20 Episode results for "Wooldridge"

Covid Pandemic: America's Wake Up Call. Adrian Wooldridge

How Do We Fix It?

31:17 min | 7 months ago

Covid Pandemic: America's Wake Up Call. Adrian Wooldridge

"The health of the most privileged is dependent on the health of the least privileged never has that been truer than it is today. How can America and other democracies rise to the challenge of recovering from the Cova pandemic without letting liberty slip away we consider this and other questions in the next thirty minutes. VID Pandemic America's wakeup call Adrian Wooldridge. Christ. Is taught us anything. It taught us the government really matters and government can be the difference between living dying. Our show is about fixes. Yeah. How to make the world a better place? How do we fix it? Didn't fix it. By most measures, the US has done poorly in the fight against Rona virus we have more than one fifth of the world's known cases in nearly one fifth of total. Who's responsible is debatable and Richard you and I will debate this a lot but we have to do a whole lot better. Next time there's a global health emergency. One Solution Jim is to spend more time on how to make government more efficient or how can we make government great. Again, we discussed the lessons of the pandemic with. Adrian wooldridge he's the political editor and also a columnist at the economist. Your. Favorite magazine. Richard. He's the CO author of the new book the wakeup call how the pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West and how to fix it. Adrian us on the line from near. Petersfield. England in Jane austen country. Apparently welcome to our podcast called. How do we fix it? Thank you for having me. So. How does the US compare with other countries in the fight against Corona virus? I really badly badly certainly in terms of expectations would expect the world's great superpower to be rather good at fighting things like a pandemic but also very badly as one of the worst performances with we've seen in the world, the death rate. In Britain is about six hundred to six, hundred, fifty, million in the united. States is not that much hind that in Germany it's about a hundred million. So that shares that you're doing about six times worse than Jimmy the PS power in Europe. and when you come to countries such as South Korea Taiwan it NAM you're talking about a dozen a million. So America is not doing well, it's not doing welcome to the best in Europe. It is also particularly badly compared with the with the best in the Far East the number of people who've died from covid in Seoul, the capital of South Korea. is about a couple of dozen the most in New York City it's twenty, two, thousand I mean that is a very big and I think rather than embarrassing difference I would say that's America has a lot to be ashamed of I'm not that it's not that suddenly all such do of Great Britain the setting not something one would expect from. The world's greatest power and from a country that's tended to be in the full front of. Human progress for the last century. Talking about Great Britain and the US, you say, the two countries that have set the mood music for the West for the past half-century, look divided and Shambolic Shambolic is one of my favorite words it certainly, the word that is part one of the charms of reading the economist is words like Shambolic. What do you mean how how? Was the response, a divided and shambolic. Why are you telling you to see in countries of been very successful at dealing with the crisis is the country of come together and they've acted collectively ineffective move to deal with these problems and you could see that in Japan or Germany. Definitely you can see it in New Zealand where the prime minister just been reelected with a huge majority. AM The sense of not public acclamation what you've seen in the United States and those in Great Britain is a great deal of division I think in the United States. It's it's been worse than anywhere else could have division between the Republican Party and the Democrats. with trump in particular politicizing this, that's not just trump, but you both had division between. The federal government state governments local governments, Adrian. Aren't divisions inevitable in a democracy. You praise Singapore for performing well, but it's an authoritarian government one that imposes severe restrictions on freedom of speech. Is that what you're talking about or is it more nuanced? I. Think it's awesome that I think democracy is about collective the accountability of the government to the people. and. That inevitably involves divisions and sometimes, of course, they are extremely healthy but I think you can go too far with divisions when people are disagreeing not just on strategy and tactics on the nature of reality. That's probably going too far when people endangering each other's lives by disagreement that's probably getting too far. It's definitely true that Singapore's authoritarian country even more true that China's authoritarian country and of course that they they impose enormously severe locked against without taking into account the will of the people, but there have been other countries which have managed to. Manage disagreements or not disagree to the same extent I would put. Out New Zealanders small country, but is obviously a very vibrant democracy in seen done reelected with. The Big March but also Germany has not had the degree of disagreements. I think that that you've seen in the United States. I'm intrigued by the case of Japan where they really didn't lock down the way we did school stayed open people went to work. In. Yet, they've been quite effective at limiting what what we now all know are called. Super spreader events. How did they do it very densely populated country where millions of people ride. Shoulder to shoulder on on crowded transit systems every day. Well I think it's it's. It's there's cultural things that have kicked in here. It's come to the puts a great deal of premium on social distancing they bowed that shake hands they tend to value etiquette great deal I think it's also country that the beat a mall squaring country nothing countries where mosque wearing his as being the null of banished to slow down the spread of this pandemic a lot by that expires sauce I think countries experience ause done a done very well. They seem to have an extremely decentralized, highly effective. Healthcare system, which is particularly good at tracking and tracing people who've been infected isolating them Wonder if one of the conclusions of this particular pandemic is that we may shift away from shaking hands or embracing whatever it is that people do. More, towards bearing and more towards wearing mosque is a as a default you're not arguing for big government are you? I would say that the argument about governments over the last few decades in the West has become. Unhelpfully polarized between people want big government and be want small. Does not sleep fixation with the size of government on what we're saying is that we shouldn't be safest on the on the size of government should be focused on the wisdom effectiveness smartness if government now that might strike you as a sort of banal thing to say who doesn't one small government they does get us around a sort of accession on the size of government does focus on what we. Really need to have which is sensible governments and sensible government can mean bigger government I America will need to have a big public health system. As a result of this forest but also means more focused government and I think America also have to think very seriously about the amount of government activity that simply goes to giving money to the rich through tax loopholes all which is just unnecessarily complicated as we have as you have the oil with your incredibly extraordinarily. Complicated. Tax, system. You. Talk in the book about the importance of having civil servants who are top notch professionals and you feel that our current system doesn't really reward that. How do we get better people into those positions? The relatively simple thing is that you have to pay them a proper rate of of reward and what you tended to have what you tend to have any your civil service. And we do in all civil services is a very. Compressed reward system. So I think people who just want sneezy life and then what work to odd can probably do quite what in the public sector they probably get a better sense of rewards of bumping along the both from the public sector and they do gains the private sector but people at the very top of the public sector in terms of that ability and commitments gets very small rewards competitor they wouldn't do in the private sector. So we need to have much more variance of pay. So we need more income inequality in the public. Definitely I'm a massive advocate of income inequality in the public sector but that's the easiest thing in the sense. The other thing think you need to do is value EP work in the public sector more than you do and has been denigration of the public sector in the United States essentially since. The Reagan Administration Unit what we have done this reach the. All being head of the public sector being paid back. Crisis told us anything it told us the government really matters and government can be the difference during living or dying. Are Their governments elsewhere outside of of the United States and and Great Britain, and perhaps even other parts of the West that have something to teach us about technology and how that can be used to make government more efficient and deliver services better. Legrand argument of of of of this book is that from the year, if you go back a fifteen hundred. China was head of the West and West bloodstain battlefield Bab government, and what's happened since then is that the West is pulled ahead of the east for many reasons, capitalism and the rest of it but one of those reasons is they constantly reinvented improved. Governments in line with you thinking a new technology. So when you get up to about nineteen sixty, you have a world in which the West is massively ahead of the east in terms of the quality of its government. A now, I would say what the crisis revealed is that the he's probably better at West, which is an extraordinary change and the reason for batches that better. Things better employing technology to get to that collective. And I would say the Catholic abyss example of countries that have done. This is Singapore that very, very good at harnessing technology to serve the public I suppose that using intelligent technology sue managed that society in a more efficient way and I think that's if you look at the list of the world's intelligence cities I think is as it would be cool. We'll most of them are in the Far East. This is how do we fix it? I'm Jim eggs and I'm Richard. Davies where speaking with Adrian Wooldridge the CO author of the new book the wakeup call how the pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West and how to fix it. We're back with Adrian Wooldridge, the political editor of the Economist and author of the new book the wake up call. So a superficial reading of your argument might sound like you're just in favor of a more effective more powerful government. It's essentially a left-wing argument, but it's really not where do you part company with the left on how to manage the role of government? Well I mean we come at this subject both of us from classical liberal tradition, which is that what really matters is the freedom of the individual and the government's insofar as it can help individual to reach a since never life of of of freedom productivity. Is Important but it should also always be individual and that writes that is at the center of all considerations. Government is a means to an end, not an end in itself, but we do think that it's certain times such as a wool over such as a pandemic government has to take a more active role than it would do at other times. In other words, there's no thick set of rules for the size and scope and reach of government. Those rules have to be adjusted by reality in this pandemic I would say that I would accept lockdown because I think that slurs the rate of the spread, the pandemic I would accept. A. Significant degree of. Involvement in the economy propping up failing companies and things like that because that's How you prevent. An economic crash. Things that I would not accept a at normal times but also outside the something more to it than that, and that is this It's very important of Western liberal democratic systems can prove that they in their own terms. With pandemic crisis starts at the big difference between US authoritarian regimes don't low that we do have more government and more intrusive government during a crisis that government is always ultimately democratically accountable. It doesn't worry me the the government has more tracking and tracing ability than it does a normal times they can watch what I'm doing. Doesn't worry me. So long as this was, you know parliament's that can stop them from doing that I wanna ask you more about that. Yeah. Because one answer to the pandemic and you've alluded to this is is in a sense greater surveillance certainly of our healthcare records. Joke but. That's already happening with technology companies. Dangers here do we have the proper checks and balances to surveillance? I'm extremely worried about the the the the the degree of power to to survey my life and influenced by life that these technology companies have I'm in some sense is more worried about that. Than I am about the government having met the that power because I think the technology companies have an incentive constantly nudging by my behavior in certain directions in the government doesn't quite. The. The incentive doesn't cut out the competence of the moment to do that. So I'm. Not as good at it right. Exactly. Let's talk about China where the virus first emerged. They were slow to admit what was going on and respond to the virus. But. Then more recently, China has done better than most countries in the West. The death rates I think China is they claim three, three, million, it's probably let's say ten times that thirty million. But even if it's Thursday for millions a lot smaller than is in the United States their economy is now roaring back That level of economic activity is almost back to normal whereas in the United States and Britain suddenly not back to normal. So is a victory for them. We're GONNA have to be much harder ourselves much harder tendencies HB. Flabby. Give subsidies to crony credit companies and things like that I. Think the West is best and easily defeat China at its best lober in endanger of having the West is worst against China Specimen much more easy even fight. So you say the government has become obese or flabby. What are some ways to to cut the fat, but also deliver better services or be more efficient. What we need to do is to harness the power of technology and what you have golf in in the United States now is I think that number of people. In American governments who who've in IT sectors of the American government's who over sixty is five times as great as the number who are under thirty. So you need young people new technology. This is. An area where short-term big investments in government IS GONNA pay off in the long term we need to modernize updates of governments spending one of the problems that you have in the United States, is I, think because you have. An unbalanced system for playing paying for Social Security essentially entitlements. because you have a system whereby you'll you'll taking out, will you put in your taking out more than entitlements, it in taxes you'll having to borrow. The cost of borrowing does is to squeeze spending from other sectors. If you raise your taxes abyss if you change your full entitlement system a bit people get the Bataille a year later, a couple of years. Later, you could bring that back into balance new release these pulse of money than being used support the entitlement system you talk throughout the book about the need for a more nimble public service sector with. you know a a more innovative employees more flexibility in how people are paid. In a lot of cases, these these employees are covered are are protected by unions and the Teachers Union being one that you target is a problem but people think unions just push for higher pay, but they also pushed hard to make it almost impossible to fire people or impossible to selectively give raises to the to the best performers if they're extremely powerful in our politics today. And you know you make it sound like we just need some commonsense improvements and we'll be good but. I'm at a loss. How do we do that? That's a very, very big question one of the problems that you have. Is the Republicans think bullish impossible thing to do such let's just privatize everything because that's the anywhere. You can get run the government problem and Democrats are so tied to the public sector unions. They want reform things. I was very easy to be in that in that position, but I would counsel against despair in Britain in Nineteen, seventy, nine looks this country was completely run by trade unions and there was no way of getting around that. Mrs. Sacha solve that problem it was messy but we did solve that problem and then Tony Blair took that spirits of. A would you see the power of the tribunes in the public sector? And succeeded I think in introducing much more performance pay and removing the very least veto the trade unions used to have reformed. So it's not impossible to do it. It's very, very difficult, but I think the degree of power that the American public sector unions have is actually unusual. In modern wells, I mean the system that you have making it especially possible to sack schoolteachers. Is quite extreme and also in the peaceful quite extreme the power that they've got we've been talking a lot about the weakness of the West and the weakness of of America what are a few areas that that we're better at wor yeah fucking. Great Question I do know one come across as somebody who thinks West is appalling that we want the west, the future we think the West is not doing as well as it should be but one of the obvious areas of success of the West is innovation. So just as we sold the low side of the West in terms of the the initial fights against corona. Virus until my certain, the the the vaccine will come from America or from Britain in terms of solving these big problems and solving is much much more important than anything else innovation and innovation comes from having freedom and having the ability to at you never reward the best in the to encourage creativity and all of those things. That's still a fundamental of fundamental, strength. West. Adrian Wooldridge Co author of the WAKEUP call. Thank you for joining us on. How do we fix it Thank you very much for having me. Before we have another lively conversation Jim. Let's go to our recommendation. Richard We've been having this beautiful fall weather in the northeast and you know it's we're in the final days of it probably. So I've been spending a lotta time out in the yard tinkering around in my garden and working on various projects and I love listening to podcasts while I do that sometimes I burn out on politics. So my latest favorite is a podcast called fifty years of music with fifty year old white guys. Now I. I WANNA get out of the way my annoyance at everybody having to identify their race in a jokey self deprecating way. But nonetheless, these guys are hilarious. They're really smart it's three. Brands I. Think it sounds like they met in college live in different parts of the country. They're absolutely avid music fans kind of music nerds and they decided to a podcast where they would go back and try to pick their favourite songs from each year. They they've been alive. So they start in nine, hundred, sixty nine, but they are really thoughtful and funny Examiners of just what makes pop music work, and why do we love and what what kind of a plan our lives. Great and what's it called again, it's called fifty years of music with fifty year old white guys. One more quick note about podcasts with music last week, spotify launched a new creation platform that makes it much easier for podcasters to add full tracks of music to their shows. So expect many more music based podcast be launched. In the future. We have a link to an article about this on our podcast website. How do we fix it dot me Adrian Wooldridge said Jim, we need to spend more on government in the short term updating it making it. More, efficient as a squishy libertarian what do you think of that idea? Well, I think he's right. We need a government, this more competent and what I thought was most productive in the analysis was what's wrong with our current system he's not advocating just pouring more money into our current inefficient system. He wants to loosen up how we judge what fair pay is civil servants. I think that's very smart. If someone is a financial expert and they're working for the government. They could make millions in the private sector that doesn't mean the has to the millions, but it should probably pay them more than. One hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year. One stunning thing was what he said about people working on it in the government. and. This is what happens when you have a system that rewards. Just keeping your butt in the chair for decade after decade that's how the civil service pay structure is set up. We need to break the power of the public sector unions did make it. They don't just control how people are paid so that week performers are paid too much but good performers aren't paid enough but they also they also make. It really really difficult to to prune the the ranks when necessary and anyone who's run a business knows that even good people sometimes wind up in the wrong job and it's better for for the for the institution but in the long run it maybe even better for them if they're bumped out the door and and you make room for somebody else. That's a very valid argument from the right that public service unions have too much power, and certainly we've seen that in the case of the police very recently, and then just how difficult it is to. Perfect example cops perfect example, the argument from the left that has been very much exposed by the pandemic is something that I mentioned right at the top of the show, which is the health of the most privileged is dependent on the health of the least privileged, and we really do have to look at our healthcare system. And how it delivers services especially to those people who currently. Aren't insured. Yeah. So well, we did pass a law on this. What happened? Well the law has added to twenty million people being covered who weren't covered before it could certainly be a lot better but I would argue improve that law as opposed to getting rid of it. It's going off into a different subject of our conversations, but I do think that we need not merely to look at areas that are simply inefficient, but also when it comes to public health. We need to cover more people and the book also makes this argument as well. Right. But so there's two things. There's the healthcare system. What are what people do when they're sick and there's public health, which is how do we protect society from pandemics and and other broad health problems I I would argue that they're very much close to the same thing that if you have people who. Find it too expensive to go to the doctor and have no a links to the health care system. Then that's a real problem in a pandemic right. But I'm saying the term public health care doesn't mean pain for people to go to the doctor. It means having organizations like the CDC that are monitoring broad public health issues might include affordability, but it also means he talked about resilience in means being prepared for future problems. I WANNA push back on one of Adrian's points, and that is he suggested that during a crisis like a pandemic, we should accept a temporary rollback of privacy. I would strongly. Guard against that you remember after nine eleven. You know a a a bipartisan Group of Republicans and Democrats passed the Patriot Act and it. We accepted some significant erosions of our rights. We've now seen those programs be. abused again and again I worry that anytime you give the government more power over your private life there's a ratchet effect it can always ratchet it up. It's very hard to ratchet it down. I'm on the fence on this but I do agree with him on the on the need to put in new whether they're regulations or rules about. Capitalism. One final pushback from me he said I think maybe we should be. Bore like the Japanese of bowing and socially distant and perhaps quieter as people no I don't think. So the thing I love about living in America and I lived overseas for twenty years is just how boisterous so many people are like the chaos I like the fact that people aren't always that polite or and certainly not bowing and. Overly respectful of others. This, how do we fix it? I've Richard Davies. And I'm Jim megs and our producer is brandon shaffer. Thank you. Miranda. For making it. Sound better with your edits. This show is a production of Davies. Content. We make podcast for companies and nonprofits more at Davies content, dot com, and thanks for listening. This podcast is part of the democracy group. Looking for a new podcast listen to. Here's what we love courtesy of a-cash recommends. I'm Teresa Hero and I'm dying to tell you about my new podcast. Hey, Spirit. Most of you might know me as the Long Island medium why do people even call that? Well, I talked to the debt is his birthday coming up actually his sixteenth birthday today. Oh my God you just give me the choose throughout my entire life I always just thought everyone felt and saw the same things that I was sensing and feeling through this podcast I'm going to connect guests with the souls of departed loved ones and give them the piece that they've been searching for. I've been able to smile like really smile again for the first time I am so super excited for you guys to hear and be a part of, Hey, spirit lease subscribe wherever you listen. Cash.

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The Economist asks: Can America remain the world's biggest economic power?

The Economist Radio

34:08 min | 2 years ago

The Economist asks: Can America remain the world's biggest economic power?

"Hello and welcome to the economist asks, I'm mckelway. And this week we're asking, can America maintain its position as the world's greatest economic power. By many measures, the American economy east powering ahead GDP is on track to grow at around three percent. This year, and the unemployment rate isn't impressively low three point, seven percent. It's an unmissable of charity. Phuc President Trump to describe the economy as so good. Perhaps the best he said in our country's history, but for others, the same figures present economic puzzle. My guests today, the authors of new book called ambitiously capitalism in America. A history Dr. Alan Greenspan was first appointed by President. Reagan as chair, the US, Federal, Reserve, and presided in that role Philippe twenty years at the helm in an age of turbulence. Was he an optimistic believer in market officiency failing to bubbles in the late nineteen? Ninety s two thousands was he won. Biography recently put it the man who knew as chair of the Federal Reserve. He's well versed in giving God at comments. His every word could move markets like his description of irrational exuberance, which sent market south in nineteen Ninety-six while before the dot com bubble finally burst into thousand Dr. Greenspan welcome to the economist asks and we hope you feel kind of with us today. Thank you very much. I'm delighted to be here. His Co. order is very free talking journalist, Adrian Wooldridge, formerly our American bureau, chief and Lexington and Shumpert a columnist. Now, our budget push political columnist. Adrian, thank you to for joining us. You Dr Greenspan you start the book by imagining the World Economic Forum that grand gathering in devils in sixteen twenty over countries of the world, jostling for dominance America however, doesn't feature. So how did it become the world's biggest economy. Well, that's the extrordinary story which we try to present in the book that words, that's where we started. And we are where we are today for good or ill, but the whole substance of the book is a conceptual approach to what forces word play, which got us from there to here and what all the forces that you think that drives America forward. When we look at that grand sweep of history. Well, basically what is characterized the United States through most of our history is that we wrote helped by the constitution of the United States. It said, property rights, various other relationships, which created the optimum climate for economic growth. And there's no question that where we tobacco off from that, that we'd start to become an average economy. Did you read it? Similarly, -absolutely I think that the the central argument of the book is that's economic growth is driven by what Joseph's Shumpert a called in nineteen forty, two creative destruction. It's the willingness to move from old established ways of doing things to new innovative ways of doing things, and we augment the book that America has been unusual in its willingness to embrace creative destruction. What are the reasons why America's been say willing? I think partly because it's such a big country and that it could it could afford to move from the old to the new in ways in which small countries are much more more nervous is partly because it's a new country. America was founded in roughly the same year that Speth read the wealth of nations. Most countries, old countries with old established ways of doing things. America wasn't ready. It was. It was created in the world of growth in the world of business. And so it was dynamic in that sense. Had a uniquely entrepreneurial culture, a uniquely entrepreneurial approach to business lots of immigrants, lots of lots of room to move lots of economic resources. So it's it's a very dynamic culture, but it's Dr. Greenspan said it was a dynamic culture with one fixed point, and that fixed point is the constitution. The constitution defines a set of rights. It divides power. It creates a sort of framework which provides stability amongst all the dynamism. So is this unique combination of dynamism and the stability certainty provided by the constitution, which I think explains a lot of America's greatness. Doc degrees, and I'm going to choose from these very rich period. And even that is quite a long era. Adrian is covered in that sentence, what you going to choose from this beyond the sort of foundational time as the decisive maintenance, put it in blunt, make make America rich. Post civil war period which were talking about civil war was devastating period for the United States, and although it was obvious consequences with slavery and what they post civil war period was was an extraordinary period of economic growth, basically characterized by the ability to take an industrial environment and reduce the amount of input required to get the same out for Henry Bessemer. In eighteen fifties, came up with a wholly new way of producing steel which had been an a steel industry became a dominant force and the second half of the nineteenth century and the United States. And in fact, created Andrew Carnegie who ultimately put together the pieces of what became US steel. But then as the years went on and we ran into Henry Ford and development of motor vehicles for the average person, this accelerated the whole development and it's historically unprecedented and any other country in the world. United States space extraordinary capacity to bring in immigrants from abroad with extreme entrepreneurial skills, but also adapt ideas from the rest of the. And apply them at scale. And the sort of scale of something that Carnegie steel is unparalleled in Britain. Britain is the biggest producers still in the eighteen fifties. And then by nineteen hundred is absolutely dwarfed by, I think at Carnegie steel on his own is producing more than the whole of the United Kingdom. So America really takes the lead in the world from Great Britain in in in that fifty years span and seeing, as you mentioned both of you have touched Andrew Carnegie, what about the rubber barons and their reputation in massing immense wealth, oversleep building businesses, which will world-beating, but their reputation in particular time when we look at the gaps in wealth and at the super rich with perhaps more skepticism than we did the robber barons have a lot to answer for. I mean, the robber barons are amassing huge fortunes and it's often said in their defense that they may have a mass these great fortunes. But at least they gave some of the money away in philanthropy. And it's wonderful philanthropies. They create breath, much more important thing that they did was to reduce enormously. The cost of inputs into the economy, say, if you're reducing the cost of steel and your reducing the cost of oil actually ultimately making everybody much richer and what the that that reducing those costs because they're developing organizations ways of running the steel industry ways of running the oil industry, which which simply much much much more efficient and they're driving their competitors out of business, not because they're that cheating, but because they're just better at doing what they're doing. This is very interesting comparison. I think between the the robber barons of the nineteenth century and today's silica giants extraordinary comparison because the similarities between the between Silicon Valley and the robber baron world a quite a Sonics. You have huge companies being created very, very quickly. You have entrepeneurship basically masterminding the creation of these companies and you have fundamental economic inputs in. In the nineteenth century, stealing oil today, information being rented, much, much cheaper for everybody. And I think that this points to two remarkable things about America which helps to explain why America's become the great economic giants that it has. One is America's just really good at producing entrepreneurs. These people who capable of taking industries and revolutionizing them have absolutely gigantic. I'm visions and Secondly, America's incredibly good creating companies startups that can can become giants very, very quickly. Don't you Greenspan? Where do we think the sad story of slavery fits in this picture? How does it affect the engines of capitalism. Well, it's not the engine capitalism. It's the constitution. Slavery is an abomination. I mean, you can have an hiccup. Basic statement of the declaration of independence. All men are created equal. Well, that redefines who is a man who is not. And I think that. What. We've been dealing with and what. Slavery actually did was. As continued going, which essentially create an impossible situation which meant the civil war was inevitable. I've always argued that it was a cotton gin which was invented in seventeen ninety three, which took the cost of so-called up land cotton down very significantly. So when the issue arose with the cotton, gin and production increased extraordinary amount of so-called short, staple cotton. We had very high demand for slavery. So what's happening here and is that's slavery. Is it some ways becoming outmoded in hers ever moved to? It's becoming people like Jefferson and Washington, who is slave owners beginning to free that slaves. And also the present pyre, of course, abolishes slavery in eighteen thirty three. I think so slavery is beginning to look backward looking. And then something remarkable happens, which is technological innovation with the cotton. Gin makes slavery economically vital to see slavery declining in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Then it begins to take off again and spread across the United States because this technological innovation makes it more economically useful profitable. Now, some of our listeners will be familiar with the kind of experience where we go and you see, all of Shakespeare plays very truncated in eight one short performance. I'm going to have to move you two gentlemen along Papp's through history, little bit faster than the might seem comfortable to skew do homework for us. Why did the great depression happen? What would you say. Goes back to World War One. One of the things that occur as a country Quance as you all know is that when the war was over Britain. All other European countries try to reset the currencies against the United States dollar which existed prewar and as a result, a huge distortion and the whole structure of economic forces. And that is often discussed is the reason why Hitler arose in the why all extrordinary things that occurred to lead us essentially to World War Two, which is really an extension of World War One because we'll one never resolve the problems that existed that caused it. Well. Hard question, but what are the things about the great depression is that there in some ways to depressions to recessions as one of the beginning of the nineteen thirties. And then America begins to get out of the the recession, partly because of the the, the new deal in the mid nineteen thirties. But then towards the end of the nineteen thirties, it goes back into into recession, unemployment starts going going back up. You've got the serious crisis of the economy yet again in the late nineteen hundred isn't anything that really pulls America out of the depression I think is this is the second World War which passively simulates demand leader. Sounds like the city's problems is, is War. I mean, it's almost kind of this. Brush view of capitalism. It's driven by war in the wool machines drive the wealth. I mean, why is that wrong? Basically because. What I did was at craft and ships people cannot have bread on the table as a consequence of improvement in aircraft ships. It's Millie, the mechanism and the awareness, for example, that went to trickle cost plus system that there's no better way to get the private sector to function than a cost plus system. But I think that's going bit too far. I don't think it's in the spirit of free market economy is us to step back perhaps and looking at that question about the depression and what we learned from it when we come to dealing with financial crash of two thousand. And what did you learn about that history. Well, I, I would say first of all. It's a bubble bursting. Bubbles are the result of human. I don't know if it's a college a what it is, but they're Florida aspect to human nature. One of which it produces bubbles because of degree of euphoria which irrationally evolves and eventually collapse. It looks for example that when the crash occurred in two thousand eight, it was actually far more virulent and in collapsing of the financial system than nineteen twenty nine. In nineteen twenty nine. You still have very a call money market still existed and twenty twenty five percent interest rates. But in two thousand eight, the market disappears there one, no bids were nobody willing to back up a number of the markets and the system imploded very significantly. And it wasn't until we had the actual evidence that happened there. Granted the nature of human beings, how they behave with uncertainty and the like, and this is your intimately which behavioral behavioral economics as Dell's very deeply. And any event you have to do two things to produce the nineteen twenty nine and two thousand. Eight crisis one. You need a toxic asset and the toxic acid and nineteen twenty nine with stocks and. Two thousand eight. It was mortgages, but you also need as a necessary condition that these toxic assets are also basically leveraged. On. The one thing that appeared in both nineteen twenty nine and two thousand eight was a high degree of leverage. So I've concluded now we now understand the way these things arise based on the two major examples that we've learned from these two examples. We actually base real theory of how to prevent future crises onto. Temples, eleven bitter that it's directly into that context. When when people say you don't degrees Monday, presided over an enormous credit bubble. What was the central flew in you thinking that you discern when you back on that. Well, I have the impression that on the ABS vacations that I had made up to that date. Was that a backers and shouldn't Sears generally would tend to look after their own self interest and the manner adequate to create a rebalancing. But it was very clear, especially at the top of the two thousand boom doesn't eight boom, that everyone was waiting for it to crash. But the chairman of city group said so long as music is playing, we have to dance when it stops, we won't. But the reason I did that as they didn't quote dance close quote, they would've lost market share. So this very interesting set of relationships which basically go back the fundamental human nature and have their either go back to South Sea bubble. They all have these various characteristics. And I think two thousand eight actually a major statistical input because we never had before seen financial markets, especially short term financial markets literally freeze the way they did in two thousand eight wants to one of the things that struck me watching this from very much from the outside was simply the power of politics during this in the sense that both the Democrats and the Republicans for different reasons wanted to increase the number of Americans who had homes. The Democrats said, let's let's have lots of poor people getting homes, and the Republicans between George W Bush has, let's have a homework owning democracy. That'll be good for of Republican that you save got huge political pressure on people to to, to borrow money to to get into the property market. Was that a big factor at this time through Fannie Mae and Freddie MAC and the the, the mortgage finance bay. Based in Washington. And did I spent a good deal of my time both as chairman of the fed and as a private citizen complaining that these two institutions upland subsidized. Producers of toxic assets. There that we could unpack about what's being done to web blame, might've late in the past, but where do you think the next bubble financial crisis is mostly likely to come from Dr Greenspan you your ghosts of irrational exuberance. You sometimes feel them around you today? Actually, I don't think this Akon is as a buoyant as the number of people do. I best writ by the rate of growth in productivity, not by the employment rate, not by inflation as such. But fundamental is output per hour up put per hour in the last eight or nine years has been at a subnormal rate of interest as indeed the whole world has been in Britain Brexit as a wonderful example of what happens to a market economy when it's rate of growth slows down beneath a certain threshold. And I think what engendered Brexit and what is in 'gendering emergence of Donald Trump and the United States on two major Connie's slowing significantly below. That potential rate of growth. And for example, in the last six months of six years, many, how you wanna look at it off productivity growth rate is been under one percent of year. So is that in the UK we both used to be three percent of their abouts, and that is a huge difference in the type the level of the economy and you get people coming in as indeed the Brazilian election is showing very much similar type of pattern where Brazil was extraordinarily potent economy and it collapsed under very dubious political control agent. He's covering Britain Brexit's in the rates, backstage. Do you entirely identify with that that you can sort of make a direct correlation. Between the lower rates, productivity growth and populism. Absolutely. I think that basically what you have is an economy where everybody's competing for a fairly fixed pie. And so that sets interest groups against each other instead of looking to to get richer and better that that looking to get a big share of fix pine. I think also is a weird thing that's going on as well, which is that we have a combination of a very high degree of economic turbulence. There's a lot of change. Churn lots of technological innovation, but there's no really serious overall productivity growth. So everybody will move happily move house on the job. If I move into a bigger house or a better job, never been a hostile move to to the same sort of house or the same sort of job, but they're getting all the churn, none of none of the benefits. And I think that's terrible mixture. What would we learned from the history? The you two written together about populism. You discuss populism and its economic environment in the late nineteenth century, what would we learn about contending with populism in Donald Trump's America who other forms in Europe today. I think we're moving towards what we call stagflation. That is it's very difficult to have this huge fiscal deficit because remember one of the real problems with respect to untitled, it's just explained entitlements in this context for us, please. She didn't study. Greenspan international arena. It's called social benefits at its various pension funds set up by government as welfare programs to take care of various aspects of the population. In the United States, we have an old agents of Ivers fund. We have Medicare Medicaid and ever variety of other things which individuals by the very nature of being a citizen of the United States and having certain other characteristics are entitled to government payments of a certain dimension. If they were fully funded, which they were in the beginning and we're supposed to be, then there would not have that negative effect on the economy, but they're not the huge deficit which is scheduled if you listen to Congressional Budget Office and the United States, the debt. Scheduled to go up to tremendously I levels and the years immediately. Miserable agency. Two things to do with populism problem. First of all, it's going to get growth back. It's push it, sprayed of productivity growth back up, and I think tackling the entitlement problem is absolutely fundamental to that because it's shifting money away from productive investments to less productive use, and we have to make sure that new future financial crises. And I think there are ways of reducing the likelihood of financial crises by forcing banks to keep more cash in reserves. Requisite cash reserves. Convinced the twin spend the we're not risking another financial crisis right now. Points out if we were to go to, for example, club, the average rate of equity capital and commercial banks or financial intermediaries. Is historically low but far more important. We would solve all of the issues of contagious default, which is a necessary condition for the two thousand eight nineteen twenty nine type of crisis. And if you have an ability to prevent contagious default and the one way to do it is to look and ask yourself where in a free market economy, is there no significant type of the fault feeding on for one another? And that is an anon- so-called nonfinancial sector of the economy where the capital stock equity to assets is forty percent. Some in many cases, much larger than that. Commercial banks have eleven to fifteen percent. And the chances of contagious series of defaults and the first case where you have very large capital buffers is very low to nonexistent where it's very high under a troublesome. And one of the things that we put in the book is to explain how we can have a system, partly reflecting the the Swedish experience and what we see in the developed world generally how to solve this problem by doing a simple thing show up -ly raising the capital requirements and what the data show is going all the way back to eighteen sixty nine is that there is no relationship between the amount of capital have relative to assets and re. Return on equity. That means that the people who argue that they will. That point to this very substantial change would induce a major problem on just mistaken that they do not show that. And the reason is that the rate of return on equity capital is a built in issue of human time forever. And that does not vary and would not very respective of how much capital we require financial intermediaries. So this is a sensual extremely optimistic book about American capitalism because there was some people say that America deceased debate, exceptional nationless. The rate of growth will slow down is because it's an advanced economy and the other people who say that it's the nature of technology that he just doesn't generate this growth that we've seen in the past. We didn't think that's the case. We think there's an extraordinary technological revolution going on. There's an extraordinary. Power in the American economy that generates really high levels of growth. But it's it's been slowing down partly because of a poorly run financial system which generated at a crisis of important promotions in two thousand eight. And partly because of very badly run entitlements, which means America's spending more entitlements ridden. It's funding so that that feels the deficit. But if you could solve to pull ac- problems, the underlying economy, the economy that you see these great companies like Google an Amazon, the rest of it is a very powerful one. So America could reclaim its its dynamism. And that's very important because dooby won't the twenty first century to be defined by an authoritarian society like China or a liberal society, the United States. So a lot depends on solving these. These policy problems agent is become too close most through to base view the question of whether they can be more than one winner really as as we look forward. Is China will get to challenge these optimistic reading that you seem to show. Warts and all about the American economy. If you go back and China's history, Deng Xiaoping. Essentially reversed Mousa domes basic comment system which existed after World War Two. And we had a whole series progressively of increasingly more liberal governments in China. And I remember very distinctly, I had to work with. Junk some in and Huron g and the nineteen nineties and their basic. Disclose view one being the president, elevating the prime minister, there's you is, how do we make Chinese of Konomi function like American. Now with she in power now, perhaps semi permanently this, this is not the vision that Deng Xiaoping had, but I would say if it weren't for this little. This major problem, China would be very successful a market economy as it was developing. I always called it the the most capitalist in action for a number of years until. Ran into the last three or four regimes, and I frankly, I wasn't in government time obviously, and I don't know what happened and you're not gonna find out what's happening with an apology unless you're sitting there. Absolutely. I think that that's right. But I do think that's I trust America to support the the values of liberal democracy around the world. It has done for the last century. So they're really if we can improve the rates of American productivity growth and ensure that the American economy is dynamic in this centers. It wasn't a law century. That's not just good for America is good for the rest of the world because ultimately Americans being the champion of liberal democracy to Alan Greenspan and Asian wooded. Thank you very much. We are on Email here, radio code dot com. Over on Twitter at accordeonist, radio. If you'd like to feed in your foods on America, economic power. What life beyond Miquel voi- in London. This is the economist.

America US Dr. Alan Greenspan Donald Trump Adrian Wooldridge China President Britain Dr Greenspan Federal Reserve chairman Carnegie
Introducing Unknown History: 75 Years Since D-Day

American History Tellers

15:18 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Unknown History: 75 Years Since D-Day

"Seventy five years ago, this June one hundred fifty six thousand American British and Canadian forces landed on five beaches on the coast of Normandy, the invasion was one of the largest amphibious military salt in history and just the beginning of the longest and bloodiest battle of World War Two at the time. It was known as operation overlord. We know the invasion now as d day. What you don't know though, is what he was like in the barracks and on the beaches during the bloodshed in the brand new third season of the podcast unknown history. You'll hear the full story of what really happened on the bloodstained sands of Utah Omaha. Gold Juno and sword beaches, the show is written and hosted by bestselling author and historian Giles Milton. You can find the show by searching unknown history. Wherever you listen to podcasts. But right now, here's the first episode. Who was George lane? And how did he escape this certain death at the hands of the Gestapo turns out, gentlemen, HR goes a long way? Welcome to season three of unknown history. DJ stories. I'm your host Giles Milton today. We're talking about d day spies and one in particular. The extraordinary undercover mission of George lane. General Eisenhower and the architects of d day knew that the allied landings would only be successful. If they had up to the minute information about the German coastal defences, they already had French spies working on their behalf, and we'll hear more on this little later, but they also need it to smuggle daring agents across to the beaches of Normandy in order to undertake clues inspections of the enemy fortifications. It was not for the fainthearted. It was highly dangerous with the certainty of death at the hands of the Gestapo if captured so who an earth with volunteer for such work step forward, George lane who's undercover mission to Nazi occupied. France was to prove the most extraordinary of the mobile lanes addiction to risk driven him to join the elite British commandos. And it also let him to volunteer for a perilous undercover mission code-named operation top rush. X in the second week of may nineteen forty four. He was to smuggle himself into Nazi occupied France using the cover of darkness to paddle ashore in a black rubber dinghy. His task was to investigate a new type of mine that the Germans were believed in stooling on the Normandy beaches. Lane had the air of a quintessentially British adventure. But he was actually Hungarian his real name was diary Landry. And he was a member of the elite extra p- a British lead commander unit consisting of foreign nationals whose countries have been overrun by the Nazis. Now just a few weeks before d day. It was time for his undercover mission to Nazi occupied France. It got off to a flying start. He and his commander comrade ROY will which cross the English channel in a motor torpedo boat. And then paddled ashore in a black rubber dinghy the elements were on their side. It was raining hard and spray was being flung across the beach lane soon found whether the new German minds and took a photograph of it. But as he did so he was spotted by German guards seconds later. They began firing wildly into the driving rain nine Wooldridge, scrape them. Delves into the sand and waited until the shooting had stopped. Then having had quite enough adventure for one night. They clambered back into the dinghy and prepared to put to sea. But as dawn broke the sky, they realized they'd been spotted a German boot was coming off to them, and they soon found themselves with very little option other than to surrender. They were in serious grave danger. Soon after they landed a Gestapo officer arrived to interrogate them. Of course, you know, we'll have to shoot you. He said because you are obviously a saboteur, and we have very strict orders to shoot all separators and commandos he added what were you doing? Lane refuse to answer any questions his silence led to him being locked into a cell for the rest of that day and night. He was always cool under pressure. But he got the fight of his life. When his cell door was opened the door by a doctor dressed in a white gown. I thought my God what's going to happen? Now. He would reg- were blindfolded and the two of them were bundled into a car driven off at high speed lane asked where they were going. He got no answer. Eventually, the German military car came to a halt in a private drive, the doors were opened and Lane's blindfold was removed by one of the century's when he looked up he blinked in disbelief. My God he whispered under his breath. What a strange place just look at it. A fortified Chateau stood bolted to the rock a one time feudal castle that had been converted into an eighteenth century pleasure palace. It was little time to admire the view for he and Wooldridge will lead inside unlocked into two separate rooms. After a little while said lane, a very elegant officer came in and to my amazement, we shook hands he spoke perfect English and gave lane fresh chicken, sandwiches and coffee as lane, eight them. The officer said do you realize you're about to meet someone very important? I must have your assurance that you're going to behave with the utmost dignity. I happen to be an officer and gentleman said lane and cannot behave in any other way, he paused and added Patou am I going to meet the officer stiffened as he snapped out his reply you again to meet his excellency field marshal Rommel lane was knocked sideways, Rommel, the desert FOX was one of the big names of the Third Reich. The man who Hitler had entrusted with the fending Normandy. I'm delighted he said because in the British army. We have a great admiration for him. This was true enough his conduct during the North Africa campaign earned him a reputation for fair play and chivalry. Lane was now led towards the gallery to library where his gaze was immediately drawn to the figure seated behind a writing desk, it was field marshal Rommel with his glacial is and sharply cleft chin. He got up walked towards me and said sets and CeCe sit yourself down lane who spoke perfect German pretended. Not to understand. It would give him more time to prepare his answers. So you are one of these gangsta commandos, are you said Romal? Lane waited for this to be translated into English before answering. Please tell his excellency that I do not understand what he means by gangster commandos gangsters against us. But the commandos are the best soldiers in the world. Romo seem to appreciate the answer for a brief smile swept his face. Perhaps. You are not a gangster. He said, but we've had some very bad experiences concerning commandos this much was true. Over the previous months lanes fellow commandos in extra and staged a series of hit and run rates on the coastline of France. Do you realize said romell that you have been taken prisoner under very strange circumstances? I hardly think that was strange at lane. More unfortunate unhappy you are in a very serious situation. This bold statement of fact was followed by a piercing stare Rommel accused him of being a Senator lane consider this for a moment before answering if the Field Marshall took be for saboteurs, he said he would not have. Invited me here even rumble was taken aback by the boldness of lanes response. So you think this was an invitation naturally. Yes. And I take it is a great honor. I'm delighted to be here. Les knew he was halfway to winning the game when removed face broke into a broad smile. The conversation now developed into something more akin to benefit an interrogation house, my friend Montgomery, unfortunately, I don't know him said lane, but he's preparing the invasion. So you'll see him fairly soon. He added that he knew little about on Gumri than what appeared in the times as an afterthought he told Rommel that was an excellent newspaper. I think you ought to read it, I do said Rummell, I get it from Lisbon. Well, then you'll see that he's preparing the invasion, and they'll be here. Shortly fighting you Romo scoffed that'll be the first time that the English to any fighting a beg your pardon lane. Spluttered offense. What happened at Ella main? That was not the English said romell the English who is get other people to do their fighting for them. The Canadians Australians New Zealanders the South Africans. Lane a Hungarian Jew fighting for the British found it hard to keep a straight face. Rommel soon returned to the subject of the allied landings asking lane where he thought the soldiers would land lane retorted. He was junior officer. He was not privy to the invasion plans. If it was up to me, he said, I probably go for the shortest crossing. It was a lengthy pause and lane semis. That the interrogation was coming to an end. I would enjoy myself tremendously later said so we are seeing turbot or if as the Field Marshall had asked me so many questions, I would be permitted to ask a few of my own Rummell scoffed at his impertinence, but noted nonetheless what I would like to know is this said lane FRANZ has being occupied by you. How did the French people react to being occupied his question led to Rommel telling him how the French had never been so happy, and so well organized my goodness said lane, I love to see that you can see if you're self said Romo as you travel through FRANZ, laying laughed in scorn every time. I travel with your boys, they blindfolded me and tima hands behind my back. This Ronald turned to his aide de camp and asked if this. Was strictly necessary. Oh, yes. He said these are very dangerous people. These ominous words signaled the end of the interview the meeting was over lane with courteous to the end thanking the Field Marshall his time he was hoping for stave execution. But as soon as he was outside he was blindfolded once again, he and Wooldridge with and driven off at high speed to stop headquarters in Paris arriving early that evening. It frightened the life out to me when I realized where I was admitted lane who is even more terrified when he heard the screams of prisoners being tortured. Yet, his own Gestapo interrogation was conducted in such delay tree fashion that he couldn't help wondering if Rommel had interceded on our behalf and prevented ROY. And I from being executed. This was indeed the case neither man was shot a nor were they tortured. Instead, they were sent off leg nine AH. A prisoner of war camp in central Germany lane would later escape by which time the allied armies had made that successful landings in Normandy and were busily pushing inland. It was the end to a remarkable story. This week's d they slip. It takes up the story. The French spies, which I mentioned earlier one of the most colorful was a young champion cyclist named Gil muck Adere who'd ingratiated himself for the local Gestapo and then requested permission to continue his training on the road that ran along on the coast of Normandy. None of the soldiers who saw him on his bike had any inkling that he was diligently noting down every pillbox bunker and machine gun nest, but the spring of nineteen forty four Merkava had been gathering intelligence for more than three years. He was in contact with almost nine hundred agents, including three policemen and a handful of railway workers the latter would particularly important for the kept a close eye on troop movements. Once he gathered all his information he'd cycled to the town of Bayer the headquarters of the local resistance where the intelligence reports were collected and transmitted by wireless to Ingo. Oakland. We didn't a day or two of Mirka Dez cycling along the coastal road of Normandy, be architects of operation overlord, we're in possession of the very latest news of the German beach defenses. This was invaluable for the success. Or failure of d day would be completely dependent on the seaborne assault of the coastline marketer. New. The degrade number of men more than two million troops. In fact, was stationed across England all of them awaiting shipment of France, the lives of many of those soldiers, and certainly those in the first wave would hinge on the accuracy of the French intelligence transmitted to generalize an hour by brave undercover agents like Monsieur macadear. I hope you enjoyed this episode of unknown history. In the next episode. We'll be meeting Howard vanderbeek the young man entrusted with leading one of the mighty fleets across the English channel towards the beaches. Of d day. For more stories like this one read my new book about how the allies one on d day. It's titled soldier sailor fragrance by and gangster kill or die a gripping tick tock account of the first twenty four hours of the d day invasion. Click the link in the show news to learn more.

George lane marshal Rommel Normandy George lane officer Wooldridge Romo France Marshall Giles Milton France commander Utah comrade ROY Rummell General Eisenhower Gestapo Bayer British army
Farm Laws - 2020, 2021 or 2022 ??

Everyday Talkies

31:18 min | 3 months ago

Farm Laws - 2020, 2021 or 2022 ??

"Hello guys. Come to start. Cost everyday. Talkies which i don does not come. I am unsure. And i talk about trying to things to random people majorly about life but specter's and thinking process it's like an interview or let's say more of the conversation with one or two guests about china topics that interest us to be really honest. It's just a way to reduce my ambitions and talking to so come join me and enjoy. Hello everyone episode of everyday doggies so today we have an old guest but somebody with a unique perspective for the last episode. You guys must have been board last today. Yeah lasted episode. You guys must have been listening to me and scrambling about reviews from movies and series. But today i think contrast who what we were doing for the past three weeks we'll be discussing. Which is very much in the news. I think all of us should know because Well all of us eat was electric reduce to unite in the ion show. Thanks for making game For people who not have deep mail you should have watched my previous episodes by leonardo watching the previous episodes. I think he was one of the first ones in the usually has started regain monday to its was farming and the second one talked about the project or company that started and is working on. What amazed because it industry india or the world who knows soden flown back and coming to the topic of debate. Today we are like you guys must have already known we're talking about families daum laws which was launched ready twenty not yet implemented and put on hold probably may get delayed for under eighteen months or might be scrapped. Altogether we do not know so now people is someone who who's already working industry will give us this additional insights and not feel free to orlando comfortable with where the methadone he so much by. Being is a language to conquer. I was thinking before jumping into the explain kikaya palm like what are the things which was ratified by the government in the late september. Twenty and then we can jump. Do what exactly. it is. Ideal to perspective. Cooper and all of that Your team Formula los angeles woke thank. You market create carnegie maga- dookie. Abmc get toolbar. Gatekeeper abuse market committee. You'll be generally five months Keeping continues to be problems Which i do now when problems get it now but it's name. He bought tidy effigy jay. What's holding media naples. Weekly it wide much kicking off key. It's not declan beneficial to us. It has benefits but it's not much on the programs especially in the and because walker. Abmc dunia what a strong at the latest one woman. Abmc tomorrow or walking launch happened meant that we got this cheated or when he gave augments video if lee a wide if i'd once got active u s currency nor nor incapable back to discuss each we talk about what the lowest discotheque how it can benefit or hampered and both of the story. I'll start with the first one dome. Nikola earned i'm bad with names of people You want to correct me peace. Somebody correct me so the first Law which was ratified always Farmland produced and commerce in the back of promotion facilitation agricultural. Now you just to give everyone a brief. It is basically allowing the farmers to have contact with in order to sell. The farm products can be anywhere in india. Now i don't know what was the scenario so we might get that from the but in the ideal what the act says is that if i can get an agreement with the buyer for minimum product cycle of one season or the maximum of five years so it basically that get into an agreement before the producers steady and when supporters eighty five i will deliver the product and get back the money and it addition to that government has given technician snack if within thirty days of something the money's not retrieved then the famous companies they have I think create t levels of mechanics in terms of policing so that The people don't want to be with money and all contracts are valid and people are the main reason also What is that initially. What used to happen was that when the buyers not used to get the money and promised not at the money to associate so newland behind. Newmarket's dylan's or markets that houses in order to get loans and basically what Caused a problem because obviously you want more your line which gives you money right and if you are unable to pay loan then on your whole i got so in order to prevent that to do this now. That is on now. What is your take on this From somebody who is impotent. How people have come from mississippi the version in this New law is only ended up with the a day under this next is concerned about a of entry point for many of the laws in indians. That would reduce i Meister definitely gadget. When you gets on me when i'm driving up that gave up when you say slow go yes. I used a guy. Islam underneath biking lost newest. What what one. Where did a ministry was getting fiddle skinny road. What what we'll say. They pull a java exhausting just negligent of five minutes about what now he got engaged. Not key on the garden run behind in other things. Marketing box issue. Incorporate is unreliable. It's about cool. You're wanna he Five months ought for the market there next the needed someone who intervene and who can take care of all the things and finance sergei on their crops to mentioned abmc a couple of times explain ta gmc basically emc on yet. More will get What we introduce kyoto and Ms hiding major skit skin products. Don't give me one victory much. Duck aunt Steak waste control price. Hikes take out book pick gave up. Abmc mcateer key aby one who was dictating the pace. If it'd be amc's saying that you are caught. What fifteen hundred. But it under the scott meal dougie actual brace which autozone bellevue mcmahon. I'm these very clearly can. Just make a ten fifteen years. And five months low fifty times open. Not a good debater. Abmc gear janey. Do not be disappointed with it. The minimum price set and government. And what like if. I'm a quick confirm but he's gotten from incoming but the problem here is and That is causing problems in order to alleviate that i think that when we come to the second law which talks about if i am correct This one is the. I produce trade and commerce to the promotion facilities and it's me what they have said. Goldman is allowed. The farmers go beyond medes and sell the products anywhere in the country. Intrastate interstate the barrier and it has introduced laconic leading and market fee was abolished. And all of this so now according to your argument where you said key yes. The two sides of the coin key has gone. confirmed income from the government and people that they are buying it from that but the prices are too low and once you remove that boundaries and much open. A market for the fall must capture prices and the The whole world is wiser restriction from apm cappella job. Debbie nineteen then. We'll stay maybe. I'm going to do nothing not indicate when i could paceman or video. They appears conveys me teach the game when i get up on his big just Those season man when behind this little bit. We'll see the other day. Could he took it. And then i'm hanging out of nolan pitch. We'd be with you the hottest going on that but we'll stay in demand cookie or he retains. How did your way zima. Abm's optum dot incorrect pay school It may get key becky. I'd want spooky. He said pain. National transportation goes way federal loan stock up and then we explain in one. Four tour will appeal baseball. Many nation orbit other by the abebe. Flip the mission vision can sign goat. Many uncon- on replacement patient haning so for from excellent. Oh maybe i'll base lending envision of the yankee if you talk about e commerce industries. Let's say amazon. And all of that. The items within the. Let's talk about a he. When you're starting wilson was even nine online language one. I taught many up jihad cutler. Mitchell dramatically keeping millionth other gunman electronics them. But it me with e commerce and the whole industry of these. Small relocate shops is dying and they're not sustain because they are the big companies can offer discounts which these companies cannot and they're giving access the heck who decided to buy it because they have fun they can afford to in god loss for you know how many years for and cabot eight hundred went than turned. The battle started. Think one fear amongst the farming community is that the big players like amazon lions and these common began stop used as you mentioned syndicate or their foothold into the market. That bill by a touchy prices and as such and such deeper levels that local farmers market Licking bart loss. I wanted to men. Net net loss came out on brennan. Abmc a contractual key bought in mail if emc nettie context of succeeding. Yoga may ten amateur hockey Traditional point of jonky. Any and all of us i mentioned number of a just the many his production line in the art machines has gone. Nickel safe expedi- all be check unusual. Turkey hang it in logo data pavement. Inflation now go. This may be starkey did maybe a low occupies manipulation when talking apple store could get on top of you What a pump to since you talking about that later we just people know so toward a about was incorporated under this was essential commodities. So under which Initially what trump was that in order to regulate price in the market government itself. Hide a gap in the stories that they can do what he's commodities products you the food that we used essential commodity as well your fuel medicines and all of that but you're not talking about the that farmer so initially what happened was that you're not allowed to stalk tons and tons of food and that is why the big players ought comment because in order for the only way they can earn profit is when they are when they're able to stockpile stuff and then again in the market according but In order to avoid that government through regular and maintain that cap but in this new what happens is government has degraded tire cold-storage idea and this is true for multiple aspects. The first thing is that missile bringing you players some outside so that they can you stop stuff and Approach all year round will bring a new players who are interested and it will also. This is apartment which i never read in the newspapers what i was actually relating go up. Different piece of article will increase the horror stories technology for india. Now why do i say this. Because let's say during this pandemic india country very easy means of contracting the over lapsing that we get administered by now they have additions. And why was that. Because really mr wooldridge technology access skin because there is no other products that you would need to go through such for other than food. No food was under that act so the was not developed now in order to enhance that aspect as well. I think this might act ballot again. This for the mvp discussing before key. This'll be new. Into the market is bringing big leads into markets it will infuse investment into the farming community but the local were not that very educated or who as an marketing car government livelihood so way cheesy with manhattan fbi to have corporation offering the nation. Which is a responsibility to ensure food safety and a nation which has the right to buy food for us so we'll have equal at the stood ventured off school disappointed. When the be excellent autocratic labor day jason guide to lentil everything is wing works in huntersville by three day. Just a private. I know that they will do the same things that you have. And then George doesn't give us in any on a game. what do you call a pretext play. You goldman is your lackey down Cheese war she just establishment going up to a book. That conflict is still count maybe Pity valuable what the loss go. Fish nick Other jewish five minutes societies your dandruff like diesel storage physically. Look when go you're right. I'm not saying that it's the only one of the best solution for this. What i think. I might do make pumpkin yoga five win. Or noko cobra. Operatives were destroyed. Nhl clinically bordman. Seventy percent to the and ashanti's nick violence producer nation. S p o. Kagi it now law scaling up. We'll be caffeine. Make eight outside if a management indicate just like you say about your skin. So i just put up the managed for a tales. Thank you remember. Unnamed about the in built management could make this a kamata. And you're but he he Same gotta find did she. Didn't he got he He's got i think it was. I don't spawn schuster who made a counter private public relationship essay and bills when cockman management got weekly nonprofit. Object to out the manage managed. Five more skip you difficulty. I'll producers commend. Much weight was one or maybe way on. August management are got to be a water. Could he must manage that. Even if not easy most management he financial persona today. Let's give war obliquely now. Paste brought again at storage got into but natural. Start dating bronco distant. Oh we'll stay. Stain pay bus muscle. This footage on this then. It will be beneficial for months on We'll get up. We'll offer technical login. Who's been means a ministry of the biggest mystery. Animal miller expedition is bad. A rice is with expert. Who are doing this was a company. Mandate cookie five months later today. A little hood on copperfield saying he's an email ignored five months or joe five squawk on gifts unmake off other deemed on a study. That nicky about you angel it. It wasn't good initiative by the government that accused the talking and he on some problem wing with abmc generally autonation gear with the problem identification. It's a thing that i can identify the problem that this is a long wing on and the proposed a solution but offered wants to include kiloton species and what skill pinkett better bridge ball on the mob to key points key farming industry industrial. You will empower the farmers. Because i got whoa he and he they want From or so to see in harvest crops lukanen cushioning ticket and classics ideal. Don't keep you up near medium. Which which privacy. I'm looking at shell facilities aramco's in the agricultural industry might not be that exactly. How local investment otani as nicky. What government is hot. as the as. You've gotta kitty problems. They identify key which lucia condition conditions might be here and there. So i think the recent discussions that were going in the key element is ready. Who delayed the laws by eighteen months and they have set up a committee. The supreme court where the farmers and the union according to the government can't work on these laws modified them or introduce new ones as the former district that they what msp's all across india across the crops so things like this not obviously somewhat some questionable to me but lieke adamant that point kiara habits the woman and been looking at government. How you're discussing economic and government live up near sorts. Thank you by the news. What newspapers gig farmers mind. Lena you with a heart was just look. Farmers will dig name ukraine beating. But is he may be caught that he even the government we will we will. We will stay on that for eighteen months ago. Discuss on this but beaches job you participate when pay income tax rates by police harassment. What i don't think we want to discuss. Say you want to break. And i think it is one of the very few civilized for scored as india's as nobody but civilized and peace. Something which is. Obviously we don't want let's go. Let's see how will speed say mark speak man actually maccabi a skill that i won Create a new market for five months. Maybe says he can get up on. Once dole eve lead producer again become agreements. We'll man we ought to land night screaming the whole idea off demanding that elope amnestying forget might be mention. You find must be making a bit so again. It's being sold in the simply you happy medium On the non just medical. I keep any of you. Maybe didn't give him a speed. It raised it and marquis gentle head but market collect human. Thank you e workman comp. Gonna did what they have. P. a. b. c. d. He go confidence judge Medical domestic legitimate on hong which campaigning dilemma dot com. The pilot stubble burning the podcast. What was bombing rope. Make elliott and was gardening or more cutting campaigning for apartment. Saying is making very much hand. What also not in a new. And i had such a loss Rob with an up but The of those things would just any media votes. Pick five hundred go. They can go find that. Go into confidence. Moves go hand. He yeah not given holdout. Datta jobe looking. Yes saying nielsen cookie. About whole point. Isky jag miss the best lawyer but because local casinos in san bay to take your california accent. Any obviously spectacle amendments bureau regarding and mondays and free market. But it's not me language about curry key wing stable job or for obvious. The free market is like a business open. Up was the the call a monument but we have a job. You need effort and work. But it. But i don't think even in india joel embiid up their majorly dispute. Some people might not have increased and he came up with a. You will talk beneficial at john. Jin below it by george would if women or cutting ical or breaks and you'd just get used by some people but me just give us a player award tundra as light will do control us logic. Is it beneficial normal. They can why he had just one inning to produce catan yogi of buying a year. An in display costs a banana. The key membership option dot the end up going that open. My me and i have want look. Yes you stay as dickie waldman. Wins feed get mcmahon admitted movements ads on their. We'll talk if i were. I'm thinking sense. Dining by basically who is not the proper. Listen and key ago. he's fallen anyway. I disrespect panel discussion namely to laboratories across. What is what's causing it and this opening gutter urban area medical jitter but he wasn't with the book last source of highest part of hooligans magistrate night. So was maybe not in politics you from it right. You are in india. You have to deal with it. And it's all about a middle class family. Laura's mom uganda ford hoop go office nagin. And that means we're gonna go connections. Say we can circumvent laws and with like. Don't say it makes appropriate I'll be looking. We feel when market but even the open market vendor dependent breaking and chancellor warming dench in spill. He government cocaine sixteen mill. One mike and mike and we'll stay invention. Jay talk you benefit. We'll see invention corporate or nobody lost. Maybe broken the intention to worker of william and there is no way to confirm this and obviously applicable custody but Since the key point becky people like us. Who are will be the future the opening with a job but speaking everyone in general everyone is contributing meeting future since the he people like us should talk about these things and finding about dropping for the first time. I seriously thought about opening bell bottoms up to hong fifty. Don't use my thought they. It'll every day may relate to what you do at that so it's up to meet our interest. What and even. I want to know more about it because it is affecting the entire definitely mr thing. They can enter defeats. the gossips. All of us to talk about it. I know we're not great policymakers give us a nation right now but the more we talk about it the more we understand the more i think better solutions can be presented to the government talked about that. It's all about giving you be. It's all about What's best for the partners. And what is best for the country and taking it forward. That's it from my end. We haven't talked about this last forty minutes. Something have anything losing democracy. No no no. I was humptulips for everybody. Who's listening to this. Obviously as well as can understand what he does and has also. You don't encourages taking one and deals aspects. So just talk to him. See if you can help the farming community. Inada god and your heart initiatives which was talking about. I can all also listen to a previous episode talking more about exactly what has company doesn't matter the venture that he was looking forward hopefully soon We'll get more about. What the new initiatives that is and talk about that but Thinking of before gracing us at this episode and everybody listening keep thinking keep fobbing opinions lead read and read type get as much more or less and make educated decisions tanks and tank. Have anyone who commissioned this gus. I think it could give a new prospect deal about the whatever go for anything is can me might be using or merely the inflection. What are on children for giving up. Before rent's let's keep it to that. Thank you thank you. Thank you an excellent pang. Thank lynch thank you to all. The listeners are cats with you again soon but someone new and lots of interesting discussions so by.

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#69 - A Leadership Wake-Up Call Driven By COVID-19 | The Economists Adrian Wooldridge

Leadership Biz Café

34:33 min | 6 months ago

#69 - A Leadership Wake-Up Call Driven By COVID-19 | The Economists Adrian Wooldridge

"Hi everyone. Welcome to the leadership bizcafe. I'm your host Tavern s e r c e o of Tampa Nasir leadership our leadership firm the now offers both virtual as long as in person leadership Keynotes and workshops on a variety of topics as I've mentioned previously as a result of the current covid-19 pandemic, we've pivoted to doing virtual leadership keynote and it's been gratifying to hear back from attendees of these virtual talks how much they've gained from these sessions? So if you've been enjoying the leadership insights, I've been sharing through this podcast and would like to learn more about em speaking work, please drop me a line through our contact form at Tampa Nasir, and while you're there don't forget to check out my award-winning leadership log as well. And now let's get to my guess for this episode Adrian Wooldridge. I think there's an extraordinary story behind all of this that we're seeing the quality of governments in West Palm. Countries led by the United States and Great Britain really declining ossifying and we're seeing the quality of governments in Eastern countries led by singing all but including China really improving very dramatically and I think that has enormous consequences for the balance of power in the world. And also, of course the business which must operate within, you know, the contexts of the public realm, it's quite understandable these days that many Business Leaders have their focus set on the latest developments around the covid-19 virus as this Global pandemic is not only impacting the way we do business as an organization, but it's also impacting all of us in our everyday lives as well which invariably impact how your employees show up for work everyday consequently how the government's where you operate are handling. This pandemic is vital to helping you plan and strategize how to go about achieving your organization wage. Rules given the cost in lives lost and the growing risks of severe long-term economic hardships ahead. Why are some countries failing to learn from the success stories of those who've eliminated this threat and why should leaders everywhere be more concerned about the need for better governance in terms of how countries go about combating this disease to help get some answers if she goes, I've invited Adrian Wooldridge political correspondent for The Economist to the show to help us gain a better understanding for why leaders and both the private and public sectors have a vested interest in how well or how badly governments were. They operate address this Health crisis Adrian co-authored with John Michael with the editor-in-chief of Vogue news, their seventh book called The wake-up call why the pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West and how to fix it. Hi Adrienne. Welcome to the leader wage. Is Cafe thank you for inviting me. So Adria the focus of my podcast is on leadership and how to improve the way we lead. Of course how successful you are at leadership depends not only how we approach that role but not on how we respond to changing conditions after all anyone can be successful when things are going well the real test of how effective you are at leadership is how well you both navigate your organization through turbulent Waters, but also keep your employees motivated and engaged in your organization's Vision. Now, there is little question that covid-19 has presented the world with an unprecedented challenge in large part because of how interconnected we become dead and consequently how a country and its government response to this Health crisis can create ripples that impact many other countries be it in terms of trade or even in terms of Tourism and families connecting now for the past decade or so. We've seen the rise in power and influence of many organizations and I think we still see that with companies like Facebook and Google but in your book club You write how thanks to covid-19 were seeing now a Resurgence of interest and focus on a country or regions governance. In fact early on in your book you write the coronavirus wage has made government important again, not just powerful again, but also vital again. It matters enormously whether your country has a good health service and competent bureaucrats. The law of the virus was like an examination of State capacity and that's why you call covid-19 a wake-up call now, we're certainly seeing in certain parts of the world the devastation caused by viruses unleashing but what's the real dangers countries in the Western World especially need to be paying attention to more and for my listeners. What's the potential Fallout for them? If their governments disregard, that's a cup call. Yeah as you just read out we regard this this coronavirus as an examination, which the whole world has changed. Taken at the same time and the results of that examination are rather surprising because countries that we thought would do naturally do well in these combination such as written off assessing or the United States next door to you have actually done extremely badly countries that we thought wouldn't do particularly. Well have done really quite well China which of course unleash the virus in the first place, but nevertheless got his act together eventually South Korea Taiwan a lot of countries in the Far East have done very well other countries put in a such as Germany of putting the middle in performance and I think there's an extraordinary story behind all of this that we're seeing the quality of government job in Western countries led by the United States and Great Britain really declining ossifying and we're seeing the quality of governments in Eastern countries wage. Led by Singapore, but including China really improving very dramatically and I think that has enormous consequences for the balance of power in the world and all of course the business which must operate within, you know, the contexts of the public realm, you know, one thing I appreciate about your book Adrian is that you provide actually a context for some of those economic and social issues were seeing in various Western countries because as is the case when a scandal hits an organization these events don't simply materialize out of thin air, but are a consequence of either years of poor decisions being made or leaders pursuing self-serving interests that lead an organization away from their agreed-upon purpose in the case of explaining the differences. We see in how some countries like South Korea that you just mentioned Singapore and New Zealand have been able to successfully limit the negative impacts of covid-19 While others as you've mentioned have dramatically failed to gain. Proper handle is pandemic including as you said your country new K and south of the United States you point out that this comes down to how these successful countries not only view the role of government, but more importantly how much they're investing to ensure. They attract the best people to serve in government and public roles such as in education and health care and what I found interesting about this is that most of the discussions I see at least here in Canada around addressing the deficiency covid-19 has shown a harsh light on there. Is that admission that yes, we need to hire more people and various public health and education sectors, but there's little discussion or focus on ensuring we get the most capable and best people so if one of the things governments need to do is to attract and retain the best people and get rid of poor performers to basically paraphrase what you just mentioned about the ossification of governments in the west, how can they convince wage? Public to make that investment because it does cost a lot to hire train and then replace someone if they don't work out and unlike in the private sector. This is on the Public's dime. Not on a company's name. Let me last answer that question rather roundabout way, but I'll get i'll get to the point eventually. If you go back to the 1600 the center of the world. Oh really in terms of the quality of its government in terms of the vibrancy of its economy is probably China China has the largest city in the world Peking. It has the beige far the best civil service is recruiting and training people. It's recruiting people from right across the country through the world's most rigorous system written examinations. And at that time the Western Europe Europe it more generally, I mean is a bloodstone soaked Battlefield. It's an irrelevant see people are fighting each other off. Don't really have enough power to keep control of the country. So it's it's it's a mess then gradually over the years the West Begins to get out of this mess. First of all, it invents the nation states that happens really in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and that means establishing a monopoly of violence Monopoly of control over over the use of force, then in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it establishes the sort of liberal state in which people have rights and which is some sort of accountability of government so that to the people in the twentieth century, it establishes the welfare state. So this constant process process of innovation and invention of the state off of that time in China. The stage is ossifying you could take exactly if if you studied an examination book 1500 you could actually do perfectly well in an examination in New Jersey. 1800 you've got the same questions same confusion text being examined over and over again. So it looks ready. Of atrophy in the East and progress in the Mid-West and that continues to be the case right up and I think till the 1960s in the nineteen-sixties. You have the West Village, it's Heights, you know putting a man on the moon a launching the Great Society a great confidence about the power and role of the states and in China on the other hand, you have the cultural revolution your millions of people dying of starvation country. Be torn apart complete mess, then something begins to happen the the East starting with Singapore and then spreading later to China starts really taking the state's seriously investing in state capacity and the West Begins to ossified just as China ossified before him know there's no real Innovation. It's a grudging Thursday. The state state stays roughly the same as it has now what's really driving this lots of things are driving this one of the most important things is Talent is good people the first thing Thursday when you does when he tries to reinvent Singapore and take it, you know, make it a country fit for the 20th. And then the 21st century is to recruit really able people recruits the brightest people in the country. He pays them very, well. He gives them very challenging dogs jobs. He develops them in China begins to do the same thing, you know many things wrong with China. They have managed to recruit a lot of really top-class people many of them trade train actually an engineering into the state at the same time in the west. Very best people start freeing the soul Place partly because the rewards for working in the state and not very good in the sense of the private sector is paying much more but also because there's no Kudos in working for the state as a sort of culture that the song It doesn't really matter government doesn't matter government's the losers second races. So there's been a fight of talent towards the state in the East and a flight of talent away from the state of the West and I think that more than anything else explains why Eastern countries have done so much better than Western countries in in coping with covid-19 index of how good their government is and the most important thing to turn in the quality of government is the quality of the people going into it. Now your question. I've been very long-winded answer your questions about how you attract the right sort of people into government. So I think it's partly a matter of remuneration matter of pay what we have in the public sector is a ceiling on pair the talk so you can't really learn as much as you would if you went into a private sector company many companies many countries have a sort of principle that you can't and more than the president and can't and more than the Prime Minister wage. Um, so this is sitting at the top but also the bottom you actually have people quite well paid relative to their to their skills and abilities a lot of people better paid than they would be in the private sector certainly with better perks in terms of Pensions more solid pensions. So you have a squashed system of remuneration. You need the opposite of the squash deliberation, but also there's the question of the ethos of the public sectors. I say that the idea in the west is that this isn't really a great thing to be doing that you'd be better off the really the really successful people are going to the private sector. So we need to change the pay structure to make it much more flexible much more elongated, but we also need to have a new ethos but actually working for the public sector devoting yourself to the public good is a very honorable thing to do and that's something that we had in the 1960s. Yep. I remember JFK his inaugural address to the nation saying do not ask what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country or sort of public-spirited ethos. So to really important things for improving the quality in the in the public sector. I'm actually glad Adrian you brought up the example of the race to land a man on the moon because I think that example if we really look at the setup in both NASA as well as in the private companies, which they collaborated with you can see that there was pretty much an equal sharing of talent in the sense that NASA which is a government agency had very talented engineers and scientists in their own. Right and they were essentially same thing. We have some limitations in terms of resources as well as in terms of talent that we need to fill in and that's why we're going to partner with businesses to help fill that and in working in Partnership wage. We can actually accomplish this was exactly what they did. And at the time when people would say that they worked at Nasa there's a lot of these documentaries and movies that have demonstrated as how when someone would say that they were working at Nasa the public would just go. Wow, they'd be All Amazed and impressed by it. Whereas now unless you're a space Enthusiast someone saying they work at Nasa doesn't elicit that same sense of authors. And you know, when I look at how in Europe and North American countries when the coronavirus first hit our Shores very early on there was that kind of similar Partnerships existing between business and governments. For example here in Canada, a lot of the microbreweries pivoted in their production so that they went from making beer to actually following Health Canada guidelines on making hand sanitizer, which they would then hand out to various healthcare workers as well as two essential workers that were trying to keep the grocery stores open to ensure that they were limiting the spread. Of the virus and so you could see here was an ability where the government needed this resource and business stepped in and partnership and said here we can help Supply that and will work in conjunction to supply where you say it's needed. So do you think that this is something that we need to be encouraging and maybe government needs to be communicating that we want to look for people who are interested in not only improving the way government operates, but also in finding these kinds of opportunities where Partnerships can be created so we can not only address the covid-19 crisis, but also look at how we can regain that relevancy that you're speaking about that governments are now starting to realize they should have Absolutely. Well, what happened in this country was was very interesting in the sense that we started off with a lot of emphasis on partnership. The issue of the Brewers game was was obviously important here as well as in your country. We had the idea of getting ventilators made by the private sector and I think is a number of car companies stepped in there. But then that partnership sort of broke down didn't work very well after a while there was an initial surge of enthusiasm and then with a lot of barriers ring count and one of the reasons for this I think was that sections of the public saying sector were very monopolistic in their thinking about things. So there's something call organization called Public Health England wage, which insisted basically the old tests should be made in house. They wouldn't Buy in tests from their private sector or bring them in from universities. They wanted their own tests off. Their own way and this of course slowed down the supply of tests and it was a ridiculous sort of Monopoly. Also Public Health England later said they had to develop the apps. They wouldn't bring apps from Google or any private-sector organization. They needed it needed to be something invented and made by public sector England. So there is an element within the public sector that's very resistant to partnership and is very Monopoly minded. We need to pray that down. Of course we do because you know, a loss of the expertise that we're we're we're going to need particularly. In fact ology resides in the private sector now, it doesn't reside in the public sector. So there any way you can advance is through through Partnerships. So we need when we talking about partnership. We also have the problem with how well you can manage that partnership because obviously private sector organizations are profit-making entities. They will try and get the best deal possible. And unless you have people in the private in the public sector wage. Who are capable of managing those relationships and capable of striking a hard bargain? You can have public sex and money being in wasted and badly used. I'm also very glad you mentioned the issue of nass for two reasons one is that NASA was an elite organization within the public sector everybody took their hats off to it. Everybody was thrilled by NASA and what we've ten years to have is a sort of squeezing of quality in the in the public sector particularly in Britain and and and and the United States are sort of public sector egalitarianism. There aren't that many elements in the public sector leverage. Wow. There's a really great people. I really want like to be one of those, you know, that sort of elitism is now focused on the private sector and I'd like to have you know much more sense that the very brightest very best people will go into the public sector because the public sector is where his ask where they've got the best people so that sense of elitism that sense of belonging to a bath A very exclusive Club I think is is is is is very importance and the other reason I'm glad you mentioned NASA is that we have the right-hand man of our prime minister Boris Johnson is Michael Dominic Cummings and he is absolutely obsessed by NASA and he wants to have the ethos of NASA a sort of the Innovative elitist Spirit of NASA and his all also is now building a sort of a prime minister's office which has screens which is real time information, which has open-plan seating rather rather traditional teaching than has very much on a sort of NASA sort of model. So it's this is no fashionable again at the heart of British government, which they can rather interesting. And it's interesting that we're talking about technology here because that's actually something else. I wanted to discuss with you because it is another point you bring up for what this covid-19 wake-up call should elicit which is a greater an investment in technology by government whether that's in building high-speed internet networks the same way they build roads and highways to creating apps that allow citizens to conduct their business with different government agencies. And again there examples out there countries creating various digital measures to help them better manage their covid-19 response. I particularly like the one you write about in how in Shanghai each subway car has its own QR code that they use our scan when they enter the car. So if someone who was on that car test positive or covid-19 the government knows who to contact the self isolate and yet we see here in the west and you just mentioned it now a lot of pushback citing privacy concerns, for example again here in Canada government launched their own covid-19 app, they did independently of Google or any other of those high-tech companies to home. Five people if they've recently been in contact with someone who's now tested positive for covid-19 yet despite assurances from the Canadian government as well as privacy Advocates that there are no privacy issues from the the app hasn't gained wide adoption, and at the same time Facebook keeps getting caught collecting data that its users hadn't agreed to and yet people keep using their platform. So give or how companies are able to get consumers to buy in on giving up their data and exchange for some service or perceived benefit. What should governments be doing to get more participation in such an issue considering the numerous cited benefits from epidemiologists at doing this kind of tracing will help reduce the spread of this virus and consequently limit the economic and social Fallout that comes from having to put very same options in place. It's quite extraordinary that people are willing to to give up their Privacy Information Vital Information about themselves in order to look at pictures of fluffy dog. That's yes beautiful dogs. I'm a dog person on campus and but they're not willing to give up their information to save their own lives or more importantly to save the lives of other people. I think that we have to be willing to give up that data. I think that's the most important thing is preserving life and if preserving life means redrawing the boundaries at least, you know temporarily for between individual rights and Collective obligations, and I think we have to move towards Collective obligations young people are being selfish because it's not just about preserving their own life. It's about serving the lives of other people if you're a healthy young person you're not going to die from this thing. But if you're an older person you've got health problems, then you are going to worry about it. So I think that you need that the government needs to appeal to a sense sense of altruism, but also I think that we need to introduce the element of accountability in the sense that I thought. I'm willing to give up information about myself providing. I'm assured that the government is accountable for the use of that information that there is a proper oversight through the parliamentary system through figure asst and peas but also select committees commissions of inquiry which are constantly watching over the government's I think the government has to put more emphasis into setting up the right song structures of accountability and also to persuading people that the rather right sort of structures to accountability. So, you know informing them that their information will not be used by suspicious people that their information will only be used during the crisis. It won't be kept perpetually. So accountability I say is part of the answer appealing to people's better Natures in terms of altruism is is part of an answer but we can't get all the way because there is a sort of paranoia out there. I mean, I'm astonished by the number of people who say that they will not take a vaccine, you know twenty percent of the population in in in in wage. Western countries so they weren't went take a vaccine. There is a sort of distemper about government particularly about government in the United States where this is at its worst but also in Britain and I think one of the the overwhelming things we need to do is reclaim trust in government and I think possibly claiming trust in government means getting better governments are getting better people. I mean, this is a work of of a decade or or or of generation to restore trust in government, but until we've done that we are going to unfortunately have people terrified of giving their information to their Democratic elected Adrian you once again, give me the perfect segue to another topic. I want to discuss with you based off of your book and that is how this current Global pandemic is becoming yet another divisive issue in many Western countries where there's this split as you touched on between people who feel a moral and civic duty to protect their fellow citizens and wear masks to help limit job. Spread of this virus and those who seem to think wearing a mask is somehow infringing on their Liberties and typically these are people who believe this is all a hoax now. We hope will have a viable vaccine sooner than later and we'll have to see if enough people are going to be willing to take it. But even after we've developed a cure for this virus the fact is that this social division we're seeing any Western countries will still be present and will simply shift to another lightning rod issue in Canada. We've been sharing a phrase since the start of this pandemic. We're all in this together as a reminder that we all have to do our part to both protect our neighbors but to also help our health care workers who are putting their own well-being on the line taking care of those Who Fallen Gravely ill with the virus. So how long as we like to say my family do we hit the reset button so we can not only see once again enter country collaboration and not competition for resources like PB and vaccine access dead. But also more solidarity and unity amongst a country's general population as well. Great question. I think that in Britain what you saw the the start of wage and then it was a great outpouring of Civic solidarity, you know, people were banging pots and pans or cheering from the National Health Service. They were relatively quick to look down and willing to lock down. And obviously you said you have the slogan will All in This Together which of course is exactly right? So the majority of people at first were willing to wage civic responsibility above themselves, but patience is wearing thin and patience is wearing down I think and the number of people who believe very bizarre things and won't put on masks or believe that that there is an exaggeration that there isn't really And and they're very vigorous. They're very very shouty or on the Internet. And now they've even been joined. I believe today by Van Morrison who's just released a sing-song denouncing the wearing of of mosques. I think we just have to keep reasserting these fundamental things that that that that you as an individual a responsible for other individuals that if you get around with a mask, if you breathe in other people's faces, you are contributing to the spread of an airborne disease which can kill people who are older and who are vulnerable and the government has to keep banging the drum on this issue. Unfortunately particularly in the United States, but also in Britain, they're very very deep social and cultural divisions. You know, we've just had the breakfast Revolution and the war Over brexit America has perpetually at War now over over Trump and Trump like wage Used and I think you know those divisions are so deep. Now that it's going to be very very very hard for any government to get a fair hearing from Countryside. If it tries to do the right and responsible thing Adrian near the end of your book you actually detail list of things political leaders should do to not only better manage the covid-19 crisis but also set the stage for reinvigorating a government's role and influence. I know we've touched on a few and certainly we're seeing a number social issues gaining increasing prominence as you've just mentioned because those social cracks have turned into these unavoidable chasms, but seeing the direction that many countries are currently heading. What's that one critical measure you think government leaders need to get on top of if their country is to heed the wake-up call covid-19 has created. I think the most important thing for government is to be competent and one reason that people Skeptical about government is the government is quite often not been competent. If you look at the Germans and their reaction to Angela Merkel, they're basically trust and now because they were very fast Off the Mark. They've been very consistently doing sensible things in in Germany in Britain and the United States government's been all over the place. It said contradictory things. It's been slow on almost every front slow to lock down slow to tell people to wear masks loaded acquire and distribute PPE slow to do testing and tracing so government needs desperately is to learn from our mistakes in the first wave and be faster and be more more consistent, but unfortunately, it's burnt a lot of its capital by its slowness in the first place. One of the things that's most remarkable to me is the issue, you know, we talked about learning organizations is how slow Western governments in general were to learn from what was happening in the Far East, you know wage. So what was happening in China? We saw how devastating this disease was is we saw sensible ways of dealing with it. We saw countries that succeeded as as a South Korea Taiwan and eventually China did in managing the disease. We didn't imitate them. We didn't mandate or encourage the wearing a mask. We didn't close down airports. We didn't track and off late people. We just meandered along month-on-month upon month and that reveals. I think it extraordinary level of arrogance ignorance and introversion are on the part of western Gulf. I didn't think there was anything they could learn from from from the forests and they didn't really they weren't in learning mode. So I've become very worried about the capacity of government needs to adjust to a changing world, but centrally it needs to learn from its bowed its previous mistakes and and put competence of everything else. Adrian want to thank you for coming my show to discuss this admittedly in my sphere The Smokers around covid-19 tends to be on crisis management and how leaders are to quote a rock classic Riding the Storm Out of waiting for the thaw out. But the truth is we're all reliant on how our governments both regionally federally respond to this crisis of what measures will be necessary and whatnot and to both minimize the risk spreading impact of this pandemic on our communities in our businesses. And as we're seeing some government leaders like New Zealand's just into our turn are earning praise within their country and around the world how well they're leading their country through this Global pandemic While others are facing growing criticism for lacking a clear plan of action for not only how to combat covid-19 but to restart the economy, so I think as much as we need to be concerned about the impact covid-19 is having an organization. We also need to build on what you've just said have Clarity and understanding of the world we should want and expect our governments to play to ensure wage. Have the environment means to do the work we need to do and I really appreciate your helping the shine a light to help us move past the typical political lenses. We use to look at government to appreciate what changes we need to see to ensure. We not only beat this pandemic but do so in a way that protects our Democratic institutions and quality of life as well. Thank you for having me as I mentioned at the start of today's episode Adrian's book the way up call is the seventh book. He's co-written with the editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News John Michael with it's a very quick read on the subject. Which as I said at the start is without question on the minds of leaders page where and with good reason. In fact, I've given a few key notes in Europe and Canada recently that focused on the challenges and opportunities brought forth by covid-19. So if you've been enjoying the insights and thoughts as being shared here on my podcast and would be interested in having me share them with your employees by addressing the specific issues that are top-of-mind for you and your organization visit my website at Tavern a c ROM. Calm and fill out our contact form so we can start that discussion. And if you've been enjoying my leadership podcast, I'd appreciate it. If you could help support the show by helping to spread the word about this podcast. The easiest way to do this is to Simply share a link to my shows podcast page at Tavern to see here. Com slash alternatively. You can share a link to our show from the various podcast platforms people used to listen to podcasts. You can find us on iHeartRadio Spotify Deezer Pandora Apple podcast Stitcher radio Google podcasts and so many others and if you have been sharing my show with your network, I want to extend to you my heartfelt thanks and appreciation. And with that I'm Tavern to see here and you've been listening to leadership is Cafe.

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Theresa looks left: Brexit negotiations

The Economist: The Intelligence

24:02 min | 2 years ago

Theresa looks left: Brexit negotiations

"This economist podcast is brought to you by linked in jobs. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host. Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. This weekend marks a quarter century since the start of a mass slaughter in Rwanda ethnic tensions, set neighbors. Spouses, even children against one another our correspondent return to the country to see how it's moved on from the atrocity, and it's clear the drinking to excess is bad for your health. But a big study out yesterday shot down the idea that a daily drinker to help ward off heart problems and stroke, even moderate drinking comes with heightened risks. So how to achieve that carefree feeling without the dangers? A prominent scientist is on the case. First up though. After failing to find enough support from within her own conservative party for her Brexit deal. Theresa May has looked elsewhere. She's turned to an unlikely source for support the radical leftist leader of the opposition. Jeremy Corbett for months the pair have harangued each other in parliament. So doesn't that tell us that the prime minister has been rectus St. wasting time he opposes any deal. The government has negotiated with the European Union for the past two days. They've been in talks together. Trying to come to an agreement ahead of a deadline of April twelfth. Mrs Maes move was met with fury by hardline breaks tears in her own party, some of whom have resigned today she requested a further deadline extension until June thirtieth. Is being reported that the European Council may consider an extension as long as a year with the right for the UK to leave sooner. If an agreement is finalized beforehand, Brexit, tears, fear. The UK will remain trapped within the EU indefinitely or before st- to have a second referendum. So will Mrs Maes unlikely partnership with mister Corbin enable her at last to get a Brexit deal through. And who is the man she's negotiating with. Theresa May has turned Jeremy Corbyn at a desperation because the significant number of her own backbenchers in the conservative party round the bend Adrian Wooldridge rights. Badgered are call them about British politics. What she's done is quite extraordinary. This is a woman who is purely a creature of the conservative party. And Jeremy Corbyn is of course, the most left wing leader that labour party's ever had yet. Her own party has proved so intransigent on the issue of Brexit that she's had new choice, but to reach across the aisle and go with Jeremy Corbyn, he is more sensible insane. And centrists than about thirty members of our own backbenches. Is he sensible insane, centrist. No, he's not. He is the most left wing leader. The labor party has ever had. I'd like to say that he's among Cest, but that's not quite true. Because to be Marxist. You have to read the works of Karl Marx and understand the world's works. Call mocks. He's not done that. He's not an. Intellectual. He's not somebody who reads or thinks conceptually, but all of his instincts on the far left is somebody who would be a Marxist if he had more internet. So you you hesitate to call him a Marxist? But you released calling him extremely left leaning what what are his politics how how left wing is he well, his politics. Those of the is linked and left his a man who's obsessed with the evils of western imperialism and American imperialism his parents were both of the left they d- pro-soviet. And he was bought up essentially thinking capitalism was bad central planning and left in general was good. Then he drifted into London in the nineteen seventies. And he hung out really on the left wing fringes of his Lynton society. And by hanging out in those left wing circles. He became eventually connected with the labor party will lead the left of the labour party and became an Lynton MP. And when labor party was in power when Tony Blair to the labor party to via smashing. Electoral victories. He was thorn in his side and consistently supported more government spending more state action. These look like lost causes then something happened, which changed the whole dynamics of British politics. And that was the Iraq war, and they are wars enormously unpopular, and so having been an eccentric figure protesting with groups of ten fifteen people. He suddenly became a person who was protesting with nearly a million people in the streets every single person. Let's here today in the biggest ever political demonstration in the history of this country. This transformed is reputation and he's standing he became a person who called something. Right. And he keeps going back about how we call that. Right. And so writing high on on having cold that right is what sort of propelled him to the labor leadership? Well, that's one of two things that propelled him to the labor leadership. The second thing was the two thousand eight financial crisis. So the two thousand eight financial crisis blew up the idea that basically Blairite camera night economic policies have been fundamentally sensible, though, a lot of young people would disillusioned with Blairism disillusioned with berries, and because of the war primarily, but also because of the two thousand and eight crisis. So suddenly an eccentric figure become an an an aging. Figure becomes the Robin glorious saintly prophet of the future. He was elected in very odd. Circumstances have a two stage process whereby the MP's choose a number of people who then put to the membership. He was only put on the ballot to the membership in general by accident almost because a few motor labor MP's. It'd be able to have somebody from the left. Let's put all Jeremy on he'll go down to to to massive defeat and instead of going down to defeat because of this moves in the party of anger with the elites and anger with Blairism. He stormed to victory, and he is one everyone over to his side on the matter of Brexit. Well, the one problem for him is that Brexit is a very difficult subject for the labor party as well as for the conservative party because Brexit as somebody the devise the parties down the middle. So what Kuban has essentially done as to try to keep both sides together by being very ambiguous saying he's might be in favor of another. But he might not saying he wants to leave. But only. If we can get proper labor Brexit and things like that constantly fudging constantly being because the point is that that's a very very good position until you actually have to take decisions. And of course, as leader of the opposition. He hasn't attitude decisions now because Theresa May has reached out to him and asked him to help solve this Brexit problem as she should have done should have done that two years ago. But now she's finally done it. He will have to make decisions you'll have to come off off the fence, and that will win quite split the party, I think, but it will annoy quite a lot of people within the party and as for the negotiations themselves. How do you expect things might go? Well, I think then go she will go either moderately badly or very badly products is his an incredibly difficult issue is an intractable issues, we know, but partly because of the personalities of these two people in order for people to come together, they have to have a certain sympathy, and they have to have a certain flexibility of judgement. They have new sympathy with each other. They come from completely different worlds. And secondly. That people who are not given to compromise in a sense. What you need is sort of flexible glad-handing emotionally, warm politicians who can get into the room have a few beers have a few drinks and agreed to compromise. Everything's these are these rather rigid people who have nothing in common difficult formula. And so therefore no guesses as to how the flavor of Brexit may change when they when they leave the room. I think the flavor of Brexit is already changing dramatically, we're moving towards a much softer Brexit. The will probably have some sort of customs union, they might be able to to hash that out it because the the time is very short. They might be able get over their personal differences. But even if they don't it will go to the house of Commons, and the majority in the house of Commons are in favor of some sort of self Brexit. So unless we crash out by accident, we're not gonna have a hard Brexit. We not gonna crash of the EU we're going to leave a lot of people on the right of the conservative party extremely unhappy. And a group of. On the leave signs of the labor party. Extremely unhappy. Adrian, thanks for your time. Thank you. This weekend marks twenty five years since a horrifying frenzy of killing began in Rwanda in the tiny, impoverished, central African country. There had been tensions for more than a century between a powerful minority called the tuxedos and resentful majority the Hutus on April sixth nineteen ninety four the country's Hutu president was killed when his plane was shot down. What had long been tense snapped? Dawn the very next day genocide began and it began an absolutely ferocious systematic concerted MoMA starting in Kigali, which is the capital, but spreading very fast across the entire country. Thus giving the impression that it was undoubtedly preplanned Zan smiley is editor at large at the economist. He's been reporting in Rwanda. It was actually carried out in the moon by ordinary Hutus wielding cl-. Dubs. An machetes observers think that about three quarters of altered season Rwanda were killed within those three months. There were so many horrible things happen. And if people were considered to be a friends neighbors did did the most horrible thing constantly machine way. Now, an author was fourteen years old at the time. She's Tootsie she lost her father and several siblings in the slaughter last year. She spoke at a memorial held by the United Nations, she described fleeing with her family as the killing began we were into Bush's close to the river at that time. And we're hiding the killers were carrying machetes and clubs searching everywhere quoting us corporate cheese. Her family got separated. She was hiding in an attic when the killers came home in the evening, and it came outside and talking how many people are murdered and there were worrying themselves with beer entering king as she hid. She overheard that they had killed her father. Let dodge who taught their kids. My dad who was carrying every young person, you know, and in town and now they're word is to kill him. Because simply because he was to team constantly story is just one of hundreds of thousands, then the events in Rwanda herbs certainly seen as a genocide. Right. I think it is on Christian to be a genocide issue. Take the UN definition, which is an intention to destroy in whole or in part, a national ethnic, racial or religious group. And so how do the genocide end? So the main opposition to the Hutu extremists was a rebel army led by pool. Kagami as the genocide got into full swing in his horrendous way, the opposition army began to move south, and eventually they conquered ruined. And after. Three months of genocide, they stopped it quite simply by taking over the country. Pull Kagami didn't become technically president till two thousand but he was always the power behind the throne. He and his new regime led by Tutsis began to rebuild the country, and they've been rebuilding it ever since. But but how to rebuild how does it country get over a an atrocity on that scale? Well, I think the two main prongs the first one was that they imposed a retribution a Justice system by incarcerating. The worst of what they call the, Geno. See dare and at one end of the scale after year also an international tribunal was set up with UM support was very unsatisfactory and slow moving process. So from two thousand to the new government. Under polka, gummy sess up, a great big web of very traditional courts known as CIA and these courts took place under trees, and in courtyards, and so forth and consisted of somewhat rough and ready form of Justice. But I think most people I talked to reckon that it did the job in those a good million cases were settled in this court and many people were sentenced to sometimes hard labor or labor, and some were many thousands were sent to prison and thereafter, quite simply the two communities of had to rub long as best. They can together you've been back to Rwanda recently. Have you spoken to people involved in that process data? Do you get the sense that people feel some closure? I'm not sure one can actually use the word closure. But I think it's generally accepted that they have now got to sort of. Get on with living together. And there is a sort of basic contract, which pull ca government, the president has effected. And that is that. Although Anders very very tightly controlled politically quite repressive state. The has been a huge concentration on social and economic development. So there are a lot of quite impressive figures. Even if you if if you take them a little bit cautiously, I think the the upshot is that Rwanda has undoubtedly grin very fast. And the hope is that ethnic differences have been softened because base is everybody has clearly improved in terms of prosperity. And so in a sense, the these two ethnic groups, then are are at peace have have made a. Peace with each other and end now live side by side with with some level of comfort with at all. I think it's an exaggeration to say a level of comfort one simply cannot tell and both Rwandans and foreigners who've did the for long time. They will warn you against taking literally what the official line is. Which is that we have all more or less rhythm over the old ethnic tensions, and we own our consider ourselves Rwandans, not Hutus or two. It says it's very very hard to believe that. But at the same time one has to admit that has one of the experts I talked to described it, quote, no other countries a day has so many perpetrators of mass atrocities living in such close proximity to their victims families. And so does somehow remarkable that the two groups do live cheek by jowl? While at the same time, it is completely unacceptable either for foreign or in public discourse for weapons even to use the labels Hutu Tootsie, and you really have to sort of get into a slightly more kind of intimate situation where after a few beers, I found it was possible to talk frankly, Hutus toots, his, but on paper the claim is that they no longer see themselves as such I find that virtually impossible to believe. Then thank you very much for coming in. Thank you. This communist podcast is brought to you by linked jobs. If you're looking to hire for your small business linked jobs is the place to find them people come to Lincoln everyday to learn an advance their careers. So linked in understand what they're interested in. And looking for which means when you use linked in jobs to hire someone you're matches are based on so much more than a resume post job today at Lincoln dot com slash intelligence and get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's linked in dot com slash intelligence. Terms and conditions apply. As regular listeners will have gathered. I could be quite partial to cocktail. But the show's producers occasionally worry about my health. Jason how many segments about alcohol we done since Hannah? Hanoch ooms. One of our producers has challenged me to make something a little bit kinder on the liver. Coming up, a certain brand of distilled, non alcoholic, spirits and soda rice. Jeez. Quite refreshing. I mean, it's it's it's herbal. It's not a strong flavor. That's for sure you missing something. I knew I hate to admit it so early in the process, but yeah. For those who don't see the appeal in these kinds of non alcoholic drinks. British scientists David Nutt may have an answer. He's the director of the neuro psychopharmacology unit at Imperial College London. And a former drugs advisor to the British government recently, he told me about a synthetic alcohol replacement molecule he says he's developing it's called Elko cynth-. Said this. I don't turn to all. It's a compound which has been designed to replicate or mimic the good effects of alcohol. The desirable affects but to significantly reduce the negative ethics alcoholism, most popular drugs that in most western countries, but the enjoyment of oklaho- comes at a price and the price is liver disease, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, brain disease, stomach ulcers at censure alcohol is the most harmful drug in all western countries where it's worthy used and that's the tension. And if we can reduce the homes of two hundred drink, then I think most people would prefer that. It sounds frankly too. Good to be true. How how does that work on a sort of molecular level in works by targeting? The particular sub types of neurotransmitter receptors that give us the good effects of alcohol, but eliminating the many other receptor interactions alcohol produces and you. Reckon the stimulating of the less desirable ones, essentially lead to negative health effects. Yes. There to Aspen to this. The first is Oklahoma hall has affect on receptor systems in the brain, which can cause serious problems like for instance, death and all since won't do that. But the other issue with alcohol is it has to metabolize to substance called acid tala hydros tall height is an intrinsic toxin so funding substances which are not metabolize to acetone. How it means that you eliminate one of the major causes of harm from alcohol, and so you are presently in the business of trying to get this stuff to market your fundraising at the moment. That's correct. We have raised our secon funding and of putting together perspect- to switch should go onto the next month. Or so where we get the first trunch of investors, what about licensing regulations? And so on won't you face up hill battle will face the regulatory system where absolutely depend for that. That's why we need. Most of the vending the way it goes is this will be sold as drinks additive, go through the food standards. Testing procedures which are quite rigorous. It's a photo five year process of taking a new food stuff to the market. And if I'm not mistaken, you co own a wind barb yourself, or are you imagining that in the future it will be an Alko cynth- bar. The plan is to have both the planet to give people a little turn it to and at present. There is no alternatives. There is a third alternative in which you don't have anything oklaho- related at all most people don't want that. Ninety five percent of the population drink alcohol whole point of these to give people what they want, but give them a choice and give them something considerably less harmful. We know our Kahal if bad frus evidence seems to cumulate every day, that's the tasha loader the economists health policy editor. A paper in the Lancet has just reported that even low consumption is to give us any protection against Dr because some people had hoped but actually increase the risk of stroke. So aesthetic alcohol tons have one that does less. Physical harm to the body is really appealing idea as for whether it's the future drinking, though, I think the proof of the pudding will be very much in the eating or drinking as it were. We just simply don't know what the people are going to find it appealing enough to want to consume it regularly instead of alcohol, and we'll send you to it safe. Right. Do do you have concerns that these kinds of things might not be with any kind of synthetic food stuff. You do have to wonder what they're made of what the impact will be on the body. We've had artificial calories. Sweeteners more people have wondered whether people actually are putting more weight on we've had a synthetic substitute less stra the turned out to inhibit the absorption of some vitamins and also had some embarrassing side effects in the bathroom. And so if you're going to. Colossus something that synthetic you do have to wonder what impact is going to have. It may be the alcohol is just so bad view that replacing it with something that's synthetic is just better that's a bit. Like the e cigarette argument, you mentioned e cigarettes or any kind of lessons to be taken from how that has played out of how that's no widespread market. Yeah. The lesson is do take seriously the sort of effect that the product has on non target groups of uses. It may be that you stop producing synthetic alcohol thinking, this is going to be really great for people who drink lots of alcohol, but in actual fact, your Mark ends up being entirely different set of people say young people, and that has negative public health impacts. You just didn't predict I mean the end of the day. This is just a start up and abroad idea and someone who's looking for funding. But at the same time, this is coming from the various stablest figure who has been fighting against the ill developed a whole for years. Yeah. I think if this idea had come from anyone other than David not we wouldn't be here too. About it. But, you know, his background in science and in public health makes it very intriguing proposal. Thanks for your time. Thank you so much. That's all for this episode of the intelligence if you like us give us a rating point apple podcasts, and you can subscribe to the economist at economist dot com slash radio offer twelve issues for twelve dollars twelve pounds back here tomorrow.

labor party Rwanda labour party conservative party Brexit Theresa May European Union president Brexit Jason Palmer Jeremy Corbyn Adrian Wooldridge Jeremy Corbett David Nutt Mrs Maes Blairism UK editor Brexit UK
Tory story: Britains next prime minister

The Economist: The Intelligence

22:20 min | 2 years ago

Tory story: Britains next prime minister

"In economics, there's more than numbers, equations. It's about making the world a better place. I have this interest in changing the wall. That's why I decided to do it. You know mixer. Not something else. Meet Esther do flow and other women who are asking the questions that matter with women in economics, a UBS program in partnership with CPR the center for economic policy research, visit UBS dot com slash WI and join the conversation. Technology today has never been smarter but smart only matters when you put it to good use. Together, we can build a smarter future for all of us. Let's put smart to work. Find out how it IBM dot com slash smart. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host Jason Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events. Shaping your world. Psychedelic drugs are mostly known for opening the doors of perception during this swirling sixties. More recently, we've become a performance enhancing supplement for Silicon Valley types. But the drugs are also being investigated as effective treatment for depression, anxiety, and more, like, wow, man. First up, though. British Prime Minister Theresa may will officially step down as conservative party leader today. She announced her resignation two weeks ago after failing repeatedly to negotiate Britain's withdrawal from the European Union NP's piece of being unable to agree on a way to implement the UK's withdrawal. As a result, we will now not leave on time with the deal on the twenty ninth March. This delay is a matter of great personal regret for me. Brexit is a challenge that will be equally vaccine for her successor. Nevertheless, plenty of people would like a chance the leadership race officially starts on Monday and candidates have already started politicking, including environment secretary Michael gov. I believe that I'm ready to unite the conservative and Unionist Party ready to deliver Brexit and ready to lead this great country to resume will remain as caretaker, prime minister until the contest is decided by a series of votes over the next six weeks, or so not by the public, but by parliamentarians and conservative party members, the race kicks off against a backdrop of politics fractured by brings it in a bellwether by election in the city of Peterborough yesterday. The opposition labor party only narrowly beat the candidate fielded by the newly minted Brexit party. Led by the bombastic, Nigel, Farage hundred late times to resume told us, we believe in March the twenty ninth the reason I founded the Brexit potty is because we didn't the Tories are beset on all sides in the race to replace. Mrs may has been less than inspiring. The conservative leadership race has been an enormous disappointment. So far. This is the race to see who will replace to resume not just as the leader of the conservative in unions body, but his prime minister of the country, Adrian Wooldridge rights badge, it, our call him about bridge politics. It's being a thaws Ali because the number of people at one point it reached thirteen and it's a bit smaller than that now because they've changed the rules that you need to get aid nominees in order to come forward and be a candidate all of these candidates, offering to spend money on this, that, and the other to reduce taxes. One increasing spending, thus throwing away the conservative party's hard, earned reputation as the party and fiscal prudence that will say beating their chests, approve who will be the toughest on your. Europe. It's a panda fest and it brings to mind what happened the Republican party race when Donald Trump one too many candidates saying too many stupid things and ending up with the greatest bloviating of the more winning. So you say everyone's coming out of the woodwork, who's on the longlist. There are some serious names here. You have a former foreign secretary who's also longstanding health secretary, you have a former Brexit secretary, you have the current home secretary have the current environment secretary. A number of less well-known people who are nevertheless, quite interesting. So those two big afield, he does contained within it. Some serious people were you to pick three what three Japec I would say the three who most likely to end up on the short list Boris Johnson who by long way, is the favorite of the moment. He's got the most supporters. He's running a very good discipline campaign. And of course he has global name recognition. The second one is Michael gov that current environment secretary who is well liked within the party, a serious and substantial figure, and a big thinker and Jeremy hunt. Jeremy hunt was health secretary full six years, making him the longest serving health secretary in the history of the country, very, very difficult job, he did very well, I think and is currently the foreign secretary so he's the establishment candidate the safe pair of hands with a really stellar seavy. Any other candidates that we should make note of those are the most likely three but one more is worth considering if Boris Johnson is too. Weaken awfully for you. Go Dominic Robb who was very briefly the Brexit secretary. And he's sort of beating his chest as the purest of the pure, and he's even talked about perogie parliament, that's essentially dissolving parliaments until the moments when on October thirty first when Britain leaves the EU it's an extraordinary idea for a minority government, but there is a sort of sense on the right of the Tory party that nothing matters more than Brexit. You have to do anything imaginable to bring it to bash and he is going for that vote. And what about the other three, you mentioned, what, what are their what's their stance on Brexit? Well Boris is really going for the Brexit vote, and he says the Britain has to deliver breakfast and he's willing to contemplate leaving without a deal. He says that we can't possibly take that off the table. He doesn't want to leave without to deal, I think, but he thinks we have to pull out all the stops in order to get some sort of deal, and he's a bit of a magical thinking person say, Bora, says. What really matters is we have to believe in Brexit's. And as long as we believe, in it firmly enough strong enough something will come through in the border problem that can be dealt with and the disagreements, the that can be dealt with. So he sort of brushes aside, all the complexities. Michael go is. I think much more serious than care. He understands the danger of leaving that to deal. He's been environment secretary agriculture minister and the rest of it. So he understands just what will happen to us. Applies foods and basic products. And he's very, very worried about leaving Astratel. So he claims that we shouldn't make a fetish of leaving on the thirty first of up to, but we should be willing to extend that deadline, emission do everything we possibly can to avoid leaving without to deal. So he's become the voice of responsible Brexit, who says we must make a success of it, and making successive means not doing not doing really foolish things and strange enough having been the one of the original Brexit is he's getting a lot of support from remains all soft Brexit is within the party. And Mr. hunt. Well, Mr. hunt was originally, a remainder and his sort of overcompensated for the fact that he was remain by being a bit of a hard Brexit here, man. And he's settles things about we must be willing to contemplate, leaving without a deal and we mustn't give in to these Europeans. So he says that he, he say, rattles on the other hand tries to present himself as the competent managerial person he's been a very good manage. And he says, I'll go over and negotiate a better deal. And this is the way I'd go out the Goshi Asian Dale. So he's created rather schizophrenic image on the one hand, the buccaneering Brexit here on the one hundred responsible manager. And I think that is actually undermining his position a little bit. So those are the front runners, but another candidate that's been getting a lot of attention. Here is Rory Stewart. Why do you think that is he's aroused, an enormous amount of interest in one sense? He's not going to win. But in another sense he's raising very interesting questions. So there is something else going on other than just to selection process, and that is a sort of an attempt of the. Partner to find a compass and a map for for its future. Brexit is clearly the biggest problem that faces any of them. In fact, the cause of of Mrs Maes downfall. Do you think any of them has a real chance at succeeding at Brexit? If you like no. Simple as that ident-, because the problem with Brexit's is the any reasonable, manageable deal is worse than the status quo. And so that means that you're trying to sell something is worse than the current position, you can take appears position that you the have a managed deal worsen, the status quo, or you leave without a deal and set off into uncharted waters. But I didn't think any of them can it's very difficult to, to sell obsession. I happen to think that the best deal able is still Theresa May's deal. That's the one that did the most to reconcile the competing demands of economic prosperity with honoring the referendum, and that's a very difficult sell is a messy compromise. Do you have thoughts on on what all of this means in the in the much longer term, the sort of post Brexit world, for the for the Tory party? What I think is much longer term, actually, I think we could easily move into general election, quite quickly after this, because the conservative party is the minority party and that leading might not be able to command the ascent of the has of. Even the sense of the party. So if there's a vote of confidence in that leader, then the government will fool so that need the has to somehow assure the heart rise of the conservative party. They can deliver on Brexit, but also assured the left of the conservative budget. They went crash out without a deal that may prove to be impossible to do that's impossible to do. The Queen will have no choice but to say, well, that's resolve this general election. And so we could by the end of the year, have not just the new digital the conservative party, but the new prime minister from another party Adrian, thanks very much for coming in. Thank you for having me. To the brave candidates willing to face all that uncertainty spoke to my colleague and mckelway on this week's episode of the economist asks our interview show, Jeremy hunt. The foreign secretary weighed in on the prospect of leaving Europe without an exit deal. I didn't say no deal was political suicide. I said having a general election would be political suicide. And if your only way to deal with the parliament that is blocking. No deal was to have a general election. That would be political suicide. I've always believed that we should keep no deal on the table because I still do and I will say it might happen if you keep it on the table, what might be taken away by parliament. And that's what's already happened this year. That's why we have to be honest, about the parliamentary arithmetic that we face. And I've always said that, if the only way to deliver Brexit was leaving without to deal in that really was the only way to do it, then I would do that. But because I think in the end the deck. Democrats risk of not delivering Brexit is higher than the economic risk of no deal. But I would do it with a heavy heart because of the risks to businesses the risks to the union, and I would not do it if there was a chance of a good deal that could get through parliament and what I want to be is the prime minister who gets that good deal on the table and the international development secretary Rory Stewart has strong feelings about Boris Johnson. The former foreign secretary widely touted as front runner. Would you work with Boris Johnson if by chance he became the leader, would you be prepared to stay in the cabinet work alongside him to deliver the Brexit that you feel it? We need on certain tons. No. And it sat because I'm a cabinet minister. I love my job and deeply proud we sexual said, for international one, but I couldn't do it his policy is that he's going to try to negotiate with Brussels while Tober, and if he doesn't take NATO Brexit, I cannot possibly back that policy. It is dishonest. It is undeliverable, and it would be deeply damaging to people's trust in politics and to this country for lots more from both candidates. Listen to the latest episode of the economist asks. We live in a world. That's creating a enabled everything a world with more. I o t devices than people today. Technology has never been smarter. But smart only matters when you put it to work where it matters when we put smart to work, we can help save species increase crop yields and make progress, but not just for a few of us for all of us. So let's get to it. Let's put smart to work. Find out how at IBM dot com slash smart. Humans have used psychedelics such as magic mushrooms, for thousands of years, perhaps the sacred mushroom has given them a psychic insight but I can guarantee you, man. If you take psychedelic something will happen heaven or hell, but after the excesses and ensuing moral panics of the nineteen sixties. Trend has alarmed every responsible segment of the community. They were widely band. Recently. However, there's been a revival of interest in the drugs. Psychedelics have come into vogue with Silicon Valley types extolling the virtues of microdosing LSD to enhance performance at work legendary apple boss, Steve Jobs, described an acid trip as one of the most important experiences of his life. But more importantly, recent studies suggest that psychedelics could be used to treat conditions such as depression, anxiety, and a range of addictions, and magic mushrooms, which contain the active ingredient silence, I been are in the vanguard as attitudes are changing. So is the law, Oakland, California is just the latest American city to decriminalize magic, mushrooms, their effects are well known. People who take magic mushrooms tend to report that they've had a mystical experience of some haven't Duncan is our social policy editor something like feeling of one with the universe. I was experiencing so incredibly real living link between myself and the rest of the human organism or having a great revelation of some Voss truth. Brotherhood of man. I really believe it. And that makes everything full into place for them, though. They can't afterwards usually tell you what the truth might be. But how might silence, I'm in work on the brain to help those with illnesses, like depression? That's pretty speculative. At the moment, some research has been done with magnetic resonance, imaging basically taking photographs of what's going on in the brain. And that seemed to be two mechanisms at work. There's a think the default mode network, which if you think of what your brain is doing when you'll day-dreaming thinking about yourself thinking about the post planning for the future not engaged in a very specific task of the minute. That's the default mode network operating and it goes into overdrive with depressed, people who tend to close in on themselves and think, more and more about themselves and the default mode network is kind of switched off. It seems. By taking silence ibn. And at the same time, you get a lighting up of communications networks between other bits of the brain. So it's as though maybe new pathways of being forged within the brain. And then these kind of old patterns of thinking, overridden, I mean, one of talked to said, it's kind of, like rebooting you press control delete, and abuse or clear things up somewhat. The explanation resonates with the experiences reported by some of the patients who took. So as I've been in trials suicide been unlike any other drug available. It comes in from an angle like it's like a vector and suddenly, we're able to look in. No direction guide me, a viewpoint, a different perspective on, on how I was doing stuff and, and sorta grief as an also though is holding onto that was not helping me. So it's able to let go of that. There's one really interesting study, which shows that if you look at the brains of people who do long-term, meditational practice and those who've taken silence, I been similar things seem to be going on. So one of the scientists, I spoke to said, well, you may be that meditation is kind of a long hike per mansion and Silas, Saban is a helicopter ride the Tope. So there seems to have been a real push recently in terms of decriminalizing Sivan. Yeah. So Oakland just this week has decriminalized a range of psychedelic drugs, including magic my from set aside been Denver. Did that lost month? There are moves in Iowa, where state Senator has filed a Bill to do something similar, and Oregon is doing something slightly different. Whether it's a campaign together ballot to legalize the therapeutic use of satisfy been running for a long while. They're the idea of using Allison engines in a therapeutic way decriminalizing them would have been absolutely unthinkable. What what's behind this push for for silence Ivan quite giving on on drugs liberalization generally? So I think the whole wave of decriminalization and medical use of marijuana has opened people's minds to the idea of other drugs being seen in that way. Cashman another illegal drug just got licensed as Eskom in for use against depression. And then this, you know, this whole thing going on in Silicon Valley, the fashionableness of crew day, sing psychedelics to enhance your creativity. I think that has intrigued people a lot as well. But the big change really is that there's a lot of interesting research, gang on in labs around the world. You know, we're still very much at the stage of very small studies coming out in dribs, and drabs. One of the reasons for that actually, is that the drug is so hard to get hold off because governments have regarded it with much favors, so it's been quite difficult to get funding for this stuff. But some of these small trials showing quite promising results in reducing depression, and reducing anxiety in being quite effective in getting people to stop smoking, and stop drinking, and the FDA, America's food and drugs administration is intrigued enough by the studies that it seen. To give what they could break three status to a larger trial of satisfy been for treatment resistant, depression, and that means that they won't to quote expedite the trials of this drug. So if there is all of this therapeutic potential for, for drugs, like Simon than it makes you wonder why they were outlawed in the first place. Well, yes. I mean, there was a huge amount of research that went on into that therapeutic potential in the fifties and sixties, but all of the psychedelics just got washed away in the moral panic that followed Timothy Leary, who's the founder of the Harvard. Silence. I've been project. He's cool to America's youth to turn on tune in drop by of the responsibilities that parents had planned for them. So, you know, everything pretty much got banned in nineteen seventy and the research. We shut down at the same time will I mean there must have been at least a nugget of truth in the notion that they're dangerous drugs, right? Yeah. Messing with your mind is a dangerous thing. And these drugs, particularly do have very powerful effect on the brain and people who have had psychotic episodes, certainly shouldn't take them people with a familial history of schizophrenia, shouldn't take them. But you ain't die from taking too much of them. They didn't harm anyone except the person who's taking them on a shit. Jewel of the relative dangers of twenty legal and illegal mind altering drugs, British scientists put magic mushrooms, silo sobbing at the bottom. So with all that in mind. And on the basis of what you've learned in heard, how long, do you think until so? I've been licensed is a is a drug. You can just get you have to be reasonably cautious about these things in the sense that about half of depression related drugs fail at this stage. You know, if everything goes very smoothly four to five years, but there are some researchers who are worried the. That the decriminalization effort could backfire because these can be dangerous things that can be accidents there can be newspaper headlines, which could unleash another moral panic, which could cause backlash. Thanks very much for coming in. Thanks very much. That's all for this episode of the intelligence if you like us give us a rating on apple podcasts and you can subscribe to the economists at economists dot com slash radio offered twelve issues ritual dollars which will pounds see you back here on Monday.

secretary Brexit depression prime minister Brexit conservative party Brexit Jeremy hunt Boris Johnson secretary Michael gov. Brexit party IBM Theresa May Britain Rory Stewart Republican party Mrs Maes Europe Adrian Wooldridge
Chaos and calculation: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

23:18 min | 2 years ago

Chaos and calculation: Brexit

"This economist podcast is brought to you by linked in jobs. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host chasing Palmer every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. Yesterday, big pharmaceutical companies were grilled by Senate lawmakers about the exorbitant cost of many drugs, a partial solution to that problem would be repurposing using existing drugs in new ways, but the industry and governments have to get the incentives, right? And in Democratic Republic of Congo. It's extremely important that the dead are adequately mourned with days of crying and wailing that creates an odd market opportunity mourners for higher. But I. Stay. Prime minister. There would be chaos if the United Kingdom were to crash out of the European Union without a proper divorce deal, but after months of widespread worry about that, no deal Brexit. It seems to have been avoided for now. Anyway. Commissioned Mr Speaker, I would like to make statements on the government's work to secure withdrawal agreement that can command the support of this house the deadline to agree a deal with the EU is in just over a month. Prime Minister Theresa may has told parliamentarians that if they don't vote in favor of the agreement she's already negotiated. She will empower them to vote for a delay to Brexit. So the United Kingdom one only leave without a deal on the twenty ninth of March. If there is explicit consent in the house for that outcome. Avoiding no deal scenario is one of the few aspects of Brexit for which there is a strong parliamentary majority that is not the case for Mrs Maes own deal, which he's still pushing to get through what's happening in this country. At the moment is that the government is losing control of events power is slipping away from the prime minister, quite news with that power is going Adrian Wooldridge rights badges are column about British politics. He was in the house of Commons for MRs maith announcement. That morning. She came to the house of Commons straight away from a cabinet meeting. We should be a very tense cabinet meeting in which number of members of our cabinet confronted her and said, you must extend you must take new deal off the table mustn't be the case that will be allowed to crash out of the EU without a deal, and that has been part of our negotiating position. So taken off the table was a huge embarrassment and reduction of power so power slipping away from the prime minister. So where does this leave the timetable is we understand what happens next? Well, the return things going on in the Commons of the moments. I mean, the atmosphere is electric the atmosphere is is furthered people in an extreme state of high political frenzy tying the government's hands by seeking commandeer. The auto paper. She's rather discourteous. The prime minister is delivering a statement. It should be and colleagues. No, I'm just under strong, feelings comics from the record. Everybody will get things going on his business made his speech chaos on the one hand and calculation on the other hand people trying to say what does this really mean? And I could see the members of the European research group, the hardliners that all in little plump all discussing as she was speaking. What do we do about this? What does it mean? So everybody was trying to think what does it mean mean what does it mean what she promised was. There will be votes on March twelfth he will vote on Mrs Maes deal that failed last time by thirty. It's very difficult to turn it around on the thirteenth. There will be votes on whether to accept new deal that will almost certainly there is a majority in the house against new deal then on the fourteenth whether to apply for an extension to the needing. Brexit day March the twenty ninth I think that would come onto majority in the house. So what are the important things? That's happened. This week is that Britain is unlikely believing the European Union on Brexit. They March the twenty ninth. It'll be leaving two months perhaps after that whatever the the extension if it comes to that do not find ourselves in the same position again close to that date. Absolutely. We do and it does seem that we're gridlocked that the sides of roughly the same size. They can't get a majority. And so that's probably the case. Both leaders have lost control of their parties or losing control of their parties were fighting desperately to keep control of that party's against very powerful forces and Theresa May con- controller cabinet. She can't control the lower ranks of her government, and she can't control her party. And that's also being strangely mirrored on the labor side where Jeremy open is also suffering from internal rebellions of significant rebellions and is desperately trying to reassert control. But at the expense of making very big concessions. His critics. Amid all this the labor party dropped its own breaks at bombshell, Jeremy Corbyn. The labour leader has said if Labour's owned Brexit withdrawal plan is rejected a vote today. He'll threw his weight behind public vote a second referendum. Mr. Corbin is still smarting from the resignation of nine MP's last week. They left the party in frustration at his Brexit strategy and its failure to tackle anti semitism on the face of labor who switched position to be in support of a second referendum. But that would only happen after Mrs Maes deal passes in parliament and macelroy senior editor of the economist. And one of our chief breaks apologists is skeptical that Mr. corbin's announcement has much substance. Jeremy cool been moved his party position this week to woods a second referendum quite clearly his shadow. Brexit secretary said that remain would be on the ballot paper, which is the big question for a lot of people who want this. However, that's not a commitment that we've. Yet heard unambiguously from Jeremy Corbyn himself, so to your mind than what's materially changed. Should we consider this week as the week that the the prospects for a second referendum really changed? I think we should consider as the week when the labor party was no longer able to straddle the positions as Abe liaise. It had done here to four Jeremy Kuban doesn't really want to second referendum wants a general election. He said it over and over again, but he has conceded that the emotion in his party, particularly with this breakaway group in mind that they want hit words second referendum from him. So you could see things moving gently not direction. Unfortunately, he hasn't spelled out. Whether it's the second referendum that most people mean, which is the woman that says, oh, we going always staying does the outcome of all this does the outcome for Brexit matter beyond that or is this just damage control by party leaders. I think it's to party leaders discovering, the Hoed way that Brexit is a powerful fragmentation of what they considered to be their power base so labor you're finding a leader from the left of the party who was trying to build a big momentum as he calls his movement sweeping away. The conservative government is finding that he has difficulties to unite his party around the Brexit question on the conservative side. You have a prime minister who's doubled down on getting do with the EU and eventually getting herds Dobbin, really hard core. Eurosceptics own booed and finding that process much harder. That superglue is not sticking. It's not so sticky on the other side only the two leaders to very different muse same fundamental problem. And thanks for helping us try to make sense of it. At least I'm please keep having me back. This economy podcast is brought to you by linked in jobs. If you're looking to hire for your small business blinked in jobs is the place to find them people come to linked in everyday to learn and advance their careers. So linked in understands what they're interested in and looking for which means when you use linked in jumps to hire someone you're matches are based on so much more than a resume posted job today at linked in dot com slash intelligence and get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's linked in dot com slash intelligence. Last year, America's food and Drug administration approved fifty nine new drugs a record number. But as well as finding novel pharmaceuticals lot of scientists think there's another way to discover even more new treatments without designing a single new molecule, it's called drug repurposing repacked sing is when you take a medicine has an existing use in an existing disease and you find a new use for it. The tasha Luder is the economists health policy editor and one of the things that is exciting is when you take medicines that off patent and you find a brand new use for them, and you can provide a very cheap new medicine. The promise of cheap effective new uses for drugs has sparked hope among people seeking new cures for disease. I guess my interest started because my son had cancer. He had three cancers in his lifetime and for his loss kind. So he had a type of bunch him could enough states are kinda which didn't respond to standard therapies. That's pan pens yorker while carrying for his son, George he started looking for other forms of treatment and discovered there were scientists studying the use of non cancer drugs in cancer therapy. We not able to get any of those treatments for my son who passed away in twenty seven but following experience. I decided that was an area that that needed more work. And it was something I I put some energy into Mr. pens yorker now runs a nonprofit called the anti cancer fund devoted to finding new ways of using medicine. That's already out there. The scientists have already found some new uses for drugs. Nice famous is the drug thalidomide, which is now used these days in leprosy and in multiple myeloma, which is a blood cancer. But there are lots of others via grove famously was repurpose drug it came from working on Jonah. And then Johnson Johnson a developing a new drug, which is really based on ketamine, which is has been repurpose in treatment resistant, depression, and what's this sort of the the scope over the promise here is there is the notion that there's loads of diseases that could be handled by existing drugs. People you work in drug repurposing say that the scope is vast and are thousands of generic drugs which could have potential for treating other diseases. There's an anti counts of charity that says that they've identified more than two hundred and sixty non cancer drugs. The do have evidence faculty in cancer. So, you know, the scale of your paternity is quite large, and especially as we become more sophisticated in the way, we. You know, I dent by possible molecules of interest, so with artificial intelligence, I think we we shouldn't be surprised to find that the number of leads of good promising leads a much larger than our capacity is to to test them all so how does that actually work? If there are thousands of these drugs and thousands of maladies how does how does one of these drugs reveal itself as good for one of those illnesses. There are lots of ways of doing it one way as you can screen libraries of generic medicines to look molecules that look like they might be good at the particular target. You're looking for disease. Otherwise, really you can see in epidemiological data. You can sometimes see the effect of drugs. One example was it was an insurance database and Taiwan which found a sort of seventy six percent reduction in the risk of TB among the patients who had been taking a drug who metformin for the diabetes. And so those signals tell you that you're having. Biological impact. And all of these cases, whether you identify the molecule from some kind of screening or whether you identify it from of epidemiological data, you still need to kind of go on. And then do you know, essentially, a phase three randomized clinical trials sort of test? Whether that particular drug does have the effect that you suspect, but it does. So this also incredibly promising, but we haven't heard much about it. Why is that? Well, the big problem with generic drugs is essentially their financial funds those. No, no, no, no, no. I p no intellectual property. I e no money in it. Yes. And so if you're an investor, and you you want to invest in drug development, he wants something that you could protect basically. And that's what a patent allows you to do a lot of say, we'll I own this particular molecule, and when it gets approved, you can sell them all akilah make a lot of money. If you have a generic medicine. The problem is is anyone who discovers a new use for it doesn't have necessarily the exclusive right to say on anyone could make generic medicine. And so there are some challenges in the sort of financing of drug repurposing of generic drugs. Financial incentives aren't clear what could change about the system. So that basically what to happen happens? I think governments need to be a little bit more supportive of efforts to do repurposing. Generic drugs. I mean, if you think about you know, the complaints that governments have often about the prices of modern pharmaceuticals constantly complaining that too expensive in the pharmaceutical companies assigned while they're expensive to develop. And then if you look at the amount of money that is used to support repurposing of generic drugs. It just isn't that? I mean, governments are very happy to support drug development efforts with tax breaks and grants things like that. But you know, this sort of generic repurposing endeavors really serve a sort of afterthought not really supported to tool. So I mean, there's a number of things governments could do one of the things is they could offer grants to support generic drug repurposing. Another really interesting, I did some kind of social bond social investment bond, and the idea here is that the government or the public health service would would essentially reward drugs that was successfully. Repurpose to say, you know, say the NHL new k had hoped bunch of diseases that we really expensive to treat, and they might say to investors. Well, you if you get some new drugs new drugs approved in these indications will offer some kind of financial reward. And that would incentivize investors to actually put these drugs through their paces in trials and get them approved. So there's a couple of ideas. But this there are many ways governments can do incentivize drug development. It's just not in Janette republishing, and you have to sort of the question. Well, you know, if you want access to a wider, and broader and cheaper medical tool kit. How are you going to make this happen? When foam companies are saying, it costs them a couple of billion a pop to develop a new drug, and so governments really do have to look generic medicines and say, well, can we can we make more use of what we have. Thanks for your time. Thank you Jason. Sally crosscheck was a banking executive at Merrill, Lynch before she started her own women's investment platform at the economists investing impact summit earlier this month, she told VJ Viti Swaran, our US business editor how her mind changed about ethical investment. Investors. I, you know, if you had worked your way into my office when I was running Maryland Smith Barney and said, you know, I'm here to talk about social impact. I would've said your granola eater. Tree hugger. So I was all the way withhold Wall Street, but things changed over time, and I have become passionate about gender lens. Investing the power of diversity is so substantial that more diverse teams outperform smarter teams, by the way. I get it. I'm an analyst, right? Maybe it's causation correlation. Maybe it's coincidence. But it's a hell of a coincidence. There is research that shows that guys in by the way, I love middle-age white guys loved always I've been married to a couple of them. I think. Like these incredible. My husband is the whitest man, you will ever meet. He's practically transparent. So this is not about excluding any group. It's about including another. But there's research that men tend to show off each other in competitive situations. I think some of us can imagine that happening. And there's research that shows that there is a correlation between testosterone levels and poor risk-taking to hear more from his crow 'check download money talks, the economists business and finance podcasts. Available wherever you listen. So here in Goma in the Democratic Republic of Congo. I recently attended a job interview of an old lady. Deborah Livia Ackland reports from Congo for the economist she was sort of speaking very slowly into liberally in her hands clasped tightly together, and she was blinking too nervous. And halfway through the interview the interview, I said, okay. So now, we've arrived the practical pause and Deborah left the room and came back in crying. And through us on the grind. Something the grind and screaming wailing. Body was convulsing with solves, and and she sort of looked at the heavens and shouted patina. But t now, why did you leave us Bettino? Why did you leave your children behind? What what exactly was this job temporal was applying for a job as a paid Mona in the Democratic Republic of Congo? You have these groups of women who ton to funerals and cry over the corpse, and they're paid to do in the capital city and can chassar or do you quite a well-established business? It's not so well known in the east of the country, which is where I am in Goma. And so I met this entre Pernet. It was trying to bring the business to the east of the country, and he was recruiting women. So that he can stop a group of plumbers as cooled cries. He's hoping to have the monopoly on the market. Will why are people in the market for paid mourners in the first place? So these ostentatious shows of grief at somebody's funeral Erin. Portent and congre as comedy held belief that the person who's died can be watching you after they've died. Lending by more than she won the field missing bus season. So this is what Deborah told me that the deceased could watch the funeral like a film. They could watch the living like a film, and if they're not happy with an adequate display of grief, they could come back and cause problems for that living relatives. The other thing that Deborah told me was that the crying is infectious. And so if you'll a woman annual unable to cry because you're exhausted after all of the funeral preparations. It looked very bad. That's indicative, buddies. And people might even stop to think that your and some responsible for the person's death through which Croft or through black magic. And so part of the function of the paid mourners is to illicit his in the of the funeral. And so what was the reaction then to Deborah's wailing audition? It was actually quite moving the the female interviewer was hottest in her eyes. And which clearly Deborah done a good job. I was I was a little move myself. And so she got the job and says you got the job. Yes. And how do people end up in this profession, so people get into the morning business mostly for financial reasons? Deborah Austin, a job interview why she wants to do the job. She was quite honest and said that she was inspired by the money. And then she pointed she was wearing very colorful, wax stress, and she pointed to address and said anyone can afford to buy walks like this. Alexa, as a paid more on a daily basis, you might make thirty dollars a day or if you'll haunt for week. He would make about one hundred and fifty dollars a week. And that's a lot of money in a country where for example, a primary school paid average of one hundred fifty to two hundred dollars a month. So basically, the clients wealthy people mostly politicians and businessmen who can afford to have this kind of service dot ten women were week, you'd pay around one thousand five hundred dollars and the women would start crying from the moment. The body is taken out of the morgue until the end of the funeral body which could be a full week a full week of sobbing. And so do they get training and doing this? How do they manage to to keep the crying over the course of a whole week so dippers that you actually cry on rotation because it's quite tarring cry for the entire week? But she also says it's easy to cry as easy for the TIs to come. Because we're in a very poor country. I mean, seventy seven percent of the population survive on less than two dollars a day. The demand USC should it win. Dylan Christie too. She says, you know, your mind is always turning thinking wet, and I find money and that makes you sad. And it's easy to cry. And then the other thing to bear in mind that wear in Goma were in the east of the Congo, which is a part of the country, which has been ravaged by of raping militia for more than two decades. And so there's a lot of suffering a little of latent pain that's easy to tap into. Thank you for your time. Thank you very much. That's all for this episode of the intelligence, you can subscribe to the economist at economist dot com slash radio. Offer twelve shoes for twelve dollars twelve pounds. See back tomorrow.

Prime minister European Union Brexit Congo Mrs Maes Deborah Goma Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister Theresa United Kingdom United Kingdom Brexit Jeremy Adrian Wooldridge Palmer Mr. Corbin Mr Speaker Theresa May
Six years. Six guests. 300 episodes

How Do We Fix It?

29:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Six years. Six guests. 300 episodes

"Well here we are jim. We've made it to our three hundred weekly episode six long years together richard. While it's easy to congratulate ourselves for being among the few podcast to produce this many episodes i have to say. I'm most proud of our guests. Well it's not that hard to outshine us. Richard but really what are the lovely things about this whole experience has been that getting to know just a little bit all these fascinating people in here. They're interesting provocative and unusual ideas or how to make the world a better place. So this show. We're going to highlight just a few a very few moments from three hundred episodes. We're gonna look at six specific shows. Which means will be touching on exactly two percent of the episodes recorded. They had to make up their own mind. Do i continue living ally over. Do i believe the truth and turn my life around. Science happens but it happens in a context and if we keep isolating science people will look at things and not consider that. There's a response to whatever they work on everyone's responsibility to prevent harassment. So right away get out of this mold where there is a harasser victim. Now it's everybody's responsibility only with a healthy degree of respect for pluralism and multiculturalism. Can we hold together. Our show is about fixes. Yeah make the world a better place. How do we fix it. Fix it richard. You don't agree really on politics. I'm this wishy libertarian in your the the wobbly liberal yeah i call myself at but i'd like to think i bore cutting edge but we do agree on some principals jim i mean nuance. We liked that dogma. We don't we push back against cancel culture on the left and the right both of us. And i think we're we're positive and some would say we're too much so but we also agree that a lot of damage is being done right now by those who want anew unify the country splitting into separate identity groups. Yeah that's really one of the fundamental issues going on under society and it is just galloping ahead right now you know right from the start on this show. We welcome contrarians to the table. We tried to highlight viewpoints. That you might not be hearing from your regular news or opinion sources whether they're liberal conservative people whose ideas don't neatly fit into laughter right boxes. Okay so let's start with our very first guest philip k howard and he's a good example. One of america's leading thinkers on why government is not working as well as it should. Philip is the author of several books including the death of common sense. How law is suffocating. American he is a lawyer so he knows he's the founder of a group called common. Good a nonprofit that works to simplify government and cut red tape or as he likes to call it. Bureaucratic could sue this clip. That we're about to play from our second interview with philip in two thousand nineteen. I asked him. What's the worst problem in government. Today i think the worst problem is this kind of sits of alien nation that citizens have from government. People no longer feel. It's their government and that's why they are supporting extremist candidates from both sides. And i think that's due to the fact that really almost without our noticing kind of the growth of this of bureaucratic kudzu. Since the one thousand nine hundred sixties has made it impossible for people to make practical and fair choices in their daily lives. You mentioned the growth of the bureaucratic kudzu since the nineteen sixties. What's different now than say. Nineteen sixty five. When lyndon johnson was talking about the great society and medicare was born. Oh completely different. You know in nineteen sixty five. We didn't have thousand page rulebook. So we didn't have bureaucracy. We had a governing by larch by goals. The interstate highway system for example was authorized a twenty nine page statute in one thousand nine hundred fifty six and nine years later over twenty thousand miles had had been built today the statute would be the most recent statute was about five hundred pages long and it would be a decade before there any permits given we got this idea after the sixties that we could solve the problems of human fallibility by just telling everybody how to do everything. And that's where all the rule book came from. So why did this happen. A lot changed. I mean we woke up to the abuses of racism than pollution and gender. Discrimination lies about the vietnam war locking up disabled children in the horrible places like willowbrook and those are all very real problems. Those are real problems and they required changes in our social values and required new laws. That's all good but the experts at the time said not only. Do we want to change our values and so for example to prohibit discrimination but we also want to avoid any bad values in the future and so the they got this idea that we would start writing rules to tell people exactly how to do things but if fairness could be dictated like the protocols and assembly line so what you're advocating in try common sense and your other books as well as radical. Isn't it this is a big change yes in so what i'm arguing is that we can't actually repair the system that we built in the last fifty years and the reason we can't repair it is because it's been built up on a premise that guarantees failure in which is not to allow humans to use your commonsense. You know not to elect people user judgment and then be accountable for how they do so it needs to be replaced. This whole massive amazon amazon jungle of bureaucracy needs to be replaced by radically simpler structures. That give people jobs and give other people the jobs of holding them accountable and arguing with them. And that's argument is good for democracy. We've done a number of shows on making government work better you know. Even a squishy libertarian. Believes her certain things that only the government can do. We just want them to work right. One of the shows who did featured adrian wooldridge. Who says he wants to make government. Great again and dr vivian lee. Who spoke about some solutions for our tangled up a system next. Since our show started six years ago many more people have been taking to the streets on various issues. This includes the january sixth riot at the capital plus both peaceful and violent protests against the police and four black lives matter with so much. That's happened in the four years framed. By the trump administration. It's sometimes possible to forget. How explosive the metoo movement was right at the dawn of that period. You know we had the exposure of the crimes of harvey weinstein bill cosby later. We had the rearrest and apparent suicide of jeffrey epstein and the whole issue of sexual harassment in the workplace. That had been certainly known and talked about it. But still not really grappled with the way it needed to base that's a classic example of something that we look at it and say okay. We know there's a problem. What's the solution. Yeah in two thousand eighteen. We spoke with clare kane miller who writes about gender families and the future of work for the upshot at the new york times clare says nearly half of american women in the workforce say they've experienced at least one form of sexual harassment during their careers. It's especially happens when you start naming the behaviors if you ask women if they've experienced harassment about a quarter say us and then if you say have you experienced things and then you name specific behaviors that qualify as harassment that shared doubles to half of women. I mean this is the range of things from crude jokes that make for an uncomfortable workplace all the way to you know quid pro quo for sexual favors. Some of the things we've been hearing about with harvey weinstein and others so when we talk about sexual harassment in the workplace. Everyone has the same answer. We need more training. But some of the work that you've done you've looked into a wide range of investigations of this and said it's not so simple. The training that companies do is pretty bad. I think a lot of experience with it. It's either sitting in a lecture where people aren't really paying attention or click into a powerpoint to check a box that you did this for hr purposes. And you're not really paying attention. You're just clicking through. And the reason companies do this is because the legal requirement is not that they prevent harassment. The legal requirement is that they have anti harassment regulation. What are some examples of sexual harassment training workshops that don't work specifically the ones which are the most common either a lecture often. They talk about harassers and victims and one of the reasons they backfire is. Nobody really wants to consider themselves a harasser or a victor so when they speak in that language people either tune it out or makes very uncomfortable and so they go and make jokes afterwards. That's not very effective and another thing. Researchers have found is that by describing again this legal setup where a man is a perpetrator and a woman. Is this powerless victim. That it actually reinforces the stereotypical gender roles so employees have more entrenched views about these stereotypes of men being in control and women being powerless than they did before they enter the training which is obviously not helpful in terms of preventing harassment which is based on power. You recently wrote a column about the sexual harassment training programs that are used in corporate america. And how they often don't work very well but you also had a lot of suggestions for approaches that that do work at least work better. Can you walk us through a few lows. Sure the one that. I found the most interesting. Because it's been proven research on places where it's already been used as called bystander. Training an essentially it's everyone's responsibility to prevent harassment. So right away you get out of this mold where there's a harasser and a victim. Now it's everybody's responsibility and what that does is it really creates a culture where harassment can't even start and if it does start it's stopped and it sounded a little bit intimidating to me when i first heard like who is going to be brave enough to go into a conversation especially if it's a powerful man and stop it but that's really not what it's about it's much smaller things to wonder some of the kinds of things. Someone could say if they witness something like this happening in front of in their workplace. One thing they can say to break up the situation in the moment is i'm gonna grab coffee. Will you come with me or you could go and interrupt the victim and say you know what someone needs to in the conference room right now and you make that up. That's not true but what it does. Is it removes her from the situation. A very important thing later is to talk to the victim alone and say i heard what he said. And are you okay. And maybe the person is. If they're not then you can say something like i would be happy to walk to hr with you Because a lot of times victims just feel very alone. Another piece is talking to colleagues about it. A big part of building. A culture is making sure that this isn't secretive. So that means saying. I heard what he said earlier. Did you hear that. I thought that was completely inappropriate. Did you agree claire. Kane miller on what does and does not work as employers. Try to reduce sexual harassment. And you and i ever journalists so rather than give a laundry list of solutions or ways to make the world a better place. We ask questions because were natural skeptics absolutely. I think that's really one of the important roles of journalism that we're not seeing enough today one of the topics that is really important and where we really need to be asking more questions about climate change. We've done a few shows on. That looks very specific solutions. Things like carbon sequestration the next generation of nuclear power. And you're gonna see this focus continue in the coming year. Yeah coming next though science. One of your favorite topics. Jim and one of our first shows with micro on the skills gap this is. How do we fix it. I'm richard davies. And i'm jim megs and this is our three hundred episode. Thanks so much for being along for the ride. If you like what you hear here by all means subscribe on your favorite podcasting platform and rate us. Wherever you listen to podcasts. Those five star reviews really. Make a difference. We're back and richard. We've managed to get through the first half of the show without even mentioning cove. It i think hopefully in the future. We'll be able to do that more. But let's go back to the past and one of our very first shows on. How do we fix it with mike. Rowe who is famous for promoting the virtues and rewards of dirty jobs and we spoke to him in twenty fifteen about the big shortage in skilled labor for blue collar jobs. And it's true today. There simply aren't enough young workers being trained plumber machinist all kinds of of positions that require really skilled labor. But don't require a college degree. I asked mike. Do we need an attitude. Adjustment in america about how we define. What a good job is. I think you're exactly right. I think so much of what we talk about. In terms of a problem whether it's the skills gap or crumbling infrastructure or outsource manufacturing. All of these. Things are serious but i. I suspect that they're really symptoms of something. That's just a lot more broad-based than i think that thing is our relationship with work our definition of a good job. So you're saying we need a big cultural shift here and and actually you done something about that mike Tell us a little bit about the micro works foundation and how it operates in why you started it short version with lycra works. Is we simply want to encourage people to affirmatively explore jobs that actually exist so when you look at the two and a half three million jobs currently available right now and realize that bit less than twenty five percent require a four year degree you can start to see where people are talking. Asked one another so what we try to say. Look these opportunities real. There are a lot of big companies right now willing to train you. There are a lot of Programs that are available and so much more affordable so the kind of people that we aspired to award of go through will be called a work ethic scholarship program. And i know you guys know. There's there's scholarships based on academics. Their scholarships based on athleticism scholarships based on talent need. But nobody really focuses on work ethic and specifically looks for people who are willing to retool retrain and essentially relocate. Oh have we become fat and unhappy where we're we're lazy and were not willing to work as hard as we used to is. Is that actually a problem. Personally i think so. But i hate to lead with that only because a lecture is not gonna fix anything and the simple answer to your question is yeah yeah i think we have to think twice about what it is. Were most impressed with in the wide world of work. And if we're not blown away in twenty fifteen by the fact that the lights still come on when we flip the switch or the crap goes away when we flushed the toilet if if those things don't still strike us as miraculously then i think that's kind of where the problem starts micro and you know jim so much of our podcast has been about a sense of wonder for the things that do work. We did a recent episode on the grid with gretchen. Balki as micro says we all ought to still be amazed when the lights come on but of course we take it for granted until something comes along like a giant ice storm in texas that knocks the grid out and makes people really appreciate our power grid and how it still needs to be improved. Another show that we did that. I really enjoyed because it inspired. That sense of wonder was a recent episode with space writer. Eric berger about his new book about spacex and the early days at how elon. Musk has revolutionized the business of spaceflight. Yeah that was one of our favourite recent episodes and really did remind me of of how things have changed in space. But let's visit next on a different form of scientific topic with a niece ramirez. Who's the author of a terrific book on discovery called the alchemy of us. She's passionate about since technology engineering and math education stem. She's also great president. Follow on social media. If you want a little uplift somebody who's talking about something bigger than just the scandal of the day and this little expert is from episode. Two fifty five. We've done a couple of podcasts. On this issue of stem versus more of a liberal arts education. I'm a big advocate for seeing those things. Go together what's your take. My take is that we need both. And i think that one of those feels needs to stop and and extend their hand out to the other field if you go over to stem and you mentioned history. They're not interested because they like to do things certain way. And if you go over to history and say hey. We need to talk more about science. They're not interested because well they don't wanna they don't wanna seem. Secondary to stem. stem is kind of got. Its moment right now. I try and highlight both is equally as possible so that we can see how we need. Each other science happens but it happens in context and if we keep isolating science people will look at things and and not considered that. There's a response to whatever they work on and history without any sciences is is not as rich as it could be another point. That anissa made in that interview. Is that most. Inventions are not made by only one or two people but are possible because of the work of many of teams of people. That's also something we talked about with matt ridley who discussed how innovation works among the ideas we celebrate on. How do we fix. It is changing our minds. You do a lot of that jim. How he thinks a. I think some people would beg to differ. But maybe that's because. I don't have to change my mind because i'm usually right one of our most fascinating interviews in the first. Three hundred shows was with jerry. Taylor who is president and founder of the niskanen center Which is a leading. Think tag jerry. Who is a well known. Public intellectual describes himself today a radical moderate and he moved away from his more conservative leanings in his earlier years right. Jerry was a leading spokesperson for the idea of what somebody will call being a lukewarm miss. That is experts who acknowledged climate change is happening. But kind of downplayed say problems won't be that severe. Let's not overreact to it. And then he really went back and studied the science moore and realize he'd been wrong and once he admitted he'd been wrong on climate change. He went back and reevaluate at a lot of other ideas. So we asked him. What sort of ideas does he promote. Today we think that the main conflict points in american politics are completely artificial in bogus. So for instance on the right you see an embrace of free markets and they believe they're in a war with the left which wants more social insurance and welfare would it misses is that without social insurance and welfare. Free markets don't function very well and they certainly won't get much political support and likewise without a wealth-creating dynamic economy. You cannot pay the bills for the kind of social insurance and welfare programs. You want for people who can't compete well in that kind of dynamic economy And we find the same thing when it comes to the debate about social cohesion and Pluralism a lot of people on the right today are concerned about immigration. They're concerned about multiculturalism. Because i think the country is breaking apart too many different tribes which are increasingly uncomfortable. One another but the reality is society is so heterogeneous and there's so many different cultures that are that are as part of america and go back as far as you'd like that only with a healthy degree of respect for pluralism and multiculturalism. Can we hold together. That's jerry taylor. Which brings us to our final thought. And it's this show is really built to try to enable although we never done it with guests. Were disagreements are as severe as we're going to hear about in this next clip. The question is how do we talk to people with whom we strongly disagree or people who really even hate us in episode two fifty seven last year. We learned about dr davis who is a black. R&b musician who has spent the past thirty five years. Speaking with and sometimes even befriending white supremacists and his goal is to help convince them to leave the ku klux klan and similar groups. There have been over two hundred people who have we announce that ideology and left Those organizations or turn their lives. Or now i have robes and hoods nazi flags all kinds of stuff given to me by active members who were active when i met them and now they have they have. We announced that. I asked him. You know during the first interviews hoppy you. Hey you know you don't you don't even know me. All you see is the color of my skin if somebody just in front of you and tells you that you're a criminal that you lack and tell her germs richer lazy and preferred to be on welfare. Would you say that what that question is. This telling you is offensive. Absolutely but here's the difference and my offended absolutely not not because what the person is saying is true but i'm not offended because what the person's saying is a lie at the end when they renounced this the girl you know i was wrong. I i don't have any reason to hate you. You know because what's happening is we're having a conversation. They've never done that before. They've had debates or they've had clashes instead of i would disagree with them but instead of clashing with them i would listen because i'm there to learn. Everybody wants to be heard. I would let them get it all out and then i would. I would explain things to them from my perspective they would go home and they think you know what that black guy said was right but but he's black. He's black but he's right but he's glad so it was a cognitive dissonance thing going on they had to make up their own mind. Do i continue living ally over. Do i believe the truth and turn my life around. So that's why i say i planted the seed. I nourished it and they converted. Were convinced themselves that sterile davis Do hear more if you haven't listened to this episode already. He's a fascinating and brave man. It's episode two fifty seven. Daryl davis on. How do we fix it. Some final thoughts jim before we go final thoughts. Well i've got a lot. I mean you you do so much is so much has happened over the years we've been doing this show. I feel privileged to have been able to have kind of a front row seat to some of the most important discussions about our country and our society and where. It's going today with some of the smartest people i feel honored to be able to make a little contribution to those ideas as as we go along and especially there's something about podcasting scene where i really feel a special connection with the people we pat on on the show even if though we're only spending maybe forty minutes with them. I feel like we're getting to know these people and becoming if not friends exactly but colleagues in a way. That's different from what i just call someone on the phone interview them for an article. It's it's much more intimate. It's much more personal. I hope that comes across on the other end of these conversations because to me. That's what i really love about podcasting. Yeah it's less transactional as a medium. And also i think is the most informal medium out there partially because of the way people listen to podcasts. Which is usually on our own and very often with earbuds. And you know it's just that voice in your ear and the ideas are not distracted by video where sometimes you're looking at somebody and going. Hey a weird beard or you know. She's wearing a strange tress. And and it just distracts you from the ideas that are being discussed. It is also less of a force feeding kind of medium almost completely stopped watching cable news. I listened to a lot less even. Npr where i too often feel that. There's an agenda. That's not just a political agenda. But the format itself drives a certain kind of neat summing up and delivery of certain content without that much thought about what might the weaknesses be. What might the questions. But i feel like there's more room for use the word nuance before there's more room for open ended questions that maybe don't have clearcut answers and people's personal stories and i love being part of bringing those stories to the listeners. I'm just going to end with one. Final thought which is we never forget. The name of our podcast. How do we fix. It has a question mark at the end. And i think that as we've done more shows we've honored that question mark. Perhaps more than we did at the beginning. It's how do we fix it. i'm richard davies. And i'm jim mags and our producer is miranda schaefer. Thanks as always maranda for making this show sound surprisingly smooth despite the ragged beginning when we first go into the studio our listeners have often heard us thank miranda. they haven't heard much from maranda directly over these these episodes but her fingerprints are all over. How do we fix everything you hear. That sound smooth and good and well organized. That's probably miranda's concise and focused and skilled editing at work. She also gives us a lot of really useful advice and suggestions behind the scene. So we really. We shouldn't close out this issue without a special thank you to our producer ran shaffer and one more round of thank yous. Thank you for listening to this. Podcast is part of the democracy group.

harvey weinstein jim philip k howard richard adrian wooldridge dr vivian lee jeffrey epstein clare kane miller america Kane miller jim megs lyndon johnson larch mike Tell micro works foundation bill cosby Balki
89 - SAM BASHOR and DJ WOOLDRIDGE join us!

The Valleycast

1:10:55 hr | 1 year ago

89 - SAM BASHOR and DJ WOOLDRIDGE join us!

"They lost I just feel you like going to get hit by a car. The amount of pain I would experience wouldn't be over quickly and it would last a long time and ended up being machine entire family would decide all around me whether or not to let me the humane hooked up w appropriate Renna go basically any other way or spend the rest of my life with hiccups and also I got the stew on the stove nine seven minutes and I'm sitting here right Aggie. Ah It is it really only seven minutes long. Oh it well who did that. One those goes from Matt. Donald's Donald Mold Matt Don. I don't know where any of those it's from episode of your show. Did we kid oh. That's why you were not in 'cause I don't Watch Valley Allie folk and I was in the hospital for a month with my wife so I wasn't there for that. This user says if this is not the opening music for episode eighty eighty four of the valley cast. I will be shocked who cares if it's four times as long as normal. It's art dammit yeah. If if you could T- tweet at me I would love to collaborate on yeah. those car crashes yeah welcome to the valley cast. What an interesting episode to special guests. We have special the guests. Dj and Sam only stupid answers. It's US yeah what's up my kids. Were you know we just got back from fantastic did just get back just stepped doc the plane right into this room. We need to talk about our AIRBNB adventure do every year there is something new airbnb venture and we've consumer airbnb adventures in Austin together for fantastic fest but this one was quite interesting. Yeah it really kind of kept us up every single literally every single single now airbnb adventures aired after Chippendales Rescue Rangers School in the ninety s and it was about bees a lot longer than you think what eight season well there. was that season where they completely switched the language wasn't English anymore and that was pretty interesting that was a mandate it was considered ended a bold move but now looking back in hindsight a creative one that paid off in the end agreed agreed so guys welcome. This is your first first time well Sam. You've been on the valley cast before. Dj this is your first one. Yeah yeah welcome We'll have to get you on without this goofball. Sometimes we could get away I just did you just crap your pants Yep. You're doing all right man. That's taking a frog outside our AIRBNB that made the same journey I watched you do like the seven stages of regret while letting it out. I had to be careful. That's why it wasn't they come out as yourself segment quick back story if you're new to our existence and you weren't here in our previous lives we worked with Sam and DJ at source bed way back in the day. We're couple of old folks couple all of historical we got some history on our belts worked on some cool off our bill right with teaching too many keys many keys one of those ones you can stretch out sneaking up on anybody absolutely not but yes so salmon. Dj You guys have a podcast. MHM has three years. We've been doing only stupid answers yeah. It's a one stop shop for war KNICKKNACKS PATTY WAX movies. TV show comic book the Game News that kind of stuff and you got down way to go. That's good. We've been practicing yeah. We we've been doing that. We do movie reviews on Youtube. You can find might be awesome and a bunch of other stuff. We usually just talk about the the nerdy shit nothing important. I love you guys recorded some stuff while you were in Austin. Yeah we did reviews for all the movies able to see good and bad good and also also very special episode gun control Did you know that was fun. I would love up to at some point podcast. I don't want to deep dive into some of your thoughts on the movies but just get like some quick quips about some of the stuff that you saw we should at at least tell people what fantastic fest is for those of you that have not heard of this. It's a film festival. It's on its fifteenth year birth. Happy Birthday fifteen was a very important year for me. I don't know about you guys. The year I start growing hair downstairs and your mom told you to get that science experiment out of the kitchen and she said take it to the second floor which is why it back upstairs but yes sorry yeah yeah so fantastic fest film festival that would that happens at the Alamo Draft House in Austin Texas and and every year it's kind of a showcase of genre films like Sci Fi horror and drama animation and documentary and short form long form all sorts of cool shit and it's just a place where we have gone many times salmon. I've gone five times consecutively because we went for source way back in the day and then we just got addicted to it and we love it so much and we've seen such films as like the witch and arrival of all rose Halloween that was What's that movie the Strangler Strang I did. I thank thank thank thank thank thank you just used it to US awesome to New York and we stayed at Arizona Arizona. That's what it was going to. Arizona and I forced everyone everyone to watch it. I've never seen her. Elliott was like he was offended. Elliott left the room multiple times. I think you're the only one that stuck it out. Yeah it was fun. Bowman was there so of course Bowman Bowman. Seal of nothing is crazy fricken masterpiece of weird yeah and then like they do secret movies. He's like one year. The secret movie was spirit. Last year was the spirit of the new one and then before that it was was it overlord or was over overlord bigger. Just there the year before I never went to one and I know what it was. I was there it was was Shashank Redemption repertory screaming. They get to watch stolen. Okay there. You go installing but this year so this year we all went again when young and we had a nice little group of people and we saw Joe. Joe Rabbit was TYCO A TD's. Jealousy Jealous got to meet him. Oh Super Jealous he stuck around fantastic fast but in various states of me be should I have to assume he'd just off like an international national flight forty eight hours and he went straight there with a couple of drinks and he's he took shoes and jacket barefoot during the Cunanan was like the microphone was really making sense. Stephen Merchant was going like yeah right man it was like really strange and then he was there like the entire rest of the day just like walking around the draft house unlike smoking with people and out of clothing yeah exactly anyway but we saw Gioja rabbit ammon various other movies and then the secret screening this year was undone. DOLEMITE is my name. Dolemite Murphy a Netflix movie it's like a what do you call those Let's take on the exploitation yeah a biopic to for Rudy Ray Moore historian when it started up. It was like I get all. Here's the thing we were the whole time. You're at fantastic fest. You're trying to I guess with the secret. Screening is going to be and they do two of them up. Two of them's. They're fantastic. Fest is usually two weeks long at the draft house and we usually go for the first week as two weeks of movies leases insane. You usually see upwards to five movies a day. It's crazy and you could see more. That's exhausting really. Is You know we were a lot the times we're like. I'm so fucking exhausted and someone was like Oh yeah you tired from watching movies all day. You're sitting in a fucking dark room home in a comfortable seat where they're bringing you food the whole time alcohol and alcohol and you're and you're out of draft house of so it's like tons of delicious boone you're being in that like people sometimes underestimate why being engaged is tiring in the moment and paying attention and giving yourself in. You're all to one like a stimuli the movie or even a teacher in school like sitting there for eight hours a day. There's a reason you get tired until exhausted at at the end of the day and also we're trying to analyze it and try to come up with an opinion based thing. We're collection of work. We attended as press. Dj Salmon Myself and the the other people who were with us too and we had an obligation as press too because I was creating content. was there and you guys were creating content while you were there and we have an obligation to be able to you know Consi- in a concise way explain if the movie was good or bad and what we thought about it and all of that and you gotta be fucking completely you gotta take it all in and after watching like four four movies in one day. It's like holy. Shit that I even see that movie. What why don't even remember what I saw what your favorites because they're the ones that stick with you at total. Let me say this about Dolemite is my name is I as a and then as it went on. I was very pleasantly surprised. I enjoyed it quite a bit especially. Somebody WHO's trying to make their own stuff. It touched touched me well the thing the other thing too is like like what I was going to say before was is like the whole time you're trying to guess what the Secrets Secrets Green is going to be an everyone's saying rumors and some people uh-huh no but some people are like it sounds like a rumor and the first you know when you start to talk to people like what he has think the secret screening is like the word on the street was is that it was gonna be Doctor Sleep which is the the shining sequel which everyone's very excited about and then the next word on the street was maybe it's. DOLEMITE on Netflix and the next word on the street is maybe it's the what's the second one that came out the light the lighthouse the lighthouse and then someone decided to spread the rumor that it could be cats. US awesome on that one really took off. They made they made pin. Taylor Swift's cat characters has asked me about the secret screen and I I mean it's two and a half months out. There's no way the effects are close to being what they wanted to be. A Fun troll could be though you don't know the programmer came him out and he was like if you ask me about cats and going to scream I bet you ca- cats marketing team. They're like this. Let's get the conversation going. Let's go with it. Truly was like stoked. I was like fucking cats. That's the perfect fucking movie to show at fantastic fest like some battle cat tests Hassett tastic but so many people were like if it's cats. I'm fucking getting the fuck. Outta here like people were pissed off about the idea of it being cats but it wasn't Godsey was Dolan said he liked it basically any. I didn't see it because I was like I need to wake up at four. Am to be able to take get my six. AM flight so I had to go back to the AIRBNB but everyone who saw it said that it's really good and it's like Eddie Murphy being really funny again and and everyone was great and yeah if you guys have ever we tried to. I mean like you guys make you do that. You do that you do that. Maybe you guys do that. You Watch this this is it's just really inspiring seeing somebody who at a time where there was no room for him to ever make something like this put his all into it and be successful in his own right and that's cool test. It's a cool not too fantastic made his own path situation your I think your initial reaction is just based on the last like what twenty years of Eddie Murphy get why like here we go again no huge opinions on it and there's been some like star turning moments from him within all this stuff but it was a lot of like family mediocre. Koker films like cut and paste with Eddie Murphy for Awhile and people have been disappointed except for dreamgirls worry stepped out so I get the reaction then like I remember seeing the trailer and going this could be another. One of the good things going to be a turn and it's the same feeling I have right now for the uncut gems with Adam Sam yeah. Have you seen good time. No Sir Robert Pattinson is from the same director highly recommend. I gotta say one is that with the it's a bank robbery. It's it's amazing and that wasn't sure Amazon prime it was on Netflix for a little bit yeah streaming on Amazon prime but it's the same directors and it's just it's it's just a panic attack of a movie and it sounds like Adam Sandler looks next level yeah. I miss seeing dramatic Sandler. He killed it in Punchdrunk love. This is dramatic sandler but with like a really big sandler s character turn. It's it's not like subdued dramatic Sandler in punchdrunk. This is like that people people are saying Oscar Buzz and apparently I heard the description of his character. Stay whirlwind bad decisions every decision. He makes us the one it it. It looks really. I'm bummed that we have to wait for December. Co Star in it is Adele Disease Commission. Yeah please welcome. The wickedly Gidley talented one and only does the does does the does does the does the yeah yeah. We have a lot of fun with a lot of sounds sounds here Jesus Christ. It's loud plan that classic part of the classic quote. Oh Yeah do you guys remember Al.. Pretty well member of that quote. You say that you'd rather phrase. Where's the catch remember that you don't anyway to get back on track a little bit. Let's talk about just really quickly kind of like whatever movies at fantastic. Oh mytalk will you guys go first and then I'll okay vast the vast of nights coming to Amazon prime and it's a sci-fi twilight zone esque adventure between a two teenagers in the nineteen fifties hearing a signal over the radio and trying to figure out what it is it's great and it goes full twilight zone with that Joe Jo- Rabbit. You guys know what it is. I really enjoyed it and I think I throw dolemite in there because of how much of a surprise it was cool for me. That's a tough one I might say Dolemite Jelica to which was this Indian in landlocked Jaaz described which bear unfair comparison but basically in the in the small Indian village a buffalo gets loose and just starts wreaking havoc which is bad but what's worse is that every man in the village decides. They're going to be the one that gets it. So by the end of the movie you've got hundreds of sky's roaming the village wreaking havoc trying to kill his buffalo. I think the the person there's like eighty different characters in the movie. There's four that are actual actors and the director had like eighty people to be like okay now do this then. There's there's a scene at the end. It probably wasn't done with C. G. And it's like how just human bodies flowing Africa you like a lot of it is like 'cause I saw it to a lot of it is like you can't tell l. what CG and what's not and the bowl like havoc is like really well done yeah and the effects are pretty amazing and I I say this one and the next one mostly because they're movies that I didn't have like huge standouts but mostly these are movies that I would not have been able to see any place else. My last one was but boy which which is almost impossible to describe if you haven't seen it so yeah what was the what was the inciting exam he he's he's like a prostate exam and then discovers the ability that he he just starts putting stuff up as but he likes to to put the Tartus actually one hundred percent one hundred percent because there's like in the first ten minutes easily like it starts with bar soap and then he like looks at a dog and then the dogs guard and then and then he looks like a serious tone Oh yeah and then and then he's a baby in the park and then suddenly the to the cops trying to find the baby and everything and if flash forwards fascist Ford nine to five years. It's a little cutout card says nine years but the time is a little dubious and a cop ends up trying to five figure out. What's going to solve these disappearance like David fincher movie. The bill like the lives like a scene like there's like a scene from heat where they're in a diner together there and like no one knows anything yet but like you can tell this cop is somehow related to what happened like all those years ago when things started disappearing and it becomes like a manhunt manhunt to find this guy and he finds at crime scenes he finds a little like Dingle Bayer. He's he's. You know it's amazing. It's so well done right left and I watched a movie about a guy who showed up and I was so angry with my friends. I'm not upset when I saw it just angry at the premise and how well they'd get it. It's funny because my favorite scene in the movie is hasn't typical like the chiefs like. Are you telling me that this is what's happening but because of the premise you're one hundred percent with the chief like he just lays out. You're telling me this guy. Sponsor is shoving stuff up and they jesting them inside. The cops like well. I don't know about about the digestion situation but I do think it's making some sort of sci-fi or magic element there sure. How is he putting things in there a after they came out after he's like to see it. I want to see a really bad. Suspension will find you debriefs fantastic all of us to is that there's like a there's a ton of movies like that where you're just like. I don't know what I'm getting into. I see a synopsis and I go. I hope I get it and then I go see it. Can you read it and you're like okay. I saw that three my three were definitely Gioja Rabbit and then I saw this documentary called you don't Know Me and O. M. I. A and it's a documentary like crazy amazing hilarious deep dive into showgirls the movie Shogo. I saw something about that. Yes yeah so good because it's just like the person is just like I know it's the worst movie ever made but it's also the greatest movie ever made and I'm GonNa tell you why and it's just like this crazy really funny analysis of like every scene and how Elizabeth Berkeley's characters just like complete she just flies off the handle at any moment for no reason and they just just like a super cut of her freaking out at people and like it's just this really funny shit and they also had a brown rice and vegetables eating contest before the movie movie because in the movie they keep mentioning that because they're strippers they're only diet is brown rice and vegetables and it's just this weird thing they keep bringing up up in the movie and it's just it's Paul Villanova and so it's like fucking bonkers and not really about what it's supposed to be about right but but yeah it was great. I loved it and then my third favourite. It was deer skin which the first hour of yeah flights or miss the rest yeah. It's the Guy Quinton do do pugh do peo- oh or depot or something rector of of rubber tele kinetic killer tire yeah. This one's crazy because it's basically about this guy hi who buys a deer skin jacket and then realizes that his dream is to be the only person in the world with a jacket so he sets off to kill Hill everyone and take their jackets so weird so that he can have the only Japan world fucking so funny and it's so fucking weird and it's just like really amazing. Shit okay the one we missed. I'm really bummed about because he got a crazy history. After it was released way back in the sixties was V. I think as VFW they'll VFW Jerry I found footage movie ever made wanted himself and he w was that post-apocalyptic movie okay so it's a different one but there's somebody else made this very. I found footage. Movie tried to release it. Studios didn't know what it was and the only real zee half of it burnt down in a fire late year somewhere in the sixties and but at a certain point someone found a vhs the originals are gone just a VHS exists and and somebody online took it cut off the credits on the front end and they uploaded as will basically the movies about a F- a family birthday party and then they'll get abducted by aliens but it got cool loaded. Reading people like this is a real a real artifacts. It circled for decades real evidence of an alien of actual deduction. That was filmed yeah. Yeah that's fantastic fast so real quick because two of Sam's choices were streaming movies. How About Yours Dome. I was one the other two. I know Steve New years where Joe Joe's coming out to theater so you'll see that soon. I have no idea but it's an interesting commentary on just don't now in the current state though right like some some of the best movies you saw aren't going to be theatrical releases and stuff you saw we're. GonNa see digital. Fantastic is like it's kind of a grab bag of whether you see them. If you see something when you really like whether you'll ever see it again because a lot of these movies don't have distribution yet google and so they're looking for distribution. They might not find me. Hope people talk about life life hoping to your skin out some pretty sure I wanNA see the rest of it of socially rubbers such a cult hit assure will see speaking of that actually mentioned him on podcast. I went on goosing Eddie's podcasts and I mentioned my all time favorite movie as fantastic fest and the person who owns the distribution rights to that movie reached out to me and we're gonNA keeps me updated. Whenever it comes to Erica I can't buy it. It's called three football and soul. It's Fan. That's the one I was just talking about yeah so it's and it won't ever come here but the person emailed me and was like hey. It's going to be at a film festival in San Francisco. If you want to go see it. I don't want to go all the way up there to watch a movie but like watch one movie back we felt the same way about Anna in the apocalypse which so fantastic fest like a couple years ago last year or something and that was one of those movies where it was like. Oh Fuck. I love it the music so good. It's really good. I WanNa see it again and then you're like I. I don't know if it ever ever came out and it is out now. Primate thing yeah I went to Acuna with the whole crew and task at the arclight and they were great have you guys haven't seen an on the apocalypse that's on Amazon prime. Um You should check it out highly recommend but to your point like did you see Balata Buster scruggs the Coen brothers most recent mom some of it. It went straight to net flicks and they were like yeah. We don't even really bother talking about because nobody would want to make it and stuff like like dolemite that you should just be a movie yeah. You're an and so now what movies that were just used to just be able go see theaters. Go I mean God bless net flicks industry platforms for investing in these meetings but it's it's a bummer that they just don't get. They're not just movies that are out on the day that net flicks wakes up and does the thing where it's not gonna take as many creative and swings 'cause it will eventually get there but right now. They're like this bastion of like people can go there with their crazy. Ideas funding and it's awesome. The hope is that it isn't the fear that you have in that. They just go to stream and they they missed that experience. In the theaters. The hope is that net flicks and it sounds like they already already are an Amazon will sometimes take some of their best hitter. Make them theatrical and they've done it. They did it with the Manchester Right. Actually I really liked the way Amazon does it because I know net flicks looks gets crap because they want day and date feeder and at the same time Amazon will usually drop movie in theaters like six to eight months prior to coming to get for him and so that allows pretty lengthy. fear runs for their stuff. I know that the breaking bad movie El Camino is going to be an limited run in the hitters. WanNa see them at the same time Alex Yeah I know I was talking about it and I was like should we go see this and he was like I'd rather be able to like be in my underwear and have a joint and just like uh-huh depending on the theater probably be just one P. We went to and comes to mind. Go at a certain time at night. Maybe like two weeks in Suze at twelve. I went to it too and it was in like the biggest theatre. AMC But was eleven pm and I was like on Tuesday and I'm never going to get to see this because my kids can't go when my wife doesn't want to and I went there. I was in the theater by myself watching it chap. I don't know if I'd like that self scary in in the in the midday movie leg matinee showing painless for your ticket. I mean yeah yeah yeah totally totally yeah so anyway. That's fantastic fest. It's really cool. It's it's there's just you know year. After year you just discover some kind of new director or new genre or new movie v. The you never thought you'd ever be able to see things that could happen in an AIRBNB that you wouldn't expect yeah yeah talked about that. We stayed in this really cool airbnb. that was little off the beaten path but still fairly close to the theaters bars called a Hilton quite understand what an Airbnb it it was like this a and B unit that was like a how like duplex yes and and the a unit salmon. Dj Stayed in and the B unit me and my a friend Josie and briefs these squad the B squad and so one night I like I like I didn't have as crazy of his experiences. Dj and Sam did but one night just kind of in the middle of the night you could hear some kind of like sound up in the ceiling and I was just like Maybe it's a nightmare Mary something back to bed and then the next morning i get to the theater. We all get to the theater and we're all talking about the movie. We're GONNA see and stuff and then Sam is like missing. I was like ah going after them. No it was just like hey did anybody here that weird sound in the ceiling and Sam yet. It kept me up all night yeah no it. It scared the shit out of me I got we got back the second night we were there. I was UPLOADING I. I'm doing a new show now called one more time. ooh. Plug it baby. It's a podcast youtube. Youtube showed us one more time than search may get so I was uploading episodes for that and I started hearing little scratches and it started to kind of like run run around upstairs moonlight with some weight on it. I'm like it's it's probably just Iran watching like fucked up movies and a lot all of them are horror movies and some of them are like trippy psychological weird like mental drain yeah like Japanese man living in the attic a a day and so it doesn't help but that was your experience. What was your so so the it was like three in the morning I want to say this is ninety two you I was out in the hall and say it was like either something the ceiling and so we go we go into space and there's one of those little crawlspace stores but it's one one of those like you know. It's so tight that you're GONNA be right. There and we both look. There's no no whatever whatever's up there. I don't need to be that close to it and so it was on his side and then at about six in the morning. I hear like the IT sounded like it was trying to pry up would like wanted wanted wanted in and and I heard it on my hunger yeah yeah and it was just one of those like so pitch black out and it's just like what do i. How do I and it just that was the way it was the next two nights you just every once in a while but no definitely gotten a fight with something else sitting around at one point and you know those when you go to sleep you're You're dreaming but you can fully here and feel everything in the room. In this dream state I heard something on the ceiling fall onto the bed and calling the covers offers but I had like a little bit of sleep process so I couldn't move what I swung my arm. Nothing was in the room when I go to sleep for like an hour after that. You had the best experience the royal. Oh Yeah Oh yeah Oh yeah so the plus is beating artery my room at blackout curtain like Pitch Pitch Black in my room I didn't have I didn't have blackout curtains but it was it was been diesel from pitch black high but it was weird because I haven't experienced this visit like my grandparents or whatever where it's just like woods behind the house which always feels weird once you've lived in a city for awhile always there's a little weird but there was one night where if I heard stuff crashing crashing around five bathroom and then there was stuff I could tell it was like you in the in the adjacent bathroom or in the ceiling or maybe I'm just losing it because I'm always sleep but I heard something new event. An event was facing the bed so it turned the flashlight on my phone towards the van and heard it skittered away so then I went to the vet and I adjust it so the vent the vent event blades were like facing and then are the last day she's when we went to when we woke up dead dead roaches by like every window and the bunch of my cables have little little chew marks. We're we're done. That was sorry I wonder set. The tone was spooky music awhile. Yeah No. It's still scary last year we had people walk into our AIRBNB and the year before that are airbnb that guy gun victim from it yeah well. We were given a a bad airbnb like we were put into a bad airbnb situation because they weren't allowed actually used their place as an Airbnb so so we got fully kicked out of your money back yeah but but you know it was like it was one of those things where it was like we had to go find somewhere else at the last minute minute pain in the ass but something else about this situation was I ended up hitting up the AIRBNB person and say I hit them up because like I didn't like that. Sam Wasn't sleeping that night. That made me feel really bad so I was like I'm ended up motherfucker and see what's going on so I hit up the guy and I was like hey so so motherfucker cause me up it was like is everything okay because having a good time and do you need anything did you. Did you meet my son yet yeah but no he. I hit them up and I was like listen. There's something in the ceiling. It sounds like like between the like in a crawlspace or something. It just sounds like something's crawling around up up there and it's like I don't know if it's cause for concern but I'm letting you know and then he hit him. You visit back. Is it happening during the day or night and I was like it's happening at night and then he didn't answer that was it. He just like that. Was it because you broke the curse. What if it is do he's on at night and he looked up and went my God and then he got yeah. It was no good. It's creepy it could have been this is just like flips the sheets in the morning there the first night when I was hearing it. I've kind of tired of it. So I took a coat hanger. I started banging on the ceiling and it didn't faze whatever it was at all aw just kept moving as if nothing in China like scare it a little bit. I was trying to see if maybe I could combine tack and cockroaches and just above you as well. It sounded like it was definitely like it could have been rats. Bats was idea those photo but I think we would have heard more squeaking or flipping. Yes they definitely sounded like it was like to visit possum mammal mammals abroa- maybe squirrel squirrel might have been a bear bear you you know. I don't know if it could have been an hour and he goes. Oh Bird but that's Austin man could up in the Austin the go-to anyway so that's that that was their story from Austin. Hey guys welcome to the ad portion of the show. It's time for for some ads all right. We'll get back to the show in just a second but first we're GONNA talk about stitch fix. Describe your look in one word casual sophisticated playful. What's Your Steve. I guess so it'd be let mine is a couple of words. I call it figuring it out. However you dress stitch fix as the expert personal stylists that can help you look your best. Personal style is like a fingerprint everybody. Everyone has their own. Whatever your style the experts at ditch picks are ready to help you express yourself. 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Sometimes my favorite question nor answer that I got from Jackson when I was like what do you WanNa be for Halloween this year. He said a washing machine well. You are going to make that kids. Dreams Dreams come true to do it and now he'll never wanna do it again. Oh man being washing machine would be sweet. Maybe the quality costume yeah. You should be washing machine. well guys is now that you're an adult. Halloween feels less Halloween. He didn't it well. This is bringing back that child like joy of picking out the perfect costume with their spooky prints Princeton Halloween costume onesies. That's right costumes onesies. That's what they're doing here at at me. UNDIES now are going to be the most comfortable costumes. Dude Dude this morning. 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Dot Com Slash Valley Cast Code Valley cast for seventy five dollars off candid handed. Co Dot Com what valley cast ballots cast the Code Valley cack-handed Co dot com slash valley cast. Thank you to candidate. Thank you Oliver sponsors to thank you sponsors and now back to the show to the show. Tell us more about what you guys are working on right now. Let's talk about that so for only answers we do weekly movie reviews rebel to go to press screenings because they people finally got back to our email initially press for you pretty fun and we do weekly reviews for like the newest movies and and try to keep you informed on what's good bad and in between and also we do like a TV show reviews as well for like of the Superhero style. Let's the the bad and the ugly for for movies and TV shows right now like what's your favorite thing. You've seen lately not fantastic fast yeah something like more. That's in in the Zeitgeist but yeah like what's your favorite. TV show movie thing and what's the least favorite thing I'll be out I mean we do some reviews for the DC universe apps where you gotta pay like seven to eight bucks a month and get those. titans was pretty rough for the first season for me. That was not Super Fun. You stuck with it. We stuck with it because then we got doom patrol and doom patrol. Oh was fantastic. That's good that was a wonderful exploration of what it means to be a person and finding your identity great honors in on yes she uh-huh yeah. She's the one of the best episodes to share. That's cool she plays a great role and also just righteous gemstones is really going so. Elliott's been freaking out over. It's insane. I went on a friend of ours Whitney van. Landing Ham fund named to say hard for me to say even leaning Dean she does like cartoon reviews and I checked out Steven Universe and I just finished it because God that is such an inspiring show and I wish I watched it when I was a kid because it really helps you understand who you are loving yourself and figuring out when to let go and also what relationships can and it's like really deep stuff. I hope kids are watching that. Oh yeah what it means to be you and when you get to be with somebody else with that can feel like for you good and bad and how you can maybe work through some of those struggles. It's so oh cool and beautiful music too saying yeah so if you want more of the pins of stuff like that you can check out our podcast only super answers you want those titans reviews that's on Youtube at had only stupid answers as well and then for a normal movie reviews. We're doing stuff that might be awesome and more explainers and stuff like that. I know for me. I've been watching a behind but I've been watching the terror the show the terror. Oh Yeah so it was supposed to be a like a limited series and then a successful so now it's an anthology so now there's a second season here is very good for the first season which is one. I'm watching now is based off a horse historical fiction book that elaborates on these two ships the HMS Arabists in terror that were supposed to find a trade route through the Arctic circle like just to China and it surprising go oh great the the the real history Spanish off the face of the earth. They didn't find the ships until like twenty fourteen so this not on this story was like seventy years exploding blew my dumpling. Bring the store. The fiction part is is the story imagining what happened during that time and the supernatural element but like a lot of these the real terror is what people do when they're intense. Jewish `isolation what s elation didn't understand so this is like eighteen forty they had supplies for three years like there is people people are like yeah. We're not going to go looking for them for three years when they run out of supplies at and just the idea of like the mid eighteen hundreds. You're supposed to be on a boat for three years and it's like have refrigerators raiders. They don't have what Trysofi like what warmth where they are at the yeah yeah so late now and it just blew my mind that these people were just you just bring blooming the Arctic for three years and like all over the help help it works out and it didn't because what happens in the show and I don't know if this is similar to what happened in real life is there's there's a there's a moment and Jerod hairs in the show and he plays a similar role that he did not bullying dynamite. Finally you back drama. He plays a similar role that he plays into novel where he's. The Guy don't do this and everybody's like fuck you and then anything goes to shit and they get stuck in an ice drift for a year two years do winters. They're just stuck in the ice and have to wait for the fall and and I just watched a scene where they're like. Everybody stoked because the sun's finally gonNA show up again and because of where they're at it peaks up and then goes right back down. T's and you're like this. This is a night yet. This is a nightmare depression like fold darkness and endless cold. Yeah I literally couldn't imagine like like maybe you know if you look back. In that time I could possibly see myself doing the wagon train out to the West. Maybe I mean even that's. That's like dude. I'm staying in this fucking town until fifteen years have a lot of choices more reckless but just the the idea of just. I think it's similar to what we would have with space travel. Now is just going to literally the most hostile environment of what's out there. Yeah no thank you and that's what it's always been that just like the ultimate that sounds like event horizon meets the thing meets fricking the shining like yeah just horrible ships. It's Great Yeah Yeah. Go ship that one scene waving anyone ever remembers about ghost ship. I know it's getting a show now but I think event horizons hasn't underrated really scary. Yeah it is fucked. I had friends in college. It wouldn't watch it like I saw that back in the day and I can't disturbing graphics graphics dated but like the the overall premises. It gets a little hokey. It's hell on a spaceship lovecraft to have hell on on my spaceship. Thank you know not looking for that. Pass on that teleportation became a thing but they're like one out of one thousand you end up in Hell just like just like we can't say is one out of a thousand people or one out of a thousand times actually. GonNa big group and like one person. Oh Jim Jim's in hell. You'll never be the same but there's a one in one one thousand chance that you're GONNA end up in hell slimmer than you'd want. I don't know if I'd try it. What I think I I think we would because we'll probably be fine. Yes there's enough people out there that don't like to think about the truth of percentages way back from. Hell if you make the ship popped out eventually like it and it was it was fine any shows that you think you wish we're better had had some hype and not very good but I wish I wish ad Astra was better. I'm here in bad thing. Oh so visually it's great but you know like the first it similarly. The first release of Blade runner had that narration through the this has that through it feels more kind of but also like stuff. It's just like doc. Am I my dad or my my anger and then he just stares at a wall for a little bit. You're like I don't treat you like you're eighty. You might want to catch it when it streaming because because there aren't a whole shootout on the moon that's really cool. It takes like big sci-fi stuff and grounds them into a more reasonable instead of like big space battles. You're just literally trying to for Cross. The moon and other people are starting to shoot at you and it's cool because I've seen stuff like that but the voice over is that's the Brad Pitt thing we've been Super Lebanon dark are crystal. It's like our favorite right now. I keep trying to know it's going to be great so good. I was thinking behind the scenes via fax thing and it looked incredible. It's just just like you know. It's it's the all the artistry that goes into it. They like they really expanded upon Jim Henson's creative vision in in a way that I never thought they could if they were. GonNa make a new dark crystal thing but it does what I wish they do more often where they have the poppet say this this was a whole big chase sequence and so they have the puppets and then they green unscreened stuff around. I think it was. I wish we'd do that more like in um where the wild things are movie was a big practical monster but then the facial expressions were the allegation had like CG help yeah yeah and I think that's the act my wife. Just give me a call me a sap tax. Update us when you come back Yeah I love it. I think you should see you should see when you get a chance trying to start it and then like the first like five minutes are like there are three stars yeah thrown seven people we don't know the the last one but these have wings and it starts getting explaining everything and I'm like just be patient because we stick with their eight hours of TV like rates ten ten hours because it's ten ten episodes so like I I will understand. What's happening. Dumps a lot on you 'cause. I've never seen dark crystal. I know enough of what it is. I should just watch it though because it sounds like to see Dr Kristall Staw to know because it's like a pretty good just jump right into the benefits not having seen Dr Crystal because because I think sometimes prequels. It's like you kind of know what's going to happen. I mean totally the shows shows are key. The the the projects are a little different right because like the dark crystal is this really dramatic art piece just like totally very slow and it's very slow burn and it's like more like a like almost good nature documentary in a way that has a story around it and I loved and appreciated for what it was because I grew up with that shit but for a lot of people watching the Cristal series you might get tricked into watching the dark crystal movie and hoping it has the same kind of like action action and and kind of like forward motion momentum but it Kinda doesn't know and and I really you know 'cause I mean someone like Elliott Elliott and Grace Gray said that they were watching it and they don't really watch things and watch movies and watch. TV shows really they just kind of like whatever they're they're not into it like. Elliott's not very much of a movie nerd or anything like like that but he was watching it and he was like it's like it's like game of thrones but with like puppets essentially and I was like yeah. That's a good way to describe it and he's like man. I guess maybe I should see Dr Crystal Crystal now. The movie and I was like maybe for everybody I mean if you can see if you can if you want to appreciate a time capsule of some weird like super like risky art piece that Japan's import his heart and soul into and just thought maybe people would like it and they didn't really at first but it became a cult hit thankfully but it was just this. It's just this big sent showpiece of puppets artistry because then labyrinth kind of right yeah yeah yeah at first yeah because yeah because because now they're below everyone scene yeah. I know I'm bad but everyone seen labyrinth. Have you seem car carnival row or whatever no you haven't seen the I have you seen it. No I want. I don't know what to think yet. It looks cool. It's a Oh cool concept. Orlando's bones are so is stage in my life. Wherever whenever shows like Oh people are a prejudice against Cara Delevingne. I'm like no. I think she's great no but I'm talking about within the university because she has wing. No that's still a crazy whoa you're not come on. Come on Yeah yeah and you do see that I've been wanting righteous gemstones and I've also been watching Oh the good place this season. That's that just popped up on on Natalie yeah three. I'm like about halfway into three GERMY JEREMY'S AMIS in season three right so you met him yet when you get to him starting really soon right. It started already know the twenty next week. Snap one lasted chose to end it with four. Oh you know what you know what show doesn't work thrown on the bus and I do like a lot of aspects of the show and did not live up is legion. Just GonNa Share Shit. I don't WanNa hear that yes season. One very fucking loved it so good. I have not seen any more. I can't wait season. Two is he's great right up until a twist at the last minute in the last episode that season three does not know what to do with oh no because at the end of season two it said at the end. Oh No we got what we do. Now is reduced PERSA fien then then. FX was like screw you giving you another one yeah and it's it's got. It's got a lot of cool ideas. There's these tiny creatures that are amazing. It's it's visually incredible but it too has to bend over backwards to accommodate this twist and throttle characterization of stuff of previous season that it doesn't yeah it's it's tough. It's tough stuff. Basically League David is supposed to be somewhat of a villain and they're like okay. How do we get there. They come up with a thing thing for him to the happens that he does and you're like that lights out that last slice of pizza. I don't think I can't over this last slice the pizza for somebody else and then there's different kids and then there's somebody else who we've established early on also stole slice of pizza but for some reason we're okay hey with her doing it but not David doing it and then the main bad guy like actually I was trying to help the whole time. You're like timeout. That doesn't like what would it was a bummer. There's still a lot to like about. The show like the cast is great in a lot of interesting ideas. It just doesn't it. Just kind of fell fell apart at the end which is a disappointment. That's bomber Yeah Joe. Is Everything Okay Yeah. Everything's good. Everything's not great but everything's fine. She saw the last episode of leading. She's like she was very Ah. Twist doesn't make sense daughters got this coach It's a new coach. Bert team that she's on and last year was very regimented like almost like militaristic schedule Joie. You knew you were going to be where you were and if you weren't yours potential to lose you're spot on the team like you're you're used to that. Coach is not like that. New Coach has now canceled missile practices last minute like she supposed to go to practice right when school ends so bell rings practice. We know she's going to be there for two hours. Last three practices canceled canceled at the last minute. Families plan around this stuff and it's a it's a frigging nightmare. That's what we're doing with this chair. Uncle Competitive Tuck competitive cheer. I would like to know your opinion or you like is it. Is it like hey you need to either instrument sport something. You need to sign up for something. I I want her to to engage in his much extra curricular as possible into that but also not forcing her letting her know it's important but she's kind of doing it on her own so that's really right now. We're in the I want to make sure she has arts in her life. somehow in any way shape or form she used to do show acquire and then she stepped away from that show just didn't like it anymore and I was like well. What are you going to do for art and I'm like I'm not gonNA. Force you to do anything so it's important that if you do music and stuff like that that helps with your schooling and makes you a better at math and a bunch of other things and instead she used like I just WanNa learn a foreign language so she like she's lava jumped into Spanish honors classes and that's really cool to teach me so she's yes she's. I'm not having to worry about that with her. Cheer Soccer Girl Scouts still like she cool. She's Pretty Rathcoole. She's well rounded enough that it's a problem for my schedule she probably have. I guess my never reminds you. Get the big book of Cassettes and put them in the nineties like overshadow. She's a one hundred percent now south identifies by stranger things and nothing else Ligo. She loves it. She loves eighties music now Cluele. It's she is on board to the point of. I hard for me to even understand how much she loves it. They still sent you those cassette like if you signed up they still send you cassette now right this very putting so you have to get like an adapter for your computer. Put a cassette tape in there so now. I want to play something with you. Guys called would you rather and we do it sometimes at the end of this episode and basically what I do is I go to our slash. Would you rather on read it and then we just have some fun with some of these. Would you rather Elliott refuses to play all the time yeah. I don't know why he hates it so much coach but he's he's a corruption. I hate him but but yeah so. Let's play some of these. how about that that that uh I see okay. Where's the cat. Where's the cat. You don't do the red at fifty fifty no. I don't know if that exists anymore. I don't think exists is sending more. I think you might be unhealthy are yeah okay so guys. Let's let's let's present this. Would you rather would you rather only be able to walk everywhere but never feel fatigued or teleport anywhere instantly instantly but feel justice fatigued as if you'd walked the same distance walking one hundred percent. I like walk in places I like being able to. I met somebody at fantastic fest. he works for the Boston Underground Film Festival and he talked about living in the city and be able to walk every night. I it because I agree with you but I can also choose to walk if I WANNA walk but you don't have to teleport yeah. It sounds like it's a choice yeah. You don't have to teleport okay. I'm GonNa take the teleportation I'd rather do. You'd have to be very careful with where you teleport sure. You could tell someone that could kill you. If you wake up dead. What if that's how I want to go in China right now. Don't you just start drowning. You teleport and you just like like you just like It's like at the end of last crusade when he drinks from the wrong cup and morally after five teleport's you just have these gigantic. Antic like quad just keeps changing. It's a new you don't need to work out now. You just you just tell us for no I would just go to sleep. I would just try to time it out of like okay. Hey Ben. I'm just going to go to sleep sleeps. Does it take to get a nap in Nevada my in my like physically worn out or my ah fatigue associated with walking that distance so whatever that would be for you probably want surprise of teleporting passing they get their. Everybody knows this guy. He just teleported okay. How about this one. Wherever you answer Oh I guess it'd take the walk walk. Walk in one yeah because television is cool but even teleporting like let's say like I wanna go to Disneyland teleport to Disneyland. I'd be like to fucking tired to do anything that I mean again. I could get a hotel room or something you just playing around with the with the walking. Now you get to walk over Disneyland tired all right could walk to Disneyland and be like I got like twelve hours to how long it would take to get to walk Disneyland start at midnight and then there and then the riots and then you walked back in being fatigued at all. That's pretty cool. I mean. I wonder if that does that discount for like normal fatigue like in a twenty four hour day your do you have to go to sleep at some point. This never know I guess it would feel the same amount of you probably still have a normal sleep schedule yeah. That's not as advantageous as you might think well. I mean 'cause you stay up for twenty four hours. You'RE GONNA start hallucinating and Shit but you could do like a four hour. Walk and be like I need to get somewhere. I'm it's GONNA walk for four the answer. okay so here's another one. Would you rather discover the cure for cancer but you won't have any credit or profit for for it or get fifteen million dollars right now cancer cancer right you have to yeah. You want cancer cancer gone. You don't want fifteen million fifteen million dollars would solve all of your problems may be and and help your family and future families cause more problems uh-huh but that's the thing it's like. It's a selfish thing I would just give people cancer without walks okay. Would you rather trim your front lawn and back lawn with only toenail clippers like God or paint a fence with a toothpick with the paint pallet one block away way is just fucked up. This is a lose lose yeah. They both stuck and one has more walking. Would you rather those have more walking with telephoto walk fatigue. Those are hell. Both of those are hell spaceship with hell. The only one it you could do is the clipper one because you at least you're in one place and paints going to dry on the toothpick. What about this one. Would you rather shit fingernails or cry hair hair. Yeah Oh strings the whole strand isn't he doesn't know when you get like hair when we just gotTa pull it out and it's got that weird foreign feeling about this think about this hair in the eye comfortable maybe at least at least learn learn fingernails at least that is designed to move to be a passageway for instance are all curves edges on gotTA. Get stuck everywhere. Get stuck contacts in my eyes. My eyes are not nerve endings anymore. How about this. Would you rather have an orgasm. Every time you see Shrek or sing all star out loud every time you have an orgasm all-star super easy already know the words body it was. You'd be like the whole I'm thinking. Shrek Shrek well. How do you fucking shrimp all all the time honestly the amount of times that I see Shrek an orgasm during for that amount of times be a welcome thing. Here's the thing it doesn't sound like that's the only the only way you can order. Just unfortunately happens all the time the thing with an orgasm it is that you know you got your what five to six seconds of elation and that's just just the somebody once told me line. You're going to be sitting there in your mess four minutes okay unable to someone running away from you. Let me introduce you to the world of discrete pampers. Talk Okay this one. Would you rather hammers all star. Would you rather live ten years but everything you say is made reality or live of a regular lifetime but the only people you are allowed to talk to is your direct family. Verse is for you. Live live ten more years you you you live for ten years yes but but everything you say is made reality that everything is is tricky monkey pox yeah yeah right right so you could just say like. I wish whatever and then it'll just happen so I mean if that's the case you rigged the system and you go. I want this this this this everything you've ever wanted and then at the end of it you ago and also. I don't want this power anymore. Genie wishing for more genes. Manhattan hacked the system. Did I do it. I think if anything you say comes to be we ain't no rules that you can't change the rule. I wish I was immortal. They go oh shit. What about that was set up to allow that though that's the question okay you make a clone body that appears at the ten year mark in your brain transfers into it with the power see? You know what that's that's a question of people treat the clone as if it's you but it's not not you know put my brand also yet to be careful about what you're talking about because we're we're saying it with the qualifier that were saying. I wish but really you might go Steve. You suck yeah and just start suck. I thought that's the way I feel like that's the way it's free everything yeah. It is yeah that's a nightmare and you're a piece of shit. Oh Fuck fucking. Oh everything ah okay last one. Would you rather have a perfect memory of your past picture-perfect photographic detail L. or to see one minute into your future like forever. He could always look a minute into your future minute into the future. I can so clumsy if I can a start avoiding. I've stub my toes so much that I'm scared to get an X ray. I don't WANNA I don't Wanna I'd rather have the one minute you could also be like like. Oh Shit. I'm in a dangerous situation. Take a look here. Okay okay. I'm say I wonder if that means like in a in the theory of relativity if you can change your path in future knowledge and interesting interesting. What a minute long and also is it something you activate or you just always like you're always cutting through the cage superpower that damn movie says in the in the bylaws of this particular. Would you rather it says you can see one minute into your future clearly in your head like an instant one minute movie that you comprehend in milliseconds okay so you yeah yeah. It's very useful rather have that I mean it's like you could win every game show ever probably he keep you could win trivia contests and things like that you could be like am. I about to say something stupid to this person and be like okay. I guess I am so I'll say something out like every person Karimi start scanning or conversation okay. This person I'm GonNa Talk to is cage movie. or the benefits of knowing your pass having just yes. I mean it's Nice. Being able to revisit you could revisit your any memory from your past into photographic visit too much of my past already dark stuff that imagine all the stuff that you've forgotten on purpose because trauma but some memories from the past are precious and some of the best you'll ever have and they they made you who you are today. Today's who you are today now when I get the revisit them because of memory degradation. I get to imagine them as not as bad as they probably were. I guess that's true yeah but I mean eventually lose all of their right. Yeah all right well listen. This has been a blast. It's been an absolute fun one time. Having you boys here a treat. It's a tree. We want you back obviously anytime and we'd love to maybe do a little something like I'd love to go on your guys's is a show or vice versa or have Jones. Yes we would love to Elliott and force them to watch some shit on his own. You know what I'm excited to force somebody to wash something they would never watch is my wife is watched blue velvet with me and punchdrunk love and she hates all of that. I'm GonNa make her watch Mandy with me. Oh Shit Mansions ain't no. I felt like drugs yeah. There's a slim chance you might like it wow but but I just need to understand a weird special movie. I like that. It's a very very cool movie. Well I want you to report back. I will make to godly. We should have a movie night watchman. I think he might be down for that all right well anyway one more time. He has wanNA plug plug stuff. Yeah go to only Sudan's DOT com. You can find our youtube Info there you to dot com is the only stupid answers and might be awesome. Also podcast goes up every Monday. Only stupid answers on all the platforms and go listen there. When we talk about fantastic festivals week got reviews you can listen to and also I'm starting out a new show called one more time with Bashar so you can go and check that out. I'M GONNA be watching Avatar the last year bender and then just a bunch of really shitty movies so it's GonNa be a good time. Dj Got Anything. You're working on but not it's not it's not at any point where it can be talking about it. Got Me come back when you're ready to talk about some your stuff. I'm really hard. What is a juggling juggling. Five balls are just got the one. Oh that's that's the toughest part gotta start somewhere all right. Well guys. Thank you so much for listening to the valley cast we appreciate so you guys and also check out our Patriot patriot dot com slash the valley folk to get in on some of that special stuff over there like this podcast early and all sorts special treats. You can check out over there and that's about it. It's all say Joe. You'RE GONNA say anything you want to say. I love you guys. Thank you for coming employs one BURANA canape Iraqi by everybody. Thank you bye. Where's the CAT UH-HUH.

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Business Book podcast: capitalism, the past, present and future

FT Management

25:12 min | 2 years ago

Business Book podcast: capitalism, the past, present and future

"Hello, and welcome to this podcast. I'm Andrew hill management, and this is the first of three programs where we'll match authors of the six books on the short list this year's financial times and McKinsey business book of the year award and invite them to talk with an f. t. expert about the issues raised by that books. You can read more about the shortlisted titles at f. t. dot com slash book award or follow the award on social media using hashtag BB Waie eighteen in the next two podcasts. We'll be talking about enterprise entrepreneurs and work in society. And in this program, it's the big one capitalism past present and future. I'm delighted to be joined in the studio by Marianna mat, SU Carta author of the value of everything making and taking in the global economy and on the line from the United States. Adrian, Wooldridge co, author with former Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan of capitalism in America history, where also joined in the studio by Martin wolf, the FT's chief economics. Tator. So welcome to you all Adrian. As you're the one out in the third, I'll give you the first shot describing as briefly as you can. These central idea of capitalism in America in America essentially starts out with this sort of conceit, which is a meeting of Davel four hundred years ago. And if the great minds of the world have been in Davos four hundred years ago, talking about who would be the dominant power in the future, they would have mentioned every part of the world have been mentioned China, the dimension Europe, the dimension, India, but the one place that would never have been mentioned would have been the United States. But of course, the United States became the dominant economic power of the next four hundred years and the dominant power now. And this really addresses two questions. Why did this extraordinary event happen? Why did this completely peripheral place become the powerhouse of the world economy and Secondly will remain the powerhouse of will the Konami in the future in the next four hundred years? And the answer we talk about his creative destruction. We said that the United St.. Had a greater appetites greater tolerance for creative destruction than anywhere else in the world. And so it manage to become the frontier of economic progress. But more recently, it's appetites capacity for creative destruction has become too slow. And with it, it's Doman is beginning to decline. Briefly won't. Your book is about the elevator pitch. So the book looks at what happens when the debates about value or no longer had economics departments, but in business schools, it used to be that the economists in literally thinking from, you know, now to three hundred years ago, talked about value as a fundamental concept that actually had to be debated. It was contested. So classical economists, David Ricardo call Smarth marks. Adam Smith looked at labor, literally the division of labor and machinery and technological change. And from that, they actually devised theory of price. The physio Kratz looked at farm labor and agriculture as the center of the valuation process. And before them, the mercantilist looked that trait. Now, what's quite striking is that a modern new coffee conomic that debate about value basically is not there, and we just basically call economics and how it's tall, which Newcastle economic theory, there's an implicit on an expert discussion about values. So I argue. That disappearance of this contested terrain of what is value and how is it actually different from price when it disappears. We end up confusing rents with prophets. We end up confusing value extraction with value creation. So it's not that value extraction in itself is new is that it actually gets easily masked in terms of innovation and value creation. And I look at the effect that that has on the economy basically on the innovative potential of the economy. It goes down and inequality that goes up. So this isn't a world that goes to the book that provides the most compelling and enjoyable insights into molten business issues. What do you think Mariana business rita's a CEO or banker, as opposed to an economist should take from the value of everything? Well, I think there's different lessons, but one of the key ones is that value is fundamentally actually collectively created by different types organizations, institutions and actors. So just really simply public private civil society, organizations have actually contributed to the value creation process, even trade. Unions by fighting for weekends and eight hour workdays actually contributed to help the market itself has evolved and when we don't actually have a deep understanding of this collective allocation process, we end up having extremely problematic understandings, for example, within the pharmaceutical industry, how to actually price drugs. So there's currently and ideal value based pricing which comes down to basically what the market will bear there is even just recently a four hundred percent increase in the price of an antibiotic and the CEO of the company nostrum said that he actually had a moral imperative to allow prices to go up to what the market could bear in order to please shareholders. So this concept of shareholder value, for example, which has been critiqued by many in terms of the short termism brings to the Konami what I try to do in the book. And hopefully it will be very useful to those business leaders actually thinking about these issues, for example, Larry, thank you know the CEO black rock who wrote a letter to five hundred CO saying, hey, we got a problem here. We need to rediscover our purpose that it's not enough just to comply. Lane about short termism. We have to better understand some of the problematic assumptions that underlie the value proposition behind maximization of shareholder value. And so what I do is I go through sector-by-sector pharmaceutical industry the modern day Konami how we think about government. And of course, moaner day finance and try to sort of uncover some of these very problematic assumptions about value. And in order to actually then think together again, the public sector, the private sector increasingly civil society and voluntary organisations about what kind of economy we actually went to construct Adrian new books history. But obviously it comes right up to the presence in his said, it's looking a little bit at what the future of American capitalism look, what are the lessons of business leaders from capitalism in America, very much an economic history of the United States. But I'd say it's pretty much also a business history of the United States. The economy looked at through businesses and the two central actors in this book are onto preneurs and corporations companies, and we. Argue that Americans to real advantages reason we can embrace creative destruction. So in Tuesday's deadly is that it has a sort of an ability to decrease on preneurs an ability to create corporations. Whereas many of the most successful people in Britain went into becoming sort of gentlemen farmers and how scraps or in FRANZ they went into becoming civil servants intellectuals in the United States. The most I'm bishops the most talented people tended to go into business, tended to becoming own America's had entre knows who have had an extraordinary ability to transport in the world of the skies is nevertheless, they have extremely visions of changing the world and that capacity to produce on seems to be repeated throughout history. You see it in the late nineteenth century with the so-called barons calling. Again, Rockefeller today in Silicon Valley is an extraordinary on preneurs machine for creating Auburn, and there's entrepeneurship manage to express. The creative talents through corporations America was in many ways founded by corporations, the Massachusetts bay company on the Virginia company. It was the first country to allow companies to become general purpose Wilkins ation so they didn't have to build canals will build railroads very specific things. They could go into the business of doing business essentially. So limited liability, granted very freely, much more freely in the United States than anywhere else. And so America has created companies as always being very friendly to companies and also allowed those companies to operate on an extraordinary scale, much bigger scale than you've seen anywhere else in the world. So by the end of the nineteenth century, you have Carnegie steel producing more steel in Great Britain, huge, huge organization. Again, instead of Convalle you have companies that were founded, nobody don't ago and the now them it's huge organization. So America's to talents onto preneurs, zeal, culprits, almost imperative. The creation of corporate giants. And I think any business person who wants to understand what it is about business, what makes business dynamic? What makes business creative do better than really look at this book looks kind of what happened in the late nineteenth century or what's happening now in Silicon Valley for examples of the ship extrordinary creative power of the corporation. Of Asli rising every week, and you have to you about the field of economics, your kind of Megyn thoughts about some of the ideas that Mary on her and Adrian airing in these two books, I suppose by media reaction is that these ideas represent if like holds of rational analysis of progress in the votes Connie's to note about catch shop about development, it's about won't makes economies and phones and the polls. Something like this agreable dre gen, Alan Greenspan all routine. That view of view s in heroic entrepreneurialism combined scale. And the core idea is oversleep rooted in. Trumpeter who is the the grand father where the progenitor of the creative destruction idea there is critical of neoclassical economics in the sense as Mariana his, namely the perfect competition full information. This is completely irrelevant. Way of thinking about dynamic economies and even usury system whose characteristic is sort of brutal competition. But over time among entities very, very far from being perfect competition. They do have monopoly power, but insurances perception, it's temporary. And if you fail, you go under, we've had a beautiful example lot if your days with the disappearance of Sears which was a Doman retailer in the US facade loan. So they put forward this view which the way I think has a very substantial element to truth in it. And Marianna is saying that he, she agrees with them, but traditionally can make his. Of the neoplasm kind of absolutely no use. So ever in thinking about the economy, but her insistence is that a great deal of the behavior in this really calling me calling me actually have is predatory unproductive renting traction, particularly financial sector activity. It has always been so, but it's particularly bad nowadays and that need viewing the economic history of the US through the lens of private sector tippety alone, seriously, understates. I mean, massively under states the consistent role of governmental institutions in supporting this going back to land groans and all the rest of it. It's the symbiosis of the government and state and central federal. We've capitalism that allow the creation of these vase owned preneurs machine is the United States, and if we think of it as just heroic. Don't Bruno's with missing a huge part of the story. And these seem to me polar opposites. I actually tend to think that by right, but that is because I'm creasing Lee suspicious of one-sided explanations of anything, but my, that's my action that very intelligent discussions. It seems to me of different ways of thinking about the elephant of economic progress. Yes. I mean, I've I've looked both books and they are complement each other. I think it's a good lesson from this whole cost. You should read both books Marianna. Do you feel about the kind of the creative destruction pod that Adrian Greenspan above Asli outlined in the book? I mean you much more about the the government influence co shaping? Would that you use about creating the future value? Yes, because shaping I simply mean that the current way that we think about the role of government in the wealth creation process is simply fixing market failures or best de risking and facilitating the the great on. Entrepreneurs actually what history shows is that government itself when it's properly organized, it's not always probably organizers. Let's inefficient and inertial government institutions, but the history of Silicon Valley actually was a history of different types of public different types of private sector institutions along the entire innovation chain. And those public institutions, whether as DARPA an Assaf NIH SBA are sorry for acronyms, but we don't have time to go into all of those, but they were actually taking risks for every successful internet which was funded by DARPA. There's many failures, tesla received the same amount of money in recent times. Celinda cylinder rec- five hundred million guaranteed loan. They went bust Tusla receive more or less the same. Now they're going best because of all these crazy tweets. But anyway, this kind of, you know, kind of venture capital role of the government. What I call investor, I resort not just lender of last resort has actually been incredibly important for the recent history of postwar capitalism. And interestingly China has learned that lesson in the US. Learning that lesson, but just to say, you know, for me, it's not about the state or the private sector. And Schumpeter was really interesting because he was much more intricate and granular than those who just talk about creative destruction. And I'm not talking about Adrian here kind of popular understanding of Schumpeter. He had two different kinds of books. Really his early stage which came out of the theory of innovative enterprise, really kind of mythology is the small company, the entrepreneur, and just thought you know that what you actually required was thinking out of the box and this would eventually dismantle the status quo, and that was a positive force and capitalism, and his late work and capitalism. Socialism and democracy who was like, oh, we got a problem here actually to properly innovate. UNIDO series are indeed laboratories, and only the large companies are going to be able to do that. So capitalism. And his view was inevitably becoming sort of a Montel politic economy thought that was a problem that was both good in the sense that yes, big companies are big innovators and they require these large laboratories. But what does that mean? For competition and the truth is that. You know, is that somewhere in the middle, if you look at the innovation chain and the industry life cycle and some phases, in fact, it's more the small, innovative startups and other phases, the large companies that are actually able to reinvest their profits. But what we currently have, which is what I talk about. My book is an extreme financial ization of big industry. So not just about finance, right? So finance, financing, finance, but anti-holiday people that talk about, that's fine actualization of the financial sector, but financialisation of industry is when these profits that should be was looking at are no longer being reinvested back into production and innovation, but in areas like share buybacks, right. So to boost stare, prices, stock options and surprise surprise executive pay. So that's a real problem for notation. Any shoop Attaran economists who understands the importance of reinvesting, profits back into innovation of different types, including human capital formation should be very worried. They modern day capitalism. You obviously shouldn't put a bit of a hero running through your poke the government. Doesn't get much of a look in as far as I can tell. I dipped into the pump way you talk about dump and it's sort of glancing reference, and then we're off again into creative destruction and the role of Pernis or am I have? I read the right bitch. I think one of the phrase like money on is intricate and granular, and one of the things about this history I think is quite an intricate granular history. It's not a theory. I history, creative destruction is right at the center, don't say refers, it's not cool. You know theory, it's really, you know, old fashioned history, which we've done by as much as possible, telling stories and looking at examples. So in the nineteenth century extrordinary rolled of land land banks, the American particularly interventionist in the in the sense that it's I didn't think is creating Hammel Tony Republic by using terrorist liberally to to to create new industries and protect infant industries, doing that much of it must be using to raise money. But what it is doing is using land which the the government has huge amounts of land to encourage immigration to the west, and also to sort of is essentially the the building of the railroads railroads building on spec. That building into the middle of nowhere so that taking huge risks and it's much easier for them, say risk if given large runs of lamb because once built the railroads in ten twenty years time, that land is worth a great deal. Most of the role of government is extremely interesting introduced one awfulness because you've got this largely empty country. Again, I think during the second World War, the government plays a final role in through sting. The economy and office will Gordon boosting the economy. You know, never was sinking back to another recession within the recession at the end of the nineteenth, and it's really government spending government activism that boost. The economy continues to boost the economy in the forties and fifties. And again, I think with Dr, but definitely I think we give credit to the role of somebody like Vanna Bush who's in the mazing inciteful figure incredibly rolled in his thinking and does lay down the blueprint of investments and scientific Republic. So I think that with it. It's the detail and the detail often defies many of these. They grand theories in the United States role. Do you see for government now in encouraging economies? I mean, there's a lot of suggestion that perhaps it should pull back and leave this to creative entrepreneurs to do that thing, but then they're very successful economies. China being an obvious one is playing a huge role. I learned to. I think he's very, very important. The China is sort of on the cusp between this to distinguish the role of government in catch-up economies from its role in economies that are really at the frontier. I think in the case of catch-up economies eighties pretty clear that in the right policy context, governments do play a very large role when done well can seem very today in East Asia in accelerating the development process. I have a strong suspicion, however, that we will find twenty five. Five years or so from now, the point to look, the Chinese government is doing now not by any means. He's actually not helpful. We will see. I think they've gone too far the opposite direction. I've get the sense that they increasingly dominating, but to the extent the China is now at the frontier. And in some areas, it clearly is a more broadly for developed countries than I do think that working out a fruitful symbiosis between the two east sort of a necessary condition for making very rapid progress and Marian documents here. All to me fairly persuasive, probably where I disagree. There's probably more temperamental than anything else is that most of my life looking at most governments, I feel that they have screwed up more than they have helped. So getting these right is really, really hard to do. And most government systems finding. Really are to making bits of government were we don't trip reneur flow is I think, stupendous challenge and I have no doubt the for various reasons. The US has dumb this overall better than any other major country. And it's an example both where they've done it right, and where they've done it wrong, that we will have to learn from each to to some. That'll whether you're up to mystic about the future that you've laid out in your respective works. What does the future like based on the ideas that you've had? Well, you know, precisely because I think that markets are actually actively co created, which doesn't mean that's a good thing. You can actually co create all sorts of negative things, right? But that different actors are together potentially value craters. The point does not then to make a list. I say Adam Smith did where the productive versus unproductive parts of the economy are, but how can we actively shape for example, the financial sector. So it actually does step. More inside the production boundary actually allowing finance to be financing real things, but also those real things being if you want, broadly directed by vision of the green economy, the green missions that we have out there, which I think actually China's playing leader ship role alongside countries like Denmark and Germany. These are ways in which actually construct to reimagined what even a mission oriented kind of approach might be Kennedy's. Moonshot project required lots of different sectors in the private part of the economy to interact a new ways, including clothing and textiles not just 'aeronautics. What are the moon shop projects of the future and how can we really use the full capacity of different actors in the economy to get there? I do want to say just went quick thing if it's okay to what Martin was saying, because I completely agree. I mean, I'm from Italy for God's sake. So believe me the state is not, you know, a good or about thing. The problem is we have a self fulfilling prophecy. If we don't understand even the word public value doesn't even exist, really economics. I mean, the BBC talks about public. Value, but any conomic since traditionally, comic theory values created in companies and best. The public sector can redistribute that Bali through taxation or facilitated by fixing different types of market failures that becomes a self affiliate prophecy. We end up getting also the education that we provide to civil servants, really sort of backseat players, and they're actually end up getting trained that government failures or even worse than market failures. And so even the kind of capabilities and capacities that we think are necessary and government institutions increasingly have diminished. And so of course, you end up getting kind of bureaucratic, boring, Ursel kind of government because we sort of set it up to be. So even how we define GDP the government sector, only the salary, say of teachers go in to GDP, not the actual value that's created by well-functioning education system. And so, you know, it's almost impossible even to measure an accounting ways, the productivity of government. And so I just think we've almost set it up to fail. And so that's also the positive. If you went outlook that I have, I think we really can't. Change things, and that requires both looking at the accounting how we account for GDP, but also literally the training that we provide to the different types of craters the economy, Adrian new, and Alan Greenspan you optimize about the future of capitalism in general and the future of American capitalism, specifically. Commitment pessimism with optimistic in the sense that we say there is nothing inevitable about the stagnation that America is currently suffering from its consequence of the nature of technology or the nature of the internet. The nature of mature communists we say so much. The policy choice is possible to have a set of policies that will reignite the American growth machine. We talk about addressing America's financial problems of the potential for another financial crisis by obliging, big banks to keep much big capital buffers behind also talk about trying to fit with the American entitlement system. So the mandate spending on entitlements is imbalanced with the amount of taxes taking in. We think that the Repola see solutions to America, you have to turn the key of policy and you will restore much faster growth. However, saying it's time when politics is paralyzed when it's very difficult for politicians to agree over even very small things, big things like entitlement reform. Mm-hmm. Financial reform NASA difficult things. So it's a policy choice almost to have the current problem of technicians growth, but guessing America back on the right track when it comes to making decisions is not something that's particularly easy. Right, but let me think money Unimat swoop, author of the value of everything. Adrian, Wooldridge of capitalism in America and multi wolf author of books to numerous dimension for joining us today and to thankful that you need a comb. Boy producer, listen out on the work and careers channel on FT dot com. For our next business book podcast and keep an eye on FT dot com. Slash bookable would for news about the award which will be presented to one of the six shortlisted titles on the the twelfth. Thank you for this.

government United States America Adrian Alan Greenspan China Silicon Valley Konami Marianna mat CEO Adam Smith Martin wolf McKinsey United St David Ricardo Federal Reserve neoplasm Europe
Babbage: Clash of the titans

The Economist: Babbage

28:57 min | 3 months ago

Babbage: Clash of the titans

"With no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts and an app that lets you bank anytime anywhere. Choosing capital one is like the easiest decision in the history of decisions. That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one. Na member fdic. Hello and welcome to babich from economists radio our weekly podcast technology and science. I'm kenneth kooky a a senior editor at the economist and coming up on. Today's show a clash of the big tech titans. Why is facebook waging war against apple tree to form. It's getting nice and personal between the two bosses. Baffle has commenced is the answer to all our problems or the seeds of humanity's eventual destruction. For neither every time you all blown up and gave me space invaders. It doesn't matter you just play again but in the real world it matters and the world would look very different without the humble. Led we speak to one of the engineers behind this illuminating technology that we could see the light just explode other this small crystal. It was an awakening. I up on the second of february amazon announced that its founder. Jeff bezos is stepping down as chief executive and becoming executive chairman. Those will hand the reins to andy jesse the head of amazon web services the company's cloud division on today's episode of our daily podcast the intelligence patrick fouls the economists business affairs editor laid out. Some of the big decisions facing amazon's new boss one of them for example is whether the company eventually spins off. Aws this huge cloud business. Another is how much further to expand. Amazon is getting into new areas. Time where to draw the line. I think is the other big dilemma. While the tech giant faces its future elsewhere in silicon valley to other. Titans are locked in combat. It began late last year. When apple announced changes to its privacy policy that will make it harder for developers to track users across different apps and websites the change outrage facebook which launched an ad campaign scaling up to apple on the grounds it would threaten small businesses and of course the social media giant itself in late january apple. Hit back with a campaign of its own called a day in the life of your data which reveals how companies track user data across the web and apps. Now there are reports that facebook could be to take its war with apple to a new level by suing the company. You've got this time. On a tradition of big feuds between the giants townsend booth is our technology and business editor back in the day. You had apple. Birth microsoft. With steve jobs and bill gates snipe each other. Then you had appleby. Google with job sang google copied. Irs with abc the android system. You've got a bit of microsoft versus amazon lately. But now you've really got the roaring twenty s. You've got facebook buses apple over privacy and true to form. It's getting nice and personal between the two bosses after wants more privacy that hurts facebook's business model and battle has commenced so it's getting personal it is indeed senior people. Facebook have cooled. Tim cook prig. Taught people apple a cooling soccer bug behind the scenes oversee. They call him a menace and tim cook. Has this thing of not mentioning facebook our name but he's makes very clear but he basically thinks that facebook model carries the risk of nothing less than violence social catastrophe. Political polarization the works. So it's really getting a personal as any pulse. Feud has been. I believe once the dispute actually about. I think we can really trace. What's going on here back to about a decade ago when apple was not so worried about privacy and tracking people's visits on the internet and all its devices had unique to buy side dente fires. Ud's a kind of super cookie and other companies use these things to track people across the and they helped by the time make money from personalized ads. And of course help. An apples only consisted of apps on the app store. But then in two thousand and ten apple and google got in trouble for the way in which iphone and android apps with spying on us and so that point in two thousand twelve for ios. Six they brought in something to replace the called the identifier for advertisers idea. And bear with me. Have i know it's a load of akron incident but it's really important. The idea was essentially a kind of less offensive way. Less invasive way to track iphone users across the net the the idea is deleted temporary. Unlike the ud idea fa tracking is switched on iphones by default and a big thing. Now is the apple is changing its policy. Privacy has become completely central to apple's brand so the big change that has caused this that with irs. Fourteen apple's going to be practically asking users if they want to share this idea. Data an awful lot of people are expected to say no keystone shop. Don't track me. So what do you think. The impact will be of these changes for facebook and the rest of the online advertising industry so facebook objects to this in very basically because it damages the ability to personalize adds that could mean that the value and and pricing ads will decline. And that really. That could really hurt. And it's not just facebook that suggeting than the whole mobile advertising is quite worried about this. I mean they say that it's it's going back to the kind of quote spray in pay unquote model of advertising world. Where as someone famously said half money is spent on. Ads gets wasted. The trouble is i don't know which off if he damaged the ability to track people build up profiles of them served the personalized ads. You go backwards from an appetizer point of view. And if you think about that then that could actually be an impact on apple itself. Apple needs it mobile app ecosystem to thrive. And that's why apple created the idea in the first place so apple itself. I'm sure kathleen watching the the impact of this now. Apple is portraying itself as angelic. But it does seem. It's a legitimate way to manage personal data. Doesn't i think it's right. That apple is very genuinely standing up for what it believes. It's also true that it can definitely afford to do that. Just because most of its models coming from selling hardware very little from advertising so mark zuckerberg facebook's pulses is corrupt to cool that out that it sort of taking the moral kind of stratospheric highground on privacy is slightly self-serving hushing apple and facebook has quite quite nice arguments. For these times i think people say concerned inequality and spending parents on facebook says the apple is being kind of elitist southern interested people who can afford a thousand dollar iphone and facebook really believes in the model of free content that is paid for by ads and wild clearly invasive tracking people across the intent. Lot of people find that creep paper after one. No one's forcing you to watch the ads. No one's fourteen to buy stuff. So i think facebook have a point there as well now. Facebook is clearly angry but can they actually do anything about this well. It's come out. Recently of tempers have fled that for months have been preparing a loss it based on the control. The apple havoc app store. One of the world's to app stores. In clearly a focus of antitrust regulators the got us completely entrenched too awfully data and i think that clearly facebook to target the dominance of the app store probably does hit a nerve. America's dj's investigating apple in the app store on the european commission is as well and it's interesting because not only does this. Facebook kapil feud kind of fit a pattern of these big tech rivalries but also sort of an established. Tradition of using antitrust. Is the kind of competitive weapon so sort of saying well. It's it's it's not me. It's it's that company of at scott. The got the monopoly issue and microsoft tried desk with google's dominant position in search. Imagine that apple be a little bit nervous about this. At the on the other hand facebook itself has gotten too big antitrust lawsuits that have been filed against it in the us. So i'm not sure. Facebook will actually go ahead with antitrust lawsuit against apple and for the long-term facebook via apple. What do you think. Well i think apple stand on. Privacy is such a could brand and company defining issue. I think happens really unlikely to be deflected from it and in the end. What you're going to see is just in this situation. Apple has the hardware. Apple is the gatekeeper and apple. Has the power and also seems like apple has public opinion on its side. Seems people kind of like this idea. That's right it's political kind of social. Timing is impeccable. That's so interesting. Thames and booth. Thank you very much thank you can. Subscribers to the economists can also returns fantastic briefing from june. The performance of amazon's many varied businesses and clues to the challenges ahead for its new boss. Andy jesse baggage listeners can get a special introductory deal at economist dot com slash podcast offer and that link is in the show. That's coming up. We talked to oxford. University's leading a researcher about back the myths around artificial intelligence and the innovation behind a simple yet world changing technology. Led's with no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts and an app. That lets you bank anytime anywhere. Choosing capital one is like the easiest decision in the history of decisions. That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one. Na member fdic. Economists is sponsored by intuit turbo tax alive. There's no one in the world like you or your taxes and turbo tax live has experienced tax experts. Who understand your unique tax situation and now you can follow a simple return for free and get free advice from turbo. Tax live expert and until february fifteenth. Maybe this is your first time doing your own taxes. And you're worried about getting stuck or figuring out on your own turbo tax live. Experts can provide free unlimited tax advice to answer your questions and help you along the way. Maybe you've done your taxes for years but want to make sure you did them correctly. A turbo tax expert can review your return line-by-line before you file their available answer your specific questions walk you through the process or review your return before you file turbo tax live gives you the confidence of knowing your taxes are done so file a simple return for free and get help from a turbo tax law expert for free until february fifteenth into turbo tax live visceral text live promotion is valid for simple tax returns on. Please go to turbo. Tax dot com for more information next. The discussion of artificial intelligence tends to be one of extremes for some it's doom and gloom and eventual sky net like villainous robot network storming the earth or more mundane apocalypse were automation slowly erodes jobs and takes inequality to newly distortion heights for others a as a panacea the to let solution to every unanswered question from climate change to curing cancer to winning the world cup or writing the great american novel but perhaps he is become a shorthand for something that well it is mike. Wooldridge is a professor of computer science at the university of oxford. And he's been working on since the days of the floppy disk. His new book a brief history of artificial intelligence. What it is where we are and where we're going published in britain as the road to conscious machines looks at the story of ai and aims to demystify the science around it. He spoke to tom. Stanage the editor of the economist. The world ahead sa- strange thing that the sopian. Ai seems to make for much. Better movies than utopian ai. I think we have made real progress. But it's being on tiny narrow little problems getting computer programs that can recognize faces in a picture computer programs that can just come up with very simple captions for what's going on. In a picture computer programs that can do usable passable automated translation. Something which seemed like a very distant prospect recently go is as twenty years and these are all things which would become a reality. Thanks to advances in over the last decade but they don't begin to point to generally the idea of a machine that are as as powerful as human beings ours intellectually capable as human beings are they just. Don't point to that at all. now we're talking about here is if we all know what it is an agree what it is but actually we the hard to pin down. Isn't it so what is your definition of. Ai hard to define that. That's a very difficult questions. The most difficult questions you could have asked me thank you and you're actually the truth is it is extremely hard to pin down. Exactly what is partly because it's a moving target. There is an old joke and there is some truth to it that the moment that you understand how something works all the moment that you something becomes retain and come it ceases to be a so. There are a lot of things that we take for granted. Now which thirty two years ago forty years ago fifty years ago would have been regarded as a i which we now. Just don't think of being at all so for me. What is is is is basically about extending the range of capabilities. Machines have getting machines to do things which currently require brain sprains potentially nervous systems and potentially bodies which currently machines do and for which standard computing techniques. Don't offer any solution. It's a moving target. Because a swamps we expand the capabilities of machines and we get them to do things very often. People stop regarding it as being a tool. You mentioned that we worry about the wrong things with is so what are the things that we worry about that. We shouldn't be worrying about. And what are the things that we're not worrying about that we should be worrying about. There is a big debate about whether a poses an existential risk. And we don't know what technology is gonna look like in fifty years one hundred years let alone a thousand years pots at the moment. We don't see any path from where we are now to anything that could present an existential risk. So i think one of those sleep about something by all means lose sleep about nuclear weapons climate change populist politics and i could give you a list of other things to worry about but the existential threat is something that we should be worried about an. It's the issue isn't really whether there is an existential threat or not for the moment. I think our isn't but the point is if we're losing sleep about existential threats and having government committees of existential threats on the nass distracting us from stuff which is affecting people right now and one of the headline issues for example is bias. machines make decisions about whether people get bank loans. They may be make decisions about how long people should serve in jail. These artificial examples there are programs that do that with elements of ai. Right now i would much rather the debate. Right now is focused on those very real issue than the moment. What are rather artificial issues about existential threats. Okay so less worried about killer. Robots worry about mc bias. What about the other big fear that people have had in recent years. Which is this. Technology is getting much clever and sued. You know lots of people going to be out of a job as a result. Where do you stand on that okay. Interesting so that they work in. This area was galvanized by report by two colleagues of mine at the university of oxford. Michael's vote and call benedict fry. They wrote a report in which they predicted. I think it was up to forty seven percents of jobs susceptible to automation in north america. So i think there are challenges. But i think there's a couple of things to say. Firstly automation of human labor is nothing new. It doesn't just go back to industrial revolution. It goes back to the invention of the plough. It goes back to the to the to the very first time that somebody hooked in oxen a horse to plow what deeds oaks driven plows and and whole striven clouds do for farmers. You can make them redundant it. Just make them more efficient farmers so personally. It's nothing new and secondly i think as much as making people redundant it will actually change the nature of work in much same way that for example the internet the world wide web have changed the character of our working lives and i think i will do the same thing everywhere that human being makes a decision. There is another voice in the room. Which is making suggestions to your guiding. Your helping you making better decisions. I was at the pleasure of being in the audience for a tool called in shanghai before the pandemic and the to speak is were ill. Musk and jack march at mar founder of alibaba and alone was definitely. I think clearly of the view that is going to make everybody redundant which is going to be better than human beings. Everything and jet march very calmly said no it is. There's going to be plenty of jobs for people. And i have to say of the two. I rather sided with jack ma on that one excellent at what else do you think all interesting areas of research that most worth paying attention to at the moment so there's a very long history of experience in the the hardest problems those in the real world and the real world is messy fuzzy and difficult and complex and governed by all sorts of weird laws. Which we've been programmed over billions of years of evolution to be able to learn how to understand those laws. But here's the thing the we take a gain go back to mind because they've got many of the most celebrated systems in this area one of the most beautiful systems that they had which really woke me up to the fact that we were really wearing a new era of i research was a program to play atari video games. You may have. You may have read about it. This is back in two thousand fourteen salmon. You watch the videos they stick in. The video of applying breakouts quite weight works as a technique called reinforcement learning and what reinforcement learning does is. It says okay if you did something good then the next time you're in a similar situation do the same thing again or make it a bit more likely that you'll do the same thing again whereas if he did something bad if you lost points somehow you make a bit less likely now. That's hiding lots of sophisticated mass very sophisticated maths and clever algorithmic techniques but that's basically how reinforcement learning works so the deep mind program. Just play these games but he played them endlessly with half of those games. I think it learned least human level. Competence in some games breakout basically learned to play them optimally as well as they could be played but this is a quite important message reinforcement. Learning doesn't work in the real world. You can't try to driverless car by putting out on the road and letting experiment and if you're playing space invaders every time you all blown up in a game space invaders it doesn't matter you just play again right but in the real world it matters and so what i would really like to see. Its progress more progress on in the real world. I think that's a very big barrier and things will get very when we start to see that. Our thanks to mike wooldridge and tom stanage and finally as you scroll through your phone or sit in front of the television. Check your speed while driving at night or scan your groceries at the supermarket. You're probably not thinking about the one. Invention makes all these things possible. That led light emitting diodes or led's have completely transformed the modern world. They're made from semiconductor. With a positively charged component and a negatively charged one when electrons move between these components photons are emitted and the light is produced this revolution in energy efficiency turning electricity to light with hardly any heaped. Hasn't just lowered your utility bill. The climate group estimates that switching streetlights to led's worldwide could save one point four billion tons of carbon dioxide a year nearly five percent of global emissions this week the creators and developers of led technology have been awarded the queen elizabeth prize for engineering. That benefits humanity one of the winners professor russell. Dupree of georgia tech spoke to the economists resident light enthusiast oliver morton he described how as a young student of his fellow prize winner nicola. Yuck he i saw light coming out of a semiconductor dresser holonyak radja. Small power supply a liquid nitrogen. Dewar any showed us. This light emitting diode at room temperature and then plunged it into liquid nitrogen and the doer was glass. So we could see the light just explode out of this mall crystal. It was a an awakening. How far along were you and your own work on. Semiconductors when you started to realize quite water impact. Led's might be going to have. I came into this as a undergraduate student and by that time. Elliot's were commercially available. They were in indicator lamps mostly in electronic instruments at in computers as well but it was not a flashlight. It wasn't anything you would use to illuminate even darkroom. So once a month. Nick would go visit george they would kick around ideas try some new experiments and gradually the efficiency improved. Dramatically in georgia's group was really one of the world leaders in that early phase of the hockey stick where led performance went from indicator to i red tail light on a car. Then it got better and better and newer materials than we had green and blue george and his team developed yellow and high brightness red and had traffic signals. And when you have the red blue green you start thinking about white light. So it's been as george would say fifty year road but to make that make a difference. You also need production systems that will allow you to make these. Semiconductors reliably into a high quality. And i understand. That's where quite a lot of work. Being focused. that's correct. I went to rockwell. International in anaheim california that laboratory had a long history of semiconductor work. I joined that group in nineteen seventy five and basically took that technology to grow semiconductor films in advanced it and developed a whole new approach that led to the tertiary quaternary Films we use today and so my work was to show that this process which most people had thought was not. Even interesting was actually the way to go that it was the pathway to make large areas of highly uniform high quality some conductor materials. Today we have literally thousands of large scale reactors using that basic process. Twenty four seven to make billions of. Led's a day for the market place. You're basically building up. Semiconductors almost atomic layer by atomic layer. Is that right exactly. That's absolutely correct. The light coming into your eye from a traffic signal or a tail light or your computer display is coming from a region in that chip. That's on the order of three nanometers two nanometers and maybe there are four of those layers or even just one of those layers so the efficiency of these devices incredible internally laming diodes are almost all of the kershaw products are above ninety percent internally efficient and so active every electron creates a photon. There's nothing in the physical world we know of. That is more efficient. The thing that matters is well. How do i make this process work in a convenient commercially acceptable package. You've been in academia for some time. Did you ever walk by labs without first concert to what was done. Yes i was at bell labs. Well it was exciting. Because i was in what was called building one. That was really close to that famous part of bell laboratories where that experiment was done. Do you think that you all america as a whole misses that culture of the big corporate research lab the sort of research lab wings mobile prizes in which dominate the field. intellectually like. elapsed it personally i do. I think that if you had such a set of illustrious labs over many debt were really critical for this development. i know when i graduated from my phd. The goal was to get to one of those labs and as you would imagine that sort of exploratory but yet directed research gave rise to so many wonderful things we use today. Everything from information theory to the laser diode laser itself which was invented hughes research. Labs in california so the question is where is that innovation going to come from that. These labs have largely disappeared because of pressures from the economy. And the way the world is operating today adding pose that question. What do you think is the answer. Well i think it's hopefully going to be individual innovation. So today we look at apple. Spacex tesla google. These are individual creations almost their small groups of people who will start off with a little funding. Interestingly that's the same hewlett packard started right so this is not a new model. It's an old model boat at the physics level. We don't have the kind of support that the industrial apps have but facebook. Google spacex tesla. They're pushing the envelope on engineering. All the time and driverless cars won't be offended by ford. Probably they'll come out of google or somewhere timing matters. There's certain cycle to the world. And if you missed cycle. You're gonna miss out our thanks to russell and our congratulations to the other queen elizabeth prize winners essam akasaki shuji nakamura nick holonyak and george crawford for their work on. Led's and you can hear more from oliver morton about the literally. Brilliant science of light on our badge podcast from the twentieth of january. It's called futons opportunity. I highly recommend it. And that's all for this episode of baggage lawyer with us. Please give us a rating on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen it matters a lot. I'm of cookie and in london waiting for ai to do my job. So i can write the great american novel. This is the economist.

apple facebook amazon app store Tim cook babich kenneth kooky tech titans Google andy jesse townsend booth Apple microsoft fdic app stores Andy jesse Jeff bezos Stanage university of oxford appleby
Insights into the science of Leadership at Amazon with Bill Carr

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

31:46 min | 2 d ago

Insights into the science of Leadership at Amazon with Bill Carr

"Amazon is good at more than just logistics and marketing but at running their business on today's episode. You're going to learn about the science of leadership as learned at amazon from someone who's lived it and lead in welcome to the remarkable leadership podcast. Are you ready. let's go welcome to the remarkable leadership. Podcast we are here. Each week to help you lead more confidently and make a bigger difference both professionally and personally. This episode is sponsored by from manager to remarkable leader kevin's flagship workshop based on his proven leadership model learn more at remarkable podcast dot com forward slash manager. And now. here's your host kevin. Welcome to another episode of the remarkable leadership. Podcast everybody so glad that you're here. Our guest today is someone you've not heard of. But his work you are well. Aware of his name. Is bill card and he joined amazon in nineteen ninety nine and spent more than fifteen years with the company as vice president of digital media. Bill launched and managed the company's global digital music and video businesses including amazon music. Prime video amazon studios after amazon was on was an executive in residence with maveron. Llc an early stage consumer only venture cap- venture capital firm. He later served as the chief operating officer of offer up the largest mobile marketplace for local buyers and sellers in the united states today bill is co founder of working backwards where he coaches executives at both small. Excuse me large in early. Stage companies on how to implement the management practices developed at amazon is the co author of the new book working backwards insights stories and secrets from inside amazon. Is our guest today. Bill welcome from a- seattle have x. Kevin glad to be here. And it's raining where i am today. Which is often what's happening. You're living so but anyway. I'm so glad to have you with me to talk about this book working backwards But before we get to the book and all of that. I told people a little bit about you now but tell us a little bit about the journey. How did you end up at amazon. Sort of like what's the path that led you today. Well it wasn't the The most direct path in the world. But if i had to sort of give it to you in a nutshell You know even as a when. I was in high school in the early eighties outside of suburban in suburban philadelphia My father had brought home one of the first. Ibm pc's he was a chemical engineering sort of more technically oriented and in addition. I had friends that had you know from the first sort of like to and at school we had apple twos and so i found the you know the early. Pc and early apple. I found those super interesting. And while i definitely i did a little bit of programming I wasn't you know It was. I wasn't going to become a computer programmer but i guess i recognized on the i love the idea of what these devices could do and what they could mean in the future mr to solve this was the future mr drawn to it and I remember those days. I was drawn to the idea of working for a tech company in silicon valley I didn't never. I didn't ever make it to the silicon valley so i guess the next closest thing was amazon and it was a long journey because from you know graduated from college to in nineteen eighty nine know. So the it'd be a decade before i would i would find myself at amazon But fortunately some of the some of that journey prepared me well. Some of that journey was business school. Some that journey was Early career in field sales And then notably right. After business school. I spent a couple of years with procter and gamble. The consumer packaged goods giant working directly with large retailers. And actually after that. I spent a couple of years at a tech startup so by the time i got to amazon i actually had a decent working knowledge of both theory and practice of retail. And how things work for manufacturing side of things and supply chain. And i actually had a a working understanding of what it meant to be an tech startup company and so amazon really. Was you know both of those things and sort of that. Combination of skills Served me well. once. I got the company awesome. Thanks for that so there. I'm i know we're both readers. We talked about that before we before we hit the record button and one of the things that i'm always fascinated by with books is their titles. And there's actually two things in the title of this book. That i actually want us to talk about the first one is working backwards right. That's that's the title that's the main title. What does it mean to work backwards. I guess i could ask you. Why is that the title. But i'd much rather like what does that mean. Why does that. What's the value of that to all of us. Yes oh back. Refers to both the part of one amazon's leadership principles and a specific process that the company developed to develop new products and innovate of the company. So let me say more about that. So the the leadership principle is customer obsession and talks about the fact that leaders are obsessed with customers and focus on what customers need and work backwards from there and Why what does that mean Would it means is that in. Most companies people talk a lot about being focused on customers. actually not very easy to do especially if your customers are near consumers not businesses. Because you'll have you'll go through all kinds of meetings during the day with various people in the company or maybe external partners. But you'll never meet with your customers There there's never a meeting during the day where the customers are sitting front demanding x. y. and z. And so you actually have to go out of your way to come up with mechanisms and processes to make sure that you're actually focused on customers and so one of the and this is actually one of the marketable things about amazon is that they. They didn't give lip service to the idea of customer obsession they built specific mechanisms processes to You know force slash enable people in the company be that way and one of them is called this working backwards process. And how does that process work so when you are developing a new product for the company. What a lot of companies do when. They're developing new products is they might use something Things tools that you learned in business school. I learned how to. Oh let's look at the market with the size of this market in terms of the the You know sales potential. What should be our market share. What are the what are the profitability characteristics. Let's do a swot analysis. Let's look the strengths weaknesses and opportunities in threats and in all that analysis that i just described not once the is the word customer come up or more importantly not once does the the notion of what is the customer experience that i'm going to build a really create value for the customer in other words. Give them something that they can't already get. And so the way that Through a long crosses of trial and error that we we came up with a process to reinforce. This concept is called the working backwards purification process and so amazon. When you're when you're starting off on a new product what you do the first thing you do. is you. Write a press release to sort of a one page simple press release and you. Don't make the pr department do it. Anyone can do this. A software engineer manager doesn't matter who you are and what you're doing in this press release is you would describe in very clear and concise ways. What is the specific problem. You're trying to solve for a customer. What is the specific product. Solution that really solves that product and in total. Why will people care enough about this product. They'll sort of get out of their chairs. Wanna go by it and It's called working backwards because normally the press release is the last thing you do. When you're building product right after the engineering and product teams of gone in built some thing and or manufacturing he with manufacturer then you thrown over the wall to marketing. Pr say go figure to sell this thing right. And so instead. Amazon seeks to work Started the what is normally the last step of the process and work backwards from there and more to the point. What what what this does it frees you up from focusing on your various constraints your competitors. It frees you up to focus strictly on the customer. Because when you're writing that press release that's all you're thinking about. You're not worrying about anything else. Then if i put this presley's out are people gonna wanna buy this thing. And if if it's not compelling than you can just keep you can start over the throw that idea out or keep rewriting that presley until you found that now once you have that compelling press release now you have to describe the ways in which you can actually make that real and that's where the second part of this process. The faq process comes into play. And that's where you ask an answer key questions like will how big of a team am going to need to build this product. And what will be some of the technical hurdles off to overcome to do this. Or what will the piano look like for this product. And what really is that. The total addressable market all kinds of questions that people externally entering would ask you and so This is the the long answer is working. Backwards is both a way of thinking of starting with the from working backwards. In it's a process that actually reinforces that way of thinking you said so. Thanks for that. You said something early and all that that i wrote down and you said that either forces or enables and then. I think you said probably both but salem more about that because that difference between force and enable is where culture comes in right so so at what. At what point did it become more about enable and less about force well and should be clear when i use those words. I don't use them to say force. Like in a dictatorial way. But even it is a way to force a way of thinking force a mindset because it's so actually it's actually very hard to get an a mindset so let me give you a simple example of this so i in my role with the company i had you know large partners that i work with those partners were my suppliers. The suppliers happened to be media. Companies book publishers Record companies movies studios and they would. They were whether it was the physical disks and printed books or later the digital bits that they were venting to me. I would me with those people all the time they were. My partners is important for me to maintain a good relationship. Well guess what those people were not my customers. Those people never paid us a dime of revenue. All my revenue came from these other people who i could never meet with and oh by the way these partners with they had a lot they would they would ask for in demand. Many many things in a big part of my job was to in fact saying no to them a lot and the reason in the end. That's hard that's actually much less pleasant than actually just getting along and agreeing with someone and so you actually have to have a certain discipline To get yourself into a mindset that puts you in situations that are in fact often uncomfortable for because in many cases you'll make decisions or do things that those people may not want to do and a great example of that is when amazon I launched you know kindle e book business. We really wanted the publishers to make many many more books available and to not price them at thirty dollars the same price as a hardcover book because who in their right mind would pay the same amount of money for a digital copy as the printed copy by the way the publishers have just make a whole lot more money that way so that wasn't a fun conversation to have with them but it was an important conversation for customers absolutely so back to my initial thought of two questions from the title and and thanks so much for helping unpack working backwards which really helps people get a pretty good picture of a lot of the things that are in the book but then there's other word it's a great marketing word secrets so you say there are secrets so tell us something i mean. Here's my observation. Is that probably everyone who is watching or listening is an amazon customer. Many most probably have amazon prime and have boxes showing up regularly etc etc. What's a secret from about. How amazon runs their business. That would be surprising to people. Yeah so The secret really is the That will there are a number of them Really because To take one step back this book to answer the question. How does amazon do it. How have they done it. How do they how they they created such a series of phenomenally popular devices services businesses How become one of the most if not the most successful and one of the largest companies in on the planet and The the the. There's not one secret and so it is. It is plural but Let me give you an example. One of the secrets. One of the secrets is that everyone knows about all those innovative products. With don't realize is. The company is in fact just as innovative with respect to the science of management and Let me say more about that so When i joined the company in nineteen ninety nine you know like many of the other. You know leaders of the company i had an mba and we'd all worked at A series of well-respected aug companies and as amazon started to encounter Various challenges and hurdles in in many many situations instead of accepting long-held standard approach business approaches in management approaches to solving. These problems amazon actually took Many times approaches the quite contrary or counterintuitive. And i'll give you one example of that with the. The company decided to organize the team so in the early two thousands. We were growing like a weed. We were becoming increasingly complex. Are just bookstore anymore. We had multiple business categories. We were growing too many countries around the world and when that happens then you have different teams like the team in is saying. Hey we need x. y. And z to do better business in germany and the electronics team. Saying boy we really need fulfillment centers that can handle. Tv sets not just books et cetera et cetera et cetera. And so you start to get all these different requests in all kinds of end up landing on certain central teams that that whether that be the software engineering organization with the operations team to support these things. So we did what All companies or what most companies do. When they face the situation we started to create a specific positions and processes to better coordinate and collaborate with across teams in the company and in fact we even adopted a process that we took from ge. Which at that time was one of the gold standard for how you managed companies right and we took that because our cfo was from g so we said great so warren. You're going to bring in the npa process. We're gonna adopt. Because that's what. Jesus well after a year or so of that. We said you know what this isn't working. We're not gonna do that anymore. And the what wasn't working about it for us was now we were spending a huge percentage of our time coordinating debating kind of fighting for among teams and a whole lot less time actually building great news stuff to meet our customers needs and so in fact we then we decided to go in the exact opposite direction he said you know what let's instead figure out how to actually have a not require teams to coordinate in fact how can they exist without coordinating collaborating with with each other so that we don't have to get good at collaborating and so the solution dems to say how we break ourselves up into small highly autonomous teams where the leader of that team has control of the resources they need to be successful and this was quite counter to the way that most companies do it and that's just one example of and we lay out five examples of processes that the company came up with wherein each case The approach is actually generally speaking quite counter to the way that most companies run that certain process weather tattoo higher. How to how to run meetings how to do new product development how to think about managing metrics and then an altogether secret is Around how the company has developed leadership principles that really matter and are not just a sort of a pr exercise to to make sound good. So i know that much of your work today is for executives thinking about how they can adopt some of these ideas across the organization and some of those some of your perfect customers. Bill are listening to or to us or watching us today but looks saying that. I'm not an executive. Say that i'm a mid level manager or a even frontline meager. What are what are three things that i can take. And it'd be and begin to apply in my team. Sort of inside of my team that i could use or apply from some of the lessons. That amazon has learned. Well if you have to still amazon to four things And jeff was asked once in any he did this. He ate this list. He said amazon is four things. Its customer obsession rather than competitor obsession. It's a Long term thinking much longer term than most companies have it's a willingness to take risks and invent and and and a willingness to accept the failure that comes along with that and then finally a professional pride in operational excellence so anyone in their career could actually latch onto any one or all four of those things you can apply that to your career like for example long term thinking. This is a great way to think about your career having coached and Mentor many many people are in their career. In reflecting back to how. I felt about my career in my early twenty s man. My pants were on fire to like you know. Get ahead and get into a big role in you know. I measured things in terms of months. And what is hard for you to realize in your early twenties is that year especially especially in today's day and age where our lives are getting longer and longer not likely to retired. Sixty five like you're probably likely to have a career that spanned four decades so this is a marathon not a sprint and so a lot of ways that a lot of mistakes people make they go for short term satisfaction may be like. What's the place where i'm going to get the cash. Bonus the fastest shore by switch to this company instead of making eighty k. I can make one hundred k. Instead of focusing on these short-term things you need to focus on long-term things like what. How do i put myself in a position where i am going to be challenged and learn a lot and have the to take on More and more responsibility. How am i gonna put myself in a where. I'm working for someone who i can really learn from. And how am. I going to put myself in a company. That's growing and where. I really respect them. So long term thinking can apply there. You know you may not be able to affect the long term thinking of a company if you're junior level person and diverse. Eeo is focused on hitting quarterly numbers. You're probably not probably barking up the wrong tree. But you can. Also you can definitely By focusing on customers doesn't matter what level you're at if you really understand your customers really well if you really obsess over them if you really seek to understand what are the ways in which. They are not satisfied. Are you reading. Every one of their reviews of your product are you. Are you sitting down with the customer service organization to sit in on their calls and look at their different emails to understand. What are people concerned about. You can do this at any level so And then the last one that professional pride and operational excellence. This is a great one to take to heart whether you know no matter where you are in your company which is in your career. Which is there's all kinds of work. You're gonna do that. No one's ever gonna see. Sometimes the customers aren't going to see sometimes. Your manager may not see it and the people that are. Gonna you know where that that marathon is really going to pay off if you really take pride in setting high standards for yourself and doing high quality work. Having you know making sure that you have a thoughtful analysis right good documents put together the right. you know finance You know Quantitative analysis whatever. It may be even if it doesn't see the light of day that That practice in that repetition which by the way the great professional athletes that we all love and see you. Don't see all the reps and all the practice they're putting either so that professional pride and operational excellence will will will get you a long way in your career. It's interesting bill. I was gonna ask you a question. What advice you have for leaders today but you've answered that question. I think for all of us in one way or another so i ask a different question instead. What's something that as we start to head toward closing. What's something that we haven't talked about that. Maybe you think we ought to or that. Maybe something that based on this conversation you'd like to share with the group. Well i guess. I just like to to give you know to expand on that last point a little bit further which is that You know you asked about that question about the secret and in many ways So you know why was amazon You know we call. I my co author. We actually emailed jeff bezos before. We're going to write the book and told him it. We're gonna write about and you might wonder. Why would this be obama's on. He gave us his blessing. And you might wonder. Why would the amazon. Okay with us spilling the secrets of how they've been so successful in like. What is their secret sauce for me entrance science point of view in the answer. That question actually can be found in One of the reviews of the book. That gentleman named tom ahlberg. Who was a one of the first. Investors in the amazon was a long time board member for more than two decades. He was on the hymns on board of directors and. He told a story about how he was sitting down with You know executive from a large global company who who was at trying to pick. Tom's will how does he do it. You know how they successful in thompson. It's actually not a secret at all like if you actually read jeff's annual awards if you look at the what he talks you to look at the leadership principles there but you know the reality is that few companies have the discipline to actually do it and so i would kind of like in in some ways the book to i've written we've written a a description of how successfully complete an ironman. Anyone can do it. But it's requires enormous discipline and hard work so To quote jeff. there were. I can't remember how many times you know we'd be in some meeting. And someone would be describing some roadblock buffets inc or some challenge and jeff Basically looking to jeff for like you know like this is really hard. You know how we were struggling to do this. And jeff would say. I never said this was going to be easy and That's the thing to remember. Is that if you want to achieve greatness like you can do it but it's not easy. It requires a lot of hard work and a lot of discipline. That's a good place to start to land the plane. Everybody i never said it was going to be easy. My dad you just say this. Why get paid the big bucks on your big boy pants Not quite the same but the same idea of going to be easy so speaking of easier bill. What do you do for fun. Well i i love I love sports. I love love the outdoors and so some of my favorite sports. I love to play our role of the ski action into both downhill and cross country. Skiing i do. I love Cycling road cycling and now gravel cycling to and I do love to play golf and love to spend time with my family and going hikes and Enjoy enjoy the beautiful surroundings here for for much of the year. you're in the pacific northwest but But in the in the winter you have to get up into the mountains into the snow to to enjoy. Because they'll rainy wonderful weather right. So again you and i talked about this before. We and we joked in chuckled. A little bit about this before we went Before we get record and that is what is it that you're reading you said. Listen i gotta pull up my kindle and find out what is it what do you want to share people that you're reading these days well actually read a variety of topics. But this sounds like. I'm cheating because it's a business book but i am reading marine capitalism in america a history by alan greenspan and This book I think it came out actually four or five years ago. it's fascinating. I actually sounds like this would be like a super boring topic. Even for someone who's into business books and like alan greenspan does not sound like he would be like the most thrilling author like. I've ever seen allen talkies kind of dry and boring but is that is a really good book. It's it's it's bleeding. It's kind of a page turner to really like understand how capitalism developed in the country in sort of the interrelationship of capitalism with with The different historical events and with how the government It's a really good book. I strongly recommend it capitalism capitalism in america. Everybody that's the first time bill on this show episode number two hundred and sixty some this. Someone has has mentioned that book. But i like it but we have been talking with alin they bill carr and alan. Alan greenspan bill car. The co author of the new book working backwards insights stories and secrets from inside amazon. Where can people find out more about the book and your work where you're gonna point people bill. Yeah you can visit our website which is www dot working backwards dot com pretty simple everybody working backwards dot com so now question for all of you who are watching and listening and it is this. Now what what idea from what bill has just shared or you got from this conversation. Are you going to apply because it's in the application that it ma- makes where we make any difference at all. Because as bill said no one ever said it was going to be easy. And it's certainly not going to be easy just because you listened and maybe even found it enjoyable but to challenge will be what actions will you take as resolve. I think if you just listen. I hope you listen to every minute but even if you only last listen to the last ten or twelve minutes where bills or you started to talk about those four principles. Four values amazon connecting those to all of our work regardless of where we sit an organization. There's plenty for their to think about and apply so bill. Thanks so much for being here as a pleasure to have you know traveling right so everybody. This episode was brought to you by artie. New book long-distance teammate. Staying engaged in connected while working anywhere you can go to long distance teammate. Dot com to learn more. Get an excerpt because there's a big difference between working from home and being a member of a successful remote team and with that we will say goodbye and we'll be back next week with another episode. Love the remarkable leadership. Podcast thanks everybody.

amazon silicon valley kevin presley Amazon apple Bill procter digital media jeff gamble Llc Ibm seattle philadelphia Kevin america salem npa
Gaslit Nation Self-Care Challenge

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

07:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Gaslit Nation Self-Care Challenge

"They everyone it's andre from gaslight nation. Sarah unfortunately is not feeling well. So we're going to take this week off and use it for some much needed spring cleaning and maintenance work for the show. We will be back with our usual programming next week for supporters on patriot. You can look out for a bonus episode from us this week. Whenever sarah's feeling better were aiming for friday will be answering your questions at our weekly cuna as well as of course discussing the big show verdict the latest on kremlin aggression and The western response including the confusing. Reporting on the kremlin bounties on. us soldiers in afghanistan. That conversation will continue into next week's show as well. There's just a lot to cover and since we're not gonna have our public show this week. We urge everyone to instead. Watch the investigation into putin's staggering wealth and corruption has stolen wealth produced by the team of alexia volney. The russian opposition leader who putin is murdering slowly before the whole world. You can find a link to that documentary. It's called putin's palace history of the world's largest bribe. It will be pinned this week on the top of our twitter account at gas nation on twitter. Now that trump is gone. The gaslight nation party will continue of course as we confront the corruption the white supremacy the complicit and traitorous republican party the kremlin aggression the global far right movement the axes of autocrats the social media blood money giants and unchecked corporate greed that gave rise to trump and twenty twenty. We took down darth vader. Now it's time to go after pulpit. Thank you to everyone for all your support of this show. We could not make asset nation without you Our discussion continues. And you can get access to that by standing up on our patron at the truth teller level or higher. We want to encourage you to donate your local food bank which is experiencing a spike in demand. We also encourage you to donate to the international rescue committee. A humanitarian relief organization helping refugees from syria. Donate at rescue dot org and if you want to help critically endangered or rank tanks already under pressure from the palm oil industry donate to the ranking project at the aranka tting project dot org research ways on how you can cut out palm oil in your life. Gasoline nation has produced by. Sarah kensinger at andrey chiluba. If you like what we do leave us a review i tunes. It helps us reach more listeners. And check out our patriot on it keeps us going and you could also subscribe to us on youtube. Our production managers are nicholas torres. And carlin dagel are episodes or edited by nicholas torres and our peach exclusive. Content is edited by carla nagel original music and gas nations produced by david whitehead martin visit. Berg knicks are damian. Ariaca and ancarlo diggle. Our logo design was donated to us by hamish smith of the new york-based firm order. Thank you so much mish. Gasoline nation liked to anchor supporters at the producer level on patriot. Higher pat kenny. Mayne john showing dollar. Frank chuck hat. Kenneth read ellen. Mcgurk joel farren. Mary gazon erica. More karen a deal. Niko phillips brian. E caster lex read andrea scouser could be andrea could be melissa holland karen heisler jordan sanders and burkino. Rachel winder tr dunston. Kim jon millet. Michael finn david. East shannon acey ida chris fellow dodi pop kristen readiness gabrielle. Our ben wheaton joseph mara junior. Amy amy thomson. Rich holcomb shawn mcdonald. Jeremy thomson thomas shabby kelsey molsem. Julie matthews megalopolis mark mark matthew matt brittany keener schanberg kristin kuster tracy ash benjamin delusive high gillis sharon hat trick irv robinson keith gottschalk william barry reeves janet robinson john s actress. Sorry it's it's spring. We've got spring fever. Richard smith having gannon. Sandra coleman heating masseurs john laughlin. Jeff thomson james d lettered. Evan rose more chips. Cells burke rioch aloof off the definition of spring fever himself. Carol goal staff. I'm sorry everyone. Michael wooldridge greg kramer. Jason banke marcus. J. trent's joe darcy. An marshall jeremy lewis treat christine Deals sinfield matt peres. Nicole spear kelly ranson ryan in the great debate. He told us one east in did so the j. gustaf halls b. Stop me kristie vitale. Maureen murphy michelle dash. South zachary levin. Dorothy merrick big toria olsen alabama hundred grammy's zew. We still aflame. Jason bainbridge katherine anderson corinna sara gray lawrence graham mike tropico diana gallaher john ripley ethan man jennifer slavic rhonda white yet. Sma david quarter. Kate cotton him mellon liam campbell. Lorraine w todd. Lynch jared lombardo. Karen humphries giles folkets and marshall arena guardia. Eric kaplan sonja bogdanovich pam paris. Tanya chalupa thank you all for your support. We cannot make gasoline nation without you.

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Going through the motion: more Brexit contortions

The Economist: The Intelligence

25:08 min | 1 year ago

Going through the motion: more Brexit contortions

"Realize your full potential with an executive masters in leadership from Georgetown McDonough by studying both the art and science effective leadership you'll gain the skills and confidence needed to achieve your professional goals learn more at choose Georgetown Dot com slash am l. Ranging from pianos to sex toys I up though albuque- every weekday we provide fresh perspective on the events shaping your world thanks to Britain's parliament begins its work this week with distinct feeling of deja Vu an anti-climax clinging to the House of Commons after the nation voted for Brexit and during those years friendships Wien strain families divided and the attention of this house mind blown to there you have it get the facts and see the science behind the sparkle at light box jewelry dot com slash intelligence use code Intel consumed by a single issue that has at times felt incapable of resolution but one recently ejected member hi time to get brexit done the house will need no reminding that this is the second deal and the fourth vote three and a half years Mister Johnson's conservative party had other ideas Sir Oliver Letwin worried that if the House passed the motion to approve Mister Johnson's deal all the other necessary legislation to do with foods but in Indonesia the world's most populous Muslim nation lots of manufacturers are angling for status marketing friendly blessing for product waist means viewers have dwindling attention spans that's driving changing the sports themselves and the designation of allow usually thanks for twenty five dollars off hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio I'm your host Jason over the weekend Prime Minister Boris Johnson had hoped to persuade members of parliament the vote for his fresh brexit divorce deal with the European Union he told members it was almost as hot as the sun in about two weeks those little seeds turned to full carat stones lightboxes hacked the process to consistently create their gorgeous gems. Now here's where it gets really interesting light box lab grown diamonds aren't just made the same every time they're also priced the same each carrot is eight hundred dollars under broadcast deals and streaming sites sports fans the world over can catch up on the best of Global Games such as football but here's the paradox all that the motion that it couldn't be voted on before that other legislation had been passed and he won the is the right three hundred and twenty two ab- grown diamonds are essentially chemically the same as natural ones just made in a lab to make them they use a plasma reactor to heat tiny pieces of lab grown diamonds up to temperatures alleged to ask for an extension to the brexit deadline it seems increasingly unlikely that Britain will leave on the currently scheduled date Oliver was highly skeptical about the strategy that we can't show that such a threat from the prime minister would work so he introduced an amendment might not get through in time for Britain's current deadline to get out of the EU in ten days the prime minister has a strategy I fully accept that and I accept the Russian the two terms it is that he wants to be able to say to any wave risk it's my deal for no deal vote for the implementing legislation or we crush out might just have it in the bag but everything was torpedoed by Sir Oliver Letwin who presented an amendment his was a piece of subterfuge nose to the left three hundred and six triggered a recent law called the Ben Act that meant Mr Johnson was Saturday was supposed to be Super Saturday it was the moment when MP's would get the chance to vote on Boris Johnson's deal and Downing Street thought I think it's extremely unlikely everything would have to go right for Boris and I didn't think everything will go rite aid wooldridge rights paget our column on British Politics Austin Extension at eleven o'clock evening why did he do that was about a group of spartans committed eurosceptic MP's notice Baden's who and that's why he proposed this amendment and that's why this amendment was voted through because people didn't trust the system too flee at eight thirty to nine in the morning and people were expecting this great Saturday extravaganza this vote but we're thirty I post risk somehow and they've been thwarted by this let when they were achieved to pose a risk by Sorolla let win and his supporters you have to deal because at the moment they voted for the meaningful votes than the Ben Act would disappear and the bannock force forest when he was terrified that's if they voted for Boris's meaningful vote then that would increase the chances creates a chance for Britain to DVD ridden as it were out of the EU without a deal so against all odds Mister Johnson struck a new deal but essentially the people most committed to getting out by the MP's particularly when fed might vote in favor of the meaningful boat then scupper it say that they project in principle to leave the EU on the terms that was agreed between Boris Johnson and his European counterparts he's safe they were worried about leaving the EU that deal either because of the leaving the peculiarities of parliamentary voting because certain people decided actually to to to Scott elements in which everybody was waiting for this dramatic vote we arrived into parliament in which the government in the sort of huddle the that that is created which means that there's lots of detail lots of nitty gritty about what exactly we will be doing so we moved from emotion in at least two amendments one is that we should have a second second referendum and the second is that we should remain in the customs union when now he's put it in place he said he will vote for the deal and you were in parliament on Saturday yes and the atmosphere in parliament is very interesting because we got there just outside the the press gallery was briefing heavily about how this amendment would go so the whole day from the very first moment that one arrives in in parliament shifted art to bring this motion if he's not allowed to bring this motion then instead what you have this is the second reading of Withdrawal Bill Tomorrow and that's a bill also sent a letter of his own saying that he thought any delay would be bad and dangerous if the Britain and the EU but legally he has done begrudgingly what he cannery with the letter is just to prove to his base that he's doing his level best absolutely absolutely so what can happen in parliament today if the extension so a request for an extension has gone indeed Boris Johnson said that he would die in a ditch before sending this letter he's not dead he may be in a ditch and but he's not dead but he then Downing Street became very very worried about the let win amendment very word that it would get through on very worried that they look foolish as a result of getting through so instead of arriving and unfortunately it's not likely to be admitted by the speaker because the speaker has principle that you can't keep asking the same which of course voids the whole nate the whole of Boris Johnson strategy which is to remove us from the customs union so instead of a world in which twice he stopped to resume from doing that in the past so the likelihood is probably less than fifty percents that he will be the deal in project Britain out of of the USA it was an insurance policy which Oliver Letwin puts in place deliberately and it's quite you may not be coming from the European Union let when Bill has been has been passed Mr Johnson has been defeated once again or at least stalled what happens now this Jones we'll bring the most around and it seems that we're heading towards a situation where that can essentially be unpicked and that that is going to slow things down tremendously it's clear what being about the Boris's meaningful boat to being about the amendment so the point here was essentially to get to the the Ben Act enacted and to get this this letter sent to the US people in the middle of very frustrated they want an end to this nightmare they dominated politics is divided politics debate about brexit. I'm afraid we've signed our our fate record talk about Brexit for years and years and years Adrian thank you very much for your time he sent the letter of the very begrudging way. What did was the photocopy the letter that was included in the Ben Act and sent this copy off probably a smudged in Bedford copy please visit future of marketing DOT economist Dot Com over the past whether you accept or accept those principles then moving onto a world in which you're talking about legislation and what that does is to slow the momentum that she was going to to to to bring on Saturday and pulled after the the the Lebanon amendment went through and that's basically what we mean by motion is an agreement principal to agree something to detail legislative work whenever you get detail betty station you have lots and lots of room for nitpicking lots of rule room for objections you begin to scrutinize run that to to to accept in principle and labor that's also made it clear that will attach it's do and the EU can now if it chooses grant Britain an extension and we will know more about that than a week ago says time and this is the British people are incredibly divided about this remain once remain leaders want to leave the MM which is crucial to getting anything through this very disparate group of people and secondly it creates a much higher hurdle of the hurdle being all about it's of digital economy successful marketers will be those who take a finance based approach to marketing planning and spend management to learn how KPMG is helping companies transform marketing move a general sense that we accept the outline of the steel and Pollen will vote on whether they accept the outline of the still Hugh weeks fans from all corners of the world have been gathering in Japan for the Rugby World Cup this weekend the four remaining insides will battle for a place in next Saturday's final but the teams aren't the only ones competition rugby itself is fighting to prevail in the global sports market she your thinking about the very principles that were at the heart of the agreements between Boris Johnson European Union and voting broadly bores Johnson and his government want it seems clear what the opposition Labor Party once or at least how it wants to change the way things are going what about the people went to the British people want well newfound entities existing ones Tim wigmore writes about sports for the economist do we see sports aggressively expanding into regions in which they previously it's a very mature sports marquette and it hasn't necessarily expanded into other territories by anything like successfully as possible its rival in the US isn't in trouble because football remains the world's favourite game and his grown its overall market share since two thousand aw kpmg knows that the practice of marketing must transform in order to thrive in the future in the highly competitive data intent headed families and they want to hear the word brexit again so and that was something which was very much playing to on bar side now on Saturday one of the things he said we got the detailed legislation rather than the principle of what you agree with so we've gone from a Saturday consideration of kind of the the withdrawal deal in the there's nightmare over we gotta get beyond this but we can't somebody said that it's like saying I want to get on with giving birth fans being more fickle than in the past will tentative entertainment options new technologies and globalization which means it's easier than ever both for sports to gain the child so I can go back to the good old days of being able to lie in bed all the time and read novels and have a relaxing time once the child is born it's not going to happen it's going to be more and more uh-huh and increasingly it's winner-takes-all the competition in the global sports market is tougher than ever before because of the combination of threatening attention spans sports market is on the decline so increase in these sports are directly in competition and global sports markets becoming more zero-sum game one sport that definitely some future sports like swimming of badminton and Hora actually baseball in a fancy America's game it is under a fair amount of pressure as well because like baseball is still very strong in the US but the US sports marketing what S it's may be difficult for it to grow further there in terms of revenue and fans because dangerous to think of it as as soon as simple template which other sports can replicate so what other options are sports beyond messing with the formula so you think that one of the solutions here is simply to make for shorter games changed the formats of the games even not necessarily so that's happened in cricket and they've got a new laws in two thousand the of literally nothing happening game or the game going along with the slow pace with less tension now views just think this is boring and they'll switch off choice and yet people are willing to dedicate shorter and shorter amounts of time to it all and what does that mean for sports more broadly as a concern across range of sports from cricket baseball US and why do you suppose losing interest what why our attention spans dwindling the change in attention spans means cycles stickiness of us the number had very little support which poses risks to sports that were previously dominant in those regions new report from the CONSULTANTCY WC says the overall revenue growth in there oh which is already long been the market leader months team sports in men's game has recognize increasingly in recent years investment we'll even basketball American football about the length of games and the pace of life and the idea here is that robin except the natural pauses it's the INAUTHENTIC existing found without winning the new fans so what's happened with cricket is a good example House Bulls candidate but I think is also coming from advertisers and even from governments crucially investing in grassroots programs which sounds simple but with quotas sports they seem to take sort of top down will also early biggest sport in any particular area so that spread a little bit thinly on that full you know the greater attention being given to the most prominent to which sports are at risk so the concerns of for the Middle Class tends to mean sports which have more regional appeal it's of a game that someone watches that's typically fooling around three percent according to research from a consultancy future I'm not means basically views I'm wolf official about what they stay interested in so the tradition was that you might follow a sports team any voting every minute of all of the Games of your favorite team and will that really is changing because you assume you have more choice than Abbas so they both have choice to watch we'll spoil so although entertainments and also in outages expanding into New Territories using big tournaments and the grassroots hard work what sports do you think best exemplifies deploying all of those tools simple someplace than any other sports apart from football in the to come so I think lesson from both boss will end football is the importance of taking important matches abroad and rules building facilities and so on recent is more sports or actually recognizing the women's game is now away then growing revenue a winning new fans yeah? Ming is the symbol of China's lofty Olympic ambitions thing that's very interesting ten by for all the schools so you get kind of

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Brexit Sir Oliver Letwin European Union Britain Georgetown Dot executive Georgetown McDonough House of Commons Intel Indonesia deja Vu Ming Bedford Jason DOT Dot Com China Adrian
Concession stand: Trumps intransigence

The Economist: The Intelligence

23:13 min | 6 months ago

Concession stand: Trumps intransigence

"This economist podcast is sponsored by the future positive. Podcast from x prize. Positive aims to bring you the most future forward topics with conversations from game changing leaders take entrepreneurs and heavyweights from creative industries prevailing their inspirations and how and why they will change the world this month they are exploring artificial intelligence for good topics include how. Ai can help preserve indigenous languages. A and self driving cars and how smart food systems will transform how we eat if you're into future positive. Data driven optimism. This is the podcast for you. The day before is truly a breakthrough hits a crazy idea and at the x prize foundation. They've been celebrating crazy. Ideas since nineteen ninety. Listen and subscribe to x prize future positive podcast today wherever you get your parts. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on a qantas radio. I'm your host jason palmer. Every weekday we provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world in egypt sexual harassment and abuse have long been rife this year. Though cases are increasingly coming to light and justice starting to be served but hardened conservative views among both men and women must shift before real. Change can happen. And yes. Game of thrones was epic it was visually lush. It was packed with intriguing characters but my word it was long sixty episodes. Three solid days of watching. We take a brief look at why television. These days is anything but first up. Though there was no ambiguity. In a statement from chris krebs on thursday the head of america's cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency charged with monitoring. The presidential election said the vote had been the most secure in us history that set the clock ticking on his tenure yesterday outgoing president. Donald trump fired him by tweet of course two weeks on and mr trump staunchly refuses to concede the election. Courts are throwing out his legal teams challenges left and right yesterday. Republicans in michigan failed to block the certification of results in wayne county where president elect joe biden won with a comfortable margin. Make no mistake. These squabbles are nothing more than theater. None of them know some of them can change the outcome of the election. But they do matter. Mr trump's obstinacy is keeping america polarized and angry. Some republicans have spoken out including former national security adviser john bolton every day that he delays under the pretense studies simply asking for his legal remedies ultimately is to the countries disadvantage. But most in the party are staying in line behind mr trump quietly allowing him to chip away at that. Most fundamental democratic institution voting. The more immediate concern is the handover to the incoming president on monday. Mr biden made the point that a messy transition amid a pandemic will cost lives. More people may die and coordinate. But he said that. Mr trump's foot-stamping wouldn't hold him back. I find more embarrassing for the country than debilitating for my ability to get started. America's lame duck period is anomalous. Long a sign that it takes a lot of time organization and cooperation to ensure a stable and over of power quixotic or no mr. Trump's post-election sideshow is threatening that stability as of right now there is no formal transition the general services administration which is supposed to give the incoming administration offices access to secure. Communications has not been allowed to do so treats. Cullum is the economists. Us policy correspondent and is based in washington. The incoming biden administration is not consulting with the outgoing trump administration. On important things like troop drawdowns than beliefs that are being discussed on vaccine distribution. All of that is not happening right now. Because of the president's refusal to concede and clearly that's going to be damaging for for mr biden is as he comes in in particular on matters of national security were still in the middle of a pandemic. yeah at his. He gave a speech on monday on the economy and he said that more people may die if we don't coordinate and he's not getting his presidential daily brief on the classified intelligence secrets The incoming president should be getting. There's a pandemic going on the plans to vaccinate. Most americans is going to be a significant logistical undertaking. That planning probably needs to begin on at the same time. There's a lot of agencies are going to experience a lot of waste of time. As a result of of not getting off the transition the trump administration is making federal agencies draw budgets for the next year which will of course never materialize and america has a huge number of political appointees that need to be installed. The sooner that you can get through with that transition. I think the the better and more secure one of the conclusions from the nine eleven commission report. Was that the short and transition in two thousand between bush and gore when there was dispute over who had won the presidency because of a narrow win in florida hindered awareness of the possibility of a terrorist attack and how our fellow republicans reacting to all this most of them in the initial weeks after the election have said that trump is right to pursue the cases that he is pursuing most notably mitch. Mcconnell who is the senate majority leader. You've seen in past weeks a little bit of inching towards a reality. Some republican senators are now saying that it is likely that biden will be the president to that. Maybe he should be getting his presidential daily briefings after all but that's different than acknowledging that he won of fair and free election rationale to it down about republicans benefited from trump's. Turn out and they know that no one energizes the base as much as he does. So i think in the short term. They see it as advantageous to humor the president. You see that the two senators who are in the runoff in georgia. That's coming have come out very strongly in favor of the president's theory even arguing that the republican secretary of state in georgia ought to resign for alleged improprieties in voting and in the medium term. Maybe they think that it's also a winnable strategy. That trump becomes something of a kingmaker elegant party even after he leaves office and so justice fear of offending him has kept many republicans in line for the last four years. Perhaps that persists even pass january twentieth. And so is it your belief that mr trump doesn't necessarily fully believe he's won the election but this narrative helps him stay in that attention grabbing kingmaking role. I think that narrative does help sustain that it has certainly managed to keep his grip on the republican party for another few weeks. Oh we also see that. The base is firmly on his side are polling with yougov showed that eighty six percent of republicans who voted for trump in the recent election. Thought that biden had one illegitimately that reflects the fact that they take their cues from from the president. Conservative media like fox news have said that biden won the presidency but republican elites like senators and representatives who we think might impact that see that polling and. I think that they are reluctant to say much against the president and those right wing media. That's been another facet of this that That seems to be coming to a head. Fox calling arizona before any other network. Did the sort of the romance between mr trump and and and fox news in particular seems to have ended yes. The president seems to have had a falling out with fox news which previously had been a really important to him. Most republicans getting their news from fox news and called arizona for his opponent and hosts have been acknowledging that i didn't want as opposed to prosecuting. His case trump is sufficiently upset about that that he is encouraging his viewers. Now to go to even fringer outlets places like one. America news network or newsmax which are fully on board with the idea. That election was in some ways stolen. Some people think that by creating the split between fox news and other aspects of starter media that trump is sowing the seeds for his own media. Empire people thought that if you lost the two thousand sixteen contests that that was going to be as planning as well but there is a bigger more troubling aspect to this which is that a free and fair election as election officials have called it is being viewed widely say as as fraudulent. I mean that is putting some cracks in american democracy. That weren't there even after four years of trump in office. Chipping away at institutions. That's fairly extraordinary. And so is the spectacle of a sitting. American president refusing to concede that he lost election and insisting that he's going to remain the chance that he does that is obviously closed zero. But the fact that it's still happening is fairly remarkable in american history and once you create a narrative of say can fraudulent elections. That's hard to to put away. America was already pretty divided place during the trump era. But if you add the feeling you know. Elections are unfair and are stolen. These are the precursors to civil unrest. Violence you know. This is a well documented pattern that is pretty concerning to see Erupt in american out. Injuries thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. There's more from greece on checks and balances our weekly show on american politics in the latest episode. He joins the regular team to discuss. How the biden administration intends to tackle america's latest covid nineteen surge with or without the outgoing administrations. Help find checks and balance from your preferred podcast purveyor unwanted family guests are like fish. Research stink after three days. So what's the best mattress for them. This holiday season definitely not a nectar. Then they'll never leave. Flip those fish your old mattress and put your human body on the nectar prices. Start at just four hundred ninety nine dollars and you get three hundred and ninety nine dollars accessories thrown in a three hundred sixty five night home trial and a forever warranty a fresher deal than your macaroni mother-in-law right go to nectar sleep dot com. Today your miles go further with the capital one venture card the travel card that lets you earn unlimited double miles for more than just air travel right now earn one hundred thousand bonus miles you can actually use redeemable for vacation rentals car rentals and more when you spend twenty thousand dollars in your first year. What's in your wallet. Limited time offer terms apply see capital one dot com for details about sexual harassment is just extremely coleman and public spaces. So if you're opening egypt. I knew ever think on the streets. You've definitely been subjected to at least verbal sexual harassment. And if you for awhile then you've started keeping subjected to other kinds of sexual violence in public spaces. The dean ashraf is a philosophy student in cairo who campaigns against sexual harassment and assault. I came to a moment of anger. After years and years and decades of feeling life issues like sexual harassment and sexual violence aren't really taken seriously. Address reached a point of frustration. And so not chilly. I just took social media and so earlier this year. Miss ashra launched assault police the instagram account attempts to draw more attention to sex crimes. The account now has more than two hundred thousand followers. It's become part of a much wider reckoning with sexual violence in egypt this year. But it's not been a straightforward path more than ninety percent of women in egypt. Say that they have experienced sexual harassment or abuse and too many just a normal part. They lie amy. Hawkins is a journalist for the economist in egypt. Men have loan policemen's behaviour. They're quite antiquated notions of morality. While at the same time they tolerate crimes against women but this year. Been a bit of a reckoning with that mainly driven by women on social media. And how did that get started. What what sparked this conversation this year. So the conversation started in june when a student at the american university in cairo posted a warning facebook about i former student up nights some vaki the original allegations about him who made in twenty eighteen but nothing had been done on monday. Student on the bus mbeki was back in egypt. She decided to post a warning facebook accusing him of sexually harassing and blackmailing women. Thought post disappeared after nadine. Ostrov launched assault belief and they repeated the allegation that mr zaki understood more. Now it should be said that missus ocoee denied all the allegations against him. But mr mackey was arrested and other cases started making headlines. The national council of women that government body is other victims to come forward and of the parliament approved lower grunting veteran booth and so all of that indicates an increasing willingness to to acknowledge sexual assaults. Does does that mean that there have been more prosecution since so far there haven't been any high profile prosecutions but some of the people accused of sexual abuse have been arrested and charged including mr vaki. Also some of the accusers have been arrested and charged the most high profile example vessels a woman alleged i. Group of wealthy young man had gang raped a five star hotel in cairo in two thousand. Fourteen weeks of campaigning. By optima th-that public prosecution office to do anything about the allegations of by the time they started trying to arrive from the south many had fled the country. Five men have since been arrested but she was still at large and three of the arrested. Men have been charged with rape state deny but also four of the people who came forward are the witnesses onto acquaintances were arrested and charged crimes such violating puppet morality debauchery and human rights. Watch said that two of those people have been detained into what should subjective evasive for the nation so hang on the authorities charged the witnesses themselves. The ones who were speaking against these crimes. Yeah exactly. that's offensive a repeat pattern so now the case with teenager cooled. i comedian. Who accused him on a friend of holding rate into her faith and raping her and she'll cute the police ignoring hurricanes. She broadcast the occupational tiktok where she has more than one hundred thousand followers. That video went viral and the police picked up the whole group. The accused rapist on the friends. Shoes without knights khudobin having a party together for the authority more confined with use of house in the mixing of nine men and women of a wire about the allegation of rape. Her tacky eventually charged with raping other offenses to do with facilitating rate but miss comedian author charged with prostitution drug keith. Violating company values. Only when she completed a three month program correct how concepts that the charges against him dropped so despite this recent pushed on the legal system is is really failing to protect victims. Yes it does have no gang violence and harassment. The lord ain't fashion harassment with any pasta twenty. Fourteen victims tend to keep quiet and there are lots of reasons for their fifth. The authorities have been known to subject women folk would virginity tests and they also also been about the fashion history to monte cave of nike of sexual assault. And i've salma el the documentary and who folks fashioned by the told me the lower interest what he writes in a piece of paper and the real problem at the attitude of egyptian men and women most of each of judge them prosecutor. The men and decide will violate egyptian buddies so recently been cybercrime pasta to crop donald woman. Jonathan tiktok videos since april. They've arrested ten female tiktok either charge the five eighteen finally value inviting indecent. The debauchery and some people argue the mma treated more harshly by the authorities because they come from cloth backgrounds. Fix the two year present in two three years in prison but the judiciary here is just kind of embodying attitudes that are more widely held about what is indecent debauched. Yeah i got you. So according to survey done by the un in two thousand seventeen sixty four percent of men and fifty percent of them and believe that women should marry her rapist and there are also other kind of antiquated values. health sciences or three quarters of men and actually a higher proportion of women said that women who draft provocatively to be harassed. And in fact edith interesting because only in egypt with the view of young men of conservative. Although the old madman it comes to gender according to all for me he worked and so. What's your view on the conversations that women such as massage have have started in terms of influencing those values those beliefs if definitely conveying a big conversation in egypt and it's been not just more facial also popular walks started on radio show if the topic is being discussed was appropriate thing but it will take a long time and the bigger by the government if they asked you. Want to change and social value of asha. She has been optimistic. But things are starting to change in egypt libel and expect to be taken seriously by not only the people but the government and by ngos. I think we ought to point where sexual violence is being taken a lot more seriously than it had been in the past and i'm hopeful that we can build on that change and got things moving from a legal perspective. Amy thank you very much for joining us. Thank you for having me. I'm like some broadcast media. We're gonna cut to the chase here. Television programs get on and on and on they getting longer and longer and more more of which put in just to fill time to move the story along adrian. Wooldridge is the economists political editor columnist for our sister magazine eighteen forty three and a dog reporter of trends as observed from his couch. One example of that is game of thrones the most popular television show of the last decade. It stretched over sixty episodes. But i must say the last series in particular really did seem to drag on. They couldn't bring it to a conclusion. And why do you suppose that is why our shows getting longer and longer well. I think it's a mixture of technology autistic ego the technology available allowing people to go on and on and on all of this digital space to fail an autism by definition egomaniac. They liked to drone on their like to take up people's time. They need to be disciplined. But there's no reason technologically discipline them used to be the case. The in the old days of linear tv episodes has a an hour or half an hour. The has taken from wanted. Vote is meant to another. There was a premium on time. So the people who run these things got people to move along at some speed. You know if you think of friends it lasts for half an hour. While in fact it's probably twenty minutes giving all the verse so they have to be very very snappy very very fast now advert mostly gone. This space expanded and content is to sagging in the final about space but look during a pandemic during lockdowns. Surely something long immersive is a good thing. It is a good thing. And i think the best series are immersive. They are long. They take your time they introduce you to a whole world so if you think of the while it's a world that you're introduced so if you think of the sopranos is a world you're introduced to give them time to develop mina characters fill in the background to really immerse the audience but however not everybody is as good as the wire and the sopranos and so what ought to be a virtue is becoming vice and instead of being immersed in what's going on beget lost all annoyed who have endless scenes of people walking along. Beaches splash splash splash. We'll talking about the meaning of existence. Classic example of this is of goals breaking bad. A wonderful a brilliant series. But i remember one to in which you have a fly buzzing around for an inordinate amount of time and i think it broke the spell of what's rather modest program. And is there something of a push back producers noticing that people like you or getting a little bored. The boss of nets lakes reed hastings once described old fashioned television as managed disatisfaction. Just as your backsta. Get really into a program. You'll tell you have to wait until next week. For more of it. And i think what we have now. The moment is quite a lot of unmanaged dissatisfaction with sort of. Let's meandering through these terribly long programs. I think people begin to say well actually. My time's valuable. So i think consumer pressure will mount. I think these blue artists will eventually they under some sort of control undisciplined to adrian. Thanks for your time for keeping it. Brief thank you. That's all for this episode of the intelligence. If you like us give a rating on apple podcasts. And you can subscribe to the economist. At economist dot com slash offer link is in the show notes. See you back here tomorrow.

mr trump Mr trump trump administration fox news egypt America biden jason palmer trump chris krebs america's cybersecurity and in Mr biden mr biden eighty six percent x prize foundation biden administration john bolton four hundred ninety nine dolla ninety nine dollars Cullum
BabaVanka

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

26:50 min | 6 months ago

BabaVanka

"Hello everyone. This is Billie. Joe From Green Day is Senator Cory. Booker. Theresa. Greenfield. Clinton to Niagara here Kathryn Hahn y'all this is Jon Ossoff Cure sedgwick Kathryn grody. Thinking her her his my better half Okay Nancy. Pelosi The forty ninth governor of the Great State of Michigan Tom Ford. Andrea. Thank you so much for getting involved y'all know why this is. So important, this election will be decisive war for the soul of our country. Yes. The importantly a war for the future that we deserve to build. So thank you for being on the field in the fight to bring about a different tomorrow for ourselves and for our children, our children's children don't regret not doing more do whatever you can do. This is ed all hands on deck. It's time to do all that we can every hour every dollar, every friend, every voter you can reach out to do our part. The good will be done. You take action you feel better immediately these the last weekend's to save our democracy homestretch. Weakens, which is a coordinated surge to make sure that we have the largest impact. We can before November hundreds of ways to get involved. Volunteering is the best way to help elect across up and down the ballot but say it's easy is fulfilling and it works we need more volunteers we need you to get in this fight to. Democracies. Not. An individual sports teams for you give. You have no excuse not to participate in saving the shout of it. We can win back the White House and the Senate will expand the House majority together. We will not only swing lest we will swing through and we will swing for the fences and we will win. So let's get it done. All right everyone. So Wealth Gum to the premiere of gasoline nations bury first radio, play. Sarah and I at the start of the pandemic. When we went into shutdown, we challenged our listeners to send US radio plays about jared any vodka and their massive web of corruption. We knew at the time people are going to be stuck inside and art was going to be the oxygen tank. We all needed. So we challenge our listeners to create some art at home. We did not think anyone would actually submit a radio play a sold Sarah on the idea of doing this that look no one. Does it all right the radio play and then we'll be saved will have a radio play and Lo, and behold we got dozens of emissions from across the country and there were so fun to go through and we were thrilled by the amazing creativity and the wide spectrum of treatments of a bumpkin jared is extremely satisfying to see. And just so you know while we had to choose just one winner of the radio play a we have so many honorable mentions and we're going to keep all of these radio plays in a file and we hope to do another radio play in the future because we are team had a lot of fun doing this and so without further ado, the winner of the Gasoline Nation Twenty twenty radio play challenge is. Jane Willis. Thank you so much Jane Willis who sent us a brilliant stunning work called babafunke based on the Old Slavic fairy tale horror story Baba Yoga or Bobby Yamaha if you speak Ukrainian. And this brilliant work is starring the great j Smith Cameron as Bob Bunka herself a j Smith Cameron is, of course, these star of HBO's succession. A must watch series about the corruption, the moral corruption inspired by the moral corruption of Rupert Murdoch, and his twisted family. You absolutely must wash that if you haven't yet and just say gives a stunning performance just like she does and everything that she gets her hands on a brilliant artist and we're extremely grateful that. She took the time to star in our little radio play. Thank you Jay Babafunke was produced by Eliza. Smith. who also stars in this as dot you'll also hear the talents of Nellie, lonner. Gin as Clare and Scott Whalen as nate. Thank you everyone for your submissions. We were thrilled to do this. We look forward to doing it again and we were we want to remind everybody to absolutely boat hand deliver your ballots in person to a dropbox. Or the election office it's too late. Of course, for the male stand in line to vote in person bring chairs, bring snacks, books, bring whatever you need to make. Sure you vote on election day and you can join me and Sarah on Saturday four thirty pm when we do a phone bank with indivisible to get out the vote and must win Pennsylvania where the polling is still too tight for comfort and Republicans are trying all sorts of shenanigans to steal it. So, you can join us on Halloween for a fascism or treat phone bank, and we want to thank everyone again for their emissions to this contest and we were so touched and honored with the sharing your creativity with us. Yeah. Just everything Andrea said thank you so much to everybody who submitted a script. Congrats to our winner Jane The a great little project, a welcome diversion from the horror of the news and I hope everybody you know enjoys it to. Enjoy things nowadays, and I really appreciate everybody listening and taking time and you know remember we're in it together. During this whole week to come and we have an announcement. So as everybody knows, the election is on Tuesday. That's normally the day that a new gasoline nation episode comes out at night. Obviously we're not going to do that this week the new episode, the one that's free to everybody will be recorded and we'll come out on Wednesday but Tuesday night Andrea and I are going to do a special episode just for Peach Yon Subscribers at the truth teller tier or higher where we give our gut rory action on everything that Transpires election-night from whoever the hell they're saying the president is what happens in the House and Senate races to the direction our country is going so if you want the really hot take. Make sure you join a peach eon in advance of Tuesday evening and we will post the episode then and then we will do a another episode out open everyone on Wednesday with no further ado here is the show. They were tired and night was falling and pretty blonde lady had a voice like silk. But it's getting so dark and chilly children where are you going in such a hurry? Hungry. Course you are. And you look so tired. We can't stop now nate, we have to keep on the children were exhausted and hungry from their journey. They were missing their parents terribly and determined to find the wizard folks said the wizard springing so many torn families back together but they had so far to go. Still we have to go see somebody. She doesn't need to know our business. Oh, how cute. But a little man you are. For Real, we're going to see the wizard. The Blonde Lady flinched at the wizards. But she quickly recovered back to her doll like Demeanor Clare Thought. This was peculiar as otherwise the pretty blonde lady seemed placid was skin a smooth and white as VANILLA ICING Yeah. The Wizard Clare said the wizard again just to see what the lady would do and she did flinch again. But then her face broke into a bluey smile that reminded clear of the fluorescent lights and the dentist's office before the dentist stuck needles in her gums. Yeah and she's going to help us find our Erin Oh. That's too bad. Don't tell me you lost your parents Clare was struck by how strange the pretty lady was it was as if the lady knew the words of the song but not the melody, her words seemed out of kilter like she was trying to be caring but couldn't quite pull it off. Well, that was careless. He wasn't UCLA boy. Now where in the world did you put them last? Of course it isn't all did you lose them in the latest round up? and. What did Daddy to get rounded? Journalist, I mean he's still is and mommy what did Mommy do? Mother was a chemistry teacher. I. Mean She's still is. That means you've got nobody fend for you anymore. Oh, poor little things. Come. Inside. Tiny while. I've got cookies and hot. Chocolate. Let's go have some player. No we've got a ways to go I want to get there by morning wandering around in the dark snow. Fine. It's so nice and warm inside and a little rest would make you compete. But whatever. Teetering on her products. The Pretty Blonde Lady scooted back to the cottage and stood in the doorway beaming her electric smile. I WANNA go inside I'm really hungry and I've got a blister on my point. You're GONNA have to suck it up for not going in Clarin. Nate had been surprised to find this little cottage deep in the forest, the roses in the garden and the fruit trees made it. So inviting scattered about where many little stone statues of children behind one of the child statues the Pretty Blonde Beckham come closer. You don't think she's pretty nice. Now creeps me out. She's like a creepy robot. To go now. You always ruined stuff. You always find something wrong with everybody. Going in. Clare Scott was telling her that there is something very off about this lady, but Clare was always alone in her intuition about danger and people with hidden agendas. And she was always shamed for speaking her mind and told she was too sensitive. In an earlier life, she might have been valued army scout the kind that put her head to the ground to detect the enemy miles away. We for me as clarify followed nate, she skirted pass the stone statues. The rain had stained green tears on their faces. Children. Let's get these roses in water. The second the children entered the cottage, the roses wilted died. The cottage suddenly morphed into a cavernous prison, the walls dripping with reptiles and Google. Alarmed the children turned to leave but the door slam and a Harry Wardi hand through the bolt locking them in the children whipped around to protest, but the pretty blonde lady had transformed into. My God. What happened to her? Told you. There was something off about her. She's not wards and schools around her neck and her eyes are pulled and green liquor snakes. It's probably y'all to look. Work entered. The. Pretty lady outside was now inside a beast of unimaginable for the white teeth gone now, a gummy orifice dripping with drool. Strangely, the things still wore Prada and on its chicken lakes to. Stress Strength Pick the children up and threw them into a little south locking them up. Then it clicked away on his chicken labs. You're right about her. Just like you're usually A. Sorry Yacht. Well, maybe you listen to me, there is a next time suddenly the creature reappeared and through a very large pot and possibly crested with rust and old food into the cell and a box of Brillo pads scrubbed clean that a Spec and tell me when you're finished I want shiny bright. Or else eats weird. She still has her pretty voice on, but she's a monster. It's not how people sound is the stuff they do. At Bat Baba Lanka, shook her head and flipped her few blonde hair strands sending spit all over the children. Then, she went to her quarters. We're never going to get this shiny and bright. Finish the task, just keep doing it. I've been counting this VAT of rice over and over if you finish the task, she just terrible things dot a girl of about ten was in the corner of the cell sorting grains of wild rice. She was filthy clarin nate got scrubbing the impossible pop. And be really. Careful. To face to pretend to be nice one minute and then do something deadly than Max and whatever you do don't look at her how do we get out of here? We've got to escape nobody gets out of here alive. But the story goes that if you're kind hearted noble Bobby Yoga will respect you and let you go home like she did with the lease of the beautiful. Fairy, tale this is real life, but sometimes, you can make friends with monsters. It works nightmares she stopped Bobby Yoga she's Funke hold different monster and she doesn't follow story rules she breaks. But. It's not fair. She doesn't care. She picks everything she breaks nightmare rules to. You can't stream to wake yourself up here in Miss Mom, and dad. You to on your way to the wizard. To find your parents. Yeah. You too. Baba Vodka Bill Her kyw cheer 'cause she knows all his kids pass on her way to the wizard hundreds of his caught. Hundreds. Where's everyone else? You don't WanNa know claritin nate. peered out of the south and saw an enormous swath with Crawley scaly deformed creatures lifting themselves out of the Merck with growls, groans than they skittered off in all directions leaving trails of slime. Don't look don't look. Once. That awful sound. It's the swamp creatures the Jared Stephen Miller the. Reality. is a political genius one and you're stepping up and bolstering the Abbey Committees and worm joint anti-crime. Task. Forces. And notion of federal stockpile was supposed to be. Not. Remember, moment I've warned us about jared how it sucks the life out of stuff I wanna go home I, WanNa go home. Crawl out of the swamp at nine and loot the people of land and burn stuff down and blow stuff up and creep back into the swamp and do all over the next night. Law It. Thanks I can barely breathe. I just saw Ghalem to. Working. Don't finish what you're doing never ever finish. Bob avant-garde tapped over to the cell and stock her awful face against the bars. What a very fine and good job you're doing. Then you. Don't talk to it although Dottie dear I think you've finished counting that rice two days ago. No No, I didn't know I didn't. I'm not done at that Baba Vonk as long. crusty tongue snaked out of her mouth at admits DOTS cries attached itself to dock and quickly suck L. Her blood frozen with horror clarin nate buried their faces. Poor dot, the monster sector blood, and now she's turned to stone horrible poured die. Maybe, if we work really hard, Babafunke will let us go. Do you think you'll see how good we are in order to find the good in someone else you have to have some amount of good in yourself. So there's no hope for us. There is little hope for the children yet as nate dozed Clare scrubbed the impossible PAN ON I. She could hear the jared, the Miller and the bar slither back into the swamp. They're nights, evil tasks completed. Cleric kept scrubbing the Pan until her knuckles were raw. Oh. No. But just then a tiny ray of light appeared on the ceiling. Reflected from the shiny bottom of the Pan by Claire has scoured. The tiny ray was indeed a pin light of hope. At that moment, that's all she had to work with Ono Clare Up don't be done here she comes who's done. Are you done with your task open the cell and I'll show you cleared? No, don't don't do it Babafunke open the cell door and Clare stepped out holding the Pan Up. Let me see look Babafunke see for yourself what a good job did and with that clear held the shiny sparkling pan up. So that Bob bonker could see her own reflection it stop it. Look. What would agree job? Did it shining shining clear and you can see yourself? No no get it away. But my mom always appreciate it. If I warner, she is something on her mouth while I'm helping you got something on your mouth. Oh. where? Right there. Baba. Vodka. Looked at her reflection in the pan. At me as Bob Ivanka saw her own horrific self she twisted and withered away. She fell into the swamp and got sucked away. Oldest swamp creatures got sucked deeper into the swamp. Look at Pat. The swamps turning into an orange mouth. When so much unnecessary death in this country for accuracy goes away. It's going to disappear one day the miracle this is damage to the world. Go Away. We'll see what happened on the way it was always. Time is this goes away could have been stopped way. Going away, it's going to go away we. Don't take responsibility. Wow They're all gone just like that. It's just a little Schmidt spot now. Nothing more. I guess that's for that. Let's get Outta here. As the Sun rose that morning clarin nate led the way with dot at their side and with throngs of children following because it was throngs of children who Bob Ivanka had turned to stone. And now that the curse of Bob Ivanka, the swamp had been destroyed. Children's singing swept over the countryside as they journey down the road to meet the Wizard Elizabeth Warren. Elizabeth Warren could reunite them with their parents as she had a plan for exactly that. And the song they sang together had a made up. Melody. But they all knew the words which were hope over fear hope over fear hope move or fear. Discussion continues and you can get access to that by standing up on our on truth teller level or higher. We want to encourage you to donate your local food bank which is experiencing spike in demand. We also encourage you to donate to direct relief at direct relief dot org, which is supplying much needed protective gear to first responders working on the front lines in the US China and other hit parts of the world we encourage you to donate to the International Rescue Committee, a humanitarian relief organization helping refugees from Syria donate at rescue dot org, and if you want to help critically endangered orangutans already under pressure from palm oil industry, donate to the Orangutans Project at the Wrangling Project Dot Org. Gasoline Nation is produced by Sarah Cancer and Andrea Chalupa. If you like what we do, leave serve you and items it helps us reach more listeners and check at our patriotic and keeps us going and also subscribe to us on Youtube are production managers are Nicholas Torres and Carlin Dago or episodes are edited by Nicholas Torres and our patriots. Exclusive content is edited by Carlin Dago original music and gasoline nation is produced by David. White had Martin. Nick Farr Damian Ariaca Carlin diggle our logo design was donated to us by Hamish Smith of the new york-based firm order. Thank you so much Hamish Gasoline nation like to thank our supporters at the producer level on Patriot one laurel be Stephanie Brandy Mark stags Alexander Rachel. Winder Stephanie, Kaye reasoner. Dunston. John Millet Michael. Lacey W bright side counseling David East Shannon NASC- Ida Chris Fellow dodie Pop Kristen Readiness Suzanne McFadden Gabriel Ara. Ben We in Amy. Tiemann. Susan L. Powell Michelle swearing-in. Rich. Holcomb Shawn McDonald Jeremy Thomson Thomas Shabby. Julie Matthews, Mark Mark Barbara Kitsch riffing row matthew. Schanberg the annual pass already Kristin. Kuster Benjamin Golota Kyw Gillis Toby Sharon hat trick. He's got shock William Barry Reeves Janet. Robinson. Johnny trix Richard. Smith Emmy. Kevin Gannon Sandra Collins Michael Steiner Oliver. Ash. Ren Cat Cooper. Katie Missouri's John Laughlin Jeff Thomson, Evan Rose More Ray Alba. Leo Chiluba. Carol Gosta Michael Wooldridge Greg. Primer Fontaine Carpenter Jason Banke Marcus J. Trent. Joe Darcy and Marshall. Lost my place. Sorry Victoria, non Solomon Hikes George Hughes Christine were again Theo Sing Field Matt Peres. Nicole Sphere Kelly. Ranson Ryan to Juden Gustav Hosby Kristeva Tally Adam Levine. Breen. Murphy Michelle. Dash. Gen Zylstra F- Rasmussen Yawn Yawn thackery lemon Dorothy comic Victoria Olsen alabana Jason Rita Margaret Mo z white rich craw. Allen. Lou. Brian Collins Lisa Aflame. Katherine Anderson Corinna Lawrence Graham Mike Trip Akot. Diana Gallaher John Ripley. Ethan Man Jennifer Slavic Rhonda White. Yet it's Ma. David Porter Kate Cotton Lorraine W Todd Lynch Schneider Kevin Garnett. Jared Lombardo. Karen. Humphries. An Marshall Arena Guardia Eric. Kaplan Sonya. Bogdanovic. Tanya Chiluba. Thank you all for your support. We could not make this show without you. Yes. Thank you.

Nate Clare Andrea Chalupa Jay Babafunke jared Sarah Cancer Joe Darcy US Senate Jared Stephen Miller Greenfield Jane Willis Billie Booker Theresa Michigan Bob Ivanka Ben We White House
Wanted: work for humans

FT Tech Tonic

26:19 min | 1 year ago

Wanted: work for humans

"Some applications are too important to fail that's why Inter systems built software designed to handle your toughest challenges we believe in the power of partnership and committed to helping you solve your most critical interoperability scale ability and speed problems together we can elevate healthcare ensure the reliability about financial services since together we can solve anything see how we can support your mission at Inter Systems Dot com hello and welcome back to tectonic a show in which via technological unemployment pasta rounds of automation have almost all been mechanization we now have a new type of automation which is cognitive automation brave those astronauts were to go into space with the intelligence of a toaster this exponential growth in the power of computers a twenty one and a half million horses working in America nine hundred fifteen turned out to be Pecos and there are now two million horses in America that is really Allah and nothing else so when the machines took the horses muscle jobs the horses on employed in Nineteen fifteen at the moment in all of the states Mark Green in this map the most common job description is truck driver but it won't be for long summer known as Moore's law and there are people who will tell you that Moore's law is dead or dying and it's not true there is plenty more more it's just evolving which is what it's already done that was Mike wooldridge professor of computer science at Oxford University he took part in a debate chaired by my colleague meadow meter merger and in one thousand nine hundred that number went down to about forty percent and now it's down to around one percent in the long run that wasn't a massive problem for humans because when the and I think that in the medium and I think twenty five thirty five years it's going to do what a lot of people talk about and then immediately deny which is that good afternoon you're very clever I know that because you read the tea so you know that the smartphone in your pocket has more compute power than surrender of decoded let's start with you Kalam tell us why you think we are GonNa take over and we're going to have no jobs left about what happens when robots can do most of the work humans do they were joined onstage by Callum Chase of the economic singularity club and Catherine Posses Erica about a million here what are they going to do next the thing is machines have some unfair advantages which apply to most of our jobs that don't eighteen months or less good toaster now has more compute power than Nassar had in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine which makes you think how incredibly we look at the way technology is changing our lives I'm John Thornhill Innovation Editor of the Financial Times in London in this episode we're returning to the tectonic stage at the Marshall Fleet very quickly because human driver's contribute about half of the cost of the vehicle they operate and there are about five million professional drivers Z. large-scale inequality at the moment all the lessons of history to me suggests that actually the way that we're going to be going is large gave inequality we're gonNA take all our jobs automation now what's amazing of course is not new in eighteen hundred eighty percent of all Americans who worked worked on farms not as FT weekend festival for debate on the future of work either we will see everybody just in their lifestyles or we in the next ten years probably in the next five years self driving vehicles are going to be ready for primetime when they are they will sweep across the commercial fleet not necessarily the privately but skeptics about technological unemployment are really just not thinking far enough into the future and possibly not taking seriously the incredible power of exponential growth they had when they sent me a launched onto the moon and that is true but this out of date thanks to the exponential growth in the power of our computers get twice as powerful now in the short term ten years fifteen years I do not think this will cause technological unemployment instead I think what will happen is there'll be a lot more churn we so if we are going to have to figure out how to pay for a world in which the no jobs what do we do unfortunately I do not think the answer is currently means took our muscle jobs we have something to offer it we had our cognitive abilities but it was a big problem for the horse the Horse had great muscle I think we do have to take seriously the possibility that we're going to have massive widespread technological unemployment because machines will do pretty much everything that we can do for money tired get sick they don't fall out with each other they don't even go to sleep but most important of all they're getting twice as capable every eighteen months and we're not we have to do is make everybody rich and this is gonNA sound really bizarre I think there is a way to do that and I think it is called the abundance economy also known as the Star Trek economy fashionable in the mainstream idea of universal basic income because the little word in the middle gives away the fact that that is really just a way to make everybody poor and instead old of our children and our grandchildren really wonderful but we do have to start taking technological unemployment seriously as a possibility things so some examples facial recognition it's a fact it's a scientific fact computers are better at recognizing faces and pictures than people are the cheaper better and faster than us now a lot of people probably most people pour scorn on this idea but I think a lot of this disagreement comes down to a matter of timing translation just twenty years ago that was no prospect of practically usable automated translation nobody thought it was going to happen anytime soon which we make all the goods and services that you need for very very good standard living where he made them nearly free I think if we can do that we can make the sort of capabilities that people have that's not going to happen anytime soon if the happens at all and there is a debate about whether it will happen at all it's in the distant future it's not something that people out completely mundane we do it every time we go on holiday I was in Shanghai two weeks ago I used it to tell me how to just the air conditioner in my room and it didn't do a perfect job I'm gonNA have to get used to changing our jobs and in fact our entire careers more and more often so great you recalled Catherine to help us do that but in the longer term the medium-term laptops and now you've got a supercomputer in your pocket and that's all possible because of the microprocessor the end of the seventy s everybody realized that there was that kind of a I which is generally I is nowhere on the horizons the idea of having machines that are conscious sentient have the full range hey I is everybody thinks they know something about Arcus they watch TV and read books and movies and the problem is is not like the that you see heart of your computer and before microprocessors developed a computer occupied an entire room and cost millions of pounds after that they were on desks then occasions of that and what you can do with that you can do some scary things with it but you can also do an enormous number of beneficial things with it the implications of that kind of thing are enormous automated in this room are likely to be concerned about the advances that we've seen which are real are focused on getting to do very very narrow it'd be one big gap year the short answer to that is I fear not the first thing to say is the debate over having now about how ai and scholar. Michael can you tell us whether you agree with calame and you think a I is out of position where it can do everything that we all can shape Elodie why didn't it happen that way certainly the microprocessor delivered enormous economic benefits but that didn't translate it's interesting because it's something that we think is trivial but actually turns out to be terribly terribly difficult for computers to get them to getting computers to do those tiny Suedes of unemployment which would follow and there were serious debates at the time about the idea that we would be working a three day week and we would use necessary so here's a question I looked up on the train on the way here what's the world population today so it's obviously there's some uncertainty but it's about seven point seven to eight more or less time for all of us why not as a whole bunch of reasons one of the most important is that standards of living did not stay the same we consumed it'd be a huge range of automation of tasks and the biggest opportunities were in factories and there was enormous fear the time about the huge if we were all prepared to have considerably simpler standards of living than technology can free up our time but that's depending on movies that we see in movies about having robot servants and robot butlers and the Knight Rider cars and all that kind of stuff the reality is that but he did a job that completely transformed my experience there so is about getting computers to do tiny narrow little things like driving cars to make it feasible and all these other technologies would have to deliver economic benefits darndest don't really see them delivering on the scale that would ostra data I certainly agree with much of what you said Kellerman I think most of the community that I work with on a daily basis with definitely agree with most of it so I would just say a little bit about what simply I can't imagine voting for it let people have jobs will resent people who don't have jobs and that's the nature of human society I think we would have to see eh economic difficulties on a completely unprecedented scale before there was any kind of political will to make universal basic income happen but also is a fair and reasonable thank you very much so I think the minimal of the debate that went on at the end of the nineteen seventies in the beginning of the one thousand nine hundred eighty s when the advent of the microprocessor and the microprocessor is the chip in narrow the past six so that's what it is it's about getting machines to do things which currently require brains so the big question is the future Ah Leisure time that that freed up to go to the festival read Plato or do Shakespeare plays or something people seriously believed that that was point of view is that human nature or evil capitalist society steers us into consuming more we can have a debate about whether that's the case be relevant anymore and how you working with corporate Britain rest of the world to make us more relevant for this inevitability so much more we went on more holidays we had Francia cars we wanted apple watches and CD players and tablet computers and to pay for all that stuff we had to work life style has to adjust to a simpler way of living I think for example we see some signs of this right I think in twenty years time the idea of weekend city breaks technology is just one of a whole range of emerging technologies how are they going to change the nature of work in society has exactly the same tone nine ten billion people at hempstead lifestyles California middle class lifestyles cook the world feasibly support that technological change and there has been huge technological change when you actually open the doors of most businesses globally the most advanced techniques get to combat universal basic income. I don't really believe that universal basic income on a large scale and in the way that it's envisaged is going to happen anytime soon technology but it's the squishy bits off the human beings which essentially have not evolved and changed and fundamentally birth people with those lifestyles now we could sit down and work through two sons but I think answering just no it is not feasible for the world to support that scale of popular a billion people and at some point in the next couple of decades it will hit let's say ten billion people so here's my question to you can the world sustain agreement here between the two of us there are certain tasks narrow talks with an ai that all going to replace some forms of work and I think that's why Katherine comes in because is large-scale inequality so the task for us is to try to reduce inequality as much as possible and to try to ensure that the society we construct Katherine does is try and upscale humans all of us here today to make us relevant to this future so why don't you jump in and tell us what are the jobs we think are not replaced by machines quota working insurance in his fifties pen and paper couldn't even really operate nextel spreadsheets within three months he managed to upskill you justin their lifestyles or we will see large-scale inequality at the moment all the lessons of history to me suggests that actually the way that we're going to be going flying off to Barcelona start to seem a little bit implausible because there is a coming movement that actually that is just not a sustainable today that either we will see everybody Shen that standard of living the inevitable consequence for that to me is either the world has to adjust its look was what percentage of those people can be upskilled every skilled into workers of the future whatever that may be and there's a huge assumption education system hasn't changed so we've been working with a lot of adults looking at who can we upscale and who can we re skill for the future of work the future of what report came out along but I said it's a huge number of things that people do can just be directly automated by computer and in particular the new way since we launched we started saying that we teach anyone how to code in a single day and today we're actually re-skilling also skills like cybersecurity live long learning what more can we be doing in the UK to encourage people to do that so if we're talking about the jobs that are being lost and new skills can in data analytics we're working with people who have never learned this stuff before and get off insight into how businesses all across the world grappling with this eighteen eighteen up to seventy years old and looking at the skills transformation that happens only last year we working one learner in the center of that fifty cents was per week of learning and learning on the job in the job what should we be learning so the way that we do it with our learners is it's not taking people out of the reskill requalify and get a job in their data analytics team transformation of skills is possible and the way that we're going to do that is by fun I can understand what's going on in its environment around it because all of the problems in driverless cars to do with knowing what's around you what's in your environment that's a pedestrian the people over the age of eighteen upskill reskill reinvent their careers and that's something that I passionately do not believe we've been working with people over the the mentally rethinking our education system and lifelong learning so for me I want to see real change at government level in terms of how are we going to people have retrenched on their predictions about when it's going to happen but it is completely inevitable in the same way that the aircraft revolution was inevitable after Kitty Hall in Nineteen ninety-three driverless cars will happen if your job just involves driving a car around a city like London or routine driving on search engine company in China Huge Tech Company and he said any decision that a human can make in one second we can automate with I and at first sight well one second doesn't sound kind of scripted jobs will go the jobs that are going to be most resistance are exactly the squishy jobs I think it's the jobs which involve human skills so we hear about a I in medicine for example it's a fact computers can recognize tumors on xrays better than people can workplace this is on the job learning working with your own individual challenges your business challenges but the most important things see is engaged in the learning agenda Asoka and so making sense of all of that information so what does that mean I think the driverless car revolution I mean it's had a few hiccups recently and of you talk about what you think are jobs that are going to be done really well by even ai we have today or maybe five to ten years and what role they definitely do it we don't have a clue how to automate that kind of stuff so doctors which is the squishy est all squishy professions I think donned people's lifelong learning careers don't think this is a vast gap here I don't think we're going to be traveling around the world but I do think potentially we should be looking at four to eight the time being interestingly the other class of jobs are jokes which involve dexterity we don't have robot hands remotely as good as essentially you're just answering the phone and following a script without any real human judgment than your job will go because the part of your brain that's actually being running but in reality the world of businesses not being operated like that and when you look at the reasons why really it's about the fact the testes so much innovation when it comes oh gee that's being deployed in those businesses was invented in the nineteen eighties it's xl spreadsheets. You know we talk about a are we talk about artificial intelligence machine the headline prediction was forty seven percent of jobs in the United States. We're going to be amenable to automation one of my colleagues Carl Frei but that's not all a doctor does when you meet with your GP and you talk to your doctor about your chest pains or the fat you can't sleep at night they look at you in the eye a human being and they use all their experience from the human world to make judgments about you and they may not be able to tell you exactly how they do it but I'm twenty fourteen it predicted the fifty

Inter systems Carl Frei United States Michael calame ten years eighteen months twenty years one second eighteen hundred eighty percen twenty five thirty five years forty seven percent fifteen years forty percent seventy years three months one percent five years three day
2020 Survival Guide Special

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

22:42 min | 8 months ago

2020 Survival Guide Special

"Hey everyone it's Andrea with gas nation. We have to very important interviews in this twenty twenties survival guide special. We hope that you are inspired by the exciting opportunities. We have this election cycle to do our bit to pull out the weeds fascism from the root by working hard to trump proof our democracy, this election cycle a few are doing anything to get out the vote if you're going to take advantage of the great opportunities we have for you in this special. Then please let us know by Tweeting Act Gas. Nation on twitter. Let us know what you. Are Doing this election cycle to get out the vote and I will re tweet it and from the group that we get sending us your plan to help trump proof our democracy. We will be selecting some folks to come onto gas nation in the New Year and share your dreams for rebuilding our democracy. Thank you all for your support of this show. The baby is here. So I've got to go and do what you can to fight like hell because this is one of the last chance we have. Okay this is not a drill. Thank you, everyone. Okay gaslight nation listeners. We are here with every district, the CO founder and executive director Nicole. Hobbs every district essential organization we talk a lot about on gasoline nation they are working tremendously hard to undo years of damaging work by Karl Rove and others by turning state governments blue the state governments determined quality of life from healthcare to voting laws and election security. So this is the all essential work to trump proof and Putin proof our democracy. So Nicole is gonNA walk us through what every district strategy is for twenty twenty. Will thank you so much always happy to be here really want to focus in today on the states where every district is making investment and where Democrats have strong opportunities to flip chambers and make other strategic gains. This year, I'll start with Pennsylvania estate where Democrats are in a strong position to flip both chambers of the legislature, and because we already controlled the governorship this turn Pennsylvania into a democratic trifecta state putting Democrats in charge the redistricting process next year, and also giving Democrats a strong opportunity to move forward on voting rights and other key policy issues. In the Senate Democrats need to flip four seats, this would tie the chamber and effectively give them control and in the State House. Democrats need to flip nine seats which would allow them to flip that chamber. In Arizona Democrats are in a strong position in that state to flip both. Of the legislature in the Senate Democrats need to flip three seats and in the State House Democrats need to flip chew seats in Iowa Democrats have a strong opportunity to flip the State House or they only need to flip four seats to flip that Chamber Michigan. Key Stay in Twenty Twenty Democrats have strong opportunity to flip the Michigan State House needing only four more seats to flip that chamber this year in two thousand eighteen governor Gretchen whitmer one four currently Republican held state legislative seats, which gives Democrats a really strong opportunity to win back that chamber this year in North Carolina this is another state where Democrats have strong opportunity to turn North Carolina into democratic try effect. Estate, we have a really strong democratic governor in the state who seems to be in a good position to win reelection this year, and if Democrats can flip five states Senate seats and six State House seats, which is doable. This year in particular because Democrats are running under new APPS that are even more favorable for democratic. JANCIS. To flip both chambers of the legislature we can turn north. Carolina into a democratic. State in Texas. Democrats are in a strong position to flip the state. House this year, which would give Democrats a really strong negotiating position as we head into redistricting and estate at has previously been controlled by Republicans at all levels of government again, what happened in twenty eighteen and not state in Beto running for the US Senate gave us the path to a majority in the State House this year because Democrats need to flip nine seats to flip the State House and Beto O'Rourke. One nine currently Republican held State House seats. Wow. That's amazing. You made me tear up with. With relief that were doing a lot better than than I thought we were and that's thanks to grassroots powerhouses like yours. Thank you for everything that you do every district and for fighting in every district. Thank you. Also happy to highlight a few other states out where there are opportunities for Democrats to make important gains up getting to those chamber flips are a little bit more of an outside opportunity. This year at two states, every district is making investments are Ohio and Kansas fees are states where we have an opportunity to break. Republicans super majorities in those states, which would give Democrats a really important lever of power as we had into a redistricting year and also on issues of voting rights and key policy. Three other states where in the state houses in particular Democrats, have an opportunity to win a significant number of seats and if we really do see a strong wave environment this year where there is a possibility to flip those state houses are Wisconsin Florida and Georgia. That's great and what's really interesting is that local elections local candidates like the ones that you support Their like the local newspapers in terms of how local news works to beyond the ground confronting local corruption. There's one of the best. Vaccines against local. Corruption is. Our local journalists and by having these great local candidates on the ground that's also essential and building an infrastructure to keep a close eye on any election shenanigans by the Republicans including election hacking because you're strong groups on the ground, know the area very well they know the local authorities very well, and if anything seems off, they're the ones that could raise the alarm. Absolutely. I had someone asked me a question. Recently, how do I learn more about what Republicans are doing in these states? So I can educate themselves on the various ways that Republicans are trying to undermine voting rights and suppress the vote in states across the country what I said in response. Wise. Go to every district's twitter account. At every underscore district, we have twitter list of all of the candidates we've worked with since 2017 and the candidates that we've. Endorsed this year in twenty twenty. The best way to figure out what's happening in these states is to follow these candidates on twitter here what they're talking about. Because as you said, they really are the front lines who are on the ground in these places seeing what's happening and raising the alarm You know unfortunately more than we would hope is needed these days but they are really this critical arc against. The Republican voter suppression tactics that we're seeing so much of these days great and so how can people give money make donations large and small to these candidates? You have it on your website where they can just go to every district and pull up a state like Texas Pennsylvania Era Zona Kansas Iowa Ohio, and just give a lump sum to that state, and it's going to be equally distributed among those local candidates. Exactly, if you go to our website, every district, dot us, we make it really easy for you to get involved and support candidates in these key target states right on our homepage, we have a map that shows are target states this year. If you click on one of those states, you can learn a little bit more about the opportunity and donate to our slate of candidates running in that state. If you want to maximize your impact across all of these states, you can donate to our top ten list, which we update weekly with the ten candidates that we've endorsed who are most in need of your support in that particular moment. Any amount that you can give makes a difference but if you can't give right now or if he wants to give and then do something more, it's also easier than ever to volunteer for state legislative candidates. If you go to the take action section of our website, we have a mobilized feed where you can look through volunteer opportunities are candidates which are pretty much all remote right now and sign up to help send texts, make phone calls, write postcards. and Get out the vote for these candidates in this highly untraditional election year. Great will you gave us a lot of really uplifting and? Urgent Information and I feel very motivated by it's a bank you so much Nicole Hobbs for coming on gasoline nation yet. Again, you're always welcome. Thank you for all the critical work that you're doing to restore democracy. Thank you so much for having me on the today. So welcome back to gas let nation Marissa Cabelas a CO founder of crush twenty twenty, which you can find on crush twenty twenty dot org. She's going to tell us how we can trump proof in. Putin proof our democracy by getting rid of all these complicit Republicans in ushering in a big blue wave of Democrats this election. Yeah. I am going to tell you how to do that. I'm thinking so much for having me back. We talk two years ago about crush the midterms, which was the platform I was working on then and crush twenty twenty is the next generation It's very simple. Anyone can use it. It's a digital platform you've got gotTa Crush Twenty Twenty Dot Org and you just answer a few simple questions about yourself on. Issues that matter to you the amount of time that you can give to volunteer from. Now through Election Day, humanity money that you could afford to give to campaigns and a little bit about the different skills that you could offer a campaign, and once you go through that flow to less than two minutes, it spits out a personalized plan just for you for getting involved from a no matter where you are in the country. Fantastic and how is electoral map looking for Democrats? This election cycle, which races do we need to win to take the Senate? The Senate's actually looking really good from my perspective it's it's hard to say there's so many crazy factors going on right now between Kobe obviously, and the way the protests are being framed but I feel really good about it. The one that's been catching my Iowa is. A Joni Ernst race she's running against Theresa Greenfield his a Democrat who I think would bring a lot to the table and I think that racist been a little bit under the radar and I think that people should really give it a look obviously mean has been at the forefront of the conversation since you know the Cavenaugh hearings and Sarah Gideon's looking really good and she has a ton of money so I would say. Obviously, keep supporting that race, but there's a lot of races that need Bunny Montana. The Battle of the Steve's seem Dan's versus g book. Symbolic is Democrat there, and he is a really awesome guy who did a lot of revolutionary stuff as Governor Montana on for voting rights. So I would really check that out in north. Carolina is this kind of crazy dark horse that came out of nowhere but cal Cunningham has a real shot there. So those are a few that. I would would give luck and and also it's crazy. It's like the story playing out over four years a season one favorite. John, Asaf he's back is back in Georgia and he's running for a and he has a shot there, which is really exciting. So I feel like we can make this work rate and so Democrats. Need to win four Senate seats and hold onto the Senate seats already have an order to take away the speakership from Mitch McConnell exactly and want that really bad. Guess how is the House Looking for Democrats the houses looking good but we can't sleep on it either we have to fight like hell for every single seat a lot of the races that are vulnerable are I. House members that were part of the huge blue wave in twenty eighteen and as someone who worked really hard on that as I know. So many of us did I kind of feel protective over these people There's abuse thinking our in Iowa and there's any Kim New Jersey Max rose who's from New York? My hometown feel like really gotta protect Max. and. A joke. Cunningham was a huge surprise in South Carolina in twenty eighteen. So, there are a lot of first timers who really need our help so that they can become second-timers. There's one that always makes me laugh a little Bay Kendra Horn from Oklahoma's fifth district. I remember election night two, thousand, eighteen looking at times a list of the flip seats. and. Were familiar that we'd heard of before and use competitive races was like who is Kendra Horn where did she come from but she's actually been really great and she's the Lone Democrat from Oklahoma in the house. So protecting her is seems really important. So there's really not many seats that we can sleep on. I mean I think is going to be okay but. There's there's a lot of battles going on in every state in the country. And what about the White House one of the Electoral College win look like for the Democrats. So. There's so many states that could really go either way, which is kind of hard to comprehend at this playing with everything that's happened in the last four years but a lot of states are also undergoing demographic changes which would explain that the different electoral outcomes I mean, for example, Florida East to be the ultimate swing state If for those of US remember the two thousand elections, just still traumatizing to think about that used to be kind of like what's going to happen with Florida fees days I mean Biden has shown leads in Florida. I still feel a little bit. Unsure how that's GonNa work out, but we definitely have to make sure we now down Michigan Minnesota Wisconsin. Those Big Midwest states something that I am really excited to see how plays out is Texas I did a project with the Texas Democratic Party a few months back and me helped raise a ton of money because people are really excited about the prospect of Texas turning blue and it's actually the first time in a generation that that's really a possibility. The near Times has rated it a toss up at. This point which is just it blows my mind Sorry they say meeting Republican but it's still a possibility and I don't know I. Just it's a rapidly changing states getting younger it's getting more diverse. It's looking more like a California potentially so I wouldn't Texas I think we could win big there on election night. Great well, and so Biden needs to hold onto all the states that Hillary one in twenty sixteen, and then needs to flip three states that she lost in. That could be Pennsylvania Michigan Wisconsin. Florida Texas. So is that how it's looking for him his road to victory? I think. So I think that his message seems to be resonating with people there He's very well like he's doing the work he's traveling around as much as possible and Cova Times. So yeah. I am feeling cautiously optimistic at this point that is the way to be in fight like hell take nothing for granted. That's the number. One thing you there's no room for complacency. At this point, there is a little bit of a flashback to twenty sixteen looking at the polls and seeing Hillary having strong margins everywhere but. If the past is taught us anything it's that to quote Yogi Berra. Over results over exactly, complacency is poison. Alright, well, Marissa thank you so much and we invite all of our gasoline nation listeners to go to crush twenty twenty dot org and make your plan make your plan how you are going to be part of the big blue wave to wash the trump crime family out of the White House and they're complicit GOP battle Congress. So please get on that crush twenty, twenty dot org. Make your plan tweeted at gasoline nation at gasoline nation on twitter and will re tweet. It will share it just go and make your plan and we look forward to hearing how you are going to help us build the big blue wave? We Watch you encourage you to donate to your local food bank, which is experiencing spike in demand. We also encourage you to donate direct relief at direct relief dot org, which is supplying much needed protective gear to first responders working on the front lines in the US China and other hard hit parts of the world. We encourage you to donate to the International Rescue Committee a humanitarian relief organization helping refugees from Syria donate at rescued dot org, and if you want to help critically endangered orangutans already under pressure from the palm oil industry, donate their wrangling project at the Rangan Project Dot Org. Gasoline nation is produced by Sarah. Hens ear. Andrea Chiluba. If you like what we do, leave us a review and I tunes, it helps us reach more listeners and check out our patriot. It keeps US going and also subscribe to our new Youtube Channel our production managers are Nicholas Torres Carlin Dago are episodes are edited by Nicholas, Torres and our patriotic exclusive content is edited by original music and gasoline nation is produced by David. White had Martin Vista and Berg Nick Farr, Damian Ariaca and Carlin. Our logo design was donated to us by Hamish Smith of the new york-based firm order. Thank you so much cash gasoline nation would like to thank her supporters at the producer level on. Patriotic Suzanne McFadden. Gabrielle our Ben Wheaton. Susan L. Powell Michelle Swears. Fish Shell swearing-in Rich Holcomb Shawn McDonald Jeremy Thomson Thomas Chevy Kelsey Malcolm Julie. Matthews David Walker Mark Mark Barbara Kit trench rippin row matthew. ALMAC littler Aretha Carol. Strong Schanberg. Daniel passarella eighty kristen coaster. 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Democrats twenty twenty Twenty Twenty Democrats twitter Senate State House Iowa Andrea Chiluba Pennsylvania Twenty Twenty Dot Nicole Hobbs Nicole Texas Putin crush twenty twenty Carolina cal Cunningham
The Wide No Cover - The 'Bool Special Edition Day 1

Three Wide No Cover

23:46 min | 2 years ago

The Wide No Cover - The 'Bool Special Edition Day 1

"Horses throw more. What's he doing on these now Cava? Yes. She's back. Hello and welcome to three wide nyc. Cava? I'm your host meek walks a little different asset today because we are down at the bull three days in a row with coming to you live on rising dot com and the man's more. Rod Julian Vallance, he would be excited to be here you up at night, and it's absolutely sensational. We to Bahia woke up it was hot and dusty. I'll tell you what motive and gets McCollum with the sun today. Sensational conditions for the blue and Solomon Marshall. Now, these pies holds very special memories for you. You've been absolutely busting to tell us wise. They might he's your platform. Dial add standing get to everybody. I I of the bull. How excited I we? Well, I'll just remember growing up in a rising family needing the ID's. It was Jimmy hula. And he's trying fate's outstanding. Every MAs grow. Vicky Douglas and the jockeys like Harry grey Nikon, Brian constable, Jamie Evans pipe man, Brody, Scott. I will just absolutely unbelievable horsemen to win these big rices either the stakes but not ninety nine boy. Boys. She'll take you back is a nineteen year old to win the wool cap on fries. Delight for Maxine ten heartache the bucket list stuff. I was in front with the bat. Oh, fifty two gal three in front of looked across the ankle Terry who had something on a Sheila Goto, and I'll never ever forget winning the water. We'll covets the gripe moment. But maybe it'd be back. Thanks josie. This is one of many times, Dan, he for you. What does the bull into you might you? I think it's a great opportunity for everybody in the industry to come together. We've got the people that have -solutely loved the who is you've got the people that absolutely love the ROY who working on their craft. It's a sensational thing over the jumps the flat. And then you've got the baiting ring the bidding ring is absolutely sensational. That's what I love is the Pont and the Ponte's really robust. Hopefully, we're fighting one percent one and a half percent throughout the H horse. The biddings guy to be sensation. We'll see some plunges. It's gonna be some good fun. They go, and you can tell. What up about these and something differently? We doing to die Josie. Usually does the track report. But it's these just sort of commun- in how cross and more understanding that you actually got need to be with detract, manage absolutely could wind to get on a coolest prop up because it looks absolutely outstanding. We'd call it up at Daniel Lumberton chicken, Daniel alums, and he's a trek manager walkable the might cannibal diwaniyas each Daniel. This trek looks absolutely amazing. Congratulations. Thanks very much. The almost done a pair work to get to get it to this day. So they've done a long ale's a little weight gains. They get the the last time he writes, he was at the twenty ninth a month. It was so we were in the rows at the four position that day. So we had a bit of Ryan that die. So it talked that a little bit. But it's come back pretty well. And Riley in the true now few to walk this track. What would you think about it, generally, Dan, the, Dan the rouse, the best part of the track here in more in my opinion? Especially when it's true doesn't get used as much as the rest of the track. And it's it's really good. Kaisei joke shoulders. Why Heim is the faints? Now, you gotta prepared to tracks. Obviously the jumps on the inside. And the flat Kohl's what about the writings for the two courses. It's slightly different. Yes. The mind tracks genuine, soft six the paddock's, probably a touch heavier. Maybe we soft soft seven, but it's all natural grand through the panicked. So it's a soft seven soft seeks and also goes across three roads, which changes the writing louvred as well. Absolutely sensational. Your team he might because now you have track Gallup's yet. He's staple trials also heavy horses. Bet I one hundred hulce's during the week by trialing and galloping on this track project today. Yeah. So we had one hundred holes as he lost mine. Zyppah Staples schools, and then we had another ten whole scallop on the Saturday morning. And then we had another ten horses do staple schools here on Sunday. So we've had quite a few blue the traffic IV in last week was a day one absolutely perfect shortest way defense with expecting a little bit of rain on Wednesday. We after Daito. Yes. So at this time we predict Evita Ryan on the Wednesday night, which shouldn't affect the rising on the Wednesday. But. Affect the writing for Thursday. So hopefully, get a great deal dealer. Ryan died in the self Ryan. But we'll give the role and try and keep as much water out of the profile. It's possible. Fantastic. Now you had a little bit of water during the week. How much water have you had to put on the track up to the staple schools we'd had sixty meals, but that was nearly a week and a half ago and asked in the last seven days, we've put on ten mills and we've had another point four or Ryan on that town. Perfect conditions for day one. Yeah. Absolutely. Mickey mass jumps rising flat rising you can't do anymore. Kenya? Not not anymore. Running the dawn much sleep. You've you had in the last couple of days. I not a great deal. I would've thought give me a hug by. Thanks, my as Daniel lumps in outstanding job diwan of the Bulwer away voice. We'll tell you what Josie. Although that was pretty good. My what do you think had any not since I know? But really important he upon his Intel talking about that inside the seeks flat. Rices? Oh, I think the ROY Moore be the spot to be today also worth noting thirty K northerly. So it's a tile wind in the strike win. It's tile windy in the strike most tracks on. On Spade is the place to be so I think on spayed rile especially for those flat races, pundits Josie is very rarely wrong. Well, down on that report to stay. Let's have a look at first rice. We're gonna take your pot. He'd the broadly now slow poke Rodriguez has come out, which means gold medals is our favorite currently, the almost ten gold medals. Of course, winning the broadly grant annual Dabo Vaas g followed by Domo at three sixty bit of about three seventy eleven hours of Evan half. What is it there? I stay. Mcevoy at ten dollars best to the rest Josie. Really good rice, look gold medals. He wanted loss g got to take the penalties. So you talk about the penalty can be always really difficult when a horse has the penalty, but worth noting with these rights to broil the last three out of the last four winners have one with the penalty Zidane wanted with the penalty through the penalty. Impelled me I went out with a penalty as well. So it can be done dining too big way. It's going to stop gold medals footing on top. I think he's going just as well as he was last year. He ran a similar toy. Fifth clause this year in the terrain copy finished in the terrain coupla Jeep eight night links very similar or I think even though it depending gold medals will win Jomo. He's very good on the flat. He's just go to just be able to learn to jump a little bit bitter. If he does if he puts it altogether Domo mo- more be the one because he might be be quicker. But I'm going gold medals. I think he'll jump cleaner. And I think you win very good Josie esta. Yeah, he's the class run a gold medals and his shorts to flat counts, very similar to lash. Jeez. Preparation and a staple trial between having Charrier off the star gold medal. So he's clearly on top. But Mella MO and also bit of a lead. They had that steeple trial. He jeering the, and I'll tell you what mellow mo- looked absolutely outstanding. He's a big boy he lit up he jumped he was switched off at the six hundred Motomachi had plenty to give he's gonna run your a huge rice and bit of a lead. He was really happy skipping. I've at is that jumps as well during the week, but gold medals the class ran out on top. Die to be out a stray and not the tip the champion, the he, and I go minerals won the double Ghosh G notes on how hot is that tax? All I think it's very very hot. Absolutely. There's an idea that but you could say probably from on Tuesday when he did win last year just had that print perfectly. Listen to him in walled. Spike, spike, speak about it. And he just said he just threw that run. So well, so he's always going to be really hard to Bates. It aims always a tougher debater. Zooms coming for a little bit of a different print than he was lost you but was thinking bad him on Thursday was a dingo battling with him last year. Absolutely outstanding. And there's a little bit of the day for you. Mickey will I either bull when you're either rice a little bit and never. He did maybe hit Dan to the beach did. Gold medals did last year and backup to the Wednesday Thursday. Neither they can't imagine going down there. It'd be chilly. Familial thing as a couple of BAAs at the back that are going on. I'm on the apparently, this is a buy in town called the why does this? I'm more as a boob urge. And I'm going to have to check that will say how that goes on hot gentlemen will go to a break. Now when we come back. We're gonna have a look at a couple more rices. Also, we've got a really special around the country these way, and my understanding is I don't know if these true apparently pedal betas has been taken over by sports, but it's very hard Richard homicide. So he was allowed on course for plenty more coming up. Stay tuned on free one cow, and we'll be back soon. She's. Welcome back to the free wide Cava. We're going to take you a pot a couple of Rice's. Now. We're gonna have a good right side, which is a seventeen hundred Mehta. Handicap Guedes owes you five or currently at two dollars forty five. This is slot ahead of paramount spoil Paramus. Boy, sorry for almost twenty picky point is five fifty jumbo prints. Twelve dollars Voss wake thirteen dollars phone cost grass fifteen dollars and dodging bullets sixteen dollars Josie with back onto the flat team. I'd had is the map Luke Luke this small field. And not a lotta speeding. These rice whatsoever. This three horses that have go. The blink is back on dodging bullets gets. The blink is first home so expected to row forward. I think jumbo prints with the blink is back on. I think London folk with the blink is back on a row forward as well. But there's not a lot of speed when there's not a lot of speeding these coins is what do we look for? We looked for the host with the best turn of foot or think it's did sit to horse rice. I ended up settling on Paramus. Boy, just for the fact that I've afford eight hundred loss dot came in of a really fast rice one boy, call it a die. Oh, I think that's a really good platform. Really good profile. We speak about it before if you've got horses going up, and you want him coming at a fast Ron rice is and that's what these horses done. It's coming out of a fast, Ron rice Paramus, boy or think he can settle midfield. And I think it's got the turn of foot that eat can win. Biggest danger. Boy Faris quasar look its best form, he's probably seven eight hundred maters worn -able. These soft Tampa is best wins have been on soft. Hembo. Toy related rises. He'll get his chance to win their the to clear it I think they'll clear out in the market as well as they already have. But I think they'll even probably be more of a gap as we get closer to the rice. But of going with power miss boy, just ahead of as they go and Josie. So they smart we want if you want to maybe get on early hit I by coming year expect. So I think the market will really look these two guesses are very good day. How do you sit here as familiar he's the class runner? I know he's. As the five at it's pretty sure, folks. But I love his point nine second at MOVA Ville, the triple why last dot to a sheen rook, we'll do him the world or goodies attrac- and trip winner at these track. And he's sick into silence. I have a seventeen hundred meters coalfield that's good enough foam to win this race e only time track sideways. I the fiber all the wife of me or very good. Now looking at the next rice, we'll get to get out here. What was rise ten one hundred major rice says something a little bit shorter and favorite is grandview avenue. This is about more open. That's currently. Six dollars prints of seeks fifty atomic wizard at seven fifty joined by Royal boss strategic force, and I was fifty rasberry rose at nine dollars Labonte tie Josie tight here. Not too bad for your. Well, it's like that about I even. Era, decreed fifteen Manhattan spirit of fief day. One guy from all boys gymnasts at twenty bucks, a at twenty six Wooldridge and at twenty seven and Sierra Zulu at thirty one so gentlemen, Josie talk us through the map this these folks want. Yeah. It sure is looking to get at stikes if you're not in front he. Geez. I think you might be in some trouble. But if you do get the we not going to be laughing all the way is a while dating that spayed, I think atomic wizard will go forward gymnast. So I think roll forward as well. I think they'll be genuine tampo, especially your think the loss rice, there's plenty of horses. There is just so many different angles to this rice. It's a really tricky rice to Dorset prince of Venice as the horse that he's got some sensational ability. But where is he at he's had a year off? He's two wins at Hamilton before. He went for a break with sensational on heavy ground. Obviously the tracks gone to be soft. He so that's going to suit him. He's had a judge. Jump at. It was okay. But yeah, it's a long time off look. I'm taping him all I would follow. He punches the market. He's going to be a great God. There are just so many horses. Resuming. There's been some good support for Royal boss. Dan, the bottom. So that's suggesting he's come back. Well, for these Mika Leary here is obviously gonna run really. Well, it's probably ready ready to rock and roll. But I'm going prince of Venezuela. I think the market is going to be a sensational guard. It's always a good guy. But I think it's going to be a sensational for this rice. Prince Venezuela me diamond Thornton Hayes writing sensationally at the moment. We always talk about jockeys and China's we should be following their enra- will die me and thought and fourteen from he's lost ninety two. He's going into ran twenty percent. So he's a jockey that. I think will have a really good countable there and Josie. What what are we ask in terms of the Malcolm Moos walkable thirty rices three days? It does get tough and it can be a little bit of a graveyard for cash. However, if we're following the money in the Rice's out of the threat is that a pretty good is that a good pine or is it look at Ken bay. It's a very different carnival that when we're always going to have because there's no daycare. We they she usually though would just be backed and I will winning. That's not happening the issue. So look it's going to be new and original say what happens with these carnival in terms of the market, but the market he's always such a great guy because the market is just going to be so ROY bust, they go they might you say these one panning out well as a whole cold, Royal Bossier, the from tamyra Leary, they only get it. Right. When there's money these is always round. Well, now, stop he. Now, remember on Daiva was he living dollars into dollars in finished what close to golden highlight. That's good foam main one third up that preparation and that form to Grammy who city class. That's good enough Amman guide to stop. I think these horses primed to win. He of the eleven hundred made is the benchmark sixty four really well-suited. So as gills mentioned boy rice, ten watch for those boy ten watch for the shift in the market and the money because. Oregon these wolves just be the get out shopping around seven dollars fifty right now. So you're getting a really good price wouldn't surprise me this tumbled in in the last race. So Royal Boston may on top folks, the guys so both young and sought of the five of their Oviously goes. And it's very with these when we say, it's it's a good one. I just say Josie because anybody you can get involved. And if you go the raw one you're gonna make money because there's a lot of value to be had. It's playing a court to has an agility when markets I've been to big three days we were talking about at sports bit. And you sit the markets for sports bitten we would just looking at the early money coming through it was it was pretty quad early doors. But it's a little bit of a really good push this morning. Yeah. Look, it's been quiets especially in rice tame, but it's worth noting. There's a couple of other who is not enough. We'll get them to go through them. But honorable mentioning rice, no one has been really heavily supported. We'll be lying that all day. We think it's a bit of a risk and Piccadilly straits by really well supported in the two year old rice, look, there's things. Horses that have been backed by. It's interesting the we'll we'll go to another break. Now when we come back. We're going to get some motifs for you. And rich Thomasson is going to buy you. Hello and welcome back to three wide Nike by air fiber. Tom of the show is usually when we go around the country, but boys the graphics departments been doing some work. It's time to go around the boo. Good. Wanted a new single. We got one we're getting out around the blast. It's gonna work. It'll be differently. It's Pule warning this week. So Josie you're gonna give us your best. You're gonna give us three esta you're going to give us three. And amazingly they've taken each other on in pretty much every ri- so Josie go we following in here. Look I'm going with on speed horses today. I just think these northerly will advantage is horses on the spe. We spoke a better with Dan that the riot market applies to bay rice for number ten Lord of the tooth. Look. I think these horses absolutely ready to win this rice. Blink his go on. I just laid out in the street last started Hamilton that rice when half a second. So I'd stand at Tom. We love horses coming at a fast, Ron Rice's Lord of the turf of me. I am absolutely petrified of the one day on the bottom with the blink his and gelded blink I home. And then when you got it since two thousand sixteen punt is we've been doing some stats if you backed every horse it was blinking and gelded you'd be making it twenty. Eight percent on your profit on your turn about you. These gist an absolute Phillips. I scared of that who was Dan the bottom line the budget and young Yod rice seven number two in Nashville sand. I think it will roll forward. I think it will be the ones obeyed are thinking more. If you're running in Cup next year. It's a noise and in rice. No. And I'm going with the Spade horse here to bit of value Juku trying on the track just then get more in the ROY spot and run really well Juku us, they guy very good Josie is yet same Rice's Josie. And you wouldn't believe it separate selections to you know, she was talking about that Santos nitsa love team, busted and then young. I've really e- mocked these countable they bringing a strong team that she that whole code Mike Mikey can he's paying gowdy gets the blink zone. Remember on DIVY was five dollars into three dollars ninety eagle held up at a volatile stage at the four hundred meter by. And he couldn't go on with it. And that stop diminish tracks. He was put at mentioned that he's playing gal. The blink is go on. He's drawn a little awkward. You got five fifty to find out there, folks. So make it count for me rice seven Miramar for me this horse of being prompted these rice all join because he can row food mirror. Mary still prince over twenty four hundred and that was a genuine tested sand. And then he went through to steal prince at Bendigo, you know, he's one scene steal prince. He's Frank that form he's at two runs in. He's ready now he's proven at the trip. Fifty five kilos roles full, Jimmy winks, fourteen Maroney and sweets needy. All I'm happy to forgive these holes. He's last up because he wasn't able to get rolling at packet. Emmy jury one you got in the book seat, and he wasn't able to get rolling from the five hundred three hundred when you watch the replay. Now, we beat del Swinton. And he can't view two runs back. Those Willis's has since going on the one if Dell Swinton and camp view in this rice, that'd be pretty short sweet snitty five dollars fifty familiar, and I forget, that's a Tory full. He ran behind last homes being Frank with satori coming at and winning f limited look at that five fifty eight hundred three selections there. At the bowl today for me that you're talking to other on as always said young young more than when you're on the simul when you go against each other three in a row, and what's happened there on the draw damn boys? But Josie in a word who's your best of the three words Lord of the to my before the stay you best make it count mine. Right. Fleas? Betty, I think it's a really good smell of it. Oh. The teams that you're going to go and get ready. For beams gentlemen, is something that we never do on our show, but we're going to do it. Now, it is called a quasi. So we're going to have a look at accordion in multi, and we're actually going to say sign hour to the boys now because we're going to have some guests following this. But the free wide. No, cover quality is one three. I third in the first leg four five and eight in the second one three five nine eleven and thirteen in the third lake and we'll come home with two four five nine seventeen. Get your smartphones out taika photo that put it into your sports bed up and enjoy whereas we also, of course, have the very wide. No cover multi Lord of the turf, he's our both to place. So they to the guys do think you're going to be in the in the finish. Tudo was the pie Josie is actually going against as they is taking where he's I bought I think it will probably two dollars is is a bit of a is a bit of a spoil their for punches. Now on now joined boy one very gentlemen, and one one genuine mud rich Huddleston from sports bit Johns nine from Pontas. My what is going on you've sort of taken over here. All wear up Bain off the hall from your win if you'd follow him on tips or jeez our bed. But I thought jeez, have buddy goodies, the Buhl new in the right words. Rick mcintosh. We backsaw thought odd odd comeback on. We're gonna segment I'm actually going to my little stinger. Now, you've got your and now I think we're gonna we're gonna do it right now. It's still give me a laptop and Marcus off pint and an afternoon, and all I can count with everything. So we've got a sting, but we're gonna call this the mug punter the mug, of course, Lamey from punish dot com. The good punter. Was the penalty stinger? You know, Mark pint and the world is you're always the wall. What are you getting yourself into? He might not sure that that's not the most exciting. Never same. We'll see. Yes, it's not grinded old. So now, I understand I've been given a very very then. So you're both going to have one hundred dollars to pirates and any winnings way going to living legend, correct? Call one hundred dollars h h die. The blue will keep track of it. Now, I'm going to stop things off with you. Just cannot go poss- Lloyd Williams horse over the distance of the Mellon Cup aloft in racer three thirty two hundred made it happen. You guy Rome. They're almost fifty shades on Lloyd anymore. My what do you mean? It's not this is just going beautiful. He's Flemington before two years ago. Has gone out of the sticks before Kevin my. I'm going to lofty my first one, and my and fifty is going to go on LA love, which is hot. We'll just have one hundred dollars off for Regan. What are you having been to the diet? He's ways owing rice site. Luckily, trying Delekta absolutely loves it. He starts one win three placings. Join beautifully in. Barry three gets little five is. He's actually on. Ause? Thanks for joining us. We to say gypped I and obviously it's for good cost. So we'll get around that will help how these phones. Mar thank you so much for joining us on free wad Kaba gamble responsibly plays. But most importantly enjoy the bull, and we'll see you again tomorrow.

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