On a serious binge, the generally what one thing at a time now, blitz it like if it's an hour long episode of for a couple night and do that consistently into dom with it. Because it means you can like fully take things off your list whereas sometimes I have three things on a time, and that's quite stressful because I never know. It's difficult because like the way is Netflix and stuff. Now there's so much new content coming out all the time and different people tend to stuff and you kind of try dip into it, but there's not enough time in the day to to be doing everything. So yeah, I just try be quite strict myself. This is GonNa Watch now a now get through like. If like Blitzer Wordstar, watching anything else ton W that that's a good way to do it or you can do what my dad does and just watch one thing, and then watch it six times again when he knows there's other. or You can do what my dad does on on sky literally changes the channel, every t seconds, it's the most frustrating thing in the. I didn't mind what we watch died. Let's just kind of stick to to one place..

Erin Laura Haddock Blitzer Wordstar Netflix
"wordstar" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Here & Now

"Physician Jeremy on really with. That is named Karen Pierce Britain's ambassador to the United States ambassador. Thank you so much for joining us and keeping that took. Searching for things to do the summer while look up, because for instance between now and in July eleventh, you might see comet neo. Wise just before dawn. Yes, stargazing, why not? Dean Regas from the Cincinnati. Observatory has a newly expanded book out one hundred things to see in the night sky. Dean welcome back. Thanks for having me. You had me at the at the Wordstar. Remind people if if they don't look up. Why should we well? For me during this kind of quarantine lockdown time I've needed an escape, and so the stars up above are just so great to have up there. You can step outside and look up there in the sky. Even if you're in the city, there's still lots of things you can see. We've got the moon. Of course we've got the stars. And then we have two big planets that are coming around soon to to get everybody's attention oh. Let's start there. What's coming Jupiter and Saturn? Biggest of the planets in our solar system and for people that have been out late. You might have already noticed them because they. They rise at about eleven o'clock at night, and they just look like these two bright lights in the southeastern sky, so you don't need a telescope bill to see them, and what I really like about the stargazing is, there's so many big things you can see without a telescope, and when you can show people a planet and say point up there and say that's Jupiter that Saturn. They really think it's pretty cool. So can you just briefly explain one of the ways that you can navigate the night sky? You need your. You don't need a telescope, but you need your hands. You know. Explain that yes, so. First off. It's good to know your direction so one of the first things that I write in the book. One hundred things see in the night. Sky Is how to find the Northstar up in the sky, but you know we have all this great technology at our hands you could cheat and get a compass or compass apt point north from there. Then you can go around to see these constellations that are up in certain parts of the sky, and you can use your your hands at arm's length to measure angles in the sky as well so you can kind of figure out. How high up something is in the sky? And what direction to look in and that's those are the two things you really need to know, and then you can find a whole lot of stuff right? And when looking for the angles, a Pinky is one degree of sky. Three fingers is five fist is ten. What are some of the other things people can look for you say look for Pointer Stars for guides. Yeah, so at this time of year. We've got a lot of these big bright objects. Objects so in the eastern sky after dark. You'll see something that's like a big giant triangle and its nickname, the summer triangle, and so you'll be seeing those three stars. They'll be great guides to tell you which way the East is, and they'll be up all summer long, and then like I said in the southeast. We've got Jupiter and Saturn coming up kind of lower in the sky, but they will keep getting closer and closer to us as we. We get to July and then the big dipper is the other big thing to look for, because that's a pie in the north, Western sky, and the two stars on the end of the spoon will point to the North Star and the handle point you to another bright star called Arcturus, so it's like we're doing the old school way of finding your way around the sky. Just like the ancient did the really cool star of summer for me is in. In the southern sky right after dark. There's a star called Tarez. Which is this reddish colored star and people really notice it because that color and that twinkles lot, and that is the star that marks the heart of the Scorpion my favorite summertime constellation. You can get to see that every night in July is it the tail or the? The Antar eases the red beating heart, so it's even the in the right place, the the heart of the Scorpion. It's in the body of the score. Vian exactly and then the rest of the stars curve down and make a little hook shaped down towards the horizon. That's where the tail and Stinger Stars are. You know you say even if you live in the city can do this. It is harder because of the light pollution that is in a city, but there is less light pollution now, because so many things in some parts of the country because things are an open yet, so there's that. Is there anything you can do? You know with light pollution is there? I guess just go for a short drive. I wish there is a magic switch. We could turn all the lights off, but there are fewer lights that are up there, and there's also fewer planes, but really the key is to get out away from the city and get away from the light in. August, you say the perseus meteor shower is coming oh. Yes, so now per the the meteor showers are always fickle beast, so you can't predict them very well, but this one in August seems to be at least on paper, looking like the best one of. Of the year and they peak on August, twelfth and thirteenth, that's a time where the moon won't get in the way and wash out a lot of the meteors. Those are good nights to just get outside and try to see some shooting stars going across the sky at such a cheap day or vacation. You know pitch a tent in the backyard. Let the kids have your book and no navigate themselves or do it with them. It's just it's such a great idea. You know I do. Think Dean. There's something even more important in these times something that. Even though it's. Looking up at grounds, US or something. Oh absolutely. There's something about viewing the the stars for me. It takes you out of the earthly round, and I know we're all doing social distancing, but this is about a social distant as you can get and with everything going on on Earth do take a great comfort of looking up at the stars, and and knowing that the heavens are still going. The things are still spent an upper around there, and there is something that's really really powerful about that Dean Regas has astronomer at the Cincinnati. Observatory author of the New the expanded one hundred things to see in the night sky. Get Out and look for them. Dean thanks so much my pleasure. Keep looking up out there. And here now is a production of NPR. WR sociation with the BBC World Service I'm Robin Young I'm Jeremy Hobson? This is your new..

Dean Regas US Jeremy Hobson Cincinnati Karen Pierce Britain Wordstar BBC Northstar Vian NPR Tarez Robin Young
"wordstar" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Straight Talk with Ross Mathews

"Salt to injury instead of insult to Injury Arabia. Did you have any of them. No no brilliant. No those naked. I get mixed up all the time. Yeah we violet for this week. Please tell the people to pollinate talking about really. Yeah so what does it call to politics. I still don't another labor for the longest time I was buying japodlay and nobody was correcting me. Nobody I don't know if they were laughing inside my friends but let's go to Takato. What is own I was young? There was this magazine. The magazine still exists called madame assailing the no the real names Mozelle a monthly. What I found was made my salt? What is it? It's Mademoiselle still around Madame. Mademoiselle that you thought it was made in voice so it was. It made no one no that it was different. Do you read muscle and in my head. I saw magazines down. Oh made myself so letting supply and songs like I hear stuff like it. Sounds like you got to be starting something I always thought it was. It's got to be honest. I got to be done. It's gotta be her beyond. Okay so cool. Chris Eighty he decided to instagram. He's like Oh some of the things that I've heard incorrectly one was nip it in the but but instead of cue which is really cute bullet but the bud means what does that mean. That in the bud like Wordstar doesn't mean and I should have looked that up at bat an eyelash instead of bat an eye. It's the sexual in your window instead of sexual Innuendo of sexual innuendo. Actually your window. Either really good. It was a sexual innuendo and then the last one is a cup of soup loop instead of a cup of hot tea. Cup of tea like It's not my cup of tea. He would say it's not my cup of soup and you're like no that doesn't mean the same. Oh and black horse instead of dark horse like. He's the dark horse in the race. He yeah that's kind of but you know what my favorite one is. The Sexual Innuendo the window my window to the key believable happening. This is good as it's not so we done well. WHO DID BALL STEVE LEAVE ABOL to? We thought we evaluated. You couldn't find looker. The message me. Yeah so she'll be out for the fact that I had when I'm GONNA take for it I'm GonNa do you remember that though I love it. Two straight talkers that you guys remember everything up to so. Do you need some axes Jew because I think we should do a call out to people so if you have any things that are said wrong things that her sexual in your window to Nikki be at straight talk with Ross Dot com also any spooky stories I love those riddles and professing a vaccine. Excellent GMAIL.COM VACCINES DOT COM. Set Me Free. You WANNA go ball Steve. If you want us to ask questions to ask why they're gone. Whatever the heat from the United Rubber? Send me your questions. But for brief acsi anything goes and we don't have Ross here too so I don't know if anyone was ever come off of was ever ever off. There were moments where we there was some poop involved. And now it's always always gonNA distance the poop poop. POOP poop clue player. We there you go. Go Get poop playing when all those poop story now. One of the microwave. One I can't I I. Yeah I have to say even on some of my life coaching calls. Sometimes we actually dip into podcast. Talk in. The microwave story has come Emma so the fact that I'm talking about someone else's Freaky fags during life. Coaching is like merger girl. Never met out the people in the street talkers that come come into the crystal shrine in there every Saturday that Chris Right here in Burbank California. I'm the pupil coming in using. The first thing they say is how much they love bags. Yeah because I've gotten negative stuff online but people love it. Some people secretly love it too right. Yeah Aso's Samir. freaky facts are we. I think this is a did it. Nikki I hope we did it. We love view. Thank you so much for listening. I don't know if if if you know we're GONNA be here next week. I don't know where Rawson. Cj are going to be where in the world we'll see us land in the world is diverse. Always always is okay so thanks for listening you guys make sure to follow us we are hello. Ross pod on also media a Sign up for Patriot. The Kiss Kiss Club. We promise we will make more exciting content for you. Nicky Life Code Jazz. A show you avid shots right. That's right and thank you for your patience. You know with this. This is just temporary and bridges. Giving you like Nikki but we will have guests. We'll have Tehran on yet. We're GONNA have Bellamy beyond that whole girl. Give us ingestion Russians. We want to send us emails and let us know if you want to answer questions. I don't know if it was like Burrito girl. I have not met really here now. It's not working. She I think she was there for the holidays so she told me this she said the last time I started going to be here anymore but her family owns that. Always look the we're going to get her and she's going to bring Rio says she asked. Would you do the show and she goes absolutely. It's mandatory that when you absolutely absolutely okay. Good girl so make sure to follow us. I'm at Nikki. Boyer on all social fatty acids and let us know what you're thinking. We love you on you. You know being on the road is a whole lot of fun but you missed most of all I mean. Of course the dogs I miss earl and Selena and Audrey and I miss you know being home in all of that but really what I really miss. Is My mattress my purple mattress. These hotel beds. Just don't and add up purple mattress different from any other matches you've ever slept on their soft on their farm. They're perfect purple mattresses make their mattresses support support everything so you still feel comfortable no matter what purple also offers a one hundred nine risk-free trial so if you're not fully satisfied you can return your matches for a full refund. Purple is also backed by ten year. Warranty they offer free shipping and returns and Free in-home setup an old mattress removal plus. We love purple matches because they were there for Mr Mr Malone when his home burned down in the Malibu Fires Purple Mattress stepped up and gave him a brand new bed and that really helped him build his new home. We love everyone a purple mattress. And you're GonNa Love Your Purple Mattress to and right now. Our listeners will get a free purple pillow with the purchase of mattress. That's in addition to the great free gifts. They're offering site-wide. Here's how you get just text straight talk all one word no space straight talk. Text it to eight four eight eight eight. The only way to get this free. Three pillow is to text straight. Talk to eight four eight eight eight that straight talk all in word two eight four eight message and data rates may apply..

Nikki Steve madame assailing Takato Mr Mr Malone Chris Eighty Chris Right Wordstar Ross Ross Dot Kiss Kiss Club Ross pod DOT California Tehran Burbank United Rubber Emma Rawson Cj
"wordstar" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

Defensive Security Podcast

13:52 min | 1 year ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

"Multiple years basically. Yeah in the disadvantage here is that they only considered a data. It is set for. I think it was two thousand twelve to two thousand seventeen and because that was really only data that they had available so so I I don't know that we have a good landside on scene. More studies is what it comes down to more studies in. You know longer longer time time horizons to look at that because I mean if you go back hospitals I suspect it and Russell with ransomware affection infections in the two thousand two thousand and probably was just a very rare. I mean they're leach. Management Systems weren't online at that time. Correct that's true. Yeah the right bloodletting reading and all that was still being very manually not not not automated yet. That's that's very true. It is quite interesting to see. The pneumatic pipes that they shipped leeches around in these days. Sir What's on the well. I mean they don't WanNa touch them so so yeah you know. In certain leeches get a reputation as being better than others right and they can level up and and you you know you get the a horse that are put on the head of the good leeches Rockstar. Yeah right right but it also makes me think OK. Does there come a point because clearly advancing. The technology AIDS in the outcome is probably probably a safe assumption. The reducing newer technology better technology allows the clinicians. The doctors nurses whomever better. What are all comforter patients? But are we going about it wrong in other words. Should they be more isolated somehow or somehow more a resilient to these virus. I don't know how to do that right. But it's one of those things. Where does the technology advanced go become a valued diminishing returns because of these sorts of incidents and I have no idea but it seems like an area right for research and write for study? I think that's I I. My intuition is that were not close to that that threshold. We're not we're not close to that inflection. Point in the says probably still lots of lots of upside to to improvements derived from technology. I mean look at where. We're just now at the cusp of really starting to use things like machine learning for for helping to diagnose diagnose ailments and whatnot over over time that's going to continue you know. Continue on but one one of those one of the fundamental things that's predicated on having data right that knowing the history of the patient and having all that stuff be readily available billable in consumable and anyway. I think that the point of the of this study was to to help. Maybe drive some behavioral changes in in organizations like health and Human Services who I mean they have the have this thing. Look Louis Informally called the wall of Shame Right which is where where organizations have had a hip a data breach get their name and information about the debris posted on this wall of shame. And I think the point is in this may kind of Lake in the wake of September br eleventh when people stopped flying. There's there's a pretty pretty well accepted. Although some somewhat statistically questionable concept lots more people died from increased car crashes this because people weren't driving driving. They weren't flying. They were driving significantly more than they were flying in. The you know. The fatality rate of driving is just orders of magnitude higher than Than it is if you're if you're flying commercially it's a similar kind of concern here that if we are in are we are we. Are we driving the wrong incentive. I mean obviously we don't want data breaches but is though is that the mandate to reduce those data breaches coming at the cost. The unintended cost of you know of reduced juiced patient care totally not my not my area but it's it's fascinating to think about. Yeah I I agree. It's you're right and and just to be clear not my area either but we'll talk about anyway like it is because you know the value of the show is exactly what you pay for it. It's right yeah that's right but again I it's it's an interesting thing to think about in the abstract. This concept is I think again most acute in in healthcare because it's counted is measured in lives. But I suspect the concept exists everywhere and so the point I think is that in the aftermath of a data breach. We need to make sure that we're you know we're not cutting our nose off to spite our face certainly data breaches are wakeup calls for organizations. Well Yeah I agree and and certainly I don't mean this political sense but as watching this might a news report the other day about school shootings and how teachers are now being given a gunshot with trauma kits trading high use them and I thought. Wow it's interesting but then you know as an engineer. coldhearted bastard when x thought was. What's the most likely way for students to die in the care of a teacher? I don't I don't know what the stats are. But I know that a school shooting in is really low on that list. And I'm wondering okay. What are we doing to address those other choking at lunch or and afflicted shock or you you know injuries in some other way and I'm wondering again? Are we reacting to emotion now statistics if our goal is truly to save lives. And I don't know I really don't know because I don't have the research and the stats but I was like well. We're we have a finite amount of energy and finding the amount of resources and finite amount of money and I often see us Infosec world just like the rest of the world reacting out of emotion because something got press or something has a fancy you know name and a mascot in theme song and it's a you know a popular zero day when we divert our resources to fight that when it's not our biggest threat and so I you know. I'm just kind of jumping off the topic a little bit but uh I think these studies are important. Because although it's terrible to obstruct life in-depth away into statistics if your goal so is to reduce death these things matter you know for instance. self-driving cars we you know they're not perfect but we absolutely thirty five thousand deaths a year on American roads from driving if we could drop that by ten thousand even though self driving cars caused. Let's say a thousand but we reduced by ten thousand. Is that a net gain. We WanNA society. Is that helpful. I mean it seems sometimes like when we look at new technologies. We're looking for a perfect solution. Rather than an incremental an incremental improvements is how the things have always gone in life. It's how we've always done things and now we're so focused on the negative of something we're not willing to accept it for the invert incremental rental improvement. It seems like I don't know where I'm going with this but I ultimately we've got stop reacting out of emotion. Fear start reacting out of you know statistics logic and moving the ball forward so a couple couple of things one is i. I'm personally personally frustrated by the the trolley problem continuing the pop up in the context of self driving cars. Because you want to kill all of them you can't figure out a way it was There's some some interesting cartoons about you know about the Charlie problem like you know if we stopped the train. Now what about the all the people. The train ran out over before you know now. They died in vain As a quick aside if you're not a fan of a good place when you should be it's phenomenal show to. They had a great episode about the trolley problem. And it's worth watching. I'm not seeing that really really really do think. So but yeah I we consternation over you know what what would what would the car or do you know if it was faced with running over a kid versus an adult with the car but we lose we lose the cont the context. You know one of the innate. Nate abilities of the car is to avoid that. That situation in a much higher proportion of instances than a human driver could and therefore you know lots of lots of less opportunity for that. But there's A. There's an interesting book I forget. The Nieto's risks savvy. That's the name of the book is risk savvy by a guy named Gerd did Geiger answer as name and he calls this dread risk so he you know this is the fear of the fear of flying lying. It's the fear he he defines that get the exact definition he gives. But it's basically the you know the the high profile real risks. The things that you get on you see on TV you know people have. There's lots of people I have some friends. Who are you know who who are quite afraid dove walking alone at night or having their kids go to a park and the reason is when I watch the news? WHO's right? You would get the feeling that people are dying all the time on. Airplanes people are being kidnapped off playgrounds. All the time people are being raped murdered and whatnot all the time and obviously all those things happen far far too often but the issue is that they're on the news because they are news. Yeah what's his his physical likelihood of you encountering that in your world on any given day right yet it's terrible. It happens but I mean again. This is cold dispassionate discussion. But it's something that we suck at and again I think the news drazen but the news is reflection of what we care about society. I'm not blaming news. I'm blaming society uh-huh and again not to get into politics at all but freakonomics out of really good Chapter on this about perceived risk and the question and I won't get this alright so give me taking with your salt was to parents of young children and they said would you let your young child go play at the House across the street. If if you knew they had a gun versus if he knew they had a string poor and far more said no I would let them gopher if I knew they had a gun and if I knew swimming pool however statistically the swimming pool was far more likely to kill the kids in the gun and I'm not getting anywhere near the gun automate. I'm purely looking at. We measure risk poorly because of all sorts when the swimming pool is is really the much higher percentage chance of their child being harmed or dying But we suck at measuring that and and internalizing that and reacting to that An an I think this is a similar thing. We we have these innate fears that are outside risks and I don't the statistics in front of me but you know the chances of of being harmed or killed in a terrorist incident art infinitesimally small in the United States Damn but we react more to that and we do two things at will more likely positionally kill US cancer Her disease car crash crashes and I I think it's again I'm not. I don't have the right right Wordstar as well as a lot of these authors and researchers but to me it's like we've normalize those risks. We've accepted that. And we you know we we have not and we outsize reaction to other risks And it's just a weird thing and you know emotion. It drives a lot of behavior. That is illogical. But we're illogical creatures so I'll get off my soapbox all right anyhow. Thanks again everyone. Anyone have a great leap and see even..

US Russell Louis Wordstar Nieto Charlie Nate Gerd Geiger
"wordstar" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Of stars some sixty thousand light years away that were all originally formed at the same time through the gravitational collapse of the same molecular gas and dust cloud looking the West you see the Bright Reddish Orange supergiant antares in the heart of the constellation Scorpius the Scorpion and above it you see a bunch of stars stretching out shape first question mark that's the Tel the Scorpion and just above that to the North you say the constellation of the Archer secretaries shows the way due to the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy located some twenty six thousand light years away this monster black hole called Secretary Say Star has about four point three million times the mass of the sun looking to the north northwest this time of year you see the Constellation Lyre the hop and it's brighter star Vega think is the fifth brightest star in the night sky and it's also one of the closest just twenty five light years away Vega is a special type a white star with about twice the size and any times the mass of our sun just to the right of Lyra and almost directly June off just above the horizon is the constellation of Cygnus the swan and its brightest identity which happens to be one of the most luminous stars in the sky is a massive spectral type a blue white supergiant some nineteen times the mass and more than one hundred times diameter of our Sun The star is somewhere between fifty five thousand one hundred ninety six thousand times as luminous as the sun the huge range of luminosity estimate is caused by the difficulty in determining denims exact distance from US scientists best estimates placing it around two thousand six hundred light years away give or take two hundred and why is high in the northern sky this time of the year is a quote of the ego and its brightest star al-Tair Altair's another close neighbor a spectator obey Wordstar located just seventy light years away it's about ten times brighter than the sun and has some one point eight nine times the Sun's mass despite its what's known as the Summit Triangle Stella Grouping there are three medial shelves in October the codes the towards and the Orion IDs the tourists Meteo happens tomorrow October the tenth and as the name suggests it's made up of meteors which Pierre Radiate out from the Constellation Taurus the bull Torah are active from around September the tenth through November the twentieth while the northern tour directive from around October the twentieth through December the tenth how third both northern.

US Wordstar Summit Triangle Stella Groupin Meteo Secretary Orion Pierre two thousand six hundred light twenty six thousand light year sixty thousand light years twenty five light years seventy light years
"wordstar" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on This Week In Google

"I thought i was there at the invention of of whizzy wig. Wow the term turns out. It was actually used early by a by stanford s._r._i. People hold on what is what you get came from. Stacy knows this kid the kid did your grandparents used to say that you don't need an army because all good acronyms come from the army from flip wilson as geraldine said what you see is what you get. Why is get lip wilson. Let's not go there for a really really old comedian. Have you heard a laugh in uh yes. Oh yes that was was on laughing name timeframe okay i never i mean i was not alive in the sixties so that i thought he was on the share protesting the war when you were giving up two nothing honey twenty sees what you get in and why do diet seven up our b seven up doesn't have that stale guy taste is light and dishes just by me. I want to turn around killing. You know my diet seven up the only can you give us time. That's nineteen seventy seven wilson earl dean what you get geraldine nineteen seventy-eight shut up. You must see another one. Come on more more flip wilson here here here. She is with jim brown. Oh we'll stop it right here anyway. Google flip wilson kick. Ah yeah google flip wilson kids. It's worth visit your local library so yeah so she said at first but of course that was in a different context right so that's when got it you were. You said you thought you were at the i was i was in a conference. I've heard of these methods. These seebold conferences seebold yeah yeah. That was a big deal back. Let's talk about you and so so this is where we talked about things like the first pagination way early days my children and we finally saw a presentation of actually showing you text on the screen the way it would look doc in print even justified and changing as you type this was this was were akyel's i finished justification was was a big deal and and john people got up and he got he wrote down w._s. W i n s i want yeah that's pronounced was he. He probably was that was the first time it was pronounced. Although as your book no doubt told told us <hes> xerox alto the headlines exactly yeah the whizzy week first effort screens were you there when doug engelberg to <hes> demonstrated the most the demo whatever they call it the greatest demo fulltime mother volume we had i did doug has passed away since but invented the mouse he <hes> we had him on the the old screensavers show when he was fairly old at the time <hes> and he brought the original mouse which is a fairly large wooden box walks and he talked about his mother of all demos which by the way is available. If you want to see it on youtube because yeah it's it's the first appearance of mice mice whizzy wig lots of the things that we take for granted today and i'm yeah. It was pretty pretty forward thinking yeah well. What was the first word processing software. You used microsoft word. I remember my mom used wordstar for writing in her thesis when you did it again like she can help. Wordstar was great. She's a car you the world divided itself between wordperfect word perfect and wordstar users and then along comes microsoft word and then sweeps everything off the table..

Wordstar doug engelberg wilson geraldine stanford Google Stacy youtube jim brown earl dean john
"wordstar" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Fun with airplanes airplanes buzzing your house next half hour. What do we have you name it? We have it. We have Brad Garret. We have our tech man. Greg Stephan in a bit on that. There's an app, you can get, which, well, it helps save your money. How it does that he can explain. I read it. I don't fully understand it, but he will basically you're, you're this app could try to get you a better deal with your with your cable company as an example. So that's coming up as well right now news into the picture. It is seven thirty seven hundred wwl w news, traffic, and weather, News Radio seven hundred w ELL jellies Cincinnati. The man in charge of these special investigation broke his silence. So what is next with the seven thirty report req- chino. Breaking now special counsel, Robert Muller, spoke on Wednesday on his Russia investigation for the first time in two years, he says his probe did not exonerate, the president and that Justice department guidelines prevents charging a sitting president much of his ten minutes, statements, special counsel, Robert Muller, stumped to the bottom line findings of his Russia, probe and made it abundantly clear that the investigation did not exonerate President Trump, as he exited Muller noted only congress can hold the president accountable, Democrats on the hill, taking that as a cue. But as Muller's Wordstar fresh calls from House Democrats to move toward impeachment. House speaker Nancy Pelosi is holding firm on the other side of the aisle, the president and his Republican allies, only heard case closed.

Robert Muller president Greg Stephan President Trump special counsel Brad Garret Russia Nancy Pelosi Wordstar Cincinnati congress Justice department seven hundred w ten minutes two years
"wordstar" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"Don't don't have that beard, but he's brilliant. Letterman lately. Yeah. Do we have when you're that rich and famous? And you just like you had to you had to be like, you had to be like locked in at all times for thirty years now. It's time to be like fuck you, let me spend this money and you grow so nasty. Looks like it's the Santa Claus thing, but. Let's just shave that he looks like he was in court Lincoln tunnel show. Ryan beat me. They look like he was like going Lincoln four school. I don't know. It's a bummer when you see that snow man now man, but he has a show on Netflix is Connie on there that I think it dropped soon is. How I thought it was supposed to be on Rogan and he'd never do that. He is. But yeah he did it. My favorite was the way of the gun. It rugged Connie called Rogan. They're, they're trying to figure it out. But what is there to figure out, you just go to the motherfuckers place and you do it? Why? You're worried about the it's sensitive. Talk about see still worried about it. We're not me. Worry he may not know how to articulate himself just yet. Sometimes you're like, do I want to as I'm saying that he can't get onto Orne? He doesn't care. He wants to do. He wants to do rolling wants to do. Oh, so what, what are you trying to figure out schedules? He wants to do it and they're just trying to schedule your hurt thing, a little bit different than that. But maybe but, but most people don't have the Wordstar ticket their position. That's why people say, things like woke, when you say when you say you're woke is because you don't have the worst articulate. Your woke is the new word. I hear this is really idiots. Woke is the new basic. It's like when people say, that's like this. That's a basic but you can use it for any position. Correct. It's yeah. It's like it's like say I'm pro choice, you know why? Because I'm woke. Yeah, I'm pro-life why you know why? 'cause I'm that sensor easy way. That's right. Tareq are 'cause even just did this panel on men and masculinity. And these guys. Guys, we're talking about toxic mass Linnea how we have to lose our aggression, and we have to be more emotional. I was like holding. Nobody said there's a really good site, aggressive masculinity. If it's channeled in the right way, Steven Jobs was super aggressive. He just channeled it in the right way. When you channel ended up picking up a gun, and shooting people who disagree with you. That would be that's not good. But there's a lot about being a man being competitive being aggressive wanting to win that if it's channel in the right direction gives you great sport gives you great innovation. I people, but it's also very everything may get anywhere being demonized, it's your be like men are men are, you know. And they speed about men and such a terms like toxic, your hierarchy patriarchy. It's like, hey man. I'm a little bit more complicated. Matt, right. By the way, when people say this about, like look at aggressive things like sports, like how many times, I've been watching these UFC fights, I guess, just to check it out, because I know you like air coca podcast with him worse. Fire team we play video games. But anyway, like, what I watched us now there's a lot of emotion in it lately of went went to guys just an bond. I love that. This is what I'm saying to guys. They fighting fighting fighting like literally looks like they're trying to kill each other. Right. When shoot is over they embrace, and you could see the guy like the respect. He's like you earned. Yeah. You could see the one that even the one that wins he looks at the other guy like you push me to the limit your, there's, there's a certain thing that goes on there. But men cry around sports all the time. And it's such a masculine thing hug and they. Man, but anyone who's done anything, whether it's football players quiet football player, whether it's a fighter, whether it's a comic who's doing well on the road to native hater whoever raises a business..

Rogan Letterman Woke Orne Connie court Lincoln tunnel Netflix Steven Jobs beard Wordstar UFC Lincoln four school Linnea Ryan Tareq football Matt thirty years
How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:21 min | 2 years ago

How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

"Of apps Stokes and spreadsheets that still run. Absolutely everything. Do you ever wonder if things could possibly change? Well about a year ago, a company called coda came out of stealth with the promise that anyone could make a document as powerful as an app, and now they're making good on that promise. And since the beta phase tens of thousands of people across thousands of teams are using coda every month and we've got some big companies involved here to such as cheddar, Spotify, an Uber as well as small businesses just the Hudson baking company of all being building coda docs, to create solutions to that. Very real problems. If you go by the coda website, whilst you listening to this podcast, check out that gallery to say some of those coda documents. So a couple of weeks ago coded and then new type of dog released code at one dollars. Zero and with it. That was a new mobile experience available on both mobile web and oil s so the concept of a dog being as powerful as an app, captured my attention. But when I also learned the as a rich tech history working at Google, and Microsoft, I had to get him on the show to learn more. So book elope, and hold until it, so I can be me is all the way to California, so we can speak with Shishir have Roger CEO and co founder of coda. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are, and what you do or thanks for having me Neil? Notre, I run a startup called Kuda that I've been working on for the past four, five years before that I spent about six years at Google, I most of that working on YouTube. I ran the tech side of YouTube, and before, though, it's been about six years. Microsoft, worked on office windows and sequel server and before that I started a another startup colts and Trotta. I quite a while ago. Now. On the tech podcast. I love hearing about how techies transforming every industry, but also often, more importantly, the story behind the solutions slowly changing the world. So can I ask that you share your journey that began with an observation the world still runs on documents and spreadsheets for us four years? Okay. Tell me about that and the inspiration behind what you're doing. Yeah. Sure. So KOTA where we're building. A new type of document it blends the best of documents spreadsheets presentations, applications into one new surface. And we like to say that it allows anyone to make a doctor's, powerful an app and the, the idea for the company came out of two primary observations of the world. The first is that we think that docks not apps around the world. And so we look around and look at our teammates or collie or you know, what people do at home or school, and you ask people, what they used to keep themselves productive or or management system. And so on, they'll often name some packaged applications that they've that they've bought or things they built in the across all sorts of different examples. But the if you actually observe them and you walked what they're doing. You'll see them in documents and spreadsheets all day long. And this is something when I worked on the office team it was something we used to talk about as we saw in our user base. But when I got to Google particular when I got to YouTube, it, this is became very start for me. This is right, when Google doc. She's coming out, and we basically ran the entire company on, on Google docs and sheets. And, you know, things like the way we did go planning or the way we did performance management. Or you know, one of the fun stories was at when I joined YouTube back in two thousand eight if you hit flag on a YouTube video on the website, it would show up as a row in a spreadsheet on an ops person's desk. And that's how that's how he managed thing. So, you know, so there's a sort of first division, that, that even though there's all these applications out there. Everything still seems to Ronin documents. Spreadsheets. And then the second observation is if you look at those documents and spreadsheets, they haven't really fundamentally changed in over forty years. And we have this running joke at the company that if Austin powers to pop out of his freezing chamber, he wouldn't know close to where or what musical listen to, but he would absolutely know how to work document spreadsheet and a presentation. And it's a pretty simple reason all the metaphor for those tools for set in the nineteen seventies Wordstar and Harvard graphics and visit Cal, you know, gave us all the metaphors that were still using today. How pages are laid out in the document house. Lives related presentation spreadsheet everything, like how you do a one b to see three that we've all gotten used to we like to pull up battleship all those metaphors have state, exactly the same forty years and you put these two observations together, and it sort of interesting. You know the the this surface that what are the use cases fundamentally changed. And we're, we're now using this not just for digitizing, you know, paper documents and slide decks, and so on. But we're actually using it to run our teams and our families and our. Businesses we we use it all day long. We stare at it at all of our productivity done out of it. And yet, we're using metaphors that are forty years old every other piece of software in the world has has changed in that time period, you know. So what about what about documents? And so that's how we started. We said what, what if we were what if you were to backup ignore history and start from scratch, what would we build that, and that's what we've been building? A new type of document fun. Fantastic, especially because if you'll buy ground being at YouTube, and Mike self and seeing firsthand, the heart of the tech industry. But you tell me well about how that moment that you realized that if you're going to build a new type of dog, you really were going to have to start right from scratch. I mean, it must be quite daunting. Yeah. I think it's one of those ideas that, you know, I always like to say the, you know, the sort of two questions, I ask people when they come to me and say, should I start this company and always ask them? Do you have an idea? You can't imagine not working on and do have a person, you can't imagine not working with and is rarely the case that the answer to both those questions are. Yes. But when they are, it's, it's sort of inevitable. You can just you can see the gleam in and entrepreneurs is they, they can't help it started and, and it almost becomes an obsession. So, so when we were getting started myself, my co founder, Alex tonight, you know, he was actually working on another startup at the time that, you know, thankfully wasn't going that while, and so I was helping them brainstorm other ideas, and, you know, one of us one of us wrote the sentence on the board and said, you know what, if what if you can make apps easily as you can, as, as you can make dogs and once that showed up on the board. All of a sudden, we had this whole list of ideas, it just kind of snapped into place and we. You know, we could just sort of picture the product, we could picture all little elements what we need to get done. And it was it quickly became clear that none of those elements are things where you could just slightly twist, one of the existing surfaces and, and have it just worked that you had to sort of fundamentally we start with a different type of information model and you know, everything from very fundamental concepts. Like, for example, we don't we don't differentiate between documents spreadsheets presentations, all in one surface down to like very specific. Details of the ways that, you know, the way our tables were presented as a lot closer to a database into a spreadsheet, and we have an interaction model people. Call buttons or week all buttons. And people, people really like that people use to setup actions in workflows, and so on that are all these, you know. New types of building blocks reframed in a way that, that have to have to fit together perfectly and that point, we can picture the product. It was really clear that no, we weren't going

Youtube Google Microsoft Co Founder Spotify Stokes Labatt California Colts Notre Wordstar Ronin Neil Austin Shishir Mike Self Roger Ceo Alex
"wordstar" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Triangulation

"I don't think anybody called this trash even though it was technically trash eighty. It was always the model one hundred and it was because even though you only had four or five lines on here. Maybe there were eight I can't remember and you had a full keyboard. And you could connect this to a modem and file copy right from the ballpark. And this was an amazing, computer. I I I always I eventually got one. But at the time, I couldn't afford them. They were whole four hundred dollars. Don wrench. This is. This is incredible. Incredible Tandy model one hundred there's a trash eighty this was reasonably called the trash eighty because Eddie time you touch the keyboard static electricity was shoot from your fingers and kill the whole darn thing. He's really I still have that problem these were so unreliable. So when you dead animals. You have a great quote in here from the nineteen eighty superman comic g the T R S eighty really does think as fast as superman. Golly. Golly. What's this? I this is the first porn machine. Well, if you lived in France, yes, indeed. But, you know, the member that time in Afghanistan, I ended up meeting of French doctor and later on we were in Paris, and she had that in her house. And it was I I didn't use it for an ferris things because I could hardly spell my name. French let alone in anything else, but crazy is in the early eighties. The French phone company wanted to get rid of phone books. And they put one of these in every house in France. Yeah, they were so far. They they had it. They had it all there, and you call it porn. I don't think it had graphics, particularly. You could have sexy chat yet. There was it was utilized. I I don't want to overstate that. But every electron device that's ever been. Divides starts off at or Vince. Men in you know. He wins her like that. You can go back to Roman times. Somebody John didn't somebody bring us a mini tell at one point. I think we I think we got rid of it in the great purge of pardon me. Yeah. Yeah. I think in the great purge of twenty fifteen it was was lost to. I hope somebody got it though. Because that is a that is really an important machine. Even though nobody in America relievers saw one we did see this though. And boy did I drool over this. Yeah. This is an Osborne one. Much better shape than our Osborne. Was you know, Osborne is ton business schools as as a counter example. Yes. Yes. It's not to do. How not to unveil? It was a very quirky English. And and really quite a character. He's passed since. But this computer his was his idea to make a portable computer twenty pounds, by the way, the size of that screen is almost actual size. It's tiny, and but it was two thousand dollars, and it came with all the software not only CPM, but Wordstar, and what is it calc star? What was the spreadsheet that they had it came with all the software you need that's primarily because Lee Felsenstein really knew what he was doing. When he designed this thing twenty four pounds two thousand dollars. But Adama's born made a fatal mistake. Yes. Yes. You want to tell us. I think you'll tell better. Essay it was there. I remember. They knew they announced the Osborne too long before it was ready and killed sales of the Osborne. One and the osbournes to never came out because the company went bankrupt. But the legacy of some of the software still absolutely if you've look into word or some of the key commands, it's hit control ks every time. I want to say it's almost to me like the quivalent of English Kerr roads based upon Doman road. You know, yes. Legacy systems live on for much longer than they should excess was a this was a really important, computer..

Osborne France Vince Lee Felsenstein Don wrench Paris Afghanistan Eddie America Adama Wordstar English Kerr John two thousand dollars four hundred dollars twenty four pounds twenty pounds
"wordstar" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Think Again

"You now responsible for their own retirement. As if that's a good thing rather than wait a minute. And none of them numbers and figures in charts. They give you none of those are real they're all they don't really work like that up. Yeah. It doesn't add up. I mean, the SNP you don't really only and you go down you it doesn't. And yet. Like, if it were not for the insecurity, if it were not for all the fear, and the very real problems that go along with the freelance life like not being able to afford your education or raise children, or you know, it did seem to solve some problems of the job job situation. Which is that you're not tied to a particular office. You have a little more freedom with your time. These are nice things. These are things. We would like I would like to for the job to be done. When I say, it's done not, you know to be supervised a certain number of hours, or you know, try to be the one showing up earlier and leaving later than everybody else in the nineteen eighties. When I got out of college. It was there was an economic crisis going on then of some kind and people couldn't get real jobs. You know, even I went to Princeton. And it was like unless you were you know, in that track to go into Paine Webber. Or something through your dad's people, right? You didn't get a job even then. But there was somehow enough slack in the wheel enough fat in the system that a kid like me who learn how to do Wordstar on a K pro you could go into a law office at night, and they would pay us like thirty bucks an hour to type the depositions we'd have little headphones on and we would type depositions into a computer he thirty which is a lot. It'd be like sixty an hour. Now fifty an hour. Now, could you imagine that? So you leave there with like three hundred bucks for your night, and you live with three people in an apartment in Brooklyn. So you really only pay two hundred fifty bucks a month rent. So that you made your rent that you don't feel it that hard. Yeah. That's just a little bit of your time. And yeah, so it's two all nighters week or whatever. But you got the rest of your time to read Immanuel Kant or right? You're crazy things. That's how I ended up with a writing career. That's how I ended up doing theater in New York. Then I got you got a job mixing sound for off Broadway musical for sixty bucks. An hour. I'm going there. Three or four hours a night mixing sound listening to stuff like damn you could have a cool cobbled together life, and that's not that was big that's a reasonable compromise. Like all ten eighty nine, you know, gigs labor, and it looked like the internet was going to make that better was going to empower that group. But really what it did was once they figured it out. You mean once the hirers figured it out? They realize oh, this is the easiest way we have to disempower all those gig workers. And that of course, is sadly how it always seems to go with these technologies. Sadly, it's how an always seems to go with these technologies, and then that's not the technology's fault. It's the fact that however, you wanna look at it neoliberalism or capitalism extraction value from people in places is so embedded, and you can look I wrote a book called life ain't to look at the process by which that happened a lot of it happened in Abraham Lincoln's day, you know, when corporation was given person hood for the railroads to be able to have their riotinto, man. Yeah. And all that and Lincoln was it was a railroad lawyer before he was on that side. It's kind of sad that we've reversed course. But the problem is that the corporation is essentially a piece of software and the economy is the operating system and both of them are being configured to promote one another, you know, central current. Debased Bank interest driven economy and an extractive growth based corporation, and they're in lockstep and we've come to look at the world is dominated by the rules of those systems..

Abraham Lincoln Immanuel Kant Paine Webber Princeton New York Wordstar Brooklyn four hours
"wordstar" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on 710 WOR

"You get the maximum compensation. If you've been hurt in a car accident, a slip and fall or if you've been injured on the job trust in Andrew to get you the compensation you deserve. Call eight five five P A R K nine one one. That's eight five five P A R K nine one one. Okay. Welcome back to Andrew park show. Once again, my number is very easy. Catchy. I lotta people like it is park. Eight five five park nine one one eight five five park nine one one. And also, we do have a website is very simple, WWW dot Andrew part p c dot com. Andrew park p c dot com. So if you wanna know learn about me, and what I look like and what I do, please visit my website. So thanks for listening. Today is my first show. I'm very excited. I'm learning a lot, and I'm so happy that I can share my experience with you. Once again, car accident doesn't happen every day, and you should never happen to anybody. But it can happen. So suddenly, and once again, I'm be mentioning that do not feel that you're alone that I'm with you, my ferns with you. And we'll do our best with our dedicated professionals to take care of you. I mean, one of the most important question I hear, and you might be wondering is Mr. park. What is my case worth? How much I'm going to get out of this. What is this thing all about? So what what is personal injury personal injury? Is that you didn't do anything wrong, but because someone else's negligence and their fault? You got hurt and your life and your body is never seen again. So basically, this concept how much is my case worth. What is my fracture case surgery case, what does the word to you? And is a very very tough answer because there's more science art than science. There is no strict law saying that. You get into an accident. Your injuries Wordstar amount of money. I did mention about the workers comp worker's comp cases where you get hurt on the job with workers comp cases as far as I know there are some set limits as to injury. So when you break a bone, you can get up to fifty thousand if you hurt your head you can get up to eighty thousand. So they do have limits for that. But for personal injury auto cases there are no limit. This is where your insurance company, and I we get into a litigation and fight for me. I'm here to fight for you. I'm here to fight. And so that can get you the best compensation. I mean, the reason I like the personal injury area is that I can choose either the insurance or the client side, and for me, it's like, David and Goliath. We are the David and we are fighting against Goliath. So Indian best my advertising talks about we live. Gate every case for you. Of course insurance company doesn't like that. They don't want me to litigated. They don't want me to take your case to court, but in New York and New Jersey would litigate every single case for you. And we do an aggressive representation, and we get the top number, of course in. I can't give you all the secrets because some of them are my trae secret. And what I know by one. I'm very confident is that will get you better compensation than louder people out there. And so these are our know how of course, this is teamwork. I mean, this is not just about me doing your case. If you heard you need to see the doctor there's follow up there's a treatment there all the things that you must do. But this is for you because you're not going to the doctor to get settlement. You're going to the doctor to get yourself better. So at the end of the day is your body and you have one body. So please take care of it. I have so many cases where. Where client calls and said, Mr. park, I had an accident two years ago. But I didn't do nothing about it. And now, I'm feeling pain. And I don't know what to do. So. Yes, in basically, we can do a case for you. But the problem is this person did not make a no Ford application and claim within thirty days. So all his medical bills are standing so when I see these kind of unfortunate thing. So that's why for me I wanted in a take take you to the listeners to understand that there are rules and laws out there. But you must understand that to make an educated decision about what to do when to get into a personal injury cases. So once again these cases I began clients big settlements. I mean, you can be millions. And but at the end of the day, not every cases million. But for me as I mentioned in my ad small case big case. It doesn't matter for you. You're my client,.

David Mr. park Andrew park Andrew Wordstar New Jersey Ford New York thirty days two years
"wordstar" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

13:51 min | 2 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on KTOK

"Okay. It's the drive with Leigh Matthews a happy Friday evening to you. I know it was a pretty short week for most short week for me took some time off. But now back into the grind and enjoying everything. And the weather which changed drastically. We'll get another look at that coming up in about another twelve minutes little later on to I've got a nutritionist you may not have heard of. But you may have heard of some of the books that he's written Dr Ian Smith. He's a New York Times bestselling Arthur who has author who's written books like shred blast the sugar out and his newest is the clean twenty. Now. This isn't another New Year's resolution book. This is a book on working to make habits in your life. Like brushing your teeth. Okay. I don't know about you. But for me to forget to brush my teeth. It would take a lot. It's so habitual. It's so ingrained in me. Taking a shower. Okay. That's yeah. Just about every day. And there are some other things you probably should do everyday that aren't that difficult. Once you make them have it one of those is clean eating. Now. What does that mean? Well, he's gonna tell us in a minute. When he talks about this book and joins us here on the air that it isn't as hard as it sounds. Over the weekend. I God bless the family that I went to stay with my family, my sister and her husband, and they are vehemently anti anti, but very very very low carb. And that's fine. I have to have some carbs. I like to run in the morning, and if I don't have some carbs, I'm not gonna make it through the day without some energy. And low carbs are great. If you are not into exercise. The same thing with some of these other diets Atkins, and what's the new one? Everybody loves the Mediterranean, and that's all fine. Here's here's what here's Leigh Matthews plan. Eat what you want in moderation. You can have some pasta don't have ten pounds of it. You can have some pizza. Don't eat the whole thing. There really is nothing wrong with the French fry now, and then just don't eat the whole carton. We'll see how my theory works. When I run it by Dr Smith is going to be joining us. So that's coming up on News Radio one thousand Katie. Okay. The streetcars one more problem with the streetcars. We'll get into that too. He doesn't need a streetcar. He is a streetcar on his own making transports coast to coast and listening to the News Radio one thousand KT. Okay. While he does it our good friend, trucker ten. How are you? Oh here Louisville in the rain again today. Yeah. You're getting all that rain that came through here. A snow. Yeah. Yeah. And if owned by the way, trucker Ted if you're from Louisville you pronounce it Louisville. Louisville. Anyway. I'm gonna go a little micro here. All right. Like, you're talking about the ACT's SAT's. I wish the guidance counselors Wordstar pushing a little bit more for the technical schools. Whether it be welding, culinary or whatever, you know. Eighteen year olds knowing get their CDL and dry within the state and make a decent living in to look twenty one. And and and then go over the road and make seventy eight thousand dollars a year with very low overhead. Yeah. Six thousand dollars ain't driving academy. You know, and and get their CDL, you I don't know what the cost is to go to rose or one of them and get a nursing, you know, start your nursing career. Yeah. The medical fields are always looking for nurses. Well, especially in Oklahoma. Yes, sir. Yes. Welding is everybody needs welders. It's amazing how. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm not even a certified welder trucker tad, and I've just bought a little machine and kind of taught myself because it's in my heritage everybody in my fa-. My dad, my Granddad and all that they were all welder. So I thought well I better teach us anyway, just just the garage business of of fixing lawn mower blades for my neighbors. I could probably make you know, drinking money. Easily. Yeah. He's really I mean, I've got a I've got my boy, he a technical college. And you know, he's certified welder and he's working for Halliburton. Now as almost as much as I did last year working for Halliburton as as a welder as I did driving truck over the road, and he slept in the bed every night. Yeah. And he's a heck of a lot younger than I am. Yeah. I think he's twenty twenty three twenty four year old truck trucker, Ted. I don't know how old you are. And I don't want hint at it. But here's when I went to high school. I went to a high school that was on a small town. And it got all of the county funds. All because it was one district for one county, and we had a little trade school attached to the high school. It was called career campus. And we had a truck driving school. We had a woodshop we had a welding school and dare I say it a rough neck school because a lot of kids wanted to go work in the oil patch. Now. That's when the oil patch was thriving, and they needed roused abouts in tool pushers, and you could it would very easily you could get your certification in that and get out of high school making thirty forty thousand a year. Yeah. I'm forty eight years old be forty nine generation. And yeah, right. My high school. I mean, we had automotive essay and metal shop shopping graphic, art and. Even if you wanted to take to take a lot. Yeah. And then, you know, you got to your your sophomore junior senior year, you can go off campus to the career center and get into auto body retail and culinary and all right? Certifications and all them, and like you said you can leave school and be making forty forty five thousand a year. This was back in the late eighties early. This was the late eighties. Yes. This is the late eighties. Now, I don't know if that if my alma mater down there in that little schools still has all those programs. I doubt they do because it seems like when they started making cuts that's where they would cut because they didn't have a return on investment. I guess or here's where it probably was trucker Ted, and I'm going to have to leave at this. But here's what probably started happening the more. They started judging schools by grades and graduate rates. The less. They needed those types of classes because it was harder for them to measure a grade point average from someone who is who is in the shop class or someone who's in the welding class. It's a lot easier to measure, you know, reading writing arithmetic scores than those scores. But they're still just as important. Thanks for the call trucker, Ted on NewsRadio one thousand T. Okay. And what you do for the American economy. I've had him on before. Because he's written other books before Dr Ian Smith. He's written New York bestsellers, New York Times bestsellers shred and blast the sugar out his newest is the clean twenty. Hello. And thanks for joining me, Dr Smith. Hey, Hawaii you thanks for having me. I have this argument with friends and family all the time. Dr the oh, I got her eliminate all carbohydrates, or I'm just not gonna lose any weight to which I usually respond to what happens when you go back to eating carbohydrates and my correct. That is a great response. And the other response, I would say to people is that, you know, carbs are unnecessarily vilified carbs are great. In fact, carbs are the body number one source preferred source for fuel and we've taken this macro nutrient. There are three macronutrients carbs one of them. We've taken this one macro nutrient, and we're giving it like a bad name carbs, a great. The problem is people are eating too, many of the bad carbs. And so the clean twenty is a program that definitely allows carbs. There's this whole grain whole wheat bread whole grain whole wheat, pasta most programs allow you to have that. But we want to focus on the better carbs because we do need carbs. We want to eat them in a better way. Well, let's just get right into the pasta thing because I'm a fan of pasta. I have it in very carefully measured doses. But I like to make my own pasta. Is that better than the store bought process pasta? One hundred percent, you know. Wow. That's that's a pretty beautiful labor. Love that you made your own boss. Yeah. It is a better. And you know, I tell me all the time. Listen people look at Brown pasta. And they kind of like turn their nose up addicts. They think it's not gonna taste great white, pasta and Brown pasta. When you put sauce and spice and herbs, and there you can't tell the difference. But the whole grain whole wheat pasta has so much more nutritional value for a for you. It's lowering the glycemic index, which means it raises. Your blood sugar's a lot slower than white pasta. And so I'm a big proponent of whole grain whole wheat pasta. But the book if you look on page sixteen to clean, twenty has all kinds of foods that aren't on on typical programs and there's flexibility. I mean, everyone creates their own clean twenty list. That's how I've created the plan. So you choose what foods you like. Whether you're a diabetic your Pesca -tarian vegetarian vegan. You may be gluten free. Everyone can make the plan work for them. And I say twenty foods twenty days total transformation, but there are more than twenty foods there at least twenty but you can choose to add more to your list. Well, that gets back to how we started this conversation. I mean, so many people think that denial is the only way to clean living or clean dieting. No, I think that the now actually becomes more of a problem. I I try to instead of deny. I try to get people to make better decisions. I think when people feel like they are being denied something they tend to want it more rather than when people feel like they're making a conscious decision to choose this over that. Then they are more empowered and they are more controlled environment. And they are more likely to stick to a program. Dr Ian, k Smith is with us. He's the author of the clean twenty. If you're making some choices for the new year. This book is for you. It's a bestseller with the New York Times bestselling list right now. And I like that that you do have a list that basically anybody can count a pick. And and and choose for themselves because that's actually what it comes down to what works for one person may not be suitable for another one hundred percent. You know, I'm in the midst of writing another book, and what I just wrote two days ago was and I'm I'm trying to teach you how to choose the right diet plan. And one thing I say is that, you know, looking online or looking at a magazine, we have a celebrity on their who's followed this program or a co worker who lost a lot of weight that may not be the right plan for you. You have to choose the plan that really works for you. And one thing to always ask yourself is can I eat the foods that are on this plan. That's the first real saying can I really eat the foods. And can I afford the foods, and I've made the clean twenty in a way that the flexibility allows people from all walks of life, all levels of of disposable income be able to eat clean and be able to find these foods. You don't have to go to a gourmet grocery store to get the clean twenty food. Get them almost. Anywhere. Dr Ian, k Smith is with us on NewsRadio one thousand KT. Okay. We've got a word of the day here. Dr. And I want you to get into it fight. Oh, nutrients. Fido means plant nutrient, obviously means nourishment, or or giving a goodness to so vital nutrients or plant nutrients, basically, so, you know, I talk about all the time how you have to increase the level of vital nutrients in our foods, and you know, people will say to me, for example sugar. They'll say well is there a good sugar? Well sugar is sugar, but what makes one better sugar package better than another is whether or not it's surrounded with fighter nutrients so sugar and fruits and vegetables is better than sugar in soda and cake because the sugar and fruits and vegetables also comes with these Fido, nutrients plant nutrients, vitamins, these minerals in these other nutrients, I don't wanna get on a on a on a on a bashing bench, but dot as Americans do we eat too, many, processed or or pre-prepared or core par cooked foods hundred percent. I mean, you know, the grocery store shelves are. Are rife with processed foods, and too many processed foods, and what people don't realize is. It's not always the calories Vetter eating that matter when it comes to weight loss. It's also these processed ingredients. Listen, I wrote the Queen twenty because a friend of mine was in the gym home. She couldn't lose any weight. She was working out. Well, she was eating low calorie. She didn't understand why skill wasn't moving. I said to her try to eat some cleaner foods, get rid of the processed ingredients ten days later, the scale started moving not only that she said her energy level was through the roof. So, you know, by eliminating processed foods that could be the spark you need to really start feeling better. And really get that number on the scale to start moving in the right direction. And I thank you for joining us today, Dr Ian Smith, the name of the book is the clean twenty and it's available everywhere..

Dr Ian Smith trucker Ted high school New York Times Leigh Matthews Louisville Dr Ian NewsRadio k Smith Halliburton Oklahoma ACT Arthur Mediterranean Katie Wordstar Vetter
"wordstar" Discussed on Off The Hook

Off The Hook

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on Off The Hook

"When they don't necessarily want and this is where i really have to have to lash out at microsoft because windows 10 has this really annoying trade of doing updates and rebooting your machine oh yeah and insisting that you reboot your machine uh you know we're at at at some point uh when it may not be convenient you sometimes they'll just do it in the middle of a project that you're working on and you know i i keep machines up for literally months at a time that does not work for me but if i were to use at operating system wouldn't really have a choice i i don't use windows in the office but one of my partners dozen as has happened many many times and sometimes the updates take twenty thirty minutes now will be about to get on a conference call on his machine reboots and that's ridiculous a complete disaster the windows ten updating system is is really a third tear in and um there's there's very little flexibility in control and it's uh i don't know it's not not ideal in a law real change from what i think the average windows users use to so if you liked xp or even ntt and you should be able to hold onto that just to whatever was you were doing with that and not be forced into something you might not really want of course yoga a lot slower than everybody else and we'll have access to certain things but that's a choice you should be able to make a you brought up a very interesting point as well manual which is that you know we're not doing things that are really all that different right pri tina from let's say twenty twenty five years ago and i've often thought about this word perfect six point one back and leg 1995 for 1994 whatever it was was perfectly fine for most of the stuff that i'd do when i'm drafting documents he season you know i don't need sixteen gigs of ram to run a word processor for most of the things that we do with computers i really haven't changed i think it's fascinating that you run this old word processing system because i remember reading a wild back that george or art martin the author of a game with ours i think he writes all of his putting on is as mentioned already uses wordstar worst storage store.

microsoft george twenty twenty five years twenty thirty minutes
"wordstar" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"wordstar" Discussed on The Talk Show

"I don't know though that anything is actually changed in that regard no i wrote about earlier today the sort of i talked a lot of our developer friends and a lot of people who are involved in the industry and there's sort of this consensus that and i think this is true that he is sort of hit a traditional software developers hard because they thought that they were the new thing but they turned out to be traditional in every sense the word and that's just is open to disruption as any industry and we don't longer live in an age where only a few people have computers and he's been five hundred dollars for wordstar is a box of software on the shelf and all of those things that you we now have almost everyone has access to ubiquitously connected computing devices thanks to the smartphone and what we perceive of his apps his incredibly different the there's millions of apps and no one's going to spend thirty to forty dollars for a thousand apps a year it's just it's not possible in the same token no one's gonna spend five animals on worst are now the google docs is in every browser so the entire industry has turned upside down and i think the app store made hasten that but i think it's it's more a reflection of where the industry went nada not a single handed desperately villains of thing right but you know people the tens and tens and hundreds maybe thousands of people are spending ten fifteen dollars a week on clash gallons and and uh candy crush anti crush in game upgrades and then somebody like tap butts on puts exquisite were your long exquisite work into a twitter client and wants to charge four dollars for the upgrade from the old one peeped same people are outraged so i can it it's like we will pay for eagle instant gratification is why that always white tulips were were the fortune it made no sense but we wanted to have more tulips than our friends had right it's like that get twitter client could make a for pay twitter claim could make more money by like a like locking you out of features than by just charging up front.

software developers wordstar google docs app store twitter developer five hundred dollars ten fifteen dollars forty dollars four dollars