18 Burst results for "Worby Parker"

"warby parker" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:31 min | 9 months ago

"warby parker" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Rocket mortgage for being a part of the John Kincaid Show here on CBS Sports Radio. Appreciate it very, very much. Got an email this morning from this war be have you ever heard a Warby Parker? Anthony. No, I have not. You can email from Warby Parker. It is a ah I guess they're reading glasses. You ever wonder how You get ads that you didn't sign up for Like like ads come to you. You ever see that pop up into your social media timeline like you might have been? You looked at houses. And then all of a sudden, you know, inundated with Dad's about houses and everything. I have no idea how these Sunday Now it's try five pairs of glasses at home for free. So five pairs of like reading glasses and you could choose all different frames and everything like that. Okay. What's the catch? What's the catch? Do I click on the link? And figure out what the catch is. Use reading classes. Yeah, I don't know that. Yeah, I went wading glasses when I When I work, a guy of reading glasses on during during pretty much the whole show. They're pretty much all show. I have to wear reading glasses because out of glasses, otherwise, I don't wear glasses otherwise. That is one of the genetic things. Thank you very much. Tom and Betty. For my mom. My mom wore glasses from when she was like young. And my dad never wore glasses except readers. Towards the very end. He died a 57 But he wore he didn't wear readers till he was in his fifties. And I've worn readers since I was around 46. Something like that. It's the same type of thing. But this ever I always wondered about that. And then the free offer God, you gotta be careful. Lost scams out there now. It's a free offer, like you know, come on, like I'm wondering. There's something I think nothing is free. There's always something there's a price to pay. There's always a price to pay. By the way. Did you watch the New York Yankees the other night? Did you watch Aaron Boone? In Philadelphia. When the fan dem ICS if you haven't seen the Fan, Dem IX The Phillies fans showing up outside the gate of the stadium. To watch games. Harass the opposing team from outside the stadium. Make noise. Blow air horns do things to let their presence known..

Warby Parker John Kincaid Dad CBS Phillies Anthony Aaron Boone New York Yankees Philadelphia Tom Betty
"warby parker" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:39 min | 10 months ago

"warby parker" Discussed on WJR 760

"Their portion with the gifts or to you. 1 to 2 options. One. Don't use it all user for another, right. Exactly. Just put it towards the bill. Hey, got this great gifts to be. Let's just all split. Really? So let me get this straight. I was stunned. First of all check comes check up now. You guys, There are 60 years old or thereabouts. Yes, we're at that stage. Are you still splitting checks? One of you will get a social circle with two other people and six other date other people, But to other people, don't one of you take it This time. We'll take it next time because we always go out with a four year old when you go out with somebody like once or twice a year in freeze within a year. Well, you won't be going out with him again. Never again. So okay, So the check comes check Costa. Guy pulls out his gift card says Here's Michael. You apply the disc out. How much was the gift card 50 bucks and was their portion lesson that more than that? More than well, then I don't know what they would have done. How could they use it towards the bill? If you have another pill, and then whatever the differences will split the amount between I'm saying I actually like the moves. $200 will split 150 instead of splitting over 200,000 paper the whole meal. Whatever. Yeah, that was Larry. Admit I would have. I would have been a gas Getty. Well, go out with people who have money. So you got to just pay cash for that. Keep the gift card for suck another. Yeah. You know, you just can't do that. I said to my wife, honey, if that were the two of us Who put the gift card in for the total bill. Right? Right. I spoke to difference Have you not good, but the people know that the Queen's They're not gonna understand them not want to pay for Rose's meal. When he's having lobster maintenance. You have the good manners not to use a gift, but I'm just saying If there's somebody I know, like if we went to dinner, and I had to give credit to put this on the building will do. The rest from there was split. But if these people don't know a rowdy like you say, you won't go out with him once a year twice a year and whose big boy Senior Club card, the year's best part than I we leave guy lost his glasses off the top of its head. I go deal. Sorry, man. How much are they? 50 bucks? 50 bucks. I got a gift certificate for Ah, Toys R us, doctor. I'm not sharing it with Warby Parker. Ravic give their rule was just I was stud. Is there a rule to the gift card when you can use it when you can? Yeah. I think gift card should only be used for yourself or share with others. Or when you're taking everybody out. I'm not..

Warby Parker Larry Senior Club Rose
"warby parker" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Looks like well sent to your home. Five pairs picked when you like. Send it back Get your prescription and send it to you. You you know there. There's the unlock their thing. That kinda gets over the you know kind of hesitation that people might have in every case. There's a bit of a how. How do I make this first of all? How do we get more convenient better experience and in some cases lower price? I mean let's face it kind of is Michael kind of Dubin said five dollars for a razor cartridge you know and the incas you have too often. Because they're so expensive they are were prone to bank shoplifted so You know you go to a store and you have to ask the clerk to unlock it. It's behind a locked glass case right the heck with that. I'll send it to you at homeless. Give it to you every month on subscription now by the way. That's good for me because I've got you you'll kind of have we cring revenue. I can look at the lifetime value of the customer because to offset marketing costs to get you the first time so all of these companies had some kind of a lightbulb moment often with I'm a consumer. This is something that I don't really like about the way this product sold. It's been dominated by a big company their customers with retailers in the end they are the real people. But they're really pleasing the retailers. I instead instead of thinking the way the customers want to do it with a lack of actual data on and feedback from there and custom. Guess right if there's other kind of we talk about you know kind of the white so all these problems that existed before right. So why were they being solved now. Why could they be solved now? And it was because of technology people say are these technology. Algae companies will lose their kind of hybrid companies. I would say their technology copies and they wouldn't exist without technology ten or fifteen years ago. Jason you have an idea to so razors. Yep Okay. What do you have to do go to Walmart or walgreens? Say Well you carry on bended knee will. Will you carry my race. What what what's your name? You know why I'm going to get all the stock and open. How much do you advertise? That people are going to know about your brand. Okay go to two thousand ten all of a sudden Internet come. You don't need a retailer. There is unlimited shelf space online. Okay so that is urgent. Would you know something. That's sort of a big storyline now there at the time there's burgeoning digital marketing channels exactly fleet at our affordable. Then so you know kind of again. Ten or fifteen years ago you need tens of millions of dollars if you wanted to have national advertising for a consumer product to get any kind of attention but all of a sudden with facebook a social media marketing or with viral marketing. which can help up to you can do that for tens of thousands first of all you can start with thousands tens of thousands and then you can ramp up one hundred thousand and the advantages manages you can also target those customers which are most likely to buy from you and part of it is a demographic thing but of course facebook and end up becoming issues later on with other businesses they do you know facebook has something called look-alikes? Yep Okay so with Google you know. Ah they're great at if somebody searches something then they'll feed you an ad for them right when someone has clearing ten facebook. You don't actually have to search for it. They know the demographics of the people who are responding to your ads or buying your things and they're gathering that data and it's okay. Look we'll show this ad to look alikes people who look like those people who have already purchased from you think how that helps you target and get more response for less money. Yeah I think one thing you know. I've covered dollarshaveclub pretty closely. But one thing I guess I I may have overlooked was how deeply we you know. There's the story of the Great Viral Launch Video. That you know four point six million today yeah just insane. The length or the the the significance of their dependence on facebook in early days and how through in an outside agency how they ambush in San. Francisco's it again. which is I kinda focused on the book you know three is who you know? Went to Penn.. They went to Wall Street. They were making a lot of money but they were kind of bored they want to do something entrepreneurial and kind of stumbled on digital marketing. And initially we're focusing on Google. And then they kind of had you know. How do we take advantage of this new thing called whole facebook and that was their genius and got them a lot of the DC companies and hooked up with Dollar Shave Club and together for a few years. Really that was essay on Iraq. We're here with Larry INGRASCIOTTA. WHO's the author of a new book called our Brand Club? How dollarshaveclub Worby Parker and other disrupters Are remaking what we buy. We're GONNA take a quick break now..

facebook Google Dollar Shave Club Walmart Worby Parker Iraq Larry INGRASCIOTTA Jason walgreens Michael Dubin Penn Francisco San
"warby parker" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Recode Decode

"That Unilever has purchased dollarshaveclub. One the billion dollars now I grip the wheel firmly. Yes I make. Sure I didn't serve actually said out loud to myself. Michael did it. I was GONNA say no f Ing Way that too and I was I was and it made me think How how did that happen? What changed on the landscape that allowed this to happen? And oh by the way. When I started looking into it I realized it wasn't? He was one of the early direct to consumer brands early movers. But it went and had been a little bit before him. But they're in every category. You could could think of mattresses bra contact lenses you cover it to searches toothpaste. Yes Ah this point now. Yeah Yeah and so it was really as a business. Journal's cover a lot of big stories like you said a financial crisis two thousand The rise of facebook you know the rise of Google heck the rise on Microsoft's I go back that far I fist is one of the more remarkable stories that I've seen and as a journalist when you know it's great when you don't really know the answer going when you have some thoughts about it but your your curiosity is piqued and the other thing which I found really interesting new Michael and I kind of got into it. I I realize more. Most of the people who started these companies were in their twenties or thirties. They didn't we know anything about the product that they were kind of getting into that they decided to sell but it turned out to be an advantage not disadvantage because that enabled them to think outside the box as opposed to. I'm going to compete on the terms of the big guys. So the guys that worry Parker For students students at University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Business School started. The idea was initially a class project and they figured. Hey look if we don't start a business well he's credit for it right You know Emily Weiss of glossy. She started a blog when she was working for Teen Vogue in her early twenties and it it was so popular. She said there is an interest. There is a need for this. So you know maybe that's how she started company the founders of Third Love Heidi Zach and her husband days uh-huh Specter so she had been in retail. She was interested at some point in You know they were interested in becoming entrepreneurial and so you talk about thinking outside the box and not coming from the industry what was the actual disruption that you believe these brands brought and I I should say so. The book is you sort of dip in and out of different stories about different companies and made this possible. First of all these companies companies the most successful ones saw a problem and fixed saw need and filled it. So give me an example. Let's say so mattresses it kind of going to mattress store to buy a mattress is one of the most miserable experience at any consumer. How would you you know the salesperson stocks you around the store store they try to upsell you to the most expensive movie? Vote can't believe a word you know they say. Try this one out. Lie Down on it for thirty seconds a minute and you're supposed to be able you. Can you know it's going to be.

Michael Emily Weiss Specter Unilever Parker Teen Vogue facebook Wharton Business School Google Microsoft Heidi Zach University of Pennsylvania Journal
"warby parker" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And this is a podcast about power change and the people you need to know around tech and beyond. We're part of the VOX media podcast network. Today in the red chairs Larry and Grassi former editor for the New York Times Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times and most recently the author of a book about disruptive startups called Billion Dollar Brand Club. How dollarshaveclub Worby Parker and other disrupters are remaking taking what we bought Larry? Welcome to Rico. Thanks it's a pleasure to be here Jason. So the reason why I think I'm doing this today is because I pay a lot of attention to the space the rise of these companies. And so I was. I was really really intrigued by this book and this topic. It's one I've thought about a lot. We're going to start with the book but I do want to talk about a whole bunch of stuff beyond your career. You've managed overseeing coverage at one a bunch of awarded stirring during the financial crisis other big important parts of our business history and so I'd love to get your perspective of of what we're seeing sort of tech and and the business world beyond. Let's start with the book though before this book. What was the last time you actually were had a byline or writing you were you were? You're editing reading for probably for several decades. I mean occasionally I would write a story but you know I was when I got out of university I it was a reporter for the Chicago. sun-times initially for about four years did a lot of general assignment stuff but moved over to the Wall Street Journal Where I reported probably for about about ten years fifteen years of the twenty five years I was there and royal battle is that actually wrote about retailing? That was well before ECOMMERCE. ECOMMERCE Jason Kerr alike both both covered retail one point. Yeah Yeah I mean. It's a fascinating kind of industry. It's an industry touches. Everybody's he's lives and obviously it has to do with you know kind of the people who produce it too so it's not just it's a multifaceted business but getting back to your question. Last time I really wrote much was probably twenty five years ago. I was the London bureau chief at one point and I spent about a third of my time for the Wall Street Journal is simple. A third of my time writing about two thirds of my time editing but since the mid nineties. It's been really full on editing. So how did this idea in this book. Come about so I actually knew. Michael Dubin the founder of dollarshaveclub before Dollar Shave Club. He was a friend of my daughter at Lisa's and he hit always was headed. Entrepreneurial Bent around two thousand eleven He found his digital marketing executive. He found himself out of a job and he decided to start a company that would sell razors online..

New York Times Wall Street Jou Jason Kerr Larry VOX media Dollar Shave Club Worby Parker Los Angeles Times Michael Dubin Grassi editor Lisa executive reporter bureau chief founder London Chicago. sun-times
"warby parker" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Next on Squawk POD SNOOZING US folks how do you pick the funds in your 401k. Plan a Seton Hall. Finance professor has some surprising rising data on investor bias and it's as easy as ABC. There's a lot of things we can do about it back after this. This is squawk pot. Here's Andrew Ross sorkin up an android. We're GONNA talk about investing in your 401k's this morning early because it's often an alphabet soup of choices probably looked at the various lists that you're that you have available at work. But according to a new study investors are more likely ready for this this to choose. Funds listed at the top of the list and this so-called alphabetical bias is costing investors thousands of dollars a year for more on this. We want to welcome Gen the from Seton Hall University professor of Finance and a CO author of a new study on this very issue. Good morning to you morning I have to you say I was. I was floored by this idea. That where the company and what's listed in the four times of your options literally based on the alphabet that makes that big a difference it does make a difference. It's surprising but the data bears it out We find that investors overwhelmingly overwhelmingly choose early alphabet stocks compared to later alphabet stocks that come lower on their plan menu. And can we be honest. Does I mean everybody's that dumb. It's the people are dumb. It's that we're not robots. We're not computers. We have limited mental processing capacity. And so so we have some basic. You say that you're going down and the dumb yes right. You have an idea of what you think. You'd like to invest in you. Start at at the top of the list and it's called satisfy icing you find something that satisfies. Okay hold on the reason I asked. This is so we we do this show every morning and one of the things that I like to think is that we are democratizing. The markets right and that we're trying to have fair markets and that we want both professionals knows and my mother and father and anybody else. WHO's out there to be able to invest in the market at the same with the same information and with the same degree of success? Hopefully really really that we. You've always you may not believe him. No no no I hear you but you've always wanted to bring you know what you WanNa do. You just don't know where to keep him. Who's that the monkey you wanted to bring a monkey in here from the very beginning when you first came on the show once the monkey throwing darts a quarterly? Because you're sure the monkey can win but they throw other things. One have a quarterly chimpanzee come on the set quarterly. I've I've been trying to get the producer this literally a decade. So this is you democratizing. The markets for arguing for Mikey but my point is it's the same kind of it's the same and same phenomenon and so what should we do about it. There's a lot of things we can do about Ed. The first thing is to recognize that everyone does make bias decisions and so the more you know about them the more you can overcome them so we recommend when you sit down to make your four. The Boston awesome middle important to you. I is risk important to you but then you still get impatient. As you're going down in my space so resort we resort resort. The and then the thing that's most important to you will be at the top and then look down the list of find the the company's name themselves with a as to be at the used to be at the top of the foam. Oh that's common anymore the yellow pages but ABC. The company is for you. I mean this goes back to hold on. This goes back to personal responsibility right. Joe Always have our personal responsibility conversation nanny state versus you know. What's what's what's the answer here? If people literally looking at they literally don't have the patience to get to the bottom of the list that unto itself is a problem that is a problem. Employers used to provide defined benefits plans now that it's a defined contribution plans. They've put a huge judge Moore amount of responsibility on the individual investor. And we're not saying that they should define your benefits for you but there is some middle ground. Employers can be advocates for their employees employ. Simple but is there a way from technical perspective. I know one of the things you talk about in the study or at least when the conclusions is this idea that potentially the employers could resort the list for you or at least provide tools tools that make it very accessible to do that they could resort the list for you. They could choose better default so that if you don't want to make the decision decision yourself you're already opted in your already chosen into a specific plan or they could put up a first screen fault you get into a dangerous place. Because if the default fabulous it's fabulous at the defaults not not fabulous. It's not so fabulous. Well defaulting to investing something better than investing nothing. And that's what we see. A lot of people are doing that. People people are just underinvested underrated broadly. But that's not an alphabet bias. That's not an alphabet but this goes this goes to the whole idea though about whether individuals individuals on the whole I'm not talking about. We have great viewers here who cares so deeply about the markets. But there's a lot of people who don't care enough frankly early I would argue and so the question is should we leave this all to people to do what they like. Well I think that there's a happy medium where some good defaults are chosen for you where your funds are sorted according to some criteria that makes sense for you or where. There's a screen that says before you make your decision according to your best criteria and then still allow people to make their own decisions then thank you that. Is The news US folks. That's that's the show for today on our rundown tomorrow. FAA Administrator Steve Dixon the top regulator plane safety squawk box hosted by Joe. Kernan Becky. Quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin tune in weekday mornings on CNBC at six am eastern. What am on your generation? Joe clearly a class of one. That's cool isn't it a librarian at the show. My call it generation Joe to get the smartest takes analysis from our TV show right into your ears subscribed to Scott tailable free on all podcast forms. We'll be back here tomorrow. Lean thanks guys problems. It's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things. Ben Things make things better. That's why so many people work with IBM on everything from city. Traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety smart loves problems. Ibm B. M. Let's put smart to work visit I._B._M.. Dot Com slash smart to learn more..

Joe Andrew Ross sorkin ABC Seton Hall Seton Hall University IBM professor Boston US professor of Finance CNBC Mikey producer Administrator Steve Dixon FAA Kernan Becky Scott tailable Moore
"warby parker" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Pod Begins Right now stand by a three to one good morning. Wasn't the squawk box right here on. CNBC we are live from the Nasdaq market. Seven-time Anti-discriminatory Ross. Sorkin along with Joe. Kernan Becky's off today. I up today. On the pot another Boeing employees speaks out on safety concerns about the company that he raised before. The two deadly 737 Max tragedy so manager. Former manager. Action Safe at Boeing speaking out for the first time at Pearson says he you flagged problems with the seven thirty seven. Max Bowen's main factory in Renton Washington in the months before two deadly crashes forced the grounding of the aircraft. That's the important part in the months before those things happened. He says that he worried. A push to increase production of the seven. Thirty seven Max. We lead to critical mistakes now. Pearson testified before Congress Tim Pearson testifies before Congress tomorrow but in an exclusive interview with NBC News. He described the conditions at Boeing's plant. What words would you use to describe that factory at that point? Dangerous unnecessary taken. A risk chaotic disarray says that he sent an email to the general manager Max Program in June of last year four months before the crash of the Lion Air jet off the coast of Indonesia. He says he expressed concern about exhausted. Workers who said were quote inadvertently embedding safety hazards into our airplanes. said he would be hesitant for the first time in his own life to put his own family on a Boeing plane. You urge bowing to temporarily shut that. Down in a statement. Boeing says there is no direct link to Pearson's concerns and the two crashes. It said that Boeing took his concerns. Seriously it is worth noting of course that the those two crashes happened. It appears enlarge part as a result of this M. cast system which doesn't seem to be necessarily related to some of the concerns that he was raising at that time but maybe the justice typically there are problems within the culture and pushing things ahead. If you know if if you would agree with this I mean I worry about a lot you know and I know you do too but usually not flying still I try not to worry I think about it beforehand. Look at the record. And that's why you should not you know. Don't get any food out of the vending machine because your life is much greater peril world when you're doing that getting on an airplane so it's good hope that says that while that a lot of that has to do with this bowling an over the years. How a nominally great yet? I am not a sugar and say that we always need to say that the but I think in general great company great employees that try to do the right thing ninety nine point nine nine but we need six sigma where six Sigma World with when when you're flying or when you're making pharmaceuticals or whatever it is and by six sigma that's an old. Ge Program where the managers would try to get airs down to. I don't know one out of ten million or something and that's pretty good but that's there's still a one there. I mean Uber's facing this situation right now. I mean Jean de Minimus incidents that total though three thousand alphabet has announced it is adding claimed apologist Francis Arnold to its board of directors. She won the Nobel Prize. Really in two thousand eighteen pioneering signs and enzymes and antibodies Arnold's is professor of Chemical Engineering Volunteering Biochemistry at the California Institute of Technology. She's the third woman on the company's eleven person board in a tweet. Co does send. A child wrote in part the cheering quoting credible academic and industry expertise. And as you know beyond all the things that we all know Google of were they have have that other bets category and some of that biotech in a very big way you out. Last week I was. We talked a lot about this. And as part my favorite other alphabet venture is now. They're doing some some some really hard stuff but but one that I think is mad at the boat was carrying breath and I want them whatever whatever costs they got a lot of money. You know it's a trillion dollars. I think they really need to try to do that. Wouldn't isn't that that's swine wind worthy goal. Line cars is one thing you know getting you know the cloud sorting things out for enterprise software. That's important but I think carrying death if it before we go to Mars. I'm all for extending life longevity. Actually they curse walls there. There is talk of some one hundred year. It probably. We're we're we're just GONNA miss. Fortunately not we're just GonNa Miss just think she's lifetime maybe we need. We need to do a WHO froze themselves somebody Walt Disney. Is All people also disneys cryogenic freezing self people. Three people are taking metformin metformin. They're taking down and take not going to do just the that's not GonNa know saying you know people that are getting blood transfusions. They're all those are all new ways. Also do this all I I wanted to I want to I want I want telomeres. I WanNa make sure that there's a way that are ourselves. You know keep they. Can they can divide but not what caused cancer and you can live forever. So I want him. To cure death getting older bitch Antonia Softbank pulling out of its investment wag. According to people familiar familiar with the matter and energy and internal memo those viewed by CNBC self bank is selling its stake in the dog. Walking started back to the company and giving up two seats on. Its for joining us right now to talk this morning about Tech Chico. This is insider senior tech correspondent. Erica Pandy from axios is also joining us this morning. What are we going on the South Bank right now so I think this is a really difficult time for Softbank? Clearly I mean after what happened with Leeward. I would only imagine that. Their investment strategies energy is under heavy scrutiny. Right now so I think what you're seeing here is Softbank trying to be a little bit cautious in trying to get ahead of things and possibly prevent another other. We work from happening was going to be another we were. I don't know what it's hard to tell but I mean it's a gamble right. I mean Softbank is kind of known for taking these big bets. And he's big big risks on companies like Uber like slack. We work And that hasn't as we've seen this past year. That hasn't really worked out for them as well as they might have helped some now. I think they're kind of rethinking things a little bit. But okay so my question though for for Erica on the same topic is what happens if I if Softbank fundamentally has to change its business model. Does that fundamentally changed whether these investments actually going to work at all I mean I think well I talking about in terms of Softbank. This is a relatively small deal so it's not as as big of a story as as the we work thing but I think that we're definitely going to see Softbank. Start to change things up the the smartest way I've heard this explained to me. Is that a lot of these companies Uber and we work and why we're kind of subsidizing. This urban millennial lifestyle and Softbank off bank was last money in on a lot of them so when Softbank pulls out. It's kind of hard to find more money to follow it question for both of you. We only have a minute Erica. I know you've been thinking a lot about Tesla recently. You look at. What's what's happening there with this trough? You think it's GonNa work we now at a point where I mean. People are much more optimistic than they were even two weeks ago. I mean I think this truck is one of those things where Silicon Valley pulls back the curtain and the rest of the countries. Like why did you do this but I mean this driving around with it. It looked pretty cool but he did. He did hit something so we'll have to see your take. Yeah I think Following following what Erica said. I think we really have to see in Elon. Musk is definitely hitting that goal of getting generating a lot of buzz and getting a lot of attention and getting a lot of eyeballs on this thing. I think the question question will be you know. They've already got two hundred and fifty thousand pre orders. I think the question will be. Can they produce it fast enough to actually fill those orders. When the time because we've been debating Amazon is on New York City in this whole headquarters is right or wrong.

Boeing Softbank Erica Pandy Tim Pearson CNBC Max Bowen Kernan Becky Anti-discriminatory Ross Nobel Prize Francis Arnold general manager Max Program Antonia Softbank Sorkin Renton Washington Indonesia Walt Disney Google
"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

14:14 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Kind of the thing about w showing when we talk about design to like. It's it's really interesting. There's there's not a whole lot you know. There's a few pieces of photography up there when you post and stuff but you also talk about the the design for good and designed for comprehension is something that's being talked about a lot today and so you know how we overwhelm people with with content and with information and so something like. Wt social where it is a little bit more bare bones. So I think everybody wants some extra functionality it it works right like there is something there. There's something there to kind of going back to the you know bare tax of a Internet dude It'll be fascinating to see it. Play out Steve Case the former. AOL Guy who's now a big investor guy who's been pushing really hard his rise of the rest initiative which is looking disbrow entrepreneurship into other cities. He had a fascinating dinner earlier. This week that are Kimberly. Wiesel was was at Kimberly urine something really interesting about how he's approaching diversity and you wrote a really piece dot com about it. Thanks Steve Case is a really unusual unusual investor because he started rise of the rest with the idea that he would invest in small startups anywhere outside of New York Boston or the bay area. Which is where seventy ninety five percent of all venture capital goes and to find these companies and to publicize his efforts with them? He started the rise of the rest bus tours. He got tricked. tricked out bus there five days long. He's done eight of them since I think twenty fourteen and he goes to a cluster of cities that don't get a lot of venture capital and he visit the accelerators and incubators in the universities and the startups that are succeeding and talks about how to build a startup ecosystem. And at the end of each of these there's was a pitch competition there's usually three to five winners. And they each get a check for one hundred thousand bucks which is a lot for pitch competition young company That's the minority nor any of his investments. His Fun now is one hundred and fifty million dollars which I seed fund is really big. He's in a hundred and thirty or one hundred and forty companies and and what is really interesting that he has kind of inadvertently built a much more diverse and varied portfolio of founders not only geographically but other characteristics as well without consciously setting out to do so so his portfolio right now twenty five percent of his founders or women which is extremely high number forty five percent are either women or people of color and part of this he says just because the start obscene outside of the three venture capital hotspots is just more diverse than it is in those cities like you go into startups in Minneapolis. You'RE GOING TO START UPS in Atlanta Chicago. You're just getting a different crop of people bowl. Who are building? These companies is not all like twenty five year old white men dropping out from extremely expensive and prestigious colleges. So that's part of it but the other thing that I think is really interesting about the way that rise at the rest works. Is that most venture capitalist work on this idea that if you are not clever enough to get a warm introduction to them you don't deserve their money you can't hustle enough to meet them on. The you know the King of the hill. Then how are you going to meet your contacts to like sell your enterprise software products. Did this is sort of like a classic tweet from high-powered VC's or self-styled hype Harvey. Caesar like you know if if you've got asked me to pick my brain if you if you try to link to not trying hard enough it's like great. Thanks asshole right right. You have to be in the network already even be in the network. I mean that's crazy. It's insane what rise of the rest does is when they go to a the city they make a real effort to publicize this pitch competition. They get hundreds of applicants to them and they make it known like they want everyone and they go out to all community partners they want everyone And the most recent one that they did they had four winners. It was like Tampa Fort Lauderdale. Puerto Rico in Puerto Rico. That was like the area that they were in the most recent pitch competition and they had four winners three of them were women and two of them were Latina cts so it would be amazing. What equality of opportunity actually looks like and you know I spoke to Steve Case at his dinner and I asked it was a dinner for female email founders which right there is super unusual and most funds don't invest enough women that they could put together a credible interesting dinner like this and this one definitely was interesting and I asked him like so in a perfect world like how many of your portfolio companies would be led by women a love the story and most people when you ask them that question? They're like well you know women don't really pitch us that much. So if thirty percent of the people pitching US or women than thirty percent people in our portfolio should be women or well. You know there just. Aren't that many women in cybersecurity and we invest in cybersecurity. And I believe Steve Cases the first person I've spoken to flat out just looked at me. He looked at me like I was nuts. I like like why are you asking me as dumb question. And then he looked at me. He's like well. Women are half the population so Washington behalf declarative. That statement is an like. Why did it take so long for some famous white? Vc to actually say that. I don't know it's just kind of amazing to me but I think it's because he's actually got out of the bubble you know. And he's he's he's and he's done it consciously And he's done it with an investment thesis in mind that he can make money from this and I gotta say he's not the only one like he actually has a list on his website. Eight of who the investors are in his rise of the rest fund which mostly that's very hush hush LP's. He's got everyone from the coke family. Emily to Howard Schultz Eric Schmidt. Sara Blakely it's just Tory burch Jomon Suada who's also the owner can fast company. Dan Gilbert the founder of quicken like. He's got a really large list of interesting people here so like he's not the only one but he's obviously a really effective spokesperson. Yeah Santic tastic. What are some of your favorite companies within his portfolio? So I have to give a shout out to mommy because I think everybody is interested in this company right now. It's like an APP. And and sort of coordination service for prenatal prenatal pregnancy and postnatal care and it got a lot of press because of the recent research and events of maternal deaths among black women being just multiples of what they are for everybody else So that's one that I really liked. There's another one called en Ville which is a workplace safety application and platform which doesn't sound exciting. But I liked it. It's called Anvil. Yeah I love the name similar seeing like the road runner getting I mean we lived through superstar superstorm sandy and like anybody who could like fix a line was in in our backyard working on a transformer blowing up left and right so suddenly this seems like very very relevant just to say the least. There's also they have an online in marketplace in Detroit called stock ex. Yeah which telling I mean buying and selling this for seeker heads basically more than a billion bucks the billion dollar valuation. Yeah very interesting company. Yeah they're not looking for one industry. They're just looking for great founders. And so I think it's the diversity of industries and geographies and like people people they've invested in I think is just really encouraging fans. They're all fascinating stuff in case I just I'm really glad you got to use that quote the using the DOT com store. I just love it so much. Yeah it's amazing and different. It shouldn't be so different. It should not be different edit it I hear that correctly. UCF and now it's time for like buttons. You've been waiting for this. I'm sure ladies and Gentlemen Christine. What do you got? I Have New York magazine's future issue of not sure if you've seen it on newsstands ends yet. But basically they had a very interesting construct for looking toward the next decade the next century which was kind of taking the past years local and national headlines some some international headlines daily headlines from the news and from there making predictions Some of them included. We'll worry about the wind. It's getting windy out. There guys will be the new Lockheed. Martin I don't want to go into space. With the era of televised politics is at an end. Thank God and party. Balloons will no longer float authorities. That's already upon us a helium helium shortage. They took that headline and boom. There's been no shortage for years to read it. I read it. It's on my pile of magazines which Cherkesov go through Kristen. I'm going old. I like button. This is my I like my God i. Everybody is at Thursday so I'm GONNA throw. It's Friday my like like button is my iphone. Se tiny little old iphone tiny technology. John is cheering quietly good. It's really good it's really good. It's it's one of the last ones that Steve Jobs was around to help help design and I've held onto it for years. I dropped broke my last one about a week before last year. Two two years ago New York City Marathon and I raised to the apple store and spent about an hour agonizing over having to get the larger one and stuck with the older one and every time I pull it every retired pull out of my pocket every single person that has upgraded to the newer apple model. Says I want the technology that's in the new apple models but I want to go back to the IPHONE S. T.. I think one other staff member think Marley Gazeta still has it so we nerd out but literally I'll be out at parties. Dates and people are literally like I missed that phone and then they they pull out this thing. That's like the size of their head. So jealous of that. Yeah so jealous also cute and it's tiny if it's my pockets I don. I haven't had to change my wardrobe. It's all about the pockets. I will not get a bigger phone because it does it actually work it actually works the battery because it still supporting updates to the IRS. So the battery will run low. I'm constantly charging it. But I have a system Virgil I can't even talk about this Kimberly. Please save us. I don't know this is going to save us or not. This company called percents biomed and their idea. They're trying to make a catch to improve proved the efficacy of cancer treatments. One way that you may be able to do this is to look in the Gut Biofilm of people who respond well to cancer therapy and compare it to the biomass biomass of people who do not respond. Well see which microbes are missing and then give them to the people who don't respond well and hope that they will improve to do this. You need to a sample a lot of poop this. There's a lot going on in their your big data sets new and nobody wants to do nobody. Nobody wants to donate their poop. So this founder founding team they would go to festivals like dressed up in a big cost festival. POOP is what I want to..

Steve Case Kimberly AOL Puerto Rico apple New York magazine Wiesel Steve Jobs Sara Blakely Tampa Fort Lauderdale Steve Minneapolis New York Caesar Washington Harvey
"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"They go on to say the number so you sell your data and the platform will survive on the generosity of individual donors as you paid a a subscription fee to go to join last night I did. This was enough for me and a few of the people on our product team. We're kind of looking over this and terms of kind of interest and what I pay for this right right and the brand the mission statement and kind of what. They propose that they're offering was enough to pay a thirteen dollar monthly fee. None of us are quite ready to jump on board with the hundred dollar yearly subscription But it was enough it was curious enough and we kind of thought believed in it enough that we would go on and kind of look around. So what does it look like. I imagine it's just slightly unpopulated. Village populated I think as this morning when I looked there was just shy of three hundred thousand members On the second or third day they were I'm asking actively for developers people to come and help them actually build the platform because in very wikipedia style is very bare bones. You know it's a little bit read it. You know kind of like sub cookies all the kind of thing so it is very community driven but him and his co founder wrote an interesting article on foreign policy that gets into kind of their beliefs. That things like Their mission with WT Social it'll you know they. They claim the Internet cloud killed journalism and so places like wd social will bring back smaller communities and local news newsp- you know local newspapers and things that are important to not local physical newspapers. I think we all know that those might not be out there for much longer. Good so journalists can just post for free exactly exactly exactly and this you know. That's the interesting thing right like what he's doing. It's safe journalism as we all know. And so you know there's these membership fees but you're paying for membership and there's there's not a whole lot there yet right like you're posting mediums. You know they got people to pay fifty dollars a year for something. They hadn't quite figured out yet. Still you know contributors and stuff and now there's kind of journalism entity added onto it and unsure of where that'll go sure and let me say I just just kind of kind of like that model better when you actually have a foundation. That's like behind this lake that we can media foundation does good work. We pedia does good work so you're not just kind of trying trying out this new media subscription you. You're helping an organization and I think it's great that they don't have advert political advertising Any advertising exactly the But especially right now in this moment political. They're making a statement against facebook and I think people do need to be making that statement against facebook right now sure but l- so so let's pull back and look at this in a bigger way I mean with. He's making it very big argument here. which is that? The advertising supported Free Web is is crap I mean like it's it's it's let you kind of Dystopia I mean Christon do we. Can we envision a world in which people actually do this in big numbers I mean mean. FACEBOOK is free and most people you know one hundred bucks. A year is not insubstantial. Amount of money Yeah I think you're seeing already. I think you're seeing it and some of the You know larger media you know the New York Times and Washington Post continue to grow their subscription digital subscription basis at the same time digital advertising is going down sure the qualitatively. Can we put with this going to be on the same footing as the Wall Street Journal. Washington Post New York Times. I think so. I think there's a lot of smaller. Like if we look at it in our world right and magazines and publishing and smaller media entities outside of those larger guys that will probably never leave no matter what platforms were on. You know Probably about eight years ago we saw a lot of smaller Muller Matt Smaller magazines popping up. They didn't pop up in print. I they popped up and digital first and they did exactly kind of the the model that. WT Social is doing. They had a following. They found a market that was being not being addressed or a problem. You know that wasn't being addressed. And they said Oh. Here's we can offer you. This content at a at a premium price right right like racket magazine is a really good example. They they realized that there was a there was a huge need for real tennis content outside of the bigger and there was a lot of money in tennis right. We don't have to state the obvious there. But there was no real offering in the modern world And they you know they. They started an online thing thing and then their readers started to demand actually print product and stuff like that. Is this work for an entity without strong point of view. Right if if that's the thing about like racket or no no kidding cherry bomb. There's like something very narrow and -demia young people really want to as opposed to something very very broad broad that's user created that has no point of view would not. I'm not saying it's not valued in other ways. I'm just saying does the subscription model still work. I don't know yeah we'll see I'm on sites. It's like read it. There is kind of a premium tier of membership rate and that funds. The state in general We all hey. Hey I mean there's there's different things. People subscribe to various podcasts services and whatnot. We talked about this a little bit last week. There is a premium level of the Internet. I think that people are getting I used to paying for and they are getting used to having to filter out the crap of the general unpaid with and and I do think this is part of that natural evolution Russian who knows if w social is the answer. But I think it's got a fighting chance and those numbers so far. Sound Kinda good. I mean for three days the thousands. Listen it's not horrible. We'll also I mean if they're paying fifteen bucks a month thirteen thirteen. So what have you got like four point. Four point two million dollars. I foundation in Three Days Hampshire the skeleton thing that they bill is not a day of every month revenue. This I mean now when things go doesn't look like much. Yeah what do you think of. A design was as as a design person. It doesn't it doesn't look good and it's very wikipedia and it's and it's hard to follow and if you go into some of the subways that that have already started about you know people are hopeful that this actually does give facebook in platforms like that or run for their money you know. They're already kind of reporting bugs and things they wish they had. It took me and a friend of mine on the product team a little while to find each other and then like how do we. How do we share you know so bookies and all that kind of stuff back and forth but as a product it's not there as than idea it is something that people are obviously already getting behind US reminded? I'm showing my age of the early days of friendster. Where like you go on and you find your friends and then you're like okay? Now what do we do friendster. Yeah I know. There's this whole argument in the design community to like things like You know wikipedia on craigslist it is bare bones. HTML and at work and then and there's all these other things you know we need it to be bells and whistles and splashy and stuff like that but as a user and a reader this Dan age I m you like. How much can you really really really taken? So that that's obviously a trade off that a lot of us have conversations even here at In confessed company. About how much does everything need to be. When as a user you are so over inundated when content and imagery all day long? Yeah absolutely and I mean there's also a lot of talk about like how some of the best designs can be e so addictive to our brains that infinite scrawl right like I do think we'll see media. Companies starts to kind of comment encounter that and say like we want eyeballs. But we don't no need to like harm. You take up all of your mental energy right leaving. The readers can see me raising an eyebrow at that I think media media organizational and be perfectly happy to addiction. You too and have you binge-watch until your eyeballs. But she's her but I think it's so transfer. These consumers are becoming smarter about that. When I was GonNa say I mean whether it's facebook or just that we've all been living in this digital world for a while and we see our kit? You know kids. Don't play outside side anymore. They're on the high or whatever I don't know I don't have them but I'm told But that idea that we all like the Internet and we you know that's where we get all our information you know my sixty three year. Old Dad was here last year in less was here last week in New York and was walking around with a paper map happen. I don't know how he you know like. Can you guys imagine not living with these devices. I think on the design side to like. There's an argument to be made for like the Kapiti. Non Design. Like when I'm on like amtrack on the crappy Wi fi. It's still loads faster than I can read it whereas I go to one of these sites. It's gorgeous and it may be gorgeous but I can't can't see a thing like I think not. Everybody lives like in New York with easy broadband. Like I think. There's something to be said for like barebones. Fast loading page the discussion one. I mean I completely disagree because of my inc a fun place to work. That's.

facebook friendster New York Times tennis New York Wall Street Journal Washington US craigslist racket magazine Three Days Hampshire Wi Kapiti Washington Post l Dan
"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"How do you really catch etched? People's attention linked in can help you speak to the right professionals at the right time. Lincoln's targeting tools help you focus on reaching your precise audience down to their job title. The company name location and more at the end of the day linked in ads are helping businesses of all shapes and sizes. Get big results. Try It for yourself. Linked in is offering in a free one hundred dollar linked in add credit to launch your first campaign simply visit Lincoln Dot Com Slash Inc uncensored. That's linked in dot com slash INC uncensored uncensored terms and conditions apply facebook facebook facebook. Everyone hates it the yarn on it though there are totally on instagram but no no business and seemingly no human can afford to quit and yet into the breach goes another digital giant to compete against them. Kristen you've been on this new platform and you have some some interesting thoughts about. What do we have here? Well Jimmy Wales the Founder wikipedia and Gi Tribune in two thousand. Seventeen launched on Monday Monday. I believe it's kind of the next iteration of Wiki Tribune called WTC social and it's posing itself the few headlines are written this week it is posing itself as a competitor. Richard FACEBOOK ended announced. It's it's brand on its homepage and I'll read a little bit of it Because what you know what has kind of call to action to the people is basically you know social networks media advertising. Is You know kind of taking control of your data and all this kind of stuff And so making it a more kind of AD free. You choose what you want to see you can edit. You know it'll be similar to wikipedia and that you can you know at headlines and kind of you know say this is wrong long. This isn't right. This isn't a valuable this fake. This is misleading. This is you know it gets kind of into the really meeting of everything that's going on right now with facebook even twitter You know trump Russia. Yes all of it. You know So his brand statement res Social Networks have grown. They've also amplify the voices of bad actors across the globe. Fake News is influence global events and algorithms care only about engagement and keeping people addicted to the platforms without substance..

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"I have to make contact lenses. 'cause you buy your contact lenses in your glasses off at the same time like I feel like contact lenses for them could be kind of the equivalent of Joe Want fries with with that that and the margins have got to be much better. Yeah I think they are. I think it's a it's a it could be a huge profit center for them. I think you're right that it doesn't necessarily have to be cool. We just expect this company that pioneered selling model to make it cool I think that they Have far more concern in terms of a safety and effectiveness of this new product Contact Lenses are very scientific. Good right they need to be the exact right thickness or they can cause infection. They can cause does damage to your cornea. That's those are problems. Obviously off the. I think that the contact lens industry is run by Super Genius penises. And they did. They figured that part out. I don't know I mean. Obviously these guys were good. I mean when you say as soon as you told me scout I could basically see the ad campaign I mean I could practically see a logo. I guess you know. What do we think about this playbook I mean like they there as of two thousand seventeen? They're over three hundred million according into the the information They went. They went to brick and mortar which was a huge them on. They told us on the show that that was a surprise. But they're getting like per square foot sales. That are that tiffany or the apple. Store Drool over. Did they have a APP where you can check your prescription. I mean like they're kind of they're building the monolith themselves now yeah I think it's I think it's great. I really liked the listening to your customer approach. I think a lot of our The the entrepreneurs that in clubs the most kind of use that strategy that she and I think that I'm kind of curious to see what they do next honestly or go public. Maybe maybe do they say anything about not allow Lhasa last. Could you see them getting past. I related stuff like could. Could you see this becoming like a bigger less brand or should they just in your view. Just stick to this. That's interesting I think that once they they want to beef up their you know kind of Offerings within stores optometry offerings rings I think that you can branch out a little bit from there and focus on the technology behind those things that's been a huge hurdle is federally and state regulation. Wise is to allow people to actually use the APP to check their own vision I think that technology is going to take them a while. Also in the regulation stuff's going to take them a while so I don't know I I think it'll be some years before they Pivot again or launch a new product. But it's possible. I wonder if they turn more into a lifestyle style brand though because you just point of view and their physical stores and the places are jam packed with like books pens. I mean seriously all they have just put a price tag on that stuff. Yeah right yeah. Yeah Yeah blow it out one of the most interesting things that places like worby Parker and things and other things that are you know. When I was growing up it was it it was nerdy to get glasses at like five or six? You know and you didn't talk about menstruation or anything like that and the younger generations. They don't care like it's cool to get glasses now. It's it's cool to have your P.. All of that kind of thing and I think it goes beyond lifestyle and kind of cool pencils like there's no stigma around some of these things that used to be considered healthcare health care and stuff like that. It's like maybe they'll do hearing aids next is that but that's the thing like it's not like I G- losses aren't new but the what the way that they people you're were talking you know about it just like I just think there's a lot of the. There's a lot of those brands kind of in that healthcare. I fear that have Removed kind of like what it used to mean to go to the doctor and get these things done that you know used to have a different Kind kind of connotation yeah. I still think it's I agree with you. I still think it's an uphill battle though I mean just because I have two young kids and know lots of their friends and getting getting your period is not cooling fans lot lot different than it was a generation ago. Absolutely agree with you there. I'm I'm just looking forward to being an Alpha Tester of worry Parker hearing aids in about five miles north of insults. Yeah I'm looking forward to the Oh boy just became seventy five years old on incan censored time in place is everything especially in marketing but in today's age of a million messages minute and not enough hours in a day..

worby Parker Joe Want fries tiffany apple
"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Need around the globe whenever you buy a pair we've got this cool home triumph thing so you don't even need to go to a story or you can have five frames delivered to your home They had this league whole design and style board very like hipster and KEROUAC inspired. And you know talk to different publications about all these different things and you know every it were you know. They actually did succeed in pioneering height of of a new model of direct to consumer. It's a thing that we have just seen happen over and over again I gotta be Parker's right Eh. Thirty three percent of the eyewear market in this room right. Now we've got fifty fifty now. They put them on. Thank you Christon yet. I don't need them to talk only to read and some one hundred twelve stores now In addition to their their direct to consumer online sales the model that they've spurred the structure consumer thing as you know there's worby Parker for makeup up there's more people glossy For Mattresses Casper Right. There's exactly I could take up this entire half hour for carry on luggage absolutely absolutely vitamins. Dog toys short shorts and and this time around a decade later. They're they're finally launching another brand and you know I talked to the founders while I talked to one of the founders about it And he told me you know there's a lot of different. I think people would suspect we would make accessories You know watches would be a logical thing. Requires precision could be made more cost-effectively cost-effectively nope they're doing something totally unsexy a complete commodity product that is invisible I don't know it contact lenses..

worby Parker Christon
"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"The following podcast contains explicit language. mm-hmm good day men women. Non Binary is in all the ships at sea and welcome onto another episode of ink uncensored. A podcast about business. start-ups cool companies entrepreneurship and just about anything else. That hits the like buttons of the amazing people who ride knitted frank. I'm John Fine. The executive director of editorial for ink and I'm thrilled to be joined by three of my fantastic colleagues. We have senior writer. Christine legario chaff. Can Hey don digital design and data editor Kristen Lens. I everyone and editor at large. Kimberly Wiesel Don. We have another fantastic show for you. You Ladies and gentlemen what are we going to talk about first. Worby Parker made a big move this week into a whole new product line. We'll take a look at what that means. For the company and their general industry then another digital giant is taking on facebook but wait. It's not what you think and Leslie. We will hear about Steve Case and his rise of the rest and the interesting approach they have to ensuring hiring founder diversity and of course please stay tuned for a like buttons a quick hit on something. We saw this week that we liked. I'm still not going to tell you what the best slash joint in New York City is but what we might hear about doomed retail and tiny technology the cool nerds behind worby. Parker are added again. They've launched a whole new line of products. I'm Christine you've we've long known founders. No Blumenthal Dave Gilboa and you fall the company for years. What's a play right now? Yeah well I I WANNA take us back to a decade ago when war be Parker launched on these two guys out of Harvard Business School decided they were going to start a streak. Glasses company reasonably priced frames. Ninety five dollars and disrupt looks Outta Attica the global eyewear. What do you want to call them on a list? Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's just gigantic. And you know they have have over. The past decade made a dent but when they launched they had kind of four different pitches for the company. They said okay. We've got these stylish frames we've got a buy one Give one back model where we will provide glasses to people in.

"warby parker" Discussed on Snacks Daily

Snacks Daily

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Snacks Daily

"This is John this is snacks. Daily is Wednesday November twentieth. We're bringing the best one. Yeah this is the best snacks daily we have ever done. Jack can you hit me with three. We got three stories the first the housing market is up. The Home Depot stock is down looking at how they botched like a diy. I Y situation with their own e commerce shouldn't do do it yourself website building on the second story. Jack what are we got. Microsoft suddenly mentioned that it's slack competitor peddler which is called teams. That is way bigger than slack. Turns out there's an incumbent advantage were jumping into this thing snack style third and final stories the Unicorn of the day worby Parker you probably heard it the war of war. It's actually the Unicorn of UNICORNS and Worby Parker just launched. Its second product not glasses. They're calling it scout and their contact contact. Lenses are snappers before we jump into all that we gotta talk for a second. Here you maybe know. The Winkle Voss Wins Ak the winkle yes you probably saw them in the social -ocial network these are the two giant rowers who Kinda got ripped off by Mark Zuckerberg them together. They're like the size of a tall bill. These two are thoroughbred they tell on you. They win best in show at the Westminster dog absolutely well. It turns out in the time since they've gotten over their like facebook drama. They've been running a cryptocurrency. It's called Gemini. The terms out Gemini just made its first acquisition. It turns out that Jim and I didn't just make its first acquisition. It made a very unique acquisition. You can't make this up. We couldn't wait to share this with I company that the winkle Voss twins acquired has co-founders that are also twins. We couldn't make this up. The sounds like an onion headline this is a company run by twins acquiring another company owned by twin. We're just GONNA leave it there later. Let's Daily.

Winkle Voss Wins Ak Jack Worby Parker Voss Home Depot John facebook Microsoft Mark Zuckerberg Westminster Jim
"warby parker" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on The Playbook

"On this episode of the playbook i have the co founder of worby parker dave gilboa and he's gonna tell us how losing a pair of glasses turned into a multibillion a billion dollar company and furthermore how to find a partner in if you should have a partner. This is entrepreneurs the playbook each week. I bring you some of the greatest just athletes celebrities and onto to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success in what made them champions on the field and in the boardroom. I'm your host and c._e._o. Of sports marketing david meltzer this day meltzer with entrepreneurs nor is the playbook and i have another day with me. It is dave gilboa with barbie parker the c._e._o. Welcome to the playbook. Thanks for having me on well. You know you and i was is looking to have similar backgrounds except berkeley rejected me and accepted you and when you apply to a lot harder to get into as well <hes> my business partner lee steinberg emberg early in my career was a huge berkeley and there's definitely a different energy about going to school like that especially when you went being up in the silicon o'connor valley and in the competitive state was stanford trying to figure out what real high net wealth is worth. Where did the lessons to be such a great entrepreneur. Come come from was it pre berkeley berkeley or post berkeley. I think probably starts with my parents and actually went. I went. I went to berkeley. I had no interest in business. <hes> both my the parents are doctors. I was one hundred percent sure. I was going to become a doctor growing up as a kid. I was just trying to decide which kind of doctor went to berkeley was a bio engineering major ager to call the pre med classes took them cat and was kind of all set to following that path around that time there were a lot of changes to the healthcare industry three h ammos we're starting to take over large parts of industry and talking to my parents and their friends who are doctors a lot of them were kept complaining and wishing for the good old days and talking about bureaucracy and the system and for the first time started thinking about well. Maybe there are some other paths in life but the the values that my parents instilled in me was that you should use your job as a as a way to make the world better and and i always thought that kind of being a doctor was one way to do that but then berkeley kind of opened my eyes to two other paths and particularly some of my friends that were going into business and realize is that <hes> maybe learning something about business could allow me to one day help lead an organization that had positive impact on on people's lives and there was kind of southern path path and really only taking engineering classes but talking to my friends we're going into investment banks or consulting firms realized that those firms were willing into higher <hes> just kind of young smart people and help train them and so <hes> ended up going to debate and company strategy consulting firm as my first job out of college and <hes> in in there i learned a lot and i think that kind of <hes> established a lot of foundation and that allowed me to start a business a couple of years later obviously education hugely important you know my mom was always doctor lawyer failure my brother went to harvard took the cats and decided to be rabbi <hes> <hes> help the world so there must be something in the sciences that forced you in that direction but looking at that what skills <hes> translated live from being such a great academic. Most people realize there's the true academics like yourself that really can translate over a certain portion into the the business world that most people that are you know like a very vague tucker the world he could not hold a candle to your academic prowess and he would put down the fact you know go to college no way it's a waste of money where i look at a lot of great entrepreneurs and successful business people like yourself. Your career doesn't happen open unless you utilize the resources at berkeley and really understand develop the skills. What skills did you learn that translated over into business. Any entrepreneur has to be intensely curious and has to be a great lifelong learner. I think more than anything else is being at a place like berkeley helped me figure out how to learn and how learned effectively and and also to solve problems and and with the kind of engineering background <hes> you're taught how to approach really complex problems and really complex systems and figure out how to break those down into into smaller and smaller pieces that allows you to tackle them <hes> piece by piece and and make progress against a much larger goal <hes> and i think that kind of <hes> systems like like thinking <hes> has been <hes> really important as we set out to to launch business for the first time with me and my co founders doing things that we had never done before whereas we tackle kind of new parts of our business that we've never approached <hes> being able to take a big open question and and breaking it down into small pieces <hes> has been <hes> you. I can't think that way of thinking and that skill set <hes> has been critical to tar success as a business and the courage that it's so at bain which she's a pretty secure job great secure company well world renown and then you move into a different direction. How'd you make that decision. Yes i think <hes> my i took my mcat my senior year of college. My scores were good for five years. So i my parents <hes> <hes> kind of <hes>. We're okay with me taking a job at bain <hes> kind of learning something about business for a couple of years but still we're putting a ton of pressure on me to then kind of go back into the that they had laid in front of me and go back to to med school i sort of had different ideas and i wanted to do something to kind of combined some of those business skills with interests in health and kind of helping people and and actually deciding between two different pads adds one i would have moved to uganda and worked for the clinton foundation their pediatric hiv aids initiative be my country director <hes> in uganda <hes> in the other path was to move to new york city <hes> and working finance at a small firm called allen company that had a great reputation and and and a lot of contacts but they were starting a healthcare practice and i could be kind of part of the founding team <hes> they were such different opportunities than flipping a coin and ended up in york at allen and company work there for a couple of years had a great experience learn a ton but also realize that i didn't want to stay kind of finance path and so decide to go back to school got into warden firm i- m._b._a. And took a few months off to travel in between alan in co- and and going to school and i was backpacking around the world and <hes> while i was gone <hes> i lost my only pair of glasses. I left them on a plane. <hes> they'd cost me seven hundred dollars and <hes>. I got back to <hes> to the u._s. <hes> started school has a fulltime student. <hes> and i need to buy a new pair of glasses. This is back and believe how expensive they were. Never stopped to think about why glasses so expensive. It just didn't make any sense it's technology. That's been around for eight hundred years and and that kind of that other item i need to buy around the same time was a new phone and i bought a new iphone for two hundred dollars and it was this magical device and just looking at i kind of juxtaposition of those two products and prices it just didn't make sense to me as a consumer and so i started complaining to anyone that would listen mostly my new classmates about that like last week so expensive asking a bunch of questions and realize that a lot of a lot of other people i'm kind of had a similar frustrations my friend andy who ended up becoming one of my co founders had lost so many pairs of glasses. <hes> x. ended up getting lasik friend jeff. <hes> another co founder sure <hes> he he was wearing glasses those five years old his prescription had changed twice <hes> but he didn't want to pay several hundred dollars for a new pair of glasses <hes> and then neil our forth breath co founder <hes> he had spent the last five years running this great nonprofit called vision spring <hes> where they were producing glasses for people living on less than four dollars a day <hes> and helping to distribute them to reach the world that otherwise wouldn't have access to glasses and through that experience he'd been two glasses factories and realized that there was nothing in the cost of materials that justify justify these high prices into the four of us got together <hes> and <hes> got super excited by <hes> this this idea that we could create <hes> <hes> a much more consumer friendly <hes> eyewear brands <hes> where we could use the highest quality materials in the world <hes> but still glasses for a fraction of the price in other places use the power of the internet to cut out all the middlemen all the unnecessary <hes> price markups and pass those savings on onto onto consumers and so that was really kind of where the idea for parker was born as amazing in scientist and mathematician. How do you explain explain. I always say coincidences are medical currents. That's a huge coincidence right. You're at warton. These glasses happened and then lo and behold old. There's these four cove four of you that have pretty much a shared emotional attachment to an issue but then somehow it all coordinates into a perfect blend that allows you to figure out the solution and create this extraordinary business from it. How mathematically or how did your mind explain explain how this happens because almost every businessperson. This stuff happens all the time. Yeah i think any successful person or any successful business it's always a combination of hard work and good luck and that's certainly the case with me and certainly the case with parker and <hes> and and <hes> you know i think the people that work really hard position themselves <hes> for good luck too far away <hes> and then are also able to capitalize on that good luck when <hes> <hes> when it comes their way and and <hes> you know happen to be in the in the right place at the right time do a lot of hard work and and <hes> yeah matt <hes> some amazing friends co-founders <hes> that i feel just super lucky to have been able to to start and grow business with within we're still best friends and <hes> and i think we <hes> just when kind of that good luck came our way. We did everything we could to take advantage of it and and capitalize and i kind of doubled down on <hes> on the opportunity that was presented to us. That's awesome. I executive coach. A ton of different people like yourself as the best of friends worked together <hes> it's not easy we feel really lucky in the in the moment what what are some of the biggest challenges of working with your best friends. You'll when you don't have one partner. Now you have three best friends and y'all have i do agree. What are the big challenges about that. I think <hes> yes starts by ensuring that <hes> kind of as a group you have the same set of values <hes> <hes> same goals and really open to providing feedback to each other and recognizing that they're going to be difficult decisions and conversations and not everyone is always gonna be aligned and we talked to a lot of people. I got a lot of great advice. People told us don't start a business with friends. Don't start business with four co-founders gonna end up hating each other suing each other <hes> and so we went in eyes wide open and recognize that there are going to be challenges ages and wanted to be thoughtful upfront about setting up a structure that made sense and so we started talking about this idea our first semester business school will we knew that it was a two year period where they were going to be a ton of other opportunities a ton of things that <hes> might draw one or more of us in different directions and so we tried to be really thoughtful about setting up a a.

berkeley co founder partner barbie parker david meltzer bain dave gilboa uganda harvard stanford silicon o'connor valley clinton foundation alan lee steinberg york jeff executive allen company
"warby parker" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I was up in aspen Colorado earlier this week a fortune magazine conference up there sitting in the hotel lobby minding my own business went up comes a woman role in a suitcase how are you hi this is Jen Rubio is the co founder and chief brand officer of a luggage company called away please come on in to my lobby as it were of course thank you you could sit over there who is this is a this is the suitcase away makes suitcases for people walk into places like this one well actually I walked in and the first person I saw had in a way back over there maybe you should go talk to me we'll get them when Rubio knows how to sell she was early higher at the direct to consumer I were company Warby Parker she co founded away with another Warby Parker alum into thousand fifteen and now they are running a start up with a billion and a half dollars well let's see let's climb right in here let's do it so here we sit in the lobby of the fabulous a Regis in aspen as you see people walking up to the reception desk with their suitcases what was it that you wanted to change about that you know why it there there's so many things wrong with travel and we started but the one thing that everybody brings on their chat which is luggage and if you think about kind of the landscape before away I can tell you a hundred people who travels every week every other week and didn't know the bag that they're bringing with them and as a brand person that tells me something's really wrong right at this industry where you can either get something that's cheaper affordable but you know it's not going to last that long that's that's where I go yeah and then you know you're not that bomb doctor breaks for a couple of minutes but on the other end of the spectrum if you're getting something really high and you're paying a ton of money for it probably more than your flight costs and you're not really sure why back to you being a brand person how do you get people to think of luggage as a brand instead of this stupid thing that goes in the overhead rack and.

Colorado Jen Rubio co founder Warby Parker fortune magazine chief brand officer aspen
"warby parker" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"warby parker" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"To just distract these online branch from their core competency which is digital service you know that that's our main focus as far as other businesses and models and stuff like that and we definitely think that it's the right way to go you're seeing online companies desperately trying to get into retail all the time right now you know from Casper with the online mattresses Warby Parker I think I read a couple weeks ago that Google was opening like a hundred or a hundred fifty retail stores our pop up shops obviously Amazon's getting involved into it so I think what people are finding is that digital is getting very crowded and it's it's getting harder and harder to stand out and it's becoming more and more expensive so funny enough we kind of live in this world where what's old is in always becomes new again at some point and it's funny to watch this kind of on full because retail in a retail is in the midst of changing it hasn't even they always say it's die you look for a kind of an end but there's really no way and we're just rolling right into this new model I think so our goal is is always going to be to get online brands that exposure through these retail turnkey stores so if you do want to get in touch with us we've got a link on our website is a contact form and at the bottom of the website there's also a partner with us link that you can fill out is awesome and since the format of the show is focused on a lot of all all things pets if there are businesses listening to this day at least potentially have some sort of online presence one of the type of pet industry customers that you think might actually fit well for you guys yeah I think anybody that's that's on line and is trying to compete with the traditional retail stores or any type of you know brick and mortar competitor we think I think we think we're a great fit here you're gonna be able to get in front of customers that you normally wouldn't be able to and again just back to what we were talking about earlier well a couple of things they're going to actually be able to see your products touch it feel it there's a lot of difficulty for the smaller online brands to gain that brand awareness and I think that kind of customer loyalty or customer acceptance it's difficult to get over that initial harm I think retail is a way for the smaller branch to do that but it's also a way for specifically I think about you guys out of joy it's a way to show that these are not products that you can just walk down to the local pet store or jump on Amazon and bite but they're you know they're highly curated and very unique different treats and toys and they're put together by people that are very passionate about this stuff so you know anybody that's online that's looking to gain get some traction or gain an edge over their competitors I think we're a great set call so you're a quick plug for a couple these brands that are in there check it out online review in Chicago certainly stop in bring the covered a number of.

Dave Gilboa explains how the idea for Warby Parker came about

Good Life Project

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Dave Gilboa explains how the idea for Warby Parker came about

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