35 Burst results for "Woolf"

"woolf" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

05:43 min | Last week

"woolf" Discussed on Overdue

"With peter and the whole thing so then clerk kind of shuts it down and then obviously she moves on and mary's richard and the kind of all that is left in the past when we encounter sally later in the book. Who's gonna going gonna come to the party She's married says at least once maybe two or three times. That has five boys. Like i don't think she says five big boys but the intonation is like i've got five big boys. You're just thinking about that. Because i upload that video henry saying that he was a big boy allure. It's it's both that and it's the ways in which wolf is is having clarisa see. Oh this woman who i thought was who at the time felt very transgressive and stereotype. Breaking etc has has been domestic sized in the way that this whole time. I've been carrying her as like outside of that. So while that kisses is very important. And i think is part of if clarisa looked back on her at all the things that she like diversion points where she could have not become mrs dalloway. That's like one of them But she sees sally and tallies also a version of that here as well. There's the this is the. There's one scene with this woman named doris gilman To name i for somebody who kills men. I think it's supposed to be an angles in anglo. Could sized does good. You nailed it and anglicized anglican vic side is an anglicized version of a german name like keel mon- or something still sounds incredibly intense. Who came i don't i. I don't remember if it's explicit in the book when she came to europe or when her family came to came to england. Excuse me But there's some illusions to like anti german sentiment during what we're one in how the dow always gave her work as a teacher and stuff and she is lower class though than mrs dalloway and her daughter. Elizabeth has struck up. This really like powerful friendship with doris. Gilman and that is a hurts kill. I'm sorry why. That is a relationship that i definitely remember having an analog in the hours there's the like there's a there's an nyu professor or something. Who's this kind of like activists lesbian figure that throws a lot of things back in the mrs dalloway character in that novel as well like So here they have this kind of like. We are two different types of women. Gilman really doesn't like that delaware has never really wanted for anything. But they both share a love for elizabeth and hopes for elizabeth's future the conflict in as much as there's conflict because it's this novel that we see. Is that like before the party..

clarisa mrs dalloway sally doris gilman peter richard mary henry Gilman doris europe england Elizabeth elizabeth delaware
"woolf" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:35 min | Last week

"woolf" Discussed on Overdue

"He's back in town away in india And he is as he tells us later in the novel he is here to like. I think kind of deal with some marital divorce paperwork point. I'm sorry to keep in. Mind is up as at the point when india still a subject of the crowned that is it is. I made a note of that. Because you know so that post i think the that starts coming apart in nineteen forty seven when india gets independent. Something like that so here. We are postwar one. So there's a lot in this book where these like upper-crust people have thoughts about england. Most of them are good. Thought most of them are good thoughts or at least even if they have quibbles end qualms with what specifically happening in england. They're li- they're still feeling very protective and rally around the flag about it. Got uh-huh uh-huh and yeah. We're twenty years from decolonization. We are the empire we are now coming out of. World war one. It's been revealed that britain is no longer like the biggest military power in the western world. Like there are reasons to not think that you are the best people on earth and some of these people think that they are Is that some of the underpinning is certainly came into this book not expecting it to be political. I had not done that like the research coming in. I knew about it. Being a woman's day buying flowers and stream-of-consciousness like inner monologue inner turmoil stuff. I was not expecting the commentary on british class. Stuff that i probably should have expected knowing when it was written but still i. I didn't know get on virginia. Woolf's twitter and tell her like stud stick to gay kissing. Stop to stop doing all this political stuff. You imagine telling telling someone to stick to gate kissing. Don't even think there is. There is no civically talked about how little kissing there was in virginia. Woolf's like entire body of work..

india england li britain Woolf virginia twitter
Actor George Segal Has Died at Age 87 After Complications During Surgery

News, Traffic and Weather

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Actor George Segal Has Died at Age 87 After Complications During Surgery

"Actor George Segal, who died Tuesday. I'm very responsible with my money. The Goldberg star honored by show creator Adam Goldberg, who called Siegel a legend, and then it was a true honor to be a small part of Siegel's amazing legacy. That legacy included an Oscar nomination in 1967, for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Over 125 other roles were told Siegel died of complications due to bypass surgery. He was 87 break

George Segal Siegel Adam Goldberg Goldberg Oscar Virginia
George Segal, Veteran of Drama and TV Comedy, Is Dead at 87

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

George Segal, Veteran of Drama and TV Comedy, Is Dead at 87

"Actor george seagal has died at eighty seven after complications from heart surgery his career spans six decades from the longest day to the goldbergs. Purist bob mondello has this remembrance. He was an idealistic painter. In ship of fools scheming prisoner of war in king rat a biology professor savaged in the domestic brawl. That was who's afraid of virginia woolf but it was his lightness in comedy that endeared george segal to audiences whether trying to scare his domineering mother to death in. Where's papa or starting an affair with glenda jackson in a touch of class about your wife. We've been married for eleven years and not once in all that time. Have i ever been unfaithful to her in the same city. She now down. In more recent decades seagal had settled comfortably into tv stardom as magazine editor. Jack gallo in just shoot me. And for the last eight years as pops in the

George Seagal Bob Mondello Glenda Jackson Virginia Seagal Jack Gallo
George Segal has died at age 87

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

George Segal has died at age 87

"Character actor George Segal, who was nominated for an Oscar for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Back in 1966, You know when Ted was on his first marriage, and most recently appeared as pops on the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs has died at age 87, his wife said he died of complications from bypass

George Segal Virginia Woolf Oscar TED ABC
"woolf" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:32 min | 6 months ago

"woolf" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Department of Education now says it will withhold about $41 billion in funding for schools across the country until governors submit plans on how it would be used to reopen schools. The money part of the $1.9 trillion stimulus package. I met a worldwide shortage of computer chips. Intel now says it's ready to build more factories in the U. S. The company unveiling plans to spend $20 billion on a pair of manufacturing plants in Arizona that would create about 3000 jobs. Intel says it's planning on building more plants in the US as well as well as Europe. Robotic volunteer firefighter found overnight in the burned out remains of an assisted living center north of New York City. The fire also killed a resident of that center in Spring Valley, New York. And Hollywood is saying goodbye to an actor who spent 60 years in movies and on TV. Here's NBC's Jason Nathan Seuin, nominated for an Oscar opposite Elizabeth Taylor for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? In 1967. Kept your body Still pretty good. I work out. George Segal was probably best known to modern day audiences is Albert Pop Solomon on the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs. I'm very responsible with my money. Siegel died Tuesday is why saying from complications due to bypass surgery, Siegel at over 125 credits to his name movies from a Touch of class to Look who's talking and TV shows, including Just Shoot Me, George Segal was 87. Jason Evans and ABC News Hollywood. This is ABC News on our first date, we had masks on and kept six ft. Apart. Now we're a lot closer, just like Cliff and Deb. Thousands.

George Segal Jason Evans Albert Pop Solomon $1.9 trillion 1967 Just Shoot Me Arizona US $20 billion Tuesday 60 years ABC Siegel NBC Elizabeth Taylor Europe Jason Nathan Seuin Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf New York City about 3000 jobs
George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

"George Segal was one of those actors whose career spanned decades and left memories for generations of movie and TV fans. He started his life as an entertainer as a banjo player before said, weighing into acting. He was nominated for an Oscar for the 1966 movie. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A newer generation of fans saw him stars the grandfather in the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs, his wife reports the Siegel has died so coming to complications from bypass surgery. George Segal was 87 years old. A

George Segal Oscar Virginia ABC Siegel
George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

AP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

George Segal, 'The Goldbergs' and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?' star, dead at 87

"Was one of those actors whose career spanned decades and left memories for generations of movie and TV fans. He started his life as an entertainer as a banjo player before said, weighing into acting. He was nominated for an Oscar for the 1966 movie. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? A newer generation of fans saw him stars the grandfather in the ABC sitcom The Goldbergs, his wife reports the Siegel has died so coming to complications from bypass surgery job. Siegel was 87 years old, A Moscow

Oscar Virginia Siegel ABC Moscow
 ‘Virginia Woolf,’ ‘Goldbergs’ star George Segal dies at 87

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

 ‘Virginia Woolf,’ ‘Goldbergs’ star George Segal dies at 87

"A veteran actor has died George Segal was one of those actors whose career spanned decades and left memories for generations of movie and TV fans he started his life as an entertainer as a banjo player before segueing into acting he was nominated for an Oscar for the nineteen sixty six movie who's afraid of Virginia Woolf a new generation of fans saw him star as the grandfather in the ABC sitcom the Goldbergs his wife reports the single has died succumbing to complications from bypass surgery George Segal was eighty seven years old I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

George Segal Virginia Woolf Oscar ABC Oscar Wells Gabriel
Parker Wins Woolf Award

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

05:22 min | 6 months ago

Parker Wins Woolf Award

"Industry star of the week. I mentioned it's a special interview. It really is because anytime. You have an opportunity to visit with the george woolf memorial award winner. It's a privilege. And i have the privileged i of welcoming in jockey. Does sean parker who this past week got the news. He would receive that award and he is with me now. Here on the horse racing radio network to sean. Congratulations my friend. Thank you thank. You appreciate them. Yeah thanks for taking the time you look at your resume. You see five thousand eight hundred and forty-three winds not bad for a kid from cincinnati ohio Known plus i'd probably this is something you know riding horses. What something i really planned on doing. So i mean that's great for you know coming from cincinnati not knowing what i wanna deal just being in being able to do what. I love now riding. Horses wasn't something you planned on doing. So how did you end up doing it. I love grown up around the racetrack. You know with my dad and everything and the court skills to sit down. And i used to be able to sit and ruin i kid i just love you. Know everything about the jackie's and everything like that so I was getting close to sixteen. And i was still light enough but i mean i was taller and my dad said hey just give it a shot you know ryder cup races get out your system and then you know that way you could say you did it and enjoyed it and everything like that so yeah so i got the right a couple races and after the couple i just got the bug and i just wanted to keep doing it i just couldn't you know give it up after that so i got lucky enough my dad was you know by and telling me you know who wanna do it to go for so that's what i've been doing. What else do you think you might be doing. If you didn't pursue this as a jockey. I have no clue. I honestly i My grandmother used to always Tell me you know getting ready for college. And everything like that. And i always told her you know. I would like to go to college. But i don't think i was smart enough for college. And she said oh you can do it and she said what college did you like to say. Well we're gonna go to college. They want to go to university ally. That way i can enjoy hawaii but other than that. I really couldn't tell you what i would be would be doing. I mean like. I said when i started when i was sixteen. I've been doing it. Ever since. I never really thought about doing anything else. Tell me about getting the call that you were going to be. The recipient of this year's george woolf memorial award on. That was a great call me. I needed it to after you know last couple of weeks and everything so it was. It was a call that i would. You know happy to hear just because you know my peers and everything voted on it. And i got lucky you know i know. I know a lot of riders just traveling around lately and got to meet a lot of great friends. So i mean it's just means a lot. Yeah this is an award on. You mentioned that your peers jockeys vote on this award which makes it even more special. But this is an award. That doesn't mean necessarily that you are the greatest rider in the world but it. It means that you are a great person who has represented the sport in a fashion. That's deserving of having your name associated with jockey. Light george wolf so talk. Tell people about what this were award actually means to you I mean everything is just like You know like Like george wolf me myself as a jockey. I try to help everyone that i can help you know. As a young rider coming in what i was star. Now i had all the odorized by kerber there and he Taught me a lot. I mean a lot of the old riders me down until you do this and do that and you know. Watch this and watch the so. I kind of felt like that. That's what i should do to help people. And then you know coming up apprentice jockey and stuff like that and try to help them out the same way. I was told you know what i mean you know. Just try to let everybody know that. We're we're riders. And i mean we we learn every day. It's not something that we can say we master because if you think you've mastered then you you know you might need to be our sport. Because i don't think you ever mastered jackie. There's a lot of times that we we make mistakes all the time and we try to. We watched races. And we you know come back and make it better if we can so. I just try to explain that. So a lot of the young riders to that. You know we're going to always make mistakes. They just whether you can handle letting you know. Get back on the horse and you know you know i could older guy told me like when you get off the horse. Turn a page. as another. There was a match lawn waiting for you. So you gotta just keep your head up and just keep doing what you love and just keep doing it. And like i said. I was taught from the older riders. And i feel like. I'm kind of veteran writing. Now that i i should kind of you know help out. And like i said. I still take Are still you know. Talk to other riders and take advice moneywise all the time too so i mean. That's just something that. I think that we ought to do with individual plus we all out there out there for the same thing trying to win and i mean we all do it. You know safeway and everything that we're doing it the right way so

George Woolf Memorial George Wolf Cincinnati Sean Parker Jackie Sean Kerber Ohio Hawaii Safeway
Should Ekholm Be the Bruins' Top Trade Target This Season?

Bruins Beat

02:34 min | 7 months ago

Should Ekholm Be the Bruins' Top Trade Target This Season?

"I will give you the floor to explain why Mattias ekholm is a great fit. Just thought I agree with you on pretty much most of these points. Yeah. I mean, I think you look at it even obviously the brand see some depth right now because you know, we could be in a situation where when the Bruins resume play on Thursday if Crews Lake is a barrel on healthy, you know, you could be a situation where you're another body away from a guy like, you know, Nick Woolf for Cooper's a cord jacket Sean getting calls up to be pressed juice. Service like this so not ideal from the government's perspective. But even if this whole left side was completely healthy when you had loads on Grizzly kinds of oral. I still think the proactive move for this team is to still acquire a proven top floor guy just to shore up that defense just turned it as overall security like one. There's the health risk, which you know, we remember what it was a few years ago in the Bruins played the song is in the playoffs and it was you know, Tommy Crofts and Joe Morrow and those guys like that was that was you know, garlic McEvoy. Yeah. We're trying to give it was, you know, averaging 23 minutes of ice-time mean that's the worst case scenario in terms of injuries. But also you just run the risk of you know, going into the playoffs and it's you know solid as low as on as looked, you know as promising as a moral has been you still running a whole bunch of risk, if you roll those guys out expecting them to kind of, you know, not deal with the bumps along the road with that comes with playing heavy minutes and a playoff setting against tough teams like the capitals or off. No Penguins Flyers. If you get past that, you know, the the lightning, you know, all these teams that are going to you know, bring it to you. So I think would you rather keep this defense which has been great like you can I think you can you can admit that. It's defense has exceeded expectations and they've been very good. We'll also acknowledging and being cognizant of the fact that if you want to go all in this year, you need more stability back there. So I think a guy like at home makes perfect sense of your the Bruins. I mean, he's thirty years old big body which looks like a lot of Bruins fans, right? Just thought you know, he's six four. Yeah 6 for 2:15, but he's not just also like a I wrote that he's not like a guy like maybe Brenden Dillon who the the capitals acquired last year whose, you know, six four big guy, but he's kind of a stay-at-home option. I mean not Combs a skilled defenseman back there. He's one of the best over the last couple of years at generating 5 and 5 offense, which you need like you suck. Which I didn't it's funny. I was reading your column. I didn't realize he was that high up with 515 offense until I read that that

Mattias Ekholm Bruins Crews Lake Nick Woolf Tommy Crofts Joe Morrow Garlic Mcevoy Penguins Flyers Cooper Sean Government Brenden Dillon Combs
"woolf" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

02:24 min | 9 months ago

"woolf" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"The water. Yeah <Speech_Male> and the scientists called <Speech_Male> j scott tannen. Who fed <Speech_Male> them. Fluorescent <Speech_Male> dyed <Speech_Male> water and <Speech_Male> could see it moving <Speech_Male> from one town to another <Speech_Male> so basically. <Speech_Male> It's like it's as <Speech_Male> if a bucket trained <Speech_Male> to put out a fire. <Speech_Male> Was people <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> cool <Speech_Male> water into each others out <Speech_Male> suffering. That's <Speech_Male> friendly isn't it. <Speech_Male> It's not very covered friendly <Speech_Male> but it would make <Speech_Male> firefighting a <Speech_Male> sexy profession <Speech_Music_Male> and it already is. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Is it what is it to <Speech_Female> make. Sure <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> it would make a much less <Speech_Male> effective profession <Speech_Male> because every <Speech_Male> time you would swallow <Speech_Male> a little bit of the water <Speech_Male> by the time it <Speech_Male> got to the final five <Speech_Male> and it would just be a little dribble <Speech_Male> coming <SpeakerChange> out of his <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> obviously people <Speech_Male> with enormous <Speech_Male> mouths to <Speech_Male> hold much <Speech_Male> good so the physical <Speech_Male> profile of the firefighter <Speech_Male> might change <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> change <Speech_Male> in the system. I'm sorry <Speech_Male> i just <SpeakerChange> clarify <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> just as you see your house <Speech_Male> being brought down <Speech_Male> at least have something <Speech_Male> sexy to look at <Speech_Male> watching <Speech_Male> your life got destroyed. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> is this to moisten <Speech_Female> the other side and <Speech_Male> is this to give <SpeakerChange> a drink to <Speech_Male> the people on the other side <Speech_Male> to moisten the other side. <Speech_Male> So it's sort of <Speech_Male> it's but they <Speech_Male> then go and <Speech_Male> spit the water out on <Speech_Male> the on <SpeakerChange> the actual <Speech_Male> mound itself. <Speech_Male> That's incredible <Speech_Male> yeah. They never <Speech_Male> sleep as well. Termites <Speech_Male> don't sleep <Speech_Male> really. Yeah <Speech_Male> they're just building <Speech_Male> twenty four hours <Speech_Male> a day <SpeakerChange> until <Speech_Male> they die. Do they <Speech_Music_Male> rest. Do they <Speech_Male> have like a nap <Speech_Male> or not. He must <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> downtime exactly. <Speech_Male> They might play the <Speech_Male> xbox real while <Speech_Male> in fact. I think <Speech_Male> i've read that. They <Speech_Male> normally like. <Speech_Music_Male> Dan says they just all <Speech_Male> all active. <Speech_Male> But if <Speech_Male> they run out of <Speech_Male> holes to fill <Speech_Male> they stand around <Speech_Male> touching each other <Speech_Male> tonight <SpeakerChange> so that <Speech_Male> might be their equivalent <Speech_Female> of known <Speech_Female> well the other <Speech_Female> queen wrestle <Speech_Female> grass their entire life <Speech_Female> and then her life <Speech_Female> really tragically because <Speech_Female> her <Speech_Female> children let her to death. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> She <Speech_Female> sort of she <Speech_Female> dies in tragic <Speech_Female> way that she lives. <Speech_Female> She stops <Speech_Female> being useful stocks <Speech_Female> laying eggs and so <Speech_Female> kids like lic <Speech_Female> licnen. Liquor <Speech_Female> joined the fat and fluids <Speech_Female> out for <SpeakerChange> and she <Speech_Male> just disintegrates away. <Speech_Male> God <Speech_Male> sexy <Speech_Music_Male> imagery lorenzo. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Okay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that's it. That <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is all of our facts. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you so much for listening. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you'd like to get <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in contact with any of <Speech_Music_Male> us about imagery lorenzo. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Okay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that's it. That <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is all of our facts. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you so much for listening. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you'd like to get <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in contact with any of <Speech_Music_Male> us about the things that we've <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> set over the course of this podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We can be found <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on our

scott tannen lorenzo Dan
"woolf" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

06:37 min | 9 months ago

"woolf" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"That's the thing that exists in los angeles this thing i read it not buzzer. So if you live in los angeles you would know about this. But i'd never heard of it. Before the road signs rectangular yellow roadsides that just turned up every now and then and they tend to be a black herro with some letters above and some lettuces below and the letters below are kind of in the mirror image of the ones above. And what these are. Is that directions to movie sets or two. Tv show filming locations and when you're in l. a. And you're filming and some kind of parking lot somewhere you'll put these signs up so all the techies will know what to go. All the actors will know. Go stuff like this And obviously the people in la know what this is but if you're a tourist and you're kind of looking celebrities and stuff you just wouldn't know you just see the side and you think well it's just nonsense also doesn't say batman or whatever now but what they do is they tend to put words that the people in the know would know what it is people who don't know what it is wouldn't know what it was for instance say magnus rex this way. Magnus rex this way. And that was the batman reboot dot notes rises. So if you saw those side you would not go to the dark knight rises the size for rasputin. So you would think oh. They're just doing some low budget russian movie but actually it was i monto but that's that's russia batty in it so yeah. That's a very tricky. Yeah is i think they actually tried calling it. Yeah well in ancient rome. They used to have names on road signs. Didn't they think i read the same. That yeah you used to have. If you had a road sign. Whoever built the road would have their name on it. So you could admire the work of this particular person and then it would have the name of the person who lost repaired it so sort of updates on who to thank for the smoothness of these toilets were last checked by signs of lose exactly so this is kind of about street art and artists mucking around with things. I'm so i just thought i'd try and find out a little bit about benghazi and amazing to be who he is now identified that but the was a large theory. That did the rounds dirt. It's neil buchanan from art attack. If you remember that from your childhood because he's very used to large outdoor multimedia installations you know. There's lots of good circumstantial evidence. It got so bad this year that he had to put at the top of his website and announcement saying neil buchanan is not banksie. We have been inundated with inquiries over the weekend. This website does not have the infrastructure to answer all these enquiries individuals. We can't confirm. There is no truth in the river whatsoever. So nail so The museum of modern art's in new york has had a few of these over the years. the was a guy called harvey stromberg. Who in one thousand nine hundred seventy. One decided that he wanted an exhibition in moma but obviously they won't let him because he wasn't very famous so what he did was. He went in every day and he would take photos of a light socket or of a title of the flaw or of brick on the wall. He would go home he would printed out on his prensa and then he would go in and stick it over the exact place where taking the votes on from like a loaded. The napa found the for years and years and years. Whenever you put one on the floor they will find the same day because they had those kind of buffing machines that would go round and clean the floor and they would find them but with some that would just over a brick on the wall which they didn't find for decades in my house to broken bits of wallpaper rusting ball. And let's just take a photo of a nice bit of paper stick sticking of you read about the gramma. Vigilantes these these people who go around correcting signposts. They seem to happen in various countries in bristol. Bristol house the. uk's leading grandma. Vigilante and he specializes in apostrophes. He began in two thousand and three when he saw a council sign which said open mondays to fridays. But with a loss vs both those words which obviously is painful experience and so he invented something called the upholster pfizer which is an eight foot long tool which basically they're going to be stamp on the end so the really high signs an insert the apostrophe and. He doesn't mind do diamond so he built his own. Specially made stepladder so not to be lent up against shops. Well how is he doing with a noble stepladder. You're using the stepladder wrong if bricks fall out of it. He's noticed that. I've got a couple of things just on signs okay. General signed so firstly. I found it quite amazing. That signs played an important role during world. War two in the uk in that. That was a message that went round so a lot of people to remove the signs so that if any germans were coming over they'd be confused and have no idea where to go so they people encouraged us to take them down and people would arrive not know where they're going but on the flip side was also movement by hitler to change signs around saying you would send people to apparently that's a thing that was attempted. I don't know how successful it was. So it must have just been very confusing because dot zombie mazen. If hitler and you've got spies on the ground during the second boer definitely want to know about troop movements and the state of the country's defenses more than misdirecting people to the local church. Whatever besides gang commute a loss on its way for tea. Well this is why they lost the war on they definitely. It was definitely a sign of resistance in norway when the fascist dacoven norway very subtle of resistance was apparently you often gave nazis incorrect directions when they asked away somewhere that was the signal that year on the good guy sides become. Find the right back to you because they lost so. That's actually pretty effective. Yeah have you ever given someone wrong directions in london for instance like a tourist and then realized afterwards that you thought you didn't do l. purpose then you realize you think oh fuck. I've just sent them to. The robot is not that was feelings in the world. isn't it but if you suspect that there were foreign spy than is actually a leftover nazi looking away. Okay it is time for fact number three and that is andy..

neil buchanan magnus rex Magnus rex monto los angeles harvey stromberg rasputin benghazi Bristol house museum of modern art moma rome la russia napa uk bristol pfizer new york
"woolf" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

06:12 min | 9 months ago

"woolf" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"It is time for fact number two and that is james fact this week. Is that in twenty one. An artist got lost in los angeles and added to make his own sign to stop other people from getting lost in future. Not only did it remain unnoticed for a year but when the city was tipped off they found that it met all sign rules and they kept to in place. Eight years so jumping. What was the science saying. It said five the word nor by. Yeah so this was assigned to get off a highway and get onto another highway. And basically the signpost tell you where to go was really close to the ramp and really the should have been one a lot further back so whatever. Anyone drove down the one ten and once. He's gallons to the five. They would only realize that the last second that i needed to be in a certain lane and they would kinda sweb in front of the cars on. He was like well. It's just really dangerous. So i'm going to five. Maybe a mile further back or half mile further back and he put there and he did it in broad daylight he just one day he just got out of ladas just went up there and did it and it was there and no one noticed and i think he tipped them off in the end. The sir artists. Richard on chrome he tips off the city the end and they just kept it there and then they decided with making some new signs. Now i'm going to have to take this down. But actually they put a new five while his five was took his down on the anew up there so they kind of tacitly that he was right that it should have been the. He planned it for ages as well like he. He didn't just go in broad daylight just dressed as he was he he absolutely planned the whole thing so he had his haircut. Don't show why this haircut. He bought some workloads. He had a hard hat. he got an orange vest. He must've been defense the navy. He had a mohican and he had his truck. He did a thing where as well as making the signed edge for the actual sign itself. He made sign for the side of his truck to match the towel. Trends which california transports the logos and so on to make it. Look like he was part of them so he's properly planned and he's not as disney and he because he clearly doesn't have a nine to five job he called his piece guerrilla public service and i should just say that i got this fact from a book called the ninety nine cents invisible city field guide to the hidden well everyday designed by roman mas on. It's really awesome book based on the ninety nine percent invisible podcast by his full of loads of awesome stuff about the streets. And you you know if you read it you want down the street you go. You know why. That's though you know what about style you know. And he's amazing. Roman mas yeah just ninety nine percent. Invisible didn't need any extra advertising the new book so cool help people keep doing this around the place. And it's kind of all these micro banks but with particular bugbears so there are currently going on in sheffield where people are changing notes on resigns into cues and no one really knows why they're doing this Yeah yeah so. There is a theory that it's to do with q not. I was wondering if which is the insane conspiracy that the is run by. Satan worshipping child sacrificing pedophiles. But i don't know why in sheffield people will be changing into this. What out so maybe nothing to do with that One of the road based public service. That people before which i think is very cool. In the czech republic a group of check nerds space to save the government eighteen million dollars. What and they did this. Because this guy called thomas vondra check and he is a businessman even some businesses and he found out the country was about to pay eighty million dollars to switch their road toll system to a digital system and as someone who knows about coding and stuff he was really pissed off. He put a post on linked saying this is classic. Bureaucracy gone mad. This task is simple enough for a group of programmers over weekend and he without lenton and the prime minister got in touch. I was like well. Is that true. And would you mind doing it. And he was all right awesome friends and he signed up hundred fifty of his program of friends and over forty eight hours. They got together and redesign the whole check road system and they got like meals brought them by members of the public and not say three speaking of european road stuff and road signs at the big story of this year As we all know was the town of fucking which is in worst telephone austria in austria and they are sick and tired of all the fucking tourists. Coming stealing that roadsides right they really fucking roadsigns roadsides so. They decided that they were going to change their name to fogging. They voted on that. This happened the town of fucking is now called the town of but it hasn't stopped the vandalism because there's been a whole load of mall vandalism of people changing the sides back hoping fucking is is objective funny sounding word and it's quite close to the original. They should have changed it to get something. The koch a gap. There's already something. I get the thank you in. Two twenty seventeen in china in the province of jiangsu. A man was arrested for repainting road signs in order to make his commute easier he was pretty annoyed. Things stuck in traffic in a lane on the most way and he was calling. Cctv painting big white. Paint arrows to redirect all the cars in his lane into the lane next to it is brilliant as if as if he would get out painted. Get back at all the callers ago. I couldn't walk out for when you started saying how you would jus road signs to make your commute easier. Because i thought he was pretty directions for himself like this way derek. Or whatever i would love to do..

ladas sheffield thomas vondra los angeles james Richard navy disney lenton california Satan czech republic austria jiangsu china derek
The Great Gatsby and All Your Favorite Works from 1925 Have Now Entered the Public Domain

Mark Levin

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

The Great Gatsby and All Your Favorite Works from 1925 Have Now Entered the Public Domain

"Public domain day when works from 1925 are now free fall to use and build on the most notable works from 1925 entering the public domain this year are the Great Gatsby in Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway as well as works by Agatha Christie Instant Claire Lewis. There's plenty of music, too, with works by Irving Berlin, Duke Ellington and George and Ira Gershwin. Blues from W. C. Handy and Ma Rainey works from 1925 were supposed to go into the public domain in 2001 after being copyrighted for 75 years, but Congress extended their copyright Taunton 95 years. Which brings us to today, artists who want to create their interpretation of public domain works can do so without fear of a lawsuit, leaving a range of creative possibilities.

Mrs Dalloway Claire Lewis W. C. Handy Woolf Agatha Christie Irving Berlin Ira Gershwin Ma Rainey Duke Ellington Virginia George Taunton Congress
'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

'The Great Gatsby,' 'Mrs. Dalloway' And Other 1925 Works Enter The Public Domain

"Today is public domain day. As of january first thousands of books movies songs and other material from nineteen twenty five are no longer under copyright protection including the great gatsby. Npr's neda ulaby has more besides the f. scott fitzgerald masterpiece books entering the public domain now. Include mrs dalloway by virginia woolf and classics by sinclair lewis franz kafka ernest hemingway and agatha christie so are other works from nineteen twenty five like buster. Keaton silent film go west and the songs week toward brown now community. Orchestras can play music in the public domain for free scholars will not have to get permission to study. This material and books on the public domain can appear online without charge all part of living cultural conversation that anyone can join netto lippi. Npr news both

Neda Ulaby Mrs Dalloway Scott Fitzgerald Sinclair Lewis NPR Virginia Woolf Franz Kafka Ernest Hemingway Agatha Christie Keaton Netto Lippi Npr News
Just What is Going on at the Esports Stadium Arlington?

Esports Minute

02:49 min | 10 months ago

Just What is Going on at the Esports Stadium Arlington?

"Sports stadium in Arlington is the largest Esports arena in North America this week. They laid off almost all their employees including former president. Jonathan Ogden Josh. Whose been at the Helm of the company for the past few years made it clear. There was plenty of discontent behind the scenes. He tweeted quote would love to talk about what's happened a t Sports stadium and my fears what will happen with the new Direction off all the details but need to tread lightly from a legal perspective and quote in other tweets. He makes it even more clear that the exit wasn't pretty and that the new leadership represents a drastic change from the team driving the stage over the last few years. The new president will be luke Bauer Bauer doesn't have much experience in E Sports at all. Jacob Wolfe tweeted yesterday quote Bauer is a 2020 University of North Palm. Just graduate and Linkedin shows experience running a pressure washing company power is a friend of Luke lights means and quote. Luke is the other figure involved with the company and he's a bit controversial Thousand Years. Apparently the grandson of Ray Davis a majority shareholder of the Texas Rangers who helped launch the venue according to Woolf the current CEO of Esports Arena Arlington is Neil Lyman a minority shareholder for the Rangers. And if that name doesn't ring a bell, here's a refresher Infiniti sports and entertainment. That's the company that bought optic gaming back in 2017 and made an absolute mess of it before selling it off to a mortal's about two years later. Now, it seems like Neil is taking another popular is Esports institution run by a gaming veteran and moving it in a direction of wage earner nepotism Bauer didn't interview with Kevin hit at the Esports Observer, which I will link below in it hit questions Bauer about an odd tweet from Luke leitzman lights been again appears to be Bridge between Bauer and the Texas Rangers owners who are making the decisions here lights been tweeted and then deleted e Sports Stadium Arlington will not at any time require requests or inquire about the vaccination record of anyone. I will be buried in the ground before this changes. That's just an odd statement to make from a public health perspective, especially as venues have been one of the hardest-hit industries by the covid-19. Demek Bauer claims lights been does not have the authority to make that call but his entire page was wild with feared claims. And now as I searched for it today does not exist. So weitzman's actual role at the company is not clear whatsoever. Jonathan quotes who did the article and said there is much much more to this and is in no way being transcribed fully booked. It's not a fault of hit. Of course. It's a fault of Bauer who just is not going to provide the full situation. We likely won't know the full story until Jonathan's NDA expires, but for now given meals poor history. Use words to say the least. We certainly aren't going to give him the benefit of the doubt here.

Esports Arena Bauer Jonathan Ogden Josh Luke Bauer Bauer Jacob Wolfe University Of North Palm Sports Stadium Esports Arena Arlington Neil Lyman Arlington Texas Rangers Luke Ray Davis Esports Observer Luke Leitzman North America Woolf Linkedin Rangers Demek Bauer
Broadway shutdown due to virus extended again until January

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Broadway shutdown due to virus extended again until January

"The Sunday's Broadway Supreme shut BET Court down struck has awards been extended down on a CBS law to in next Louisiana not year only because celebrated regulating of the corona excellence virus abortion and outbreak black clinics led entertainments marches four are liberal a but letter highlighted justices with the latest the black were joined seventy lives by matter Chief six movement Justice trombones John emerges Roberts our letter in ruling with the latest the Louisiana a few law Jackman violates the stepping them bears the into landmark the role to babies Robert roe performance Preston versus made on Wade the BET famous decision in awards the music featured that legalized him man lying we'll abortions on have the pavement to wait while it an requires actor Broadway dressed doctors will not as a police to perform re officer open abortions until pressed at in on Louisiana least me early on January the to baby's have admitting neck the privileges music Chuck man D. at was nearby and supposed flavor hospitals to Flav open in let the fall an this all is but star virtually will version open identical next of public may enemy's to a law fight several in the Texas power shows such that Beyonce as the a Supreme revival they said Court that struck of she the was play given down the who's humanitarian in afraid twenty of Virginia sixteen award Woolf in will that that not while boat black to return voices Chief even Justice are when being Broadway John heard Roberts re opens they're still voted more to action uphold more to than the take fifteen law now million we have in people this case one attended more Broadway there thing was fierce we shows need to opposition last do to season walking from with a conservative true the box power office justices gross and of one that point Clarence eight is to Thomas billion vote said dollars the majority the night's winners forced include out Liz already a perfectly rich legitimate and Chris Brown state law without jurisdiction and Donahue Washington

LIZ Woolf Virginia Texas Chuck Officer Robert Roe CBS Donahue Washington Chris Brown Louisiana Clarence Beyonce Flav Broadway Wade Preston Jackman Roberts
Broadway shutdown due to virus extended again until January

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Broadway shutdown due to virus extended again until January

"The Sunday's Broadway Supreme shut BET Court down struck has awards been extended down on a CBS law to in next Louisiana not year only because celebrated regulating of the corona excellence virus abortion and outbreak black clinics led entertainments marches four are liberal a but letter highlighted justices with the latest the black were joined seventy lives by matter Chief six movement Justice trombones John emerges Roberts our letter in ruling with the latest the Louisiana a few law Jackman violates the stepping them bears the into landmark the role to babies Robert roe performance Preston versus made on Wade the BET famous decision in awards the music featured that legalized him man lying we'll abortions on have the pavement to wait while it an requires actor Broadway dressed doctors will not as a police to perform re officer open abortions until pressed at in on Louisiana least me early on January the to baby's have admitting neck the privileges music Chuck man D. at was nearby and supposed flavor hospitals to Flav open in let the fall an this all is but star virtually will version open identical next of public may enemy's to a law fight several in the Texas power shows such that Beyonce as the a Supreme revival they said Court that struck of she the was play given down the who's humanitarian in afraid twenty of Virginia sixteen award Woolf in will that that not while boat black to return voices Chief even Justice are when being Broadway John heard Roberts re opens they're still voted more to action uphold more to than the take fifteen law now million we have in people this case one attended more Broadway there thing was fierce we shows need to opposition last do to season walking from with a conservative true the box power office justices gross and of one that point Clarence eight is to Thomas billion vote said dollars the majority the night's winners forced include out Liz already a perfectly rich legitimate and Chris Brown state law without jurisdiction and Donahue Washington

LIZ Woolf Virginia Texas Chuck Officer Robert Roe CBS Donahue Washington Chris Brown Louisiana Clarence Beyonce Flav Broadway Wade Preston Jackman Roberts
Broadway shutdown due to virus extended again until January

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Broadway shutdown due to virus extended again until January

"Broadway shut down has been extended to next year because of the corona virus outbreak marches are a letter with the latest seventy six trombones a few Jackman stepping into the role Robert Preston made famous in the music man we'll have to wait Broadway will not re open until at least early January the music man was supposed to open in the fall but will open next may several shows such as a revival of the play who's afraid of Virginia Woolf will not to return even when Broadway re opens more than fifteen million people attended Broadway shows last season with the box office gross of one point eight billion dollars

Jackman Robert Preston Virginia
Walking the South Downs Way in England

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Walking the South Downs Way in England

"Welcome amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about the south downs way. I'd like to welcome to the show. Aaron Miller from the Armchair Explorer podcast at Armchair Dash Explorer Dot Com. Who's come to talk to us about hiking? The south downs way in England Aaron. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much Chris. Pleasure to be here well Erin. Why are we talking about the south downs way? And can you put it on a map? I first of all I come from this area so I'm passionate about it. The South downs way is I think. One of the most beautiful but lesser-known hikes in England in the south of England. It's a hundred mile pot that stretches from east which is south of London right on the coast and it goes a hundred miles west to winchester and it's a beautiful route because it follows the spine of the south downs. The entire way on the south downs being a series of hills mountains hills. We're talking the south. Downs is beautiful gentle rolling hills that stretch of this way and into central English landscape. When you picture that quintessential Englishness that gentle rolling hills in arable farmland and old pubs little tiny villages and sheep and cows. Because you're on the spine of these down. This incredible view to one side to the south of you is the English Channel Sparkling Blue Sea in and then the other side is this wheeled. Which is this valley. That seems to stretch on forever. And IT'S COOKIE CUTTER. English field far as the I could say. And what makes this really special is? It's the national trail for south downs. National Park which is England's National Park. I think turns ten this year. So it's really a working landscape for like for your listeners. That come from the states or other places. I love the national parks in the states. I'm a huge fan right about them. A lot and most of them are obviously protecting. He's wild spaces. But the town's national park is a little different is actually a UNESCO biosphere reserve which is an award. That's not been given out to that many places and it's to do with the relationship between a land and its people and the sustainable relationship harmonious assistance between the ecosystem and the people that live there and have lived there and work that land for centuries thousands of years in fact. So what you get. Is this real sense of living landscape. It's not a national park which is devoid of people cut off from civilization It's a national park where people have existed for thousands of years the south downs way. In fact it's been walked for at least eight thousand years. Have records of that so when you in this room you really? Following in the footsteps of people that have worked for thousands of years. There's age hill forts. There's Bronze Age burial mounds. There's Roman history so you get a real sense of that as you will through an feel like that history and culture can imbue a place with debt when you're there you get the sense of this living landscape that is very typical of England's and very friendly in welcoming you're passing through these little villages and it's a little off the tortoiseshell because I don't think many international tourists do so when you coming off the trail to stay in these tubs or these different places overnight. You really stay in local One a drop down to this pub called the five bells and the local cricket teams in having their Green Tea and Gossiping About Pu. Bakes the best scones and all that sort of stuff. So it's really you're eavesdropping on this. Little World of the south of England and I think a lot of people when they think giving they think of the south of England to landscape inspired love artists over the years for everyone from Virginia Woolf in the blooms regroup to painters and musicians. So you really feel like you're walking through a landscape that has a lot of depth battle texture to it and there's a lot of great beer too so that was helps o'clock and one thing to know is when you talk about this being a national park in UK the UK Veasley being a smaller country than the US. Where I live doesn't have as many national parks. That only has fifteen so when you say. It's a national park. It's one of just over a dozen national parks in both England. Scotland and Wales altogether. So obviously fifteen are the fifteen best sites that were worthy of being named National Park. So where are we starting? So there's two options I started in Eastbourne which is on the south coast and made my way west from there and I did that for a special reason because when you do it that way there's a really great finish to the hike which I'll I'll keep his as a surprise for example a Lotta people choose to do it the other way round. It's the same elevation same difficulty. I think a lot of people choose to do it the other way round because when you begin winchester you slowly make your way closer and closer to the finish. This really dramatic finish walking towards east born in this place called the seven sisters. Which are these beautiful chalky cliffs that the White Cliffs of Dover the famous cliffs on the South Coast and these be bit as beautiful? I did it the other way and I also did it in a very fun way. I did it as a one hundred mile. Pub CRAWL

National Park England South Downs Chris Christensen Downs South Coast Aaron Miller Armchair Explorer Winchester White Cliffs Eastbourne Erin Dover London Virginia Woolf Scotland United States Wales
Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

VINTAGE Podcast

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

"First into younger share with you is mark had author of the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime most recently the porpoise. He's talking about book. We published that. He contributed to stop what you're doing and read this. Which is an excellent but by the way is one of the books already as go as a bookseller in one of the books that made me want to really work vintage books and he talks about how he believes in the power of a good novel. A term he defines as a piece of work is humane and generous. I particularly found comfort in his description of reading as a compensation a reader and a writer sitting opposite each other. In each other's company I can write plays and films and even poems in which some of the characters are genuinely unsympathetic for which you and the reader feel no empathy partly because those forms are spectacle to a certain extent. You you can sit back and watch it from a distance but I think all novels A conversation I I tend to picture a novel as you. The writer and the reader sitting in adjacent chairs talking quietly to each other. You know a novel is never declaimed or acted out or overheard. It's it spoken quietly to the reader and of course a really long conversation and to make the long conversation work you've really got to you with a like the narrator. You're gonNA like the person who's talking to you. They can be taught or scathing satirical. But they've got to have an underlying warm both towards you and and towards the people they're talking about and I think you can see that. All great writers and Dickens in Jane Austen George Eliot in Tolstoy and in fact in Warren Pace. You can see where it doesn't work because when he does start declaim in those separate chapters about his theory of history he can lose you completely and it's one of the great novels in the world where no one reached the last chapter. Because he's just telling you stuff you don't really want to know. I think this is particularly true of Virginia Wolfe It's not just her warmth than her interest in the people she's talking about but the speed the ease with which she seems to flow in and out of different people's minds in and out of different consciousnesses in a very short period of time often around dining table in and out of the minds of people talking with with one another and I think the way in which she does. That makes you very aware of something about your own mind personally. I'm always reading Virginia Woolf and thinking Yes yes yes that's what it's actually like to be a human being not just that stream of consciousness stuff which she does so well the way you flick from memories of Childhood Your plans for dinner to the fear of death all within thirty seconds the way we move from sense of loneliness sudden empathy with people around us the way we feel sort of sealed in one moment and then suddenly we dissolve and we realized that we members of a group of people or we members of a family and a part of verse exists within all those other people in the room at the same time the way we move from our past to our future back into our president. I think there are other right to have a wide range of characters and a wide range of situations. By doting. There is anyone who understands articulates what it is like to be a person from one moment to the next so the other interview. I found interesting was one. The Margaret Atwood gave on stage all those years ago when she'd written novel taxied. If you don't know already exceed is retelling of Shakespeare's tempest in the interview. Margaret Talks about the theme of exile in tempest. And how she explores to have writing the contrast between freedom. I'm confinement. I know a lot of us feel like we're in a very strange very necessary. Exile from our normal lives in big. I'm small ways so I hope like me find this interview. Refreshing or at least a little comforting. Let me start by asking about the genesis of high exceed. Of course it's part of the hogarth Shakespeare series but why the tempest yes. Why the tempest Luckily I was early on the list of people who are asked so I got I got my druthers and that was my brother because I had thought about it quite a bit before. It even written about Prospero before in my book on writing which is called oddly. Enough a writer on writing it used to be called negotiating with the dead but I think the day word was a bridge too far for some people in the publishing industry. They don't like the D. Word. No no not always coming to say it does what it says on the tin it. Does I think what it says on the tin. So it's not about my writing and it's not about how to write about. Who are these writers? What do they think they're doing? And how are they different from other kinds of artists and The chapter in which Prospero of here's is a chapter on diabetes. Magicians because of course writers are dubious. Magicians they create illusions and are those illusions always benevolent. So that's what I what I was writing about in that book and one of the other ones in that chapter is the wizard of Oz. Who has he says is A good man but a bad magician he has no real magic. He's an illusionist. So what you need to ask about any writer probably is. Are they a good man but a bad magician or have bad man but a good magician? Which is often also true or possibly. They're good at both but Prospero in the tempest is very ambiguous. And therefore the he's been open to many different kinds of interpretations. It's also play with a lot of unanswered questions. And it is the one play above all in which Shakespeare is writing a play about what he actually did all his life. He's writing play about a director producer. Putting on a play with the aid of a very good special effects man called aerial. So that is what happens in the book and a director producer puts on a play by means of which he hopes to get revenge on the people who have done him dirt twelve years before them. Light on the setting. Because it's one thing. It seems to me to consider prosper on his magic in an essay. It's another to construct a whole story which you could read perfectly plausibly. I think without even knowing that the tempest existed I think it helps to know that the tempest exists and by the end of it. You're certainly going to know that the tempest exists. Because what they're putting are isn't is the tempest. So how did I come to all of that? The epilogue has always been very intriguing to me which Prospero's steps out of the play addresses the audience. But he's still prospero. He's not saying hello. I'm an actor playing Prospero. He is still prospero and that play is about guilt and forget and forgiveness and and and liberation because the last three words of it are set me free. But it's a bit puzzling in the epilogue of what is Prospero guilty. Why does he feel guilty? And from what is he being freed now that he's outside his own play

Prospero Writer Shakespeare Margaret Atwood Virginia Mark Virginia Woolf Margaret Talks Diabetes Warren Pace Director President Trump Dickens Jane Austen George Eliot Producer Tolstoy
Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

The Book Review

11:15 min | 1 year ago

Leslie Jamison on Jenny Offill's Book 'Weather'

"Leslie Jamison is here in the studio. Her most recent book is make it screen and make it burn essays which was reviewed in the book review last fall all but she's here now to talk about another book. She reviewed this week on our cover. Jennie O. Foles Weather Leslie. Thanks for being here. It's so wonderful to be here so you. Let's first talk about Jenny full. Who she is? Pearl Siegel staff critic for the Times. Were a profile of Jennie O.. Full in this this week's issue of the New York Times magazine but give us a sense of who this writer is. When I think about Daniel's work and why it matters and why I think it's really created aided the sense of excitement around so many readers I think part of it you know she writes about motherhood and marriage and things that can get lumped under the general neural umbrella term domesticity but she brings them to life in these incredibly razor-sharp ways and there shouldn't even be a but conjunction to that sentence right like wire wire those states of being not razor-sharp somehow but but sometimes they can get seen as softer sentimental and she brings both very different form and a very different tone to how how she writes about them and how she does justice to their emotional extremity? Now I'm thinking that we have to make a challenge to ourselves not to use the word but for the rest of this partnership. I think there we go that we're are GONNA fail so we'll just we'll we'll put that aside. This book weather is her third novel her. I was last things and then it took her fifteen years to write. Her neck spoke department of speculation which came out in two thousand fourteen and was one of our ten best books of the year. And I feel like that book really brought her to you. A wider attention perhaps not bestseller list attention but it was hugely critically acclaimed and beloved by readers. Let's start talk a little a bit about that book and why it struck such a chord and I think it's no accident when you said it was like fifteen years until the next book which actually sort of part of the plot of Department of speculation too. It's like there's a writer who is taking a long time to put her second novel. Part of I think you know my understanding from interviews. She's done. The story of that book has that it started as a much more conventionally structured novel and it sort of took her a long time to whittle it down to its really searing form which is a very a fragmented form where you feel like you're getting these absolutely essential bursts of exerience. I think her agent described at once as more like an x Ray than a body which I thought was such such an amazing evocation of how it works and so part of why it caught. Hold I think is that it wasn't it wasn't just very smart about feeling and it had this strong long hard and it's about a infidelity and marriage sort of preparing itself but it also it seemed to find a new language for feeling a new structure for feeling the guy I want to go back to that the fragments Manson the structure for people who've not Reggiani Oval. We should say this. Her books are really short. They're really really short but they are packed and yet they don't feel dense and part of that is due to structure and you use the word fragments. People use the word fragments or fragmentary or cones. Let's talk about a house. She structures these books because it is especially when department speculation came out in two thousand fourteen. It felt very different from what was being written and it felt very very different from the way in which a domestic novel was being written. You know it makes me think a little bit about the way that like Virginia Woolf would describe moments of being you know that somehow we have these moments where it feels like something about experience is intensified or crystallized on. I think Jenny has a real knack for like putting her finger on the pulse of those moment. So maybe it's just an ordinary moment like in this latest novel. where she comes home from the her narrator comes home from feeling this intense panic about climate aamot change and her sons playing minecraft noon? SORTA get like putty off of his fingers. Like it's not in a dramatic sense like it's that's not a huge plot point happening in that moment but she manages manages to find these ways that seemingly insignificant moments if you if you describe them so precisely and locate some kind of feeling what's happening in them quivering inside them. She does justice to it and the way that her books are structured. I don't think there are like us in this weather. There are parts. I can't remember if in Department of Speculation Stephen divided into chapters but it's these single paragraphs are a few paragraphs spaced apart on the page. So not not only. Is it a small book but it actually. I mean you could theoretically sit down and read it in a couple of hours I did. You did theory. You could sit down down and read it very quickly and one of the things that I think people then mistakenly assume is that. Oh you know sort of hastily written you get the cents though once you are reading it that not at all does feel something. That is very much labored over almost like poetry in terms of the precision of the ways in which the things that she's putting into those little sections as you pointed out it's often about the contrast in a given moment between something very granular and domestic and personal and then some larger thought. That's going on or something happening in the greater world. Do you think that was what was is so striking about department of speculation. The fact that she was doing not that she was taking something like a domestic novel. That was you know. Just as you said kind of a story of a Brooklyn Glenn Mother and infidelity and work life balance and these things that so many books are about but infusing in it these larger the issues. I think that's a really good point that so often. What makes these like short bursts? CLO- fuel incandescent our field. Charged is is that they're very granular. But they're also holding some kind of emotional intensity and I think when you're writing about something like infidelity where there's both the danger of somehow telling a story that people feel like they've heard before story that feels intrinsically melodramatic. It can really bring out the humanity of the story to pay attention to the granularity of of like a one scene. That's rising to mind from that novel is like the narrator after a conflict with her husband going to stay at a hotel overnight and and like preying on the carpet of the hotel floor. But it's like it's like that hotel carpeting that holds so much feeling rather than just like the larger obstruction of of infidelity per se. Or something and so I think it is that scale shifting that can happen in a space of a paragraph. Can that happen across the course the whole book. That's also really operative in this latest book. where the skills or even bigger because among other things about climate change is like one of the biggest skills yes yes yeah? Let's talk about weather and let's start start with what it's about even though you know as we think people are probably sensing when you talk about Jenny ovals work. It really isn't about plot. Yeah but what is whether yeah so the narrator of weather is a mother who years ago dropped out of a PhD program and it's working as university librarian and she takes a job job working for her former mentor. Who does a podcast about climate change? where she's answering all the letters that are coming in response to this podcast so there are a few different? There's the kind of plot of her I went to the overhauls narrator to answer my letters to this cast. I'm just kidding. I love answering your letters I would be. I thought you were GonNa even save answer my letters I was like I have a few letters. Live right Yeah I mean you know you have this narrators mother you have her as a wife wife you have her as a a worker and maybe a worker who feels a bit lost in the world. There's also for me. One of the most compelling plot lines in the book is about the narrators relationship with her brother. WHO's a recovering addict? He gets married and then has a a baby and her role in his life and her sort of desperate hope that he can put his life together. Other was a really moving strand among strands for me as well presumably. That's very deliberate. Bringing new life into a world that is in crisis crisis and feels like it's ending and I think that's one of the abiding emotional. Tensions in the book is like the the world is always beginning and ending at once. And maybe maybe there's something about that truism that has felt universal through time but it has a particular acuity now or the world is is it's ending he's send away by these factors that are at work but that dynamic of like yes the world is ending but also you wake up in the morning and you're touching base with your brother overtaxed to make sure he and the baby are doing okay that both of those are real on. Both of those are happening. I think we're seeing a wave of climate fiction and it's taking all of these different forms. Probably a most noticeably post apocalyptic and dystopia although there are also books like Richard powerhouses over story sometimes metaphorical Oracle sometimes very reality based feels different. Though I mean how does this differ from other fiction looking at climate and climate. Change for starters. You don't have that kind of like emotional. Buffer of the post apocalyptic landscape that emotional buffer mailing a strange way to describe a postal puck landscape. But it's like if the apocalypse is happening thing in Brooklyn Public School like that's the stage set for the book it feels more disquieting in certain ways because it's closer to home. It's not like Cormac McCarthy novel where a father and Zahn are like traveling the chart landscape like it's more immediate in that way and I think one of the challenges of writing about climate change is how to take this thing that is essentially on a larger scale than our minds can hold and how to make it a narrative we can hold. There's this moment early on in weather where the narrator is thinking about her son allies elementary school and she says the problem with the school is that it's not a bill on a human scale feels too large for these little children who are going into it and I I think in a way that lays out one of the aesthetic challenges the book right. It's like climate. Change isn't quite on a human scale but narrative is on a human scale. So how do you translate. How does she do it? Part of it has to do with what we're talking about a little bit earlier these questions of sort of scale shifting and simultaneity where you had these big questions of like the end of the world coming up either through the letters that are coming into this podcast or you know this narrator is doing what I think. We all do obsessive googling about lots of things where she's sort. I'm trying to see like how hot is it going to be in New York City and you know when her son is sixty years old or something like that and getting so freaked out by these numbers so you sort of have those larger questions that are always coming up against the interpersonal. TRAUMAS the books. So either it's like the obstruction of like how hot is the World GonNA get comes up up against the body of her actual son. She's imagining at age. Sixty or thinking about like the horsemen of the apocalypse. Coming in comes up against you know coming home ends ends giving the dog. His Lover Frog Toy. You know so the becomes on a human scale because we see a particular human with a particular life a particular brother who's giving bringing new life into the world that all of those abstract questions are hitting all of those granular

Jenny Writer The Times Leslie Jamison Jennie O Jennie O. Foles The New York Times Pearl Siegel Virginia Woolf New York City Daniel Reggiani Oval RAY Manson Cormac Mccarthy Brooklyn Glenn Mother Brooklyn Public School Allies Elementary School
"woolf" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"woolf" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"Ready to complement your weekend movie. Viewing plans. Thanks for joining me this week as we discuss. Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf in missile episode in our feature presentation will discuss both the theatrical and the film it qualities of WHO's afraid of Virginia Woolf and we've got tales of first time director Mike Nichols goals in our buzz from the back lot segment. But first let's get into this week's opening credits in our film. This week is who's afraid of Virginia Woolf which was directed by Mike Nichols and was released in nineteen in sixty six. Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf Stars Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton and also features George Segal and Sandy Dennis the film centers on the volatile marriage of a middle aged couple George and associate professor of history at a small New England college and Martha the daughter of the university diversity president after they returned home drunk from a party Martha reveals. She has invited a young married couple whom she had met at the party. For Bridge Rink. The guests arrive Nick. Biology professor who Martha mistakenly believes to be a math professor and his wife honey at two thirty A.. Am as the four drink. Martha and George engage in scathing verbal abuse. In front of Nick and honey. The younger couple is I. Embarrassed and later entangled and the wives briefly separate from the husbands and upon their return honey reveals that Martha has told her about her Georgia's son adding that she understands stands that the following day will mark his sixteenth birthday. George is visibly angry. That Martha has divulged this information. Martha taunts wants George aggressively and he retaliates with his usual passive aggression. Martha tells an embarrassing story about how she humiliated him in front of her father father. Martha's taunts continue. George reacts violently by breaking a bottle nick and honey become increasingly unsettled. And honey. Who has had too much brandy randy and has just been world violently around the room by George? While chanting who's afraid of Virginia Woolf runs to the bathroom to vomit Martha goes to the kitchen intimate coffee and Georgia Nick. Outside the younger man confesses he was attracted to honey more for her family's money than passion and married her only. Because does he mistakenly believed she was pregnant. George describes his own marriage as one of never ending accommodation and adjustment and then admits he considers nick a a threat. George also tells a story about a boy. He grew up with who had accidentally killed his mother and years later his father and ended up living out his days in a mental the hospital. Nick admits his aim to charm and sleep his way to the top and then jokes that Martha would be a great place to start. When they're guests propose leaving? George insists on driving them home despite his inebriated. State they approach. A roadhouse and honey suggest they stopped to dance while honey and George Watch nick. suggestively dances with Martha who continues to mock and criticize George. George Unplug the jukebox announces. The game is over in response. Martha the alludes to the fact that he may have murdered his parents like the protagonist in his unpublished nonfiction novel. Prompting George to Attack Martha until Nick pulls him away from her. George tells the group about a second novel he allegedly has written about a couple from the midwest a good looking teacher and his timid wife who marry because of her hysterical pregnancy and money than settle in a small college town and embarrassed. Honey realizes. Nick indiscreetly told George about their passed and runs from the room. Nick Promises Revenge on George and then runs after honey in the parking lot George tells his wife he cannot stand the way she constantly humiliates him and and she taunting accuses him of having married her for just that reason. Their rage erupts into a declaration of total war. Martha drives off retrieving treating Nick and honey leaving George to make his way back home on foot when he arrives home he discovers. The car crashed on the driveway and honey half conscious on the back seat beat and sees Martha and Nick together through the bedroom window through. Honey's drunken babbling. George begins to suspect that her pregnancy was in fact real and that she secretly had an abortion. He then devises a plan to get back at Martha. Martha accuses me of being sexually inadequate. He blames his lack of performance on all the liquor our he has consumed. George appears holding snap dragons which he throws at Martha and Nick in another game. He mentions his Marthas son prompting her to reminisce about his birth and Childhood and how he was nearly destroyed by his father. George Accuses Martha of engaging in destructive and abusive behavior with the boy who frequently ran away to escape her attention. George then announces. He has received a telegram with bad news. Their son has been killed in a car accident as Martha Begs George. It's not to kill their son. Nick suddenly realizes the truth. Martha George had never been able to have children and filled the void with an imaginary son by declaring their son dead. Accordingly George has killed him. George explains that they're one mutually agreed upon rule was never mentioned the existence of their son to anyone no one else and that he killed him because Martha broke that rule by mentioning him to honey. The young couple departs quietly enjoy. Martha are left alone as the day begins to break lake outside. George start singing the song who's afraid of Virginia Woolf and Martha responds I am George. I am WHO's afraid of Virginia Woolf all had a budget of around seven point five million dollars and a box office total of forty million adjusted for inflation. That is a budget of almost sixty million dollars and box office. Total of three hundred and seventeen million dollars. Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf was nominated for Thirteen Academy Awards towards winning five? It was nominated for the awards for best sound best original musical score. Best film editing. Best supporting actor for George Segal best adapted screenplay best actor for Richard Burton..

Martha George Georgia Nick Virginia Woolf George Segal Honey Virginia George Watch Nick indiscreetly Mike Nichols Richard Burton Bridge Rink New England college Academy Awards Elizabeth Taylor director professor brandy randy associate professor of history break lake Georgia
"woolf" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"woolf" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Terrorist. I feel certain that I'm going again. I feel we conquer through another East Harlem of Times. Sean recover this this time from wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca in case. You're just tuning in. Here's the deal every day we're telling the story of a woman from history who you may not know about but definitely should each month is themed fiend. And this month we're talking about beautiful minds. Intellectual giant whose work on an extraordinary impact. Today's Beautiful Mind was revolutionary author. Let's talk about Virginia. Woolf Virginia Steven was born on January twenty fifth eighteen eighty two in west London her parents each had children from previous deceased spouses and would together have four more children after Virginia. Because of this Virginia lived with seven competitive siblings all of them well educated and creative. When Virginia was nine she played a large role in the creation? A family newspaper called the Hyde Park Gate news named after the Family's home address the handwritten pamphlet regularly featured family news and gossip jokes poems fictional stories drawings and teasing between siblings. This early work has been studied as an example of Virginia's developing voice as a writer. Virginia's cheerful writing stopped at age thirteen when her mother passed away soon thereafter both with her half sister and father also died. These tragedies took an intense emotional toll on Virginia under the guidance of her older sister. Vanessa Asa Virginia moved with her siblings to a house where they pursued creative goals. The family hosted gatherings with many radical young thinkers who would later achieve fame of their own. These meet UPS would become known as the Bloomsbury group after another sibling died. Vanessa got married Virginia cope with grief breath and change through her writing. She continued to attend the Bloomsbury group and her witty prose developed further. At that point she was mostly in writing book reviews though. She also published a collection of reminiscences. That reflected sombrely on her childhood and deceased mother in Nineteen Eleven Virginia Reunited with Leonard Woolf who she originally met in nineteen. Oh four at one of her family gatherings the pair married the following year. Virginia Nya then started writing her first novel called the voyage out. The book started as an experimental piece called Mellon Rosia in which Virginia aimed to embrace all aspects of life normally missing from Victorian novels in the voyage. Out The protagonist. Rachel is introduced to freedom and sexuality through -ality on a trip to South America. She then quickly dies without any explanation in the novel. Virginia experimented with Surreal worlds distortions Sion's of perception and non linear storytelling in nineteen thirteen. Virginia's anxiety about failure as a writer led her to attempt suicide side. She recovered and published the voyage out in one thousand nine fifteen but continue to struggle with mania and depression nonetheless. Virginia published Bush more work throughout the nineteen twenties including pamphlets novels. Her writing was experimental and genre defining for example in nineteen twenty twenty seven. She published to the Lighthouse on the anniversary of her mother's death. The book blends the structure of novel and an Elegy Virginia continued her revolutionary work throughout the nineteen thirties. She pioneered stream of consciousness. Style writing literary device and her work would come to define a large part of the modernist movement of her time. Dan World War Two struck Virginia was working on both a memoir and a novel called between the acts ax which examined art perception and response but as London was being bombed Virginia struggled to find the meaning of writing. During such trying time mm-hmm it seemed like civilization was on the brink of collapse and the Demons Virginia struggled with came back to hotter on March Twenty Eighth Nineteen Gene. forty-one Virginia drowned herself in the river. WHO's.

Virginia Vanessa Asa Virginia Woolf Virginia Steven Virginia Nya Jenny Kaplan writer Sion Sean Hyde Park Gate Leonard Woolf Manteca London Mellon Rosia South America Rachel depression
The Life of Mike Nichols

The Book Review

13:58 min | 1 year ago

The Life of Mike Nichols

"Ask Carter and Sam Kashmir join us now they wrote together an oral history of Mike Nichols it's called life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred and fifty of his closest friends Sam Ash. Thanks for being here. Just thanks for having US thank you. What was was the genesis of this project? Well after Mike's Death I was at Vanity Fair and wanted to do an oral history as much as we can get away with the magazine and ask had worked as a PA.. With Mike. And I knew him mm somewhat and so I thought it best to join forces and so we did this for the magazine originally and it was so interesting and there was so much material that it just kind of presented itself as a book kind of instantly. As soon as we saw together in the magazine they must have been painful to have to cut. Had it down to magazine size well. The piece was originally assigned at six thousand. Words ran at eleven thousand and still not a word practically about his theater career hear about his time at the compass. Players is a founding member of Improv. I mean there's so much still on the table Ash you're very lucky person having worked as the PA.. What did you work on? I worked on Charlie Wilson's war. That was my first job out of college. I was so upset on hangs Julia Roberts. What was that often? Yes Oh right. Of course. It was a big movie so very often. You felt very distant from where the the real real action was taking place but still. I really feel blessed who've been able to be as close as I was. So you mentioned Charlie. Wilson's war my immediate reaction. Shen is Oh my God. That's Mike Nichols. Also the thing that I think people don't even fully appreciate now is just how incredibly accomplished. He was and for so long so if we could just kind of begin with his I think I real fame fame was with Nichols and may but before we go into each of those stop. Just take us through because I think people may be associated him with the graduate and a couple of other major projects. But let's just list some some of them so people have a sense. Well there was the great success of the Nichols. and May Elaine. May and Mike Nichols as a comedy team. which kind of transformed formed Comedy really and Mike as Director. He and Neil Simon joined forces and he really kind of in a way. Reinvented invented Simon. For Neil Simon. You know with barefoot in the park and the odd couple and as of film director his first film was the Richard Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor. Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf which frank rich other people believed to be the maybe the best reputation of a of a stage play for film ever the graduate which was second film his second film shocking. JFK transformative you know and Oscar worthy. And then there's all all the stage work Tom Stoppard's the real thing David Raves hurly-burly streamers. Yeah camelot and S- Pamela camelot idle. I mean it's kind of prodian extraordinary range of of gifts that that he I mean. He Directs Spam Lot. I I think two years after doing angels in America for HBO. I mean that's range. I don't WanNa go too much into his early life by. I think it's important to point out that this was a person who arrived here. Didn't speak English. Not as first language goes to the University of Chicago right he meets Elaine. May let's start there. What was it that made that pairing so extraordinary? What did they do? You said that they revolutionized comedy Elaine may was the dangerous genius that entered Mike Nichols life and and changed him she was kind of a combustion engine and he was the steering wheel a little bit. Steve Martin told us the first time. When you listen to those records those bits or you know the sketches? which is he said that the that I heard irony brock kind of modernity to comics situations and things that comedians did not go? Nya such as the cost of funerals was is the time of Jessica Mitford the the American way of death. And you know I mean these are weighty subjects adultery a- adultery right the previous generation of comics from the fifties where people who came from Vaudeville and the Borscht Belt Nichols and may had a theater background around. And you know both the classical repertory but also as Improv actors and by the way they're also both at analysis and brought a level of psychological acuity to comedy that really hasn't been seen before let's just a clip of them from that period some day Arthur. You'll get married and you'll have suit of your own and honey when you do. I only pray that they make us suffer the way you. That's all I pray to mothers. Okay mom thanks for calling you very sarcastic. I'm doing my best now. You call me on on the telephone I me. I'm sorry I'm sorry that bothered you and look I didn't make you feel bad. Are you kidding I feel awful. Oh honey if I could believe that I'd be the happiest mother it's true. What do you think I feel crummy Arthur honey? Why don't you call me sweetheart? That's the one bit. That's kind of in a way close to auto biography at least for Mike that was sort of his mother in a way and and he had a difficult very difficult relationship with her. Are you know after the death of his physician. Father they were really plunged into poverty into serious poverty in in New York. He I used to have to go in the olden days to the Museum of TV and radio to watch these old clips. But now I I'm imagining that. You can see all of this on Youtube. Yeah there's a lot of great stuff and Youtube I encourage people to also look up there The award for total mediocrity that they did at the Emmys when you're in the nineteen fifties so that's just breathtaking. I just actually making fun of their own mirror. You know I mean they're making fun of show business with a successful right away. They were both part of this. Very heavy kind of avant-garde guard group called the compensator in Chicago and the two of them just clicked as their manager. Jack rollins later said there. They were like ham and eggs. They were a local will hit first then they came to New York. He signed them up his clients started booking them at local nightclubs and they were hit right away and then they started going non Jackpot and omnibus and they were hit nationally. So yeah it was. It was really just like that. It was that quick. How does it get from that to? Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf well well they had a great success Nichols and may on Broadway at the Golden Theatre was an evening with Nichols in May ostensibly directed by Arthur Penn.. You know but not really and Elaine was just sort of tired of doing it and in a way was the comedic version of of the Beatles. Breaking up people were just. I just chop fall in. You know it's tragic. Yes yes yeah. It was kind of a loss in a way They would wind up working together. Other eventually you know as a screenwriter and director but but Mike it kind of put him in in the wilderness for a while He was really at see if we rely on a little bit. When he's got that evening on Broadway with a lame the theater? They were in shared an alley with a theater where her camelot was on stage with Richard Burton and they would kind of hang out after after the show and that's how he kind of got to know him and it was. It's essentially through that meeting Richard in that alley and threw him Liz. They were the ones who hired for Virginia Woolf. When you think about the collaborators he had the people he got to work with you mentioned Arthur panel the you know lately Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor Dustin in Hoffman Jewels pfeiffer on carnal knowledge? It's just you know on and on Meryl Streep the biggest names and your subtitle is is Mike Nichols as remembered by hundred and fifty of his closest friends. Did He. Frequently form friendships during these professional collaborations was. He's one of those the people that everybody felt like they knew. And we're close to make exactly this actors and and many was writers really kind of fell in love with him. I mean we could have called the book seduced by Mike Nichols you know Natalie. Portman really wept recalling. Her work with Mike Sue now. Yeah and that was much later and the closer yes. Yes but also they did stage work together so they were totally devoted to him. I I mean Tom Stoppard. For example said I think his advice memorial you know he thought to himself who is there to to write for he so he was kind of an Avatar to all of these. She's tremendously gifted complicated. People and the friendships were very deep. And Very Real Maureen Dowd. Your colleagues said that he was a null coward figure with the Jersey Kaczynski past and unlike a lot of other people who had a really horrible childhoods he did not kind of wear it on his sleeve and he we've talked about it and didn't particularly want to spend a lot of time thinking about it and I I mean I think this is kind of the key to his career. Longevity Eddie is that he was. Somebody really always wanted to be living in the moment. And kind of looking forward to the next project even up until the end of his life when he had several things that were in progress including masterclass terrence. McNally's play that he was gonNA adapt for. HBO With Meryl Streep. Yeah I mean in a way. Our title is taken from a a model of Mike's life isn't everything but it's kind of a misnomer because it was everything to him. You know in a way I mean he could be difficult to and and some of the people in the booker occur quite open about yes. That Emma Thompson is one right exactly Thompson who who adored him. You know said we're not talking about some saint here so you know and in fact Mike toward the end of his life felt that he had been cruel to people and had betrayed others. You know but he did develop a music also about someone who sort of as much of a genius as he was you know he was also complicated difficult cat and felt like there were people to apologize to. Some people presumably wouldn't talk to you Elaine. May of course wouldn't what about Diane Sawyer and were there other people who you pursued and just said you know what no now. We did approach. Diane we wouldn't have done this actually without her been addiction you know and she gave us the same response that initially initially Sam Beckett gave to digital bear you know which is. I'm not going to stop you but I'm also not going to help you all that much. But when push came to shove and we needed the people such as Meryl Streep she was helpful behind the scenes and Elaine. She did. Give us a blurb. Although we didn't use it and the blurb facetiously officiously said well I I would tell you all I know. But they're going to pay me millions of dollars to write my memoirs something. You'll never do you know. She meant it as kind of a joke before before we go one final question what do you each of you. Thank was Nicholas's greatest work and then also so perhaps a personal favourite may be less known or just something new especially leaden. And why. Let's start with you ash. I would say probably the graduate. It's not the most original choice but I just have seen the movie so many times and I think that it it just has held up so much better than a lot of other youth movies of the time that it was sort of lumped in with that plus the the comedy albums is sort of where my original enthusiasm for him started. But you know I I think catch twenty. Two for example is a movie that has not really gotten. It's do. I think it's actually kind of a brilliant movie that was overshadowed by Mash at the time though it is I see no reason why the existence of Mash prevent people from enjoying it today not an easy novel to adapt to know and but I think him and Buck Henry and we did a credible job adapting it. Sam will I mean. It's so hard to choose. My mother would choose working girl in or Silkwood you know an but are you. Seeing your mother would be wrong. My mother never wrong But for me it's you know the stage work is kind and of extraordinary. I mean the Philip Seymour. Hoffman death of a salesman at the end of life using that was really just is an extraordinary unearth accomplishment. Really it brought him Full Circle Because that streetcar with the two original productions that changed his life really all right. I'm hoping that this interview. If nothing else forces everyone to go to youtube everyone to go and stream every single thing that Mike Nichols did that was available. He was such an incredible credible talent ash. Carter Sam cash. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much thank your new book is called. Life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred

Mike Nichols Mike Elaine Meryl Streep Virginia Woolf Charlie Wilson Carter Sam Richard Richard Burton Elizabe Tom Stoppard Youtube Virginia Neil Simon New York HBO Arthur Director Sam Ash Mike Sue Julia Roberts University Of Chicago
"woolf" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

10:59 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"WD FM and am now back to the day Bram show and we are back talking with Art Wolfe's recently retired professor of economics from the University of Vermont also an economics consultant frequent commentator in Vermont aunt media on issues related to the remond economy and the national economy etc arts. Thanks very much for staying with us and oh. I wanted to check into a couple of things with you. you know. I I promise you I hope you don't mind me bouncing around a little bit on different economic topics here but we we wanted to talk about your column that appeared in the last couple of days talking about the the myth of people having multiple jobs and I did have another question that I had that one. was there any indication whether most of these multiple job holders were folks who had sort of like a job and a half you know one full time job and then extra job on the side or were. They wasn't a collection of part time jobs most of them. I believe well this first of all we you don't know for Vermont. we know from other studies about what what what's true nationally so so the answer's a lot of your questions are probably probably. GonNa be more national than than Vermont but so for for the for the US a whole the main they're called multiple job holders so the the the main characteristic is that they have a full-time job and then a part time job ours there are some that have two part time jobs but the main the majority are people that are working one full time job and and then a part time job very very few people are working two full time jobs which which makes sense because you talked about working seventy or eighty hours a week that's pretty difficult and also remember. This is not for the whole year this just ask you about last week so it could be your you know you're. You're only doing it for a few weeks or a few months or you kind of do this. You know it's different times during the year so they never asked. Did you have two fulltime jobs or a a fulltime and a part time job for the whole year. We don't know how long in a given year people worked more than one job at the same time. Do you think there's a chance that that some jobs which by their nature are there are more occasional but when the occasion arises you can actually I mean I'm thinking now I don't know of wedding photographers or or musician's musicians oftentimes can in your depending on on your situation you could go a week or two between gigs but then when it happens you make you make some money and and how does how well how does that kind of sporadic work factory in here. That's another one of those issues. take the musician because one of the you know where where do these people work and the answer is they tend to work in education health care retailing am management and professional services so they're kind of all over but let's let's take that example Napa. Let's suppose you're a music teacher in a school. There aren't a whole lot of music teachers in Vermont. Has You know there's one in each school or maybe even fewer than that but but also as you're a music teacher in the school and that's your full time job and you do get a gig every once in a while you play a wedding or something like that every three or four weeks so if you happen to be in the survey and you happen to have worked a second you know that. GIG The week before then you say I've had jobs but if you were a music teacher feature and you didn't work the previous week you would just say I had one job. That's interesting. They're all they're all districts and you know it it. There's no fortunately we don't have any from the government living in our houses. You know copying everything right. He got everything that we do. That is true. We don't live in western China in the provinces where the that is happening but yeah so there's all sorts of things you know it could be someone who is a single mom or that's probably not a single mom but could be but and or let's let's closest to family but AH MOM who works a part time job. Let's say doing one thing during the week her kids are in school and on the weekends. She has a different job. You know when the husband's home so it can he can take care of the kids so she's got two jobs. Both of them may be part time or maybe one full time in part but you you get it all sorts of things like that so it could be all year could just be random thing we. We really don't know a lot of that. We also don't know how much these people earn in a year or from each of those jobs. Is You know lots of things. We'd like to know but we don't are these people. Do they tend to be lower income people or higher income people well if a lot of them work in healthcare care and education that maybe suggest you've got a whole bunch of teachers that are working full time as teachers and maybe on the weekends or a couple of nights a week. They're making it'll Alexa money working as a waiter waitress when one famous case of course involves the chicken county state's attorney who I think last I checked was still working as a as a as a wait staff in a restaurant down Gouichi on the weekends and so I remember I profiled Sarah George interview years ago on that just talking about the difficulty of a lot of a lot of the publicly funded lawyers in Vermont including some of our prosecutor she was then an assistant is assistant state's attorney shouldn't county and felt she needed to supplement her income by waiting tables so wow here's somebody with a lot degree and anyway. What are you GONNA do. Hey we have a couple of callers on the line. Let's go to Fred in Newburgh good morning. Fred of course you have the criminal who's calling me. So if you're a criminal you're gainfully employed what happens to the what happens to the money that they use or they steal. It goes back into the economy show. How does that affect the economy. Let me ask negative. I think it's an interesting question friend do do any of the I mean. There are a lot a lot of ways you can make a living at it not necessarily legal and this is not just Robert up but lots of places you know grow grow marijuana but be a sex worker. I mean any number of things that are not necessarily legal but people doing them and and and keeping themselves. Dell's under a roof that way what do you what do you make of all that. Are there any stats on this well. I guess I have two thoughts that number one is it really depends on the person so so if if you're working as those you have a regular job but your your I won't say you're stealing if you're a criminal one thing but if you're growing on marijuana or working under the table which is really illegal because you're I don't know just doing something. That's not not quite legal. We're just getting paid illegally. The question is when when you wouldn't somebody from the government asks you Do you have another job other than you know the your first job. Are you gonNA say yes. They never ask you what you do so the question is are you going to say. Are you going to say yes thinking well. Yeah I do My high sell four ounces of marijuana every week when it was when it was illegal Are you going to say that that is a job so I don't know but the whole issue of the underground economy Miami that criminal economy can think of it people who are in the sex trade or drugs or gambling the question is how do you measure for those things and and they're hard to do because of their very nature and there are attempts to to to measure those things actually actually the United Kingdom just a few years ago decided to incorporate the sex trades into their GDP numbers the United States. We don't include that because we don't include illegal activity in England they do they had to figure out how much that added they have to figure out and how much economic activity goes on that. What is the price and How many times does that occur you know with with with apples. You know how many pounds apples are sold and and what the price. Lisa baffles are It's a lot harder to do that with the sex trade or drugs or or gambling but the UK they they have a methodology phonology to do that so it gets difficult in the US they think maybe ten or fifteen percent of GDP is is would would be L. legal parts of the activity which which isn't a trivial. It's really that means. It's about two trillion dollars yeah. That's that's pretty striking in Let's go to thanks for the call. Let's go to don in elmore good morning. Don Going Day and aren't always appreciate in having your publications number at home but when I hear a question like this I guess I'm always suspect on how the question was asked and I'm also suspect aspect of what wasn't ass in this case for example We don't know how many of these people you say that this declining the number of people have two jobs. How has this affected the number of people on Welfare and how how many what percentage perhaps of the people receiving achieving social security have felt that they had been forced and they're taking age full-time or a part time job even though they have their social security. I think those figures is are being arrested as well well well. What we do know a little bit about. Is Why people are worth in the second job. remember this so for social security ready if you're getting social security and you're working as a cashier in a grocery store. Maybe that's just one job. It's not too so social. Security doesn't count as a job but but we do know that most people who worked at part time job are doing because they want to so so it's not because they're forced to or You know anything like that so it it. It seems to be that part. Time job fits their schedule. Aw if they've got a second job doing aren't there a lot of folks out there working a second job though art who are who feel as though they need to because their you know their first nice job they had they look at their paycheck. They look their bills go. That doesn't match up yeah unfortunately from what I've been able to read. They don't really ever ask people all you know. Are you doing it for economic reasons. That is because you because you really need the money to make your daily or are you working a second job. we just got enough money to buy some nice presence for your family if at at the holidays or to save.

Vermont United States marijuana University of Vermont Art Wolfe Vermont. Bram professor of economics attorney consultant Alexa England professional services China Newburgh Napa Dell Don Robert
"woolf" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

12:12 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Day after the top of the hour news from CBS is to talk to one of our talk media news correspondent Bob. May expect will be joining US shortly he his one of the regulars who calls into the day Graham. Show here and WD WE DAV FM and am and above is a fascinating guy former Republican congressman from Ohio got himself into some trouble in the Jack Abramov scandal. Actually he ended up serving some time in the federal penitentiary and emerged from there to take on a new career as a journalist and commentator at which I think he does is a fine job. He's a very interesting. He has very interesting perspective. he's not super ideological tends to take a very middle of the road. Actually shy think approach to most most of the topics we talk about and I it's one of the things I appreciate about. Bobby's pretty level headed. I believe he's unlined with us this morning. Bob I'm showering you with compliments and let's hope you don't introduction. I'll be darned. Hey Good morning and I I I noticed you are the top item that you had is entirely understandable because this is an important anniversary comes around every year. There's the eighteenth of two thousand one attacks on the United States and endo. What are you what are you seeing and hearing about all this member and so the you know the day? Everybody remembers where they were that day. you know people have such emotions and you you were scheduled to be on top of the World Trade Center that morning but I was scheduled to be right there on the top of it and in because of Ellen Ellen Ratner who you know that created talk media news yes. She changed the month she was going to have her birthday her fiftieth birthday and and it was causing me a problem so we had two dates to go. September the Fourth of the eleventh my budget manager she picked September the eleventh to go up in the morning at eight. Am into the tower and I said Oh it's GONNA interfere with Ellen Ratner Birthday but I guess I've got a you know do something you know anyway and she said well they offered me the fourth. Let me see if I can still get the fourth so one week earlier we're up in the top of the tower six of US looking out over New York. Wow I ended up in the capital after that with we ha- we pull the alarm to evacuate the capitol because the Pentagon had been hit your and then of course we were told by the CIA and National Security Agency that we can. I remember it clearly within fourteen minutes. A plane hit the capital yeah that that is a That's scary scary scene. I I actually I'm going to have have a Garrett graff when the program on Monday he just is out with a new book called the only plane in the sky. It's a oral history of nine eleven in the interviews a lot of these folks folks who thought they had incoming that that morning and in Yikes at the I read an excerpt the other day and it was gripping and I guess is the best way to describe it. You've got to be in talked about the folks in the White House all scurrying down into the bunker under the White House grounds of course President Bush was traveling in a believe he was on air force worn and they just kept airforce one aloft for hours after yeah after it was scheduled to land. I think in but Vice President Cheney was in Washington and he actually had the very difficult the task of ordering that that last plane flight ninety three be shot down if it was approaching Washington as it turned out the passengers and crew of that plane caused it to crash themselves because they didn't want to do that kind of damage which is right an amazing act of heroism right there. We always think of them. We have a special show bind to that earlier. Bond to them because we think about them. You know that plane was headed to the capital not the White House. We know that and you know we evacuated. Wait capital. When ten thousand people you can't be couldn't take your cars because the bridges were shut down to go out of the city anyway? Virginia and you can get cars ars out and so is just ten thousand people like an ant hill. I mean just running all over the place anywhere they could and just scouring around the city of Washington yeah yeah boy. What a what a horrible experience that must've been yanks in thank you? No thank God that that last up that lasted attack didn't didn't end up occurring. That's all we can own you know one thing. I have said over and over. Steny Hoyer was the ranking member for our Committee for House Administration and we had to make AAC the next day we formed a committee with Speaker Hastert and Nancy Pelosi the minority leader and the very next day we started the unforgivable task of trying trying to change the entire way capital worked right already was and then not one instance did steny Hoyer or Speaker Pelosi or Speaker Hastert. Mr Play any form of politics with decisions not one single time over the next two years. Yeah you know and that's the kind of thing that I guess it takes a disaster. These days is to to get the politics off the off the agenda. Yes what a what a time I I'll only tell you that I was in working for the AP in in the bureau in my peeler here in Vermont and my boss said go out in the street and get some get some person on the street reactions in interviews with people for the jailing of hearing about all this so I'm walking down the street and passed the State House and we have these leaf leaf peeper buses you know the fall foliage tour Sukhum up and they were a little early. This is still early for foliage if you ask me but the bus companies WanNa make some money so they bring and people up whenever they're willing to buy a ticket and they there was a bus from Pennsylvania. A woman had just gotten off the bus. I asked her if she'd heard anything about this in what she thought and and her comment was well. I guess it's going to knock Gary Condit off the front pages now. You probably probably remember who Gary Condit was. All I remember quite well. Oh Yeah I do because we have been at a concert with him and Geraldo Rivera called me and wanted to know what happened at the concert. I remember yeah he of course he was a congressman congressman. Our listeners probably don't remember but he was a congress woman from California was caught up in a bit of a scandal where he I guess he'd had an affair with a staffer enters. Somebody Buddy yeah she later disappeared and and there was a lot of speculation about whether he might have been involved in all of that and and and then he lost his primary the following following year and so no longer a member of Congress but I thought I I remember even thinking that day at the moment when that woman said that to me. I said that's a little bit cynical. I don't know I mean I I. I I think the I you know the gravity of these two stories is just not even on the same shouldn't be on the same page so yeah yeah hey bob the big news year going on today as the Resignation Ignatius firing decapitation whatever you WANNA call it of John Bolton well. You know we're we're reporters. As you know on your show I predicted Bolton. I predicted June actually June the tenth and eleventh. I predicted that Bolton would be gone by the end of the summer so I I still had two weeks left it. I predict I predicted that back on your show on. I'm sure president trump listens to the show. I think he did on this one of my some of my friends and but I must say I know we're supposed to contain our feelings but I'm sixty five and I cart wheel this morning in my front room so yes I'm. I'm very I think America and the world is a safer place personally on this but a demon was urged. You can read all kinds of things about this. I guarantee you from many many sides campaign office staff people you know in the in the government in the House and Senate president was urged to get rid of him over the last month or so well. I'll tell you about my son is off the charts that the left end He posted something to facebook yesterday where he said he thinks the world's a slightly saved replace place so it sounds like I must have conspired there you go. My son is agreeing with a former Republican congressman all my and let the hard time later. Let Yeah Bolton Bolton is out what does this what does this mean for the future of of of US foreign policy well. I think it means for a better diplomatic approach. I think we'll have a little bit more diplomacy. we got to the brink. NCA- almost launching an attack you know under voting on probably at least twice we know and might maybe historically later on we'll find out there were more. I mean the president towards the end was when their Irish prime minister came in he said something to the effect of Hey John. Do you WanNa Bomb Ireland to me. I think that they're I think voting voting had said a lot of things that the president and the president even if somebody doesn't liking the president has not tended to be on the hawkish side when it comes to the military military will this one of the reasons that I didn't understand is higher in the first place I mean everybody knows is trigger. Happy and and and trump is really not trigger happy. I'll tell you why I believe he was hired. There's a wealthy family one of them's name Mercer and some other people that were behind him big time they people to that were all you know hawks the whole chain of the world the whole military industrial complex and N. B. Former terrorist group Mohideen Coke Emmy k they were all behind Bolton and I think that president got a lot of pressure to bring in Bolton and he he did he succumb to that pressure and then realized if he wanted to spare his election he's probably GonNa have to get rid of Bolton. Well there goes Bolton so he's. Yep off the off the stage for now and Bob Ney. I appreciate you checking in with us this morning. It's always good talking with you listed so Yanan new feature okay all right. My next guest is probably needs no introduction at this point the most Vermont because he's been a regular commentator and the Burlington free press. VAT digger appeared on wd many times the bills bill sayers common sense radio also a few times here on the Dave Ramsey show WD FM and am and I wanNA welcome Art Wilfley collumnist professor at the University of Vermont to the program this morning good morning art and I wanted to check in with you today because you had a very interesting column that I saw I in bt digger yesterday talking about the the myth of the of people having multiple jobs and you your arguments to be that the statistics don't bear out the popular conception that there is a a lot of folks in Vermont on an nationally who are struggling or whatever to keep up with the economic times and the cost of living and so on and so forth and so they are taking on a second or even third job and before we really get into this. I should do a little full disclosure myself. Fear which is maybe. I have a conflict of interest here art because I have two jobs. I do this radio show in the morning and also a part time editor at bt digger in the afternoon so there you go. I I guess I I should say that I just retired art museum but before I retired I had two jobs to since I was teaching. UVM Plus doing a little writing and commentary on the side. Okay so you you and I are guess are rare birds or what what. What did you find in this in this investigation you did yeah we are. We are unusual well and and what I believe. It was six point. Five percent of Vermont offers is at the number you came up with for. I didn't and come up with this. The Census Bureau and Labor Department did but that that's their number so about twenty two thousand monitors which sounds like a lot but remember there..

Bolton Bolton president congressman United States White House Vermont Washington Ellen Ellen Ratner Gary Condit Bob Bob I US Steny Hoyer Garrett graff Ohio University of Vermont Bobby Vice President CBS World Trade Center
"woolf" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

12:33 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Bram show on this program September eleventh two thousand and nineteen eighteen in it's a Wednesday morning in this next segment I wanted to devote to one interesting and sometimes difficult topic for folks who are experiencing dancing. Parkinson's degree disease and that is the speech and swallowing problems that often come with Parkinson's and We have a the interesting. I saw an interesting piece of news from the University of Vermont last the last week it came in and talked about how the University of Remind Mind Medical Center has been listed as the as a recipient of a grant money to help deal help patients deal with who the speech and swallowing difficulties connected with Parkinson's disease. We have a speech pathologist from the University of Vermont's Senator Medical Center on with us this morning to talk about all of this. I WANNA welcome Ashley Michaela's to the program Good Morning Ashley. Thank you so much. Dave and I. I tell us a little bit about Parkinson's. I think a lot of folks are vaguely aware of this disease and tell me how prevalent is it and and what are its main symptoms or or the way plays out in the people's lives. We're dealing with it sure so one in every one hundred adults over the age of sixty will be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease so it is a fairly large portion of the population and there are four cardinal symptoms uh-huh for Parkinson's resting tremor slowness of movement impaired balance and rigidity or stiffness and an individual can can be given a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease if they present with two out of the Four Cardinal Symptoms I see and the in your we're area of course is is a speech pathology and so that is one of the issues. Parkinson's patients deal with guessing. It's one out of one hundred folks in this this country. How are you have people over sixty have Parkinson's that the total number has to be in the what hundreds of thousands or even millions I believe so yes and in the speech and swallowing difficulties. I see you sort of mentioned together are they. Part of the same mechanism yeah so Parkinson's itself is characterized by reduced amplitude of movement of the muscles which means that you will develop smaller walking smaller writing smaller voice and those smaller movements can also develop that smaller swallow. Oh and so the the muscles of the voice and the swallow are the same and so the smaller movements can disrupt the the voice on the swallow. I CNN what percentage of Parkinson's patients have a specific problems along with the with the with the voice and swallowing during the progression of the disorder up to ninety percent of individuals with Parkinson's. We'll develop speech disorders and up to ninety five percent of them will develop swallowing disorders. I see wow and so it's it's pretty universal in the part in the in the the group above folks who were developed Parkinson's although it may not come on right away the other symptoms may appear I true yeah so we you may see other symptoms prior to the swallowing or the speech difficulties but typically most individuals with Parkinson's. We'll develop speech and swallowing difficulties during the progression of the disorder sorter. I see and so you have a little you have a Parkinson's patient. WHO's coming to you as a practitioner in this field what are you typically doing with with this patient to try to address these problems so there are a number of treatment approaches that we can use a speech language pathologist to target these he's smaller movements there is a program called the Least Silverman Voice Therapy loud program and that's a program that has been around for a really long time and is highly researched and effective and that is a program that the University of Vermont Medical Center has offered for a very fairly long time there's also some traditional speech swallowing treatment options that we can utilize and then recently we started offering speak-out and loud crowd program as well thanks into this grant program through the Parkinson Voice Project and the speak out loud crowd grant program what what is different about or how does that enhance the answer change your what you do on a daily basis yeah so it provides us with another option for and individuals with Parkinson's not everybody presents the same way so it's really important to be able to offer a variety of really highly researched and and well effective options to our patients to ensure that they get the best treatment possible and the most effective active treatment for them so when a person comes in we often do an evaluation and see what they would benefit from the most and we kind of filter I told them through and figure out which program would be the most beneficial for them. I see and tell me about your I mean obviously Parkinson's is is one cause of people presenting themselves in your office what what are some of the other disorders that you deal with a speech pathologist at Uvm Yeah so speech language pathologists deal with quite a wide variety of different disorders I think when people hear speech pathologist apologist are speech language pathologists they think we might just deal with peaching individuals to say are thousands or teaching somebody ready to speak after a stroke which is definitely part of our program and part of what we do but we also deal with and specialize in the evaluation relation and diagnosis and treatment of other communication disorders things like a traumatic brain injury or Chemo toxicity which is where you have difficulty with your cognitive communication skills following chemotherapy we deal with variety of voice disorders as well as swallowing guess orders as well so it sounds like some of the science behind your your work is going to be connected with sort of physicality of the mouth within the musculature around the face and the throat and so on and some of it's going to be connected with really with neuro and brain sciences at right. Yes yes we do deal with both both wow that sounds like a fascinating field in one in which you have to be quite well educated to to enter in in working. Is that right that's right. You have to have a master's degree to be able to practice as well as a professional licensure nationally and it is just one of those jobs that changes day to day and even our to our you could be seeing something different and so it keeps you on your toes. Yeah it does sound like now it it and so in your in your in your daily work. What percentage of your patients are Parkinson's patients. I actually see it quite a fair a bit of Parkinson's disease I am one of the therapist who applied for the grant and so I have the training and the speak-out and loud crowd program and so I get quite a large variety of those patients myself however within our department I would say that we see a really wide variety and so it it definitely greatly varies and it tends to fluctuate so some some days we'll we'll have a high caseload of Parkinson's and some days we'll have a high case load of maybe swallowing problems due to cancer or we'll have some patients come in who have shuttering and it tends to kind of flux but it but it sounds like it's it's that there are sub specialties almost within the field live speech speech language pathology and if a patient comes in with Parkinson's you know the people there might say well. We'll we'll send this patient to Ashley because you she's really trained up on this whereas as if somebody comes in with another speeches order caused by some other disease course or whatever that that they might they might go to different person is that right that's it can be yes and no they there are sub specialties within the field and and people tend to drift towards is one thing or another. I got into the field because of voice disorders and so and my grandfather had Parkinson's. That's kind of an area. I'm passionate about but we try to be as general as possible so there are other feeling pathologists here who do specialize in Parkinson's sends as well and other things and I do see a lot of brain injury and and Chemo toxicity as well and concussion so oh although it is a high percentage of my caseload it does fluctuate and those patients can kind of see a number of different specialists within the department. I don't see how how large is the parameter speech language pathologists. Do you have there. Yeah we have twelve speech language pathologist who between the outpatient inpatient patient rehabilitation and acute care setting I see and and tell me a little bit about the the hospital industry in general is a AH Vermont's even smaller rural hospitals are they all going to have speech language pathologists on staffers something you need to go to Burlington get specialized treatment. I believe that most hospitals will have a speech language pathologist on staff depending on Howrah WPRO. I'm not entirely sure actually moved up to Vermont recently. I Florida so I'm not as familiar but I do know that most hospital systems will at least have one speech language pathologist. They may not be as robust. Is the Department here. Yeah I get it. I mean as you get more rural. services services thin out quite a bit that is that's the the truth in in in medicine. We actually had a segment on the other day talking about the difficulty in finding public defender here is you know in the law in the northeast Kenya where reminding so it's a it's Kinda thing. Any Professional Service tends to get a thin out. Shall we say in the more rural parts of of the territory so but let's get back to the the discussion about the about the treatments here and the patients when they come in and and also the the grant money. How much can you tell me how much the university ruined has received from the out and loud crowd grant in program so to speak out loud crowd grant grant program. Yeah so the the grant program is through Parkinson's voice project and we're our fees to grant recipient for the speak out loud crowd grant program which allowed us to provide professional training two two who of the other speech language pathologists in our system as well as our graduate student clinicians who come in and study under us it also provided us with therapy Europe. Supplies that we can use during our treatments and during the loud crowd and we also get a a thousand dollars to use towards funding are loud the crowd program I see in any of the money devoted to helping patients soup. Perhaps might have difficulty affording these services before them so as far as the money that we're getting for the Grant Program I. We have not decided yet exactly how we're going to allocate eight the money. It's it's supposed to be used towards are loud crowd. I did speak with another speech language pathologist who was a grant recipient it last year and they managed to do something similar to that however I.

Parkinson Parkinson Voice Project Parkinson's disease Ashley Michaela University of Vermont Vermont Bram University of Remind Mind Medi Senator Medical Center CNN University of Vermont Medical resting tremor Kenya Dave Howrah WPRO graduate student Chemo Burlington ninety five percent
"woolf" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on Unspooled

"Of whiskey the one a dumb just take all your liquor and dump it into a glass. I like those cocktails. You are more than welcome to send US cocktails. Put them in a glass and soon us with ice casserole recipes. 'cause I realize slandered cast not. I've never really had casseroles all right. I've never had a casserole really from Texas during Catherine Castle Texas thing I think the I mean unlike a Frito Preto pies like a cat casserole. Yeah Ish ish okay. I don't know all right amy. Let's get into it in the years. Nineteen sixty six again of gas cost thirty two cents. The average price of a new car is two thousand six hundred fifty dollars and the average price for a new home is fourteen thousand dollars C._B._S.. Shows they're first animated special. How how the grinch stole Christmas Pampers launches? The first disposable diaper Kevlar is invented by the American Scientists Stephanie Kohic Vietnam protests ramp up and sixty six with sit ins and demonstrations all over the world students initiate the draft deferment tests. This is a way to convince the draft board some youth would serve the nation better in the quiet of the classrooms rather than in the jungles of Vietnam Mohammed. Ali declared himself a conscientious objector and refuses to go to war and the cool toys out in the stores are creepy crawlers seeing say and twister the hot musical acts include the Beatles the beach boys and the rolling stones popular movies are a man for all seasons thunderball Doctor Zhivago and today's pick who's afraid of Virginia Woolf it ranks number sixty seven on the two thousand seven AF I film list and it never made it on the original nineteen ninety-seven list Oh really interesting right amy who's in it was it about who's afraid of Virginia Woolf. It is based on the award lauded play by Edward Albee that was out. I think in nineteen sixty two so this came out five years later it's the first film by Mike Nichols later doing graduate and it stars book couple of that Moment Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton who had met in Cleopatra <hes> scandal as the world by both leaving their spouses for each other and become I mean if we thought Br Angelina was a big deal. This is like branch Alina but scandalous br Angelina but like if the U._S. government had serious conversations about revoking their passports because because they were embarrassing the country scandalous that's how big they were and then they made this movie about marital couple arguing all the time and then inviting to young people into their home played by George Seagal and Sandy Dennis Finn is basically just a movie about arguing doing in different configurations about power struggles manipulation. It is a great date movie. I mean look amy I would say at the end of the day. This is a movie about love and I'm not saying that ironically I think it is a romantic movie on on on a certain level so this movie starts at like two A._M.. After a night of drinking two A._M.. Is Late no matter where you are even if you're on the east coast when bars close at four in some areas like I think it's like this weird witching hour in a way I love it the films in black and white because it almost serves that distinction of night you see that kind of black and white day and night idea did you just call it witching hour just like instinct only yeah wow because you know that in the play when it's divided into acts the middle section is called what I'm going to screw this up with its German but it's while perched knocked which means the witch's Sabbath ooh. I did not know that oh I just knew it as the witches our Oh yeah they start doing at nine pm. We meet them at two A._M.. We meet them in this faraway shot as Georgia Martha are toddling along looking old already and small they seem sort of fragile stumbling to their house where we get to establish Dallas their relationship. We may even get S- take a step back here and talk about the sensation that this play was right. This play is the biggest thing I guess if to put it in modern day terms it would be like Hamilton right. It's known for what it is and you're not going to be using the stars that were in the Broadway version. It was like Udo Haagen. I believe was in the Broadway version. I forget you can listen to some of it on spotify I did and I listened to it and I was like Oh. I want Burton in Taylor back. I mean this is a play that people consider consider unfilmable. There's language in it but the idea of simply being caught in this house I mean how would you do this. As a feature film what was kind of great about having Mike Nichols be the director here is he knew who about the importance of theater and the feeling that you get in that room but he also understood films able to kind of bring in these moments to get out of that claustrophobic house in a way that didn't take away from the actual work that it was based on kind of complements the work and you get to see things from different characters perspectives throughout the film so it really becomes a different experience. I think that's how these two pieces really stand on their own two feet because this is a little bit more of a a well rounded piece or definitely a more cinematic piece yeah I think that's such a great way of describing it. 'CAUSE CLAUSTROPHOBIC is such a perfect or a describe part of the spell. That theater has that awkwardness of being in a room with two people people who are actually fighting even if you know that it's scripted yeah I've just sitting there and being like Oh my God they're breaking plates. What's going to happen we could see their spit coming out of their mouth illuminated by the lights favorite part I love it? Love it no but it's like there is this power of theater theater and you as an audience and you're watching this play. That's one thing but then you're also watching like these surrogate of yourself on stage dealing with it as well. It's it's the fear that we all have no one wants to be in a room with a fighting couple. I mean it's it's not a good place to be kind of fun. I mean I it's fun in this way. I think to watch it and you don't have to be there but it's awkward because they really are being held hostage. We must kind of love it in a way like all the signs people we're live tweeting like I'm sitting next to this couple on a horrible day. Yeah Oh tell me more but we're enjoying it. Via Twitter. Were little bit distance from it and you know I almost feel like somebody even tweeting about it. Gives them an outlet to have an audience for. They're not alone in it but when you're trapped you know they're not pulling out their cell phones at any point. I think this opening scene where she comes in and talks about you know. What line is this from? You know what what is this and dump. It was the Betty Davis picture of what is it inches mad edit him that he doesn't know for bringing up a thing that she just came out of nowhere being like tell me what this is by the way. Do you want to hear the original yeah yeah so. Here's the original this is. What a dump? It's a movie called beyond the forest with Betty Davis back five. What a dump and yet like in this early scene? There's this kind of tension of like. Are we supposed to be completely. Empathizing with this husband played by Richard Burton who's being badgered so much by his wife like yelled at all the time called a cluck which I guess is like almost a Proto Cook yeah well I mean I think there's a couple of things at play in the beginning. I just want to mention that Bette. Davis was one of the original people considered for play with Taylor when she's doing this is thirty two years old viewed as one of the most beautiful women in the world literally just coming off of Cleopatra and doing this next if you think about her and Cleopatra and then this there right after each other so heavily done in makeup. She gained weight pounds but she was short so that's a lot on. She was excited about it. She was like Oh finally die some pasta I mean she was this is remarkably vein yeah. She's eating chicken wing at the camera aggressively in the first couple minutes like using the most beautiful on the planet. You've been calling me this since I was thirteen. Basically thirteen is win. All of the attention started ended on her and I love watching drafting because it's such drunk conversation they're. They're kind of both in different places. He's doing the crossword. She's trying to figure out this thing there. You know he starts to talk about Chicago. It's a perfect conversation and what I noticed was. This is a dense dialogue piece. I mean in every way but it doesn't feel labored over you know we talk about these people who are our modern day shakespeare but it feels like so written. This doesn't feel written to me but yet it's like every word is almost crafted. Don't you feel that yeah I mean I think part of the trick of that part of the extra layer is that all four of the characters are incredibly drunk and get drunker and drunker and drunker so they have these like brilliant a little bit of wordplay nasty little jobs they get each other and they're done in a fog in a tiny little hayes eater and it adds a dimension to their performances that is so special that I joked with you that we should be drinking something. Yes tape this episode something really special. I cannot wait to see what this is this better to box that you see. I just brought back from a trip to Korea. I was in South Korea for WFANFM festival and one day we went and took a tour of the D._M._Z.. The D._M._Z. Tour they bring you to this one gift shop. That's right by tunnel three or the South Koreans discovered the North Korean building this massive tunnel to invade they built them and they have a gift shop there of course and the gift shop is completely fucking talking bizarre but one thing that is on the gift shop is one of the only things made by North Korea that they actually allow for sale they allow three things for sale a bottle of honey which I bought a bottle of strawberry wine which about in this a bottle of Pec Tucson Gunderman undermine liquor which they say is <hes> their version of whiskey but it has. I don't know a picture of a mushroom on the front yeah and it's very lately colored whiskey. It almost looks like a whiskey watered down now. This is true that all irradiated barrels. That's how the aged right. It is true that I have yet to openness in. This is going to be them all right here. We go yeah. It smells wow it smells like rubbing alcohol straight up like but with a tinge of fruit flavor we're GONNA passes off to Devon Josh producer or engineer and let's see how this goes down and say what a dump yeah why I dump watery and peanut he right or something I think they could be worse. It's not as strong as the the smell indicates. This is like you grab the bottle that when you stayed up late when they with your friends and you wanted all your parents look like this is what you're tasting apartment but there's definitely burn I definitely feel it going all the way down yet not as good as our Indiana Jones date whiskey and this is for me. I'd never seen this film. I am a big Mike Nichols as a performer fan. <hes> you know I felt about the graduate and here I I'm kind of amazed at what he does first of all we talked about the movies that come out in this year. Oh color films. I mean we're talking about. We're in the middle of not the middle but we're in like a little bit deepen..

Mike Nichols Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor Betty Davis Cleopatra Virginia Woolf South Korea US Br Angelina Texas Edward Albee Catherine Castle Texas Frito Preto spotify Stephanie Kohic Twitter Indiana Udo Haagen Hamilton
"woolf" Discussed on Unspooled

Unspooled

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on Unspooled

"The movie who's afraid of Virginia hello and welcome to on Enemy Nicholson and I am Paul Scheer and this is the podcast where each week we watch one film from the top one hundred greatest films of all time list two thousand seven edition to see if they are really as good as people say do they hold up and how the influenced films that we watch now our we're GONNA be talking about who's afraid of Virginia Woolf mcnichols first film in just a little bit but first some feedback Jack as we revisit the film we talked about last week which of course was gone with the wind amy lot of chatter about gone with the wind. I'm realizing I could talk about this. Movie like for Seventy Bundy thousand years. Everybody who listen to the show talking about this movie for seventy thousand years as someone on the facebook group actually posted a link to a roxane gay thread that also went on for seventy thousand years doesn't Roxane gay posted that she was watching gone with the wind on the plane and she was quote reminded of how terrible Ashley Wilkes is just absolute trash useless spineless and it's a whole bunch of threat of people dumping on with the Ashley Wilkes hate including your wife June Diane Raphael who just chimed in to say that yes he is the worst that is amazing of course I know my wife is a big Roxane Gay fan but I also found something really interesting in this Roxane gay threat on twitter someone wrote in in this really hit home with me. It felt like it summed up our hours and hours and hours of gazillions of talk about it in this is in response to people trying to make sense of a scholar Leslie. Even though he's terrible she says Jonathan works so well because of everyone's romantic vision of the wrong thing you're on blindness and how it creates your misery is the core Motif of the book from scarlet to rent to to the south itself and I think that really is the key of it. Everyone's Romanticizing the thing that's wrong for them. The thing that's destructive for them that that's destructive for the country I love that you know I've kept on reading a bunch of different threads online in as well and this is one that kind of jumped out at me from an foster and she posted this on our twitter page the discussion of Gone With the wind on this week's episode of unschooled got me thinking about how scarlet is a for taste but non sexual which is why why she continues to want Ashley Rhett provides the sexual awakening but she thinks she wants Ashley's non-threatening blandness. She was brought up depressed. She does understand or want her own. Sexual urges crushing on Ashley is safe and she can control herself Rhett makes her feel all sorts sorts of ways. She didn't WanNa feel and be a person she doesn't want to be but that person she is and there's layers upon layers to the character especially in our performance but I thought that was a really interesting point of view about that attraction to Ashley because that was something that I definitely derided her four you know and I know I got a lot of heat for not understanding scarlet but I do I I love scarlet and I love that performance. The issue that I've been was wrestling with is I've read a couple ah things some feminist theory and about her as well and I think it seemed like she was often motivated simply by a man or to get to a man I think that was the thing that weakened her to me or that was the thing that I was reacting to when we were talking about it a little bit yeah yeah and I can say like I've had crushes that when I mean my whole Childhood Land Higher Elementary School Youth was defined by having crushes on like strange nerdy blonde boys who never were aware that it existed so I totally get it yeah and then there were posts hosts from J. Eh for example who wrote about how we cling to gone with the wind because we haven't been given enough scarlet so we make apologies for this movie that minimizes enforce subjugation events even have a whole race of people at J.. F. Actually compares scarlet to a character character like elsewhere engine which I thought really hit home because elsewhere in two and said you know herself she's been kind of wrestling with her love for this movie and I thought she wrote so eloquently about it. I thought Annabel foster also did and I was thinking. I've been kind of kicking myself ever since he did this episode you know I wish I would have said another reason that people have given for why filmmakers of this period made a lot of films that Romanticize the south in ways that we really dislike and find completely uncomfortable now is because because a lot of these filmmakers really weren't personally involved on the civil war people like David o cells name his parents were from Lithuania they got here way after the civil war and for better and mostly worse he just saw the civil war is a good story. He doesn't have a side like when yeah I think about it I think about my family's legacy and it's like a deer hunter. I mean again you know stories of were told by people who were not. They're not that you have to be there but maybe have a different point of view about what the war was or how would tell good story. Exactly exactly I mean like David Arsenic had never even visited the south before the Premiere Gone With the wind which I think also relates to how GonNa win opens with I think a really toxic card where it says that this is the land of Treva leers cotton fields and that Gallantry L. entry took its last bow here and it calls them nights and their ladies fair and you know I. I wish I would have said kind of the front what's really interesting about that is a Margaret Mitchell didn't write that and Margaret Mitchell hated that and it was written by the screenwriter Ben Hecht who made ate a big deal of bragging to everybody that he never even read the book so this title Card that sets of the film and really I find awful way is written by somebody who didn't know the source book but then again it's also approved by this Guy David o Celtic who loved the book and you know I feel like the more you talk about going to win the more complicated it gets which is maybe why as a critic. I love it so much just because it's intellectually interesting <hes> anyway but look it. It brings up a lot of responses and I think you know the response to this film was very <unk> divided and I think that that's a great place to be. You know it's there wasn't just one side of it. <hes> I did want to bring up one little funny thing just weird kind of gone with him. In fact there's an episode of the cosby show where Rudy gets period for the first time and it ends with Claire and Rudy watching the film and that's how the episode of the Cosby show and so this is just a little weird fun fact of the Cosby show. Do they talk about it. I don't know if it's tweeted that has a good what an odd an odd a plot point childhood is gone with periods. I mean I I feel like that's kind of a ham fisted thing. They're doing like she's he's finally becoming an adult. You know amy so last week. We asked everybody to come up with a cocktail that could be something that would accompany them on their journey to to George and Martha's House so let's take a listen to what are I some cocktails of people concocted for WHO's afraid of Virginia Woolf combine an ounce of George dickel Tennessee whiskey with four hours of Linate half out of peach snap and ten a little bit of lime juice and you got yourself a diggle Kale quarter vodka and your partners tears or sailing solution and call it happy.

Ashley Ashley Rhett twitter Ashley Wilkes Virginia cosby Virginia Woolf Margaret Mitchell Bundy Childhood Land Higher Elementa facebook Paul Scheer Annabel foster Leslie Jack Jonathan amy Nicholson Lithuania
"woolf" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

14:01 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"What I liked was that both German Elizabeth? Neither of them had read tons of Virginia Woolf all five West before we started working on the project I think that was very important and that worked very well. mm-hmm the weight of history the weight of legacy is very burdensome one hello and welcome back to vintage podcast with me Lena gnomes at this some of antique is continuing our year of challenging ourselves to listen here respond to some of the greatest female writers we want to celebrate women writing nonfiction fiction this summer and we hope you'll join us some of reading a female expert this week I am joined by Chani button an expert in her own field of film and she is going to be discussing with me to vintage authors.

Chani Elizabeth Virginia
"woolf" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

14:01 min | 2 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"What I liked was that both German Elizabeth? Neither of them had read tons of Virginia Woolf all five West before we started working on the project I think that was very important and that worked very well. mm-hmm the weight of history the weight of legacy is very burdensome one hello and welcome back to vintage podcast with me Lena gnomes at this some of antique is continuing our year of challenging ourselves to listen here respond to some of the greatest female writers we want to celebrate women writing nonfiction fiction this summer and we hope you'll join us some of reading a female expert this week I am joined by Chani button an expert in her own field of film and she is going to be discussing with me to vintage authors.

Chani Elizabeth Virginia
"woolf" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Crush on it was more like he's like your own coal i didn't say coming i'm sorry i was naive who saw it coming he was so lovely to the vegetables so lovely to the bay so lovely footage all my goodness who'd awfully okay i'm feminist but as a short person i will never wear a flat shoe even though i'm playing right into the hands of the patriarchy ironically flats amai achilles heel i'm a feminist but last week i had a dream i was talking to virginia woolf and she was trying to tell me something important that women need to know but it was in french and i couldn't understand it and i tried to write it down so i could look it up later and so i was i was writing and what i looked up from the paper she turned into kanye west which might conscious date but to be on the virginia woolf was then co kidman photinia with the pacific knows from the is so that she had that much to tell us anyway but i did feel like portal to pro feminism early twentieth century modernist feminism and i thought i should bring the message bank it was just talking about gold diggers well these leads me to my next one i'm a feminist but one of my favorite song lyrics is if you having problems i feel bad for you son got ninety nine problems.

virginia
"woolf" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"woolf" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

"Now the that makes sense at or you could just your you've got the assets you could make a trade for casey be later if the vote work or trade frankly bradley yet every bradley is now and had yet or or you could you also all yeah i'd be that would have been a way to do it i'd be also with the sixers if they're good enough they could be competitive for highend free agents next year you know what else although there aren't that many hyon free agents exteriors that's one of the secrets of next year demarcus cousins adam woolf who who let's uh let's go through just like the general winners and losers team wise and then we can wrap up with some of our impression sir obviously houston which that happened in real life do with that that chris fault trade is looking good what's your roster now houston so houston's roster uh let's see our starting lineup his chris paul james harden trevor reza ryan anderson could cappella and then our second unit is jason terry erik gordon lean ellington pj tucker in name yachts spree nice celtic's yahoo so what is the celtics roster look quite now you've got hayward an paul george you gave up jalen brown and avery bradley still got j crowder right yes oh starting lineup of thomas george he word hor forward ncsa which and coming off the bench we have rouge year jason tetum willie read and jake crowder yes you probably close games with crowder hayward and yet and revive yachts pretty good uh dallas where did you guys end up now you got a what is your lineup look like emits a pretty big changes.

demarcus jake crowder jason tetum willie thomas george avery bradley jalen brown erik gordon jason terry chris paul houston adam woolf casey dallas crowder hayward j crowder paul george celtics yahoo celtic ryan anderson sixers