18 Burst results for "Woody Strode"

"woody strode" Discussed on The Audible with Feldman And Mandel

The Audible with Feldman And Mandel

07:33 min | 4 months ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Audible with Feldman And Mandel

"Twenty sixteen. Played running back made appearances running back for south carolina. State fifty five britain covey pretty young compared to that now where i think kobe is unique is that he's doing this over like he. He played a year then he went on his mission then he came back and he got hurt and had to register so if he does play the next two years his college career will span from twenty fifteen where by the way his first game as a youth. Was jim harbaugh. I cook game coach at michigan. Twenty fifteen to twenty twenty two. That i've never heard of twenty fifth now because the lds factor obviously here. Now we're factor in the code extension part. I think that certainly adds to it. But i do remember like taste. Em hill was like at a long stretch just again. I'm sure there's players that were not thinking of who went on missions. Were their you know. Their eligibility clock is not moving. But i think you factor in you know the baseball part like like our our colleague. Joel klatt i. I don't know how joe would've been joel. Played like minor league baseball for a few years. so i think you have guys who kinda you'll have that that side of it to where they were doing something else like you said chris. Lanky fit fit in that category as well. Can we get back to this. One question because i wanna I wanna give mike davies a little credit here because he did some of the math This question was about a couple of weeks ago about the the conference that would have the most former football players who turned into actors because I'd reach out to somebody. Usc and there's is a helluva usc itself would stack up at Let me just read to mike. Davies wrote Hey bruce following up on the o. J. simpson mark harmon. And joel. Mchale answer there have been a lot of college. Football players turned actors with woody strode and john wayne the earliest than a peak in the seventies and other peak in the direct to video action era. This i can't wait if you're if not the pac twelve. The big ten lineup looks the best lineup to me. He mentioned fred. The hammer williamson from your alma mater who is in a lot of movies and was I definitely remember him. Alex karras who went to iowa and was a great player there and then i know he was on webster and he was in blazing saddles. And i'm sure some other stuff. Look at bruce bringing out the imdb. I didn't know you were so i remember. I'm not all right. I'm not even on the imdb's part of it Dip butkus obviously. He also was on a on. A bunch of shows A former great player bubba smith. I remember bubba. Smith who was in police academy movies Great player michigan state rosie greer. Who was a great defense. A great linemen in the sixties and seventies as penn product also had some success. Now a few of these other names that come up are not big. Ten related I want to You've seen these. So i think it will help but terry crews. He's obviously been on a lot of stuff. He played at western michigan. Jim brown legendary football player. Syracuse obviously has been in a bunch of john matuzek. I knew john matuzek went to near tampa. I did not know. He went to missouri But he certainly was in sub. Burt reynolds as mentioned bill goldberg. Some of the names. You mentioned here now. Our pro wrestlers who have pivoted in their dwayne johnson Roman reigns brian bosworth. We meant he was mentioned in the question. Ben davidson Here this is a good one for san diego state car. Weather's and fred dryer. Both had really extensive acting careers. Merlin olsen neil. Did you know how. Neil from he played foot- modern family and the i knew he played football. I didn't know he went to youngstown. Six i remember hearing the story about how he had a like. He was in somebody's. Nfl camp at marinara who is on hill street. Blues ended a bunch of stuff. I knew he was. He was a really good running back at cornell. How long. I have a buddy who is in the same movie that it was like broken arrow that harry pow along. I was in dean. Cain was superman and he went to princeton. that's a good one all right so So i reached out to tim tessalone. Who's been at usc forever. And they're right. Oh yeah and then some so Is he really are no. I think he started in the late seventies. So but so i asked him i. Besides i knew john wayne. We talked about matt willett. Who has been a character actor and a bunch of stuff but then there's quite a bit more so mike henry who is a who is a tackle. He actually played tarzan Tim roth switch was a name. Like you've seen him in a bunch of stuff. He was an all american defensive end also on the oj team. Do you know patrick. Muldoon is patrick muldoon. I was a tight end. At usc in the mid eighties was on melrose. Place has been in a bunch of other things Allan graf who was he. He was a offense of wyman and had been a stuntman in a bunch of stuff but also was actually responsible for a lot of technical director. I think or technical consultant so a lot of football-related scenes he probably You know helped staff And then us has a freshman defensive. Back sierra right. Who is a big big recruit for them Has done a lot of acting. Modeling has been on. It was in training day Two broke girls and also in the upcoming twenty twenty one movie where he plays the son of lebron james in space jam. New legacy about That's great that. Tim came through with that. I knew he would he. He knows all that stuff by the way you. And i know the story well but will farrell. was an intern with intern. Right for tim. At the usc usc sports information office when he was a student there. We should probably wrap their. We've gone long. I'm okay with the fact that we went long. You know. it's been a while since we did like a super jam packed episode like this and and You know what. I'm i'm pretty excited right now. Bruce i'm feeling pretty good. I think that I'm feeling really optimistic right now. You know law. Good news going on the on the code front for one thing like i think i can start to really feel like we're going to have a real college football season with packed stadiums and games that don't get cancelled and whatnot so we hear on the automobile. I think Let let's let's keep ramping up to the season. I think there's gonna be people. Were a little down on last season but people are gonna fired up about the twenty twenty one season. We're here at the audible to to bring you people like bret bielema and mike loxley and we've got a couple of other Special guests in the in the offing. So keep coming back. Keep subscribing keep rating five stars. We'll see you.

Ben davidson Alex karras john matuzek matt willett patrick jim harbaugh Bruce mike loxley brian bosworth tim tessalone bret bielema Neil Allan graf Joel klatt Cain patrick muldoon bill goldberg joel iowa john wayne
"woody strode" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:26 min | 11 months ago

"woody strode" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Check out John Wayne and his relationship to and what he did for Ah, black actor, one of my favorite character actors named Woody strode Check that out. Check out that relationship. Check out John Wayne's relationship with the The Latino actor. Pedro Armendariz ce mispronouncing the last name? What they were best friends. And You know. John Wayne was married to Not one, but two. I believe Latinas and The way that John Wayne has been characterized. Ah! Based upon things that he has said. Eyes one thing but looking at the deeds of John Wayne. Again. I allude to the Hispanic actors names availing me right now and also the black actor Woody strode. And you might get a decidedly different picture of the Duke. And I'm sure if you do your homework properly. You will see that there's no reason to remove his name from this airport. All right? He has been John Wayne has been severely misrepresented. Throughout most of his his life. Was he a good actor? No. I don't think so. Oh, I love his movies. I adore them. I loved I seek him out. I love him. Um But John Wayne in every single movie played the same. The same guy, John Wayne. You know, but that's why John Wayne was so great. He was so good at playing John Wayne. Nobody else could play John Wayne other than John Wayne and John Wayne played John Wayne, and every John Wayne movie. Things are different now. We don't have actors that are like that. They're known for being them basically playing them wrapped in a character when was the last of them? You know? Kirk Douglas, another one to a degree. What was that? The The cowboy flick with John Wayne and anti Martin. They played brothers. Likely Brothers, You know, they look so much alike. Those films. I mean, just I could go on. I'll shut up now because I'm running late. It's time for a commercial break. But if you want to comment about thes banned movies, and you know how this triggering of so many white people who make up their.

John Wayne Woody strode Pedro Armendariz Kirk Douglas The Latino Martin
"woody strode" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"woody strode" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Byline. He is the son of the late. Los Angeles Rams Offensive Lineman. John Hockey played his college football and was a rams intern and he has written a very interesting book. It's his first book. And it's called Hollywood's team and the book takes a look at the rams of the nineteen fifties a time when Jim's dad played for them. And the rams were the first pro team west of the Mississippi the first to integrate the first team to reach a million fans and the I team with a TV contract and the rams were Hollywood's team and this book is their story A fascinating look at the rams from the inside. What did you find that you did not expect as you were researching and writing this book? Jim Boron Avenue beyond the book was a Labor of love. 'cause I started at As you said it's my first book. I'm not an author by background You know been in government and been you know had my own Marketing Firm. But when my dad passed away in two thousand cancer We did a memorial service friend. You know we're Irish. So at the end of the Servants we had a little celebration on my dad's life with a lot of his old teammates. Buddy who he played football with With around in the fifties and they were sitting around telling stories and one of my brothers. I'm the youngest of Seven. Hits me in the shoulder and says hey man I'm not a writer you are but you need to write these up piece of great story. So that's where it started and honestly I was just doing it to To give to my siblings and my mom and then I got had two boys and one of them's named after my dad. You know a few short years after that and so the book took me about ten years to write and I really just spent a Lotta time. We all kind of deal with the grief of losing a parent Talked to a lot of my dad's old friends both on their end and others. Not on the rams but in the league like Frank Gifford who played for the giants in Donovan played for the Colts and Sam Food played here in Washington. But for me. It was at the blast. I gotTA learn more about the my dad. Learn more about the rams and the fifty As you said they were You know kind of Hollywood team and that's why we named the book after Hollywood is ingrained but they were glamorous. They had a high powered offense a lot of big personality. So it's just a blast but I just love to putting putting dimensions on the stories. I had heard as a kid and hearing a few new as well give it a little bit of a history lesson on the rams being on the West Coast and being out in Hollywood. Yeah so they regionally from Cleveland they were the Cleveland. Rams and they were struggling in Cleveland owner. Dan Reeves Lives in the supermarket business. And you know bought the team for one hundred thousand bucks and and saw kind of a future of the country was moving west And so he moved the Rams and the forty to Los Angeles and the La Coliseum was where they hosted the Olympics And you know. They were the first team to move within the Mississippi River the first team to modern team and pro football to integrate a year before Jackie Robinson the first team television contract the first team with a logo on their helmets Fred Jerky was paid a dollar a helmet the paint the iconic ram horns on their I reach a million fans. They had the you know. Just a lot of kit history and filled hall of famers like normal Van Brooklyn Elroy crazy like I was there wide. Receiver Bob Waterfield is another one of their quarterback. Tom Fears and Dick Night Train Lane was All A fan defensive back less rector in the hall of fame linebacker but even the coaches did Gilman is in the hall of fame one of the founders of the modern passing game and Pete Rozelle was their public relations guy and general manager. Who became the Commissioner half out of Blake Commissioner? They call them at age. Thirty three even about hope is one of the minority owners so lots of big personalities and lots of history with the team and in fact then they're only twelve teams and they were not in the south Farther than the Redskins for the furthest others kit southern teams. There's no Dallas cowboys or like that so You know really kind of one the. Nfl is exploding. One of the things that I found interesting about this book is the story of how they became the first professional football team to integrate and it had to do with the lease for the stadium. Did it not exactly so when Dan Reeves wanted to move to to La the La Coliseum Commission which runs the Coliseum huge gigantic facility? Ironically where the rams moved back to playing now but la La was was integrated as a city in terms of city government et CETERA and Obviously making Not to where they needed to be but The calcium commission required that at the rams are gonNA move that they would have to integrate. It was also the the the right thing to do but they were often compelled to do it from the Coliseum Commission so Dan Reeves kind of saw. That and said okay. I'm GonNa find that two best players I can possibly get and so he got came to Washington and woody strode out of UCLA and unfortunately charisma on his long or dynamic Jackie Robinson but groundbreaking in many ways. Just like Jackie Robinson what was the reaction to the signing of those two black ballplayers well. It was It was a different time. And unfortunately you know we are countries struggled with race. And you know there are a lot of folks didn't like it Lot of fancy didn't like it seemed like the right thing to do and and you know the history of Los Angeles has one that post World War Two. There are a lot of people moving to Los Angeles. The population essentially doubled within. You know ten to fifteen year period up until nineteen sixty so. It was growing incredibly fast. You had a lot of kind of innovative people. Moving out for new opportunities so In Post World War Two with manufacturing Know kind of exploding in the aerospace industry there a Lotta jobs for African Americans so it had a bustling diverse community life. So on the whole it was it was a most folks Embraced it. That's not the you know without saying that some folks were you know had a difficulty with it. I will tell you. My Dad don't experience. His best friends are some of the African American players like Tank younger and he really you know. As a young guy he was in his mid twenties he would always tell stories. Just didn't understand why African Americans were treated differently Why they would go on road trips and again because there weren't any other teams they would do a number of their exhibition games and in Texas or Alabama etc. And you know he wouldn't theis buddies you'd say until they're on the field but he couldn't seem locker room. They didn't stand Sandwich House. I can't even driving vehicles to and from the stadium or though tells just because it was you know there was unfortunately part of the time you say in the book the signing of Washington caused all hell to break loose among the owners of the NFL. What was their problem with it. Well I think about it back. Then you know that was the forties in in teen. I'll give you an example of a team. You know you used to work for the Washington Post but the Redskins for example. We're the most southern team. And they were the last team to integrate and they had a huge radio network throughout the south So you know integrating for the Redskins was no just one team in as an example And thought it would be too too much of a negative to their fan base. So there were there. Were voices like that throughout the NFL. Thought that it would be a negative To have African Americans play in and be part of the game. Which of course you know is is an ethics as we think about it To most people but then was a you know there were some. You know a lot of sentiment. Unfortunately we're still doing some of that today right George. Preston Marshall was the owner of the Washington redskins and he was in open racist. There's just no doubt about it. I've heard a number of times knows no some of the stories as well exactly exactly and so. That's just one person and one example but there were other owners of that same type of ilk that you know. Change was too too difficult. And so you know Dan Reeves kind of really pushed the envelope and you know Again news the right thing in compelling himself because moved to Los Angeles but you know quickly You know more came started embrace African American players fortunately to the benefit of league. Because some you know do the best athletes should be gonNA feel. Yeah one of the things too is is at the West Coast and I know this living in San Francisco and particularly down in Los Angeles. They always liked successful teams. They like successful people and everything. And certainly the rams in their first heyday in la which was between nineteen forty nine in one thousand nine hundred fifty nine or make it fifty five played in that pre. Super Bowl Era an NFL championship games. Four times and they won one of them in nineteen fifty nine. What was the essence of their success early on early on? I mean they were in in this part of the reason we call it Hollywood's team 'cause they were. They were Kinda exciting glamorous but one of the reasons they were because they threw the ball all over the field. You know whether that was even sit. Gilman right he was an NFL Hall of. Famer but going was one of the first guys coaches who really embraced watching game film and Breaking Down Game Film and seeing that you could future the ball. Twenty or thirty yards downfield. You could speed up the game and you know have a lot more scoring of course owner loved it. Because you know touchdowns meant people sitting in the stands and the rams are constantly breaking records with the number of fans in the fifties. They had so they were. You Know Norm Van Brooklyn just looked it up the other day still director for five hundred fifty four yards in a season Nfl Hall of fame but he was checking it all over the place. So that was exciting. And that was You know innovative a lot of ways because you know prior to that there are you know. Football was known three yards and a cloud of dust. I know in talking to the angels and some other people that came out to the West Coast with the angels in Los Angeles It was usually pretty colorful teams. The angels I mean you had Boba Linski who I remember their former manager telling me told him to get rid of his gold cadillac because it could be seen on Hollywood and vine and everybody knew where he wasn't how light it was and so he did try to came up to the manager and he said I traded the car like he's suggested he said what did you get he. He said a Purple Cadillac. I what would the some of the stories of those guys in Los Angeles in those early days? Well you know it's it's funny around You know I said and again you know Hollywood was kind of imbued in the team and and like I said Bob Hope was one of the ours but you know people like Dianne Disney were was a Ram's wife she was married to Ron Miller They Walt Disney was there. The Games a lot You know hey opened Disneyland. Nineteen fifty five and believe it or not that there was built in less than a year. But you know. This place is exploding. They there were Hollywood. Folks all over You know at Ram Games Both actors COMEDIANS etc. And it just was part of the fabric and so You know there were stories of kind of they you know the players went out and you know my dad and my mom were. Kinda quiet folks so they weren't kind of big parties but They just started having children but they you know all the the rams why fung together and you know look out for each other kids in you know so those type stories up but But Hollywood is a little bit more innocent back..

rams Los Angeles Hollywood football Dan Reeves Nfl Los Angeles Rams Washington redskins Jackie Robinson West Coast La Coliseum Gilman Bob Waterfield Cleveland Mississippi Washington Post John Hockey Dallas cowboys
"woody strode" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"woody strode" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"You know we all kind of deal with the grief of losing a parent Talk to a lot of my dad's old friends both on their hands and others. Non The rams but in the league like Frank Gifford who played for the giants in our Donovan and played for the Colts and Sam off. Who played here in Washington but for me? It was the blast. I gotTA learn more about the my dad and learn more about the rams fifty And as you said they were You know kind of Hollywood team and that's why we named the book after it. Hollywood ingrained but they were glamorous. They had a high powered offense a lot of big personalities. So it's just a blast but I just love putting putting dimensions on the stories. I heard as a kid in hearing a few new ones as well give us a little bit of history lesson on the rams being on the west coast and being out in Hollywood. Yeah so they originally from Cleveland they were. The Cleveland ran and they were struggling in Cleveland owner. Dan Reeves Wasn't in the supermarket business and bought the team for one hundred thousand bucks and and saw kind of the future of the country was moving west And so he moves the rams and the in the forties to Los Angeles and the La Calcium. Was You know where they hosted the Olympics And you know. They were the first team to move west of the Mississippi River the first team to modern team in pro football to integrate a year before. Jackie Robinson the first team of the television contracts the first team with a logo on their helmets Fred Kirke was paid a dollar a helmet to paint the iconic ram horns on their First team to reach a million fans that You know just a lot of good history and filtered hall of famers like Norm Van Brookline elroy crazy. Lakehurst was wide receiver. Waterfield was another one. Their quarterback Tom Fears and and Dick Nitric Lane was All A fan defensive back in the hall of fame is a linebacker. But even the coaches Sid Gillman is in the hall of fame one of the founders of the modern passing game and Pete Rozelle was their public relations guy in general manager who became the Commissioner of the NFL to boy commissioner. They call them at age. Thirty three. That can Bob Hope is one of the minority owners so you know lots of big personalities and lots of history with the team and back then there are only twelve teams and they were not in the south Farther than the Redskins further the furthest others southern. There's no Dallas cowboys or anything like that so You know really kind of one. Nfl exploding one of the things that I found interesting about. This book is the story of how they became the first professional football team to integrate and it had to do with the lease for the stadium. Did it not exactly so that when Dan Rees wanted to move to to. La The la Coliseum Commission which runs the Coliseum huge gigantic facility. Ironically where the rams moved back in applying now but L. La was was integrated as a city in terms of city government etcetera and Obviously making Not to where they need to be but The Coliseum Commission required that at the rams are gonNA move that they would have to integrate it so it was also the the right thing to do but they were often compelled to do it from the Coliseum Commission so Dan Reeves kind of saw. That and said okay. I'm GonNa find the two best players can possibly get. And so he got Kenny Washington and woody strode out of UCLA and unfortunately their careers. Were not as long as dynamic as Jackie Robinson but groundbreaking in many ways. Just like Jackie Robinson. What was the reaction to the signing of those two black ballplayers well? It was You know it was a different time and unfortunately you know what countries struggled with Raith. And you know there are a lot of folks who didn't like it Lot of fancy didn't like it but there were enough that you know it just seemed like the right thing to do and and you know the history of Los Angeles has one that post World War Two. There are a lot of people moving to Los Angeles. The population essentially doubled within. You know ten to fifteen year period up until nineteen sixty so. It was growing incredibly fast. You had a lot of kind of innovative people. Moving out for new opportunities so In Post World War Two manufacturing You know kind of exploding. In the aerospace industry there are a lot of jobs for African Americans so it had a bustling diverse community and so on the whole it was. It was a most folks. embraced it. That's not the you know without saying that some folks were you know had a difficulty with it. I will tell you. My Dad. Don't experience some of his best friends were some of the African American players like Tank younger and he really you know. As a young guy twenty he would always tell stories. He just didn't understand why African Americans were treated differently. why they go on road trips again. Because there weren't any other teams they would do a number of their exhibition games in in Texas or Alabama or etcetera. And you know he wouldn't see buddies he would say until you know. They're on the field. You couldn't seem locker room. They didn't spend Sandwich House. I can't even driving vehicles to and from the stadium just because it was you know it was unfortunately part of the time you say in the book signing of Washington caused all hell to break loose among the owners of the NFL. What was their problem with it. Well I think about it back. Then you know that was the forties. And then I'll give an example of a team. You know you used to work for the Washington Post but the Redskins for example where the most southern team and they were the last team to integrate and they had a huge radio network throughout the south So integrating for the Redskins was a no no just one team and as an example And thought it would be too too much of a negative to their fan base. So there were there. Were voices like that throughout the NFL. Thought that it would be negative To to have African Americans play in and be part of the game. Which of course you know is as an Athens hugged. We think about it To most people but then you know there were some you know and a lot of sentiment. Unfortunately we're still seeing some of that today right George. Preston Marshall was the owner of the Washington redskins and he was in open racist. There's just no doubt about it. I've heard number of times knows the no some of the stories as well exactly exactly and so you know that's just one person at one example but there are other owners of that same type of ilk that you know change was too too difficult and so you know Dan arrays kind of really pushed the envelope and you know again like news the right thing to do and and compelling himself to move to Los Angeles but you know quickly You know more teams started embrace African American players you know fortunately to the benefit of the League because You know the best athletes should be get on the field. Yeah one of the things too is. Is that West Coast and I know this living here in San Francisco and particularly down Los Angeles. They always liked Successful teams they like successful people and everything and certainly the rams in their first hay day in la which was between one thousand nine hundred eighty nine in one thousand nine hundred fifty nine are make it fifty five They played in that pre Super Bowl era Nfl Championship Games. Four times and they won one of them in Nineteen. Fifty nine was the essence of their success. Early on early on I mean they were in part of the reason we call the book. Hollywood seem 'cause they were? They were kind of exciting and glamorous but one of the reasons they were because they threw the ball all over the field. You know whether that was Gilman Right. He was an NFL hall of Famer. But that was one of the first guys coaches who really embraced watching game film and Breaking Down Game Film and seeing that you could the future. The Ball. Twenty thirty yards downfield. You could speed up the game and you know have a lot more scoring of course. The owner loved it. Because you know touchdowns meant people sitting in the stands and the rams are constantly breaking records with the number of fans in the fifties. They had so they were. You know norm van. Brooklyn's looked it up the other day. Still Record for five hundred. Fifty four yards in a season You know NFL Hall of Famer. But he was checking it all over the place so that was exciting. And that was You know innovative in a lot of ways because you know prior that there are you know football with known as three yards and a cloud of I know in talking to the angels And some of their people that came out to the West Coast with the angels in Los Angeles It was usually pretty colorful teams. The angels I mean you had Boba Linski who I remember their former manager telling me told him to get rid of his Gold Cadillac because it could be seen on Hollywood and vine and everybody knew where he was and how light it was and so he did traded he came up to the manager and he said I traded the car like he's suggesting he said what did you get he. He said a Purple Cadillac. What were some of the stories of of those guys in Los Angeles in those early days? Well you know it's it's funny You know I said and again you know. Hollywood was kind of beauty the team and and like I said Bob. Hope was one of the ours. But you know people like Dianne Disney were was ram's wife she was married to Ron Miller They Walt Disney was there at the Games. A Lot You know hey opened Disneyland. Nineteen fifty five and believe it or not. There was built in less than a year. But you know there's place is exploding. They there were Hollywood. Folks all over You know Iran Games Both actors but COMEDIANS etc. And and it just was part of the fabric and so There were stories of kind of you know the players went out. You know my dad and my mom were Kinda quiet folks but weren't big parties but They just started having children but they follow. The rams wife hung out together. And you know look out for each other's kids and you know so. Those types of stories came out but But Hollywood is a little bit more innocent back. Then it was in the sixties and seventies and eighties and and You know you had other rams down the line Fred Dryer and Merlin Olsen get their own television program and So but in the fifties was kind of a more innocent. I'm sure it happened but folks You know kind of flamboyant if you will those Kinda Stories. We have about two minutes left. I wonder in researching this book and writing this book. What you found out that you didn't know or what surprised you I think it was You know some of the Highlight some of the the stories about my my parents. The way they met and I didn't realize my My mother at ask my dad out it up Saint Patrick's Day dancing this skinny little Girl who grew up in in Los Angeles Watts up strapping up supply and at the time that was kind of unheard of. But you know some other things to just When my dad made the pro bowl The research for the book that He made five hundred dollars My parents made pretty much the exact same salary. My Mom was elementary school teacher and he comes home and you know what should we spend the five hundred dollars on it and then my mom had reminded him honey. You promised me a new bedroom set. He's like okay so they went out and bought a bedroom. Fete spent the five hundred dollars and to this day. My mom is still alive. She called the pro bowl that so. I'd never heard that Jim. We only have a minute left but What do you want people to take away from this book? Hollywood's team I would love for folk to understand more about the history of the NFL You know the people that made it up just regular folks like my dad. Who are coming lunch pail guys who can make things go in any organization whether it's a radio studio or NFL team there folks that you know the the lunch pail course folks That make it up so I wanted to highlight. You know someone who maybe not doesn't usually get the spotlight but also you know. Highlight friendship family kind of a really cool team. A REALLY INTERESTING CITY. That was growing dynamically. And you know for me. It's crazy a labor of love to write this book. We're whatever we make off of my wife and I are going to go to a fantastic charity in Los Angeles called homeboy industries. Which helps that rescue with jobs and workforce training and Cetera so You know get to share the story of Football on the fifteenth about the rams who I love and now they're back in La. So it's all good. I WanNa thank you first of all for writing this book because it is a fascinating history about the rams on the West Coast and and also for the way. This book came out there. Some great stories in here not only a football but as you pointed out of a very interesting family with seven kids in Gym i WanNa thank you very much. Take Care we're GONNA make this a selection of the month on the sports.

Los Angeles rams NFL Hollywood football Washington redskins West Coast Jackie Robinson Dan Reeves Cleveland Washington Bob Hope Mississippi River Olympics Dan Rees Lakehurst Frank Gifford la Coliseum Commission
"woody strode" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

08:46 min | 1 year ago

"woody strode" Discussed on In Black America

"From the University of Texas at Austin K. UT radio this is in black. America. There was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges and so at the time. I was at Florida Atlantic and so I was like and Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jake gaither was dominated. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they had the archivists there in the library at up before they were amazing and they gave me these materials. All these letters and documents and so I had budgets and letters professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program. Because the issue is Pam. Today there was a lot of research money Let me so recruiting money and not a budget. Within coach Gaither was the ad coach basketball one point and those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Ken. Rollie Bob Hayes. I want to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions. That some coaches were better than others so I wanted to tell that story doctor. Derrick E. Y. Associate professor of history and African American and African studies at University of Kentucky and author of Blood Sweat and Tears Jack. Ghaith applaud him in the history of Black College football published by University of North Carolina. Chris Doing Super Bowl. Fifty four weeks recently held in south Florida more than thirty community events place but none more significant African American community than celebrating the legacy an impact of a SPEC- football and the NFL the African American Research Library and Cultural Center and the Urban League. O'brien county hosted student athletes on Mary highschools for panel discussion on the impact of ACC US on football former and current NFL players participated along with an NFL executive. I'm John L. Hanson Junior and welcome to another edition up in Black America on this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much right. And they're part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the NFL in part is done because teams.

football National Football League Florida Jake gaither Ivy Leagues Dominated College Rollie Bob Hayes Florida Atlantic America Willie Gallimore Ken basketball University of Kentucky Wigan University of Texas ESPN Astaldi Willie Gallimore Kim Pam African American Research Libr
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

06:27 min | 1 year ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers
"woody strode" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Cried passion, then patron tree of college football leaves here. This is the Paul finebaum show, our to podcasts. Welcome back to the second hour of the program. We are so glad you're with us and lots of do today. We've already had a good conversation buried Trammell from the Oklahoma in talking about Jalen hurts. That's, that's a story that will be a big theme during the upcoming college football season. Kind of tweet that just was said to us from the always take guy seriously. When his tag name is Bama, hater what's single season. And team was the best college football team of all time. I don't know what does that mean? Does that could that pretty much whatever you want it to be, isn't it? We're, we're all I wonder what I wonder what his was since. He's a Bama Haider. It's obviously nothing recently anyway. Love to hear from you and the phone number is eight five five two four two seven two eight five. Let's continue with more phone calls. Larry is in Ohio, in your next up. Hey, larry. Thank you, sir. Appreciate it. Appreciate that was calling about call. You got about two weeks ago from a gentleman from New York City and in fact, his call was outstanding. And we covered a lot of subjects and you in fact, stated that you would like to meet him sometime and have to. Right. But, but there was one thing his story. He talked about his dad playing. Football against what he strode in endless statement. And of course, this gentleman wouldn't know because he didn't play because what he strode he stated that 'cause dead said, I'm playing against this little five foot ten one hundred eighty five pounds black guy, and I'm going to murder him while there was a really big guy like to forty five to fifty in those days that was big. Woody strode was a professional wrestler and. A an actor. He played in a lot of big movies with John Wayne, Burt Lancaster. So for Woody strode with six feet, five inches tall. He was a heavy guy, probably to twenty but, but that is really the truth, and in going against what destroyed I can understand how his dad really killed. I can understand that has the great story now. I remember it now it was it was a fun conversation. Yes, it was. It was a great conversation. The gentleman was really known loved wanna tell you something else. I admire your show, so much you wouldn't believe, and you and vernal and twist came along. It's the same. You have raised the SEC so much. Unreal. Larry. Thank you. Thank you very, very much for saying that, that means a lot to all of us here. Thank you. Love your show. Thank you. Thank you. I hope you'll call back very soon. Wow. That's really nice. Appreciate that on behalf of everyone here. Dan, is up next in Louisiana. Hello, dan. Hey, paul. Thanks a lot. Thank you follow. Just gonna avoid some some of Joe predictions. I think of Georgia Alabama, and LSU will all have one loss this year. Okay..

Woody strode Bama Haider Football Larry football Trammell Jalen Bama Oklahoma New York City LSU SEC murder Georgia Alabama Burt Lancaster Joe John Wayne Dan Ohio Woody
"woody strode" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"For details. Radio where we are wrapping up this program before Tony page comes in at two o'clock. Let's get back to the phones. Bobby on Long Island is next on the fan. I'm Bobby creek. How you doing good, Bobby? What's up? Aren't they got to the over time? Yup. All right. You ever coin toss? Yup. They have to take the ball and their own ten yard line. Okay. Go ninety yards. They deserve to win. Okay. And what do you think of that, you know, like? Seventy five yards is a big difference between ninety seventy five. So even in the regular season seemed like the best, you know, great defensive teams. They're going to the gym. You know, I mean, they're going to win the kickoff. Me. I don't I don't hate it. I just think they want to get it done quicker than that. I would rather see them get it at the twenty five score. If they score give the ball back to the other team if they don't match that score or surpass it. The game's over. That's all. And if they do the game continues for the ten minute regulation. So it would still give depending on how clock management works. A lot of it would depend on the clock. Like that first drive yesterday. The Brady had was eight minutes. So that would left only two minutes for the chiefs to come back. So that's not, you know, people would say, well, that's not overly fair either. Well, you gave up an eight minute drive. You got two minutes. Do something with it. I I never I guess my point is this. I'm never trying to get the perfect. Okay. I can't get the perfect. There's no perfect solution. I'm trying to get the better. Right. Trying to get the better. I'm trying to make sure both offenses. Have a chance with the ball and the best way to do that while keeping the clock. Keeping the game short as I can after the sixty minutes. Those are my two goals. I want both offenses to have a chance to talk to the ball. And I want the game to go fairly quickly. That's what they do in college. And that's why they do it the way they do it. They want both offenses to touch the ball. And they wanted to go quick. So that's why they do what they do in college. I'm not for that. But I respect I respect what they do in college. D in New Jersey is next on the fan. Hey, how you doing good up? Listen, I am unlike that guy earlier, I love what you're on. The world. Go round, brother. I know man. I'm really happy. You know, having a little seasoning. In your in your experience is important. I think I called because I'm a ram San, and I'm gonna talk about times that you've probably the ram vent back during the day, the Roman Gabriel. No, wow. Oh, my go-. I go back away. But I just wanna kinda, you know, share a little bit, you know, in honor of Dr king. I believe that the Rams are team of destiny I believe that the Rams are gonna win. I do believe that it's gonna be payback. Because of the you know, when the patriots feta back in the Super Bowl the last time, we win you know, that was the controversial one. When they had gotten information. They were they were, you know. And I remember that a lot of people don't remember that kinda came out that when they went on Super Bowl. Yeah. Kinda got spy gate. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. So I, but also I just wanted to drop on a few of the people who might not be aware. I love the Rams because as a kid, you know, I was aware of the fact that they were the first team reintegrating, you know. You know, black African Americans weren't allowed to play ball after thirty three. And it was a guy by the name of any Watanabe move from Cleveland. And one of the deals that they taught at that particular time if they wanted to ban possibility players, and they got your kid Washington reintegrated, the NFL nineteen forty six I believe and the dying in Woody strode. You may remember he played the guy that Kirk Douglas sporting black guy, grandma, if you remember that remember that movie don't. Yeah. Anyway, what he started eating play poured the Ramsey. Well, I it also gained parents both black quarterback to win a playoff. All those are reasons that has gone up. Yeah. And then, of course, we're not nameless. Got straight as you know. Like if blackout. Stop. No, there's gonna be reserved for the ram winning a Super Bowl because of what happened back in. There you go. Well, I wish you well on that. Because I think most of New York would be very happy to see the patriots. Not raise the Lombardi trophy again. Kevin in the Bronx. What's up Kevin? I just wanted to say, you know. You know, you get an opportunity to. Core down the field. A touchdown weird. I have no problem with the coin. And all that kind of stuff, you know. And it's just the way the game is played. There you go. It's the way the game that's played because that's the rule they decided on. It's not as if I love the way that people say, you know, that's the way it is as if no one sat in a boardroom one day and decided that was the way it is. That's how they decided to go. They sat there and said this is fair and at the time, by the way, the time the rule came out. It was more fair. Why? Because. The playoffs were routed with teams that were offensively minded and defensively. Minded it wasn't ten to offense. The defense. Like this year's playoff was ten offensive minded teams and two defensive-minded teams. They've changed the rules to favor offense. And that's a big factor in my mind as to why it is now on fair or more on fair than it used to be. Because it wasn't so blatant before that offense. Is easier than it's been and that scoring is higher than it's been. So that's a big part of that Jack on the west side next on the fan hijack. Hi regarding the overtime. I have an idea what the league does not want the games to go much longer than direct luck involved right with the costs. But you know, there are two point causes the first one. So why not keep the rules as they are notorious cross in over time and the team that didn't get the twin 'cause gets it for overtime. Well, because they defer so that's that. Because at each the first toss is not a relevant. It's not really a coin toss. In other words. It's a matter of choosing. Whether you get the ball in the first half of the second half. You're getting the ball. Both teams are getting the ball because whoever gets the ball to start the game kicks off. To start the second half. So it's not the same thing. In other words, you're trying you're trying to put a square peg in a round hole. There are three possessions. First-half second half overtime, two teams three possessions. Somebody's going to get the ball twice in that scenario. Someone's only going to get it once JR in Bronx is next on the fan JR. I up. Statements yesterday doing the regular season. There's all that they have a replay the referees replay. A know they any. But I don't see a in the Super Bowl. The second statement. I wanna make. You guys wasn't doing with the patriots. You. About the overtime. I hear people talking about Brady they don't like them because they like them. Like them because nobody the guy nobody gave up anything. He turned everything. Quarterback any aiming to many key G Gordon Geico. When they went up twenty eight twenty.

Rams patriots Bobby creek Bronx Brady Long Island Tony Kevin chiefs New Jersey Kirk Douglas Dr king Gordon Geico Roman Gabriel Cleveland NFL Watanabe Ramsey
"woody strode" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"You're listening to Nelson started yelling who was featured in the cult film. Classic Myra Breckenridge. So they sent me to the raven would apartments where she lived and George my manages very excited. I'm going along with the program. We got into the the the apartment there would knock on the door. This gentleman opened the door and the place was white carpet. White walls swipe piano white. I was getting snow blind. Woah. And look at me says Nelson here, it is the thing she wrote Choubey back in just a moment. Young man. I'll look at the spart. I'll go back maybe in about an hour or so I come back prepared. And he wasn't ready for that. Jumping to like three hundred and Trump. Yeah. And he disappears because I wasn't going to do that. I should. True to yourself. Right. But I wasn't that great of an actor. Let me be a little prepared. You know? And in a few minutes may enter the wrong, this why always explain this to people and she came in alone. But she wasn't she came in third place because in front of her. There was a career that you could read it with a knife. And there was a personality. Exuding Wooding Woodward put it on. And then come her. You know what I mean, all and she looked at me says. Like, we would know about. What was funny we went to shake his hand? And for some stupid reason either we came too fast, and our hands didn't meet and I hit a write in the sort of. Almost like a no ball. But luckily shared a corset or something in my hand on me. And he gave me an attack of left. Barney controllable, you lose because. Keystone comedy says I understand you don't want to read the part the part. I don't no why contrary I want to do it. But I want to do it in a way. It's up to your standards, and I want to make I don't want to just be three hundred sixty five guy for the fun of it. You know, do me a favor of very clever woman, very psychology in a one on one right there. She says Nelson do me a favor. I just wrote this. I wanna see how it's going to play. I know what she's doing. I look at her say Madame if you put it like this. Let's do it. It's totally immaterial. Whether I get a part or not. And we did it. And when we finished reading the parts of me says almost spiritual says, Nelson, that's also waste was meant to be. Got the part, and I went back to the studio to tell them apart. But I when I came out of the home. I I couldn't control my left or because of the nervousness. And my manager would cigar ashes falling on the lapel. I try to go downstairs on a pay form those days when right use paper when superman had a place to change clothes. You know, nowadays, the poor man gotta grow into guests stations and stuff, and I call my wife to tell her experience I couldn't because my leftover sitting on the ground holding the phone. And so we go to the studio and Augusta. So she liked okay. Let's see how we feel about it. We'll let you know. I said we'll stop their funding Georgia to miss a WalMart. So let me tell you something. I'm starring in a review in Las Vegas, Nevada in those days nine hundred sixty five or so say, I am making five thousand dollars a week. Does it look to you? Concern if I get this far not causing those days, I was not doing movie and stuff like that. And. And I laughed George couldn't believe I came home by the time. I got back to those days was not an easy thing. And the phone rang, and I had the pardon. That's great. And it was was was funny was great. But it was not what I should tell my mother in Brazil to go see the movie. Oh, yeah. Guard days. Line. And I tell my modest Henman the movies, you go sees it. And they're. Well, it's great because it's something, you know, for the rest of your life my Breckenridge. I mean, anybody that was around that time on my gosh. Luckily, the professionals with Burt Lancaster Lima, right balanced. Robert Ryan Ralph Bellamy cloudier currently gnarly Woody strode. I mean, those are people that I grew up huge clunker knowledge. She wasn't but admire them, I'm talking big stars. And was great the way we worked together for about nine weeks. So not bad. Oh party a card Anneli, of course, by mayor breakfast. Racquel welch. And I mean, and that was you know, she still looks great. But yes, yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. It was just a Rex Reed. Actually that mobile was also the first movie that. Roger ebert. Salic? Thank you. I'm glad somebody's paying attention. Yeah. That was in it. No. Where his career went. Yeah. What a career you're doing a lot around town. Now, there's a reason everybody should if you're gonna do a fundraiser is something Nelson's your person, you really have kind of dedicated your life to first of all on the on. The charity thing is very important. I have stablishment shown people that when you do a charity. It's got to be a true charity. Nobody share benefits from it either. You do it as a charity or you don't do it and every dollar must be accounts for so I've done a few with a guy like him among them for the earthquake happened. I did one for norm K was not doing so well in the hospital and so forth. A few other ones for a guy that had been died and hadn't been buried yet. So every Monday was account then somebody else tried to do the same thing, and the monies were not totally accounted for so on that one. I'm very proud. I mean, normally it's a commitment a commitment. But I don't see an alternative you do it or you don't do it. Now that makes a lot of sense, of course, and. You know for all intents and purposes, I am retired. That's how I'll be eighty four in today's you don't look you. Sure don't seem retired. And when people say go you'll up forms and doctors or someplace, and they put why do you were you born and I put nineteen thirty four b l g. And the build Jesse. But looking good. A part of that though you've been so.

Nelson George Myra Breckenridge Breckenridge Wooding Woodward Choubey Racquel welch Augusta Trump Las Vegas Rex Reed Roger ebert Barney Burt Lancaster Lima Madame Brazil superman WalMart Henman Robert Ryan Ralph Bellamy
"woody strode" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"In the cult film. Classic Myra Breckenridge. So they sent me to the raven would apartments where she lived, and George my managers, and he sees? I'm going along with the program. We got into the the parliament there would knock on the door, this gentleman opened the door and the place was white carpet, white walls, Rypien all white. Getting snow blind. Whoa. Wa and look at me says Nelson here, it is the thing she wrote Choubey back, and you do in just a moment. Young man. I'll look at the spark. I'll go back maybe in about an hour. So I come back prepared. And he wasn't ready for that. Jumping to like your three hundred guys. Yeah. And he disappears because I wasn't going to do that. I should. True to yourself, right? I wasn't that great actor let me be a little prepared. You know, a few minutes Mae west enter the wrong this. Why always explain this to people? She came in alone. But she wasn't. She came in third place because in front of her charisma that you could. With a knife. And there was a personality exuding Woody Woodward put it down. And then come her. You know what I mean? And she looked at me says. Like, we know each other about what was funny we went to shake his hand. And for some stupid reason either we came too fast, and our hands didn't meet and I hit a write in the solar plexus. Almost like a no, but luckily shared a corset or something. On and he gave me an attack of left at that Barney controllable, but you're losing because. Keystone comedy says the one read the par the part. I don't know quite contrary. I want to do it. But I wanna do it in a way that it's up to your standards, and I want to make I don't want to just be three hundred sixty five guy for the fun of it. You know? Do me a favor very clever woman, very psychology in a one on one right there. She says Nelson do me a favor. I just wrote this. I wanna see how it's going to play. I know what she's doing. I look at Madame. If you put it like this. Let's do it. It's totally immaterial. Whether I get a part or not. And we did it. And when we finished reading the parts of me, says spiritual Nelson. That's also waste was meant to be. Got the part. And I went back to the studio tell them apart. But I when I came out of the home. I know I couldn't control my left because of the nervousness and my manager would cigar ashes falling on the lapel. I try to go downstairs on a pay for those days when right use paper when superman had a place to change clothes nowadays. The poor man got to grow into gas stations and stuff, and I call my wife to tell her experience I had and I couldn't because my left the city on the ground holding the phone. And so we looked to the school you and Augusta. So she liked okay. Let's see how feel about it. We'll let you know. I said stop their funding Georgia to witness a woman. Let me tell you something man, I'm starring in a review in Las Vegas, Nevada in those days nineteen sixty or so say how am making five thousand dollars a week. Does it look to you like I'm concern? If I get this far not causing those days, I was not doing movie and stuff like that. And. And I laughed George. Couldn't believe I came home by the time. I got back to Vegas in those days was not an easy thing. And the phone had rang, and I had the pardon. That's great. And it was funny was great. But it was not what I should tell my mother in Brazil to go see the movie. Oh, yeah. Avangard? Oh that was. And I tell my modest how many movies she goes sees it? And they're the. Well, it's great because it's something, you know, for the rest of your life Myra Breckenridge. I mean, anybody that was around that time now, Mike. Luckily, the professionals with veteran Castellino, right Jack balanced, Roman Ryan Ralph Bellamy cloudier Carleen Ali, Woody strode. I mean, those are people that I grew up huge. Knowledge, but admire them, I'm talking big stars. And was great the way we work together for nine weeks. So not bad. Portia Carter Nellie, of course breakfast. Racquel welch. I mean, and that was you know, she still looks great. But yes, yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. It was just a Rex Reed was actually the movie was also the first movie. Roger ebert. Salic? Thank you. I'm glad somebody's paying attention. Selleck was in it. And yeah, where his career went. Yeah. Well, what a career you're doing a lot around town. Now, there's a reason everybody's if you're gonna do a fundraiser or something Nelson's your person, you really have kind of dedicated your life to first of all on the on. The charity thing is very important. I have shown people that when you do a charity is kind of a true charity. Nobody share benefits from it either. You do it as a charity or you don't do it and every dollar must be account for. So I've done a few with a guy like him among them for the earthquake happened. I did a one for. When norm K was not doing so well in the hospital and so forth. A few other ones for a guy that had been died and hadn't been buried yet. So every Monday was account then somebody else tried to do the same thing in the monies were not totally accounted for so on that one. I'm very proud. I mean, they could normally. Yeah. It's a commitment commitment. I don't see an alternative you do it or you don't do that makes a lotta sense. Of course. And you know for all intents and purposes, I am retired. That's how I'll be eighty four. Today's you don't look at are, you sure don't seem retired. And when people say, I go fuel up forms and doctors or someplace and they put why do you were you born nineteen thirty four b l g. Bill but looking good. But is a part of that though, you've been so active.

Nelson Myra Breckenridge George Woody Woodward Las Vegas parliament Wa Rypien Racquel welch Choubey Rex Reed Mae Portia Carter Nellie Roger ebert Barney Brazil superman Bill Augusta
"woody strode" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"He was feeling being that alone, but also immersed in the world. And then the other person I'd like to talk to is Paul Robeson in the nineteen twenties when he was a absolute football star. Black star in the NFL or the first black player in the NFL? Yeah, no, the the, it's it's interesting because the NFL it had players like Paul Robeson and Charles fullest and Fritz Pollard the great Fritz Pollard in the nineteen twenties, and it was an integrated league and it doesn't segregate until nineteen thirty three at the behest of George Preston Marshall, the owner of the Washington football team and the last team to to integrate in the NFL and then it integrates again nineteen forty six and nineteen forty seven with players like Woody strode and Kenny Washington, and the the great Marion motley and Bill Willis with Paul Brown and Cleveland. And so there's this by the way, I'm teaching my students this stuff, and there is just like they loved it. I'm sorry, I just I love this stuff. So I think they love this stuff to, but Paul Robeson was such a star and he helped integrate the team at Rutgers and he was a terrific player and he was abused by zone teammates until he proved himself. Physically Rutgers was good. I, I'll. Wow. Well, Ray rice. I mean, we've not. Shot. It doesn't New Jersey get enough lack. I swear you got Springstreen in Bon Jovi. What more do you want? Yeah, that that that's enough state. Yes. So I, I would talk to Paul Robeson. What about you, Dan? Who would you interview any athlete in history? I think Babe, Ruth allow to understand the magnitude of because it was word of mouth that it was. He was. He was this larger than life figure. Did he know it? How big a celebrity was he? What was he like off the field? Did his teammates like him just, you know, hold background where you know where he came from was, you know he was an orphan, like there's a lot that went into who he was what he was all about, but to be that great in that time, when you're reading newspapers in the power of reading about this mythological figure like Babe, Ruth, I thought Babe, Ruth was six, four, two thirty. Yeah, I believe rich. A really of the giants was the same size as Babe, Ruth. So five eleven to fifteen was what was wow, but, but you know, you think of these like Jack Nicklaus first time I met jacket, oh my God. He he's like five. Ten? Yeah, because you know, you grow up listening or reading, and then you see, and then I thought, oh my God, he's got to be huge and then realize he wasn't so babe. You know, sort of the same way. I'd love to know just that impact and how big of a celebrity he really was. The great book is just came out by Jane leave. You gotta be Highland. Yeah, yeah. Gotta be high, started it. It's it's terrific as she wrote the great Mickey, Mantle biography as well. I wrote Santa Colfax to Ashi. That's right. Yeah. Oh, great. Jane Levy. Well, done it, the Babe. Ruth one is fascinating because then you also look at people like grantland rice and how they created that myth and that that generation of sports writers and what it was about Ruth. That was so charismatic to them what you're able to do it and you know, to gain access, you had to be nice like the writers were your friends and they weren't. There wasn't. I mean, Baid couldn't survive now. Now that social God. Now imagine Babe Ruth was social media. I, it would make us people like Tristan Thompson obtain. I'll just say that would babe data Kardashian without question, maybe multiple. Probably two and you know Chris to Kris Jenner in some respects. Maybe he was made for these times. We always learn. You always make smarter day. We appreciate your time, and thanks for coming through is such a thrill. I geek out when I'm here. I love it. One of these days, you gotta take inventory here of the man cave. I would love to do an article on the man. You should come in and just, you know, just peruse. Soak it up. You need to ask questions. I can explain if you could take one thing out of the man cave. That's a great question that that's many possibilities..

Babe Ruth Paul Robeson NFL Jane Levy Fritz Pollard Rutgers Ray rice George Preston Marshall Paul Brown Woody strode Marion motley New Jersey Washington Jack Nicklaus Cleveland Bon Jovi Kenny Washington Tristan Thompson Kris Jenner Bill Willis
"woody strode" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"And so I mean, there are athletes today, certainly there there's legions of them who who don't speak out and still believe in the the actually this. This goes back to people like Joe Louis and alpha Gibson like people who said let our play is going to do the talking and that in and of itself is our contribution to the broader society. I truly think that that's the camp Jordan would be in. It's just hard to imagine. I mean, maybe it would be different everyone's a product of their times. But I it's just hard to figure I think he'd be the Aaron judge of basketball. But also when you look at Michael Jordan, he there was so much privacy to. Yes. And people didn't write about things that they would be writing about now with today's athletes, and I think that you know, I I just can't see Jordan wanting to share more of himself. Whereas LeBron sort of grew up in this today's athlete grows up in this. And just says, oh, it's. Commonplace that I share pictures and everything about my life on and off the field on and off the court. Yeah, they're they're growing up now with this idea that they're on camera twenty four hours a day, and that they need to document what they're doing twenty four hours a day. And this is not just how you function in society. But also how you build a brand those magic three words that every athlete gets putting their head as soon as they enter the league. And I think for Jordan it's like he was willing to let the companies build the brand for him. I can't imagine him saying I'm going to build my own brand through social media, and basically give it away for free, and as opposed to getting paid by by Hanes by ballpark Franks, and by Nike to be able to build this brand for me, if I gave you a chance to interview any athlete in history, just one from a particular time. I mean, this is gonna sound very basic. But I I would out I'll go with two then so I'm not so basic because the basic answer would be Muhammad Ali in nineteen sixty eight when he's banned from. Mhm boxing when he's doing a series of lectures on the college circuit, and I would love just to speak to him about how he was feeling being that alone, but also immersed in the world. And then the other person I'd like to talk to is Paul Robeson in the nineteen twenties. When he was a absolute football star. Black star in the NFL or the first black player in the NFL. Yeah. No, the it's it's interesting because the NFL it had players like Paul Robeson and Charles fullest and Fritz Pollard. The great Fritz Pollard in the nineteen twenties. And it was an integrated league, and it doesn't segregate until like nineteen thirty three at the behest of George Preston. Marshall, the owner of the Washington football team and the last team to integrate in the NFL. And then it integrates again, nineteen Forty-six nineteen forty seven with players like Woody strode and Kenny Washington, and the the great Marion motley and Bill Willis with Paul Brown in Cleveland. And so there's this by the way, I'm teaching my students this stuff in there is just like they loved the I'm sorry. I just I love this stuff. So I think they love this stuff too. But Paul Robeson was such a star and he helped integrate the team at Rutgers. And he was a terrific player. And he was abused by zone teammates until he proved himself physically at the time. Rogers was good. I. Oh, wow. Well, Ray rice. I mean, we've. Shot at right? Jersey get enough lack. I swear you got Springsteen and Bon Jovi, what more do you want? Yeah. That that that's enough. Yes. So I I would talk to Paul ropes. And what about you, Dan? Who would you interview any athlete in history? I think Babe Ruth allow to understand the magnitude of because it was word of mouth that it was he was he was this larger than life figure. Did he know it how big celebrity was. He what was he like off the field did his teammates like him? Just his whole background where you know, where he came from was, you know, he was an orphan. Like, there was a lot that went into who. He was what he was all about. But to be that great in that time when you're reading newspapers in the power of reading about this mythological figure Babe Ruth. I thought Babe Ruth was six four two thirty. Yeah. I believe rich a really a of the giants was the same size as Babe Ruth. So five eleven to fifteen was what was wow. But, but you know, you think of these like Jack Nicklaus personal met jacket. Oh my God. He he's like five ten. Yeah. Because you know, you grow up listening or reading, and then you see. And then I thought oh my God. He's got to be huge. And then you realize he wasn't so babe sort of the same way I'd love to know just that impact in how big of a celebrity. He really was the great book is just came out by Jane. Gotta be gotta be high started at. It's it's terrific as she wrote the great Mickey Mantle biography as well. I wrote sandy Koufax great. Jane Levy, well done. The Babe Ruth one is fascinating. Because then you also look at people like grantland rice, and how they created that myth, and that that generation of sports writers, and what it was about route. That was so charismatic to them. Well, you're able to do it, and you know, to gain access you had to be nice like the writers where your friends, and they weren't you know, there wasn't. I mean couldn't survive. Now. Now, social imagine Babe Ruth was social media. I it would make us people like Tristan Thompson, look tame. I'll just say that would babe data Kardashian without question. Maybe multiple. Probably two and. Chris to Kris Jenner. In some respects. Maybe he was made for these times. We always learn you always make us smarter day. We appreciate your time. And thanks for coming through is such a thrill. I geek out when I'm here. I love it. One of these days, you gotta take inventory here of the man cave. I would love to do an article on the man you should come in. And just you know, just peruse soak it up you need to ask questions. I can explain if you could take one thing out of the man cave. That's a great question. That's many possibilities. I I like the picture of you throwing out the first pitch and his Saint Louis cardinals uniform. I would take that first of all the motions fantastic. I mean, it looks like a young Rick Anki. Rick ankle, a right handed Rick Yankee, and I got it over the plate of amazing. Yeah. I couldn't hit like Lance Armstrong's yellow jersey over there, a great possibility that would be on the list for sure said he had a pile does. I got a pile of them. Hopefully deodorize. No, I didn't mind that Landon Donovan's jersey that that was not deodorized that wasn't my favorite is the Peyton Manning Ryan leaf jersey. So leave had been drafted by the colds. They made a jersey forum. Really we have that one over there. One of kind and Ryan leaf sided force. That's the one that using people. Go wait Ryan leaf played for the colts. Yeah. No, he didn't. But that's where that's how divided they were in that. No matter what they tell you. They were divided on taking Ryan leaf Peyton Manning. Ryan beyond belief was Chris Berman..

Babe Ruth Michael Jordan Paul Robeson Ryan leaf NFL Fritz Pollard Chris Berman Peyton Manning Joe Louis Jane Levy LeBron basketball Muhammad Ali Ray rice Aaron Landon Donovan sandy Koufax Jack Nicklaus Mickey Mantle
"woody strode" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the new york conversation brian lehrer on wnyc and in our series the eight a brief history of the culture war decade by decade where in nineteen forty eight with richard rothstein author of the book the color of law forgotten history of how our government segregated america and jilani cobb historian professor of journalism at columbia and staff writer for the new yorker and jilani also here in his role as a judge for this year's hellman foundation journalism prizes of which one of the winners is richard rothstein for the color of law they'll have their awards ceremony tonight for journalism in pursuit of truth and let's let's bring in some callers right now with some some oral history and we'll start with lee in edison lee thank you so much we're waiting on hold you're on wnyc thank you when you were talking a story that my dad young and i asked him about this again he military titles to a veteran's loan he also had money in the bank for a very long time and he was ready to buy a home he couldn't hardly he could never find anyone at that time to get him alone and he i remember when they had some of the rights in new jersey in sixty i remember him saying i should be out there writing i couldn't get a loan and i was in pedal to one and also so finally the way that he got alone my grandparents had to take out a loan and then sell the house to him and then by that time after that time he was able to get a loan on his own but it had nothing it had nothing to do anything except for discriminating against and they didn't want him to get a va loan and when you guys were talking about jackie robinson my relative woody strode and what woody strode did with integrated football and heck that he had to go through in order to do that and in his life they have very good documentary called the i four and that could branch rickey their example from the documentary and said that he decided that he would enter baseball also being on the some of the things that happened the football came first.

football rickey woody hellman staff writer professor of journalism jilani cobb america new york brian lehrer baseball jackie robinson new jersey lee richard rothstein columbia
"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"But they have a good relationship in the film wayne's character strode are close friends of course and they lived together and it's almost like husband wife relationship certain homo eroticism some of those ford relationships and strode was for best friend actually in later years they actually live together strode moved into kind of took care of for in his declining years for a while and there's a story i love during that period some studio chief called for it and you know the butler said or whoever said studio chief is on the phone mr for it and he said tell them i can't come into the phone tell him sitting here talking with my good friend woody strode those great but what is was a fine actor as well and actually spoke at his memorial service people were talking about great athlete it was groundbreaker in films and you know in sparta 'cause he has a great sane with kirk douglas where they're having duel to the death and what he strode refuses to kill douglas and then it gets killed by laurence olivier it's very powerful into nobody was saying a lot about struts acting though they were kind of defensive about it and i got up and i gave a little talk about what a good movie actor he has a lot of movie acting is body language and i said that he acted with his body he was very eloquent with his face and his his body gestures and the way he moved was very graceful and strong and he he handled dialogue while he was not a you know a well trained actor in the sense of coming from the or anything but he does some.

wayne butler woody kirk douglas laurence olivier
"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Critic didn't good very good reviews when it came out mistakenly was that wayne in stuart or you know they're in the well stewart's in the framing story wayne his dad stewart's an old man but then in the flashback which compasses most of the films much younger stewart is supposed to be young guy fresh out of law school but he's in his fifties at the time and wayne is wayne is a old amount to and ford made no attempt to disguise their age except having stewart act little gakkai and some people thought this was bizarre my friend mike willington who wrote the for critical study with me thought that i mean it's the film of ideas it's it's it's not a naturalistic film it's it's a film of ideas like and it's kind of like a carl dryer movie it's starting to emphasize the ideas i think is the reason and mike said that he thought the character is in the past or projections of the characters in the present that's one way look at it that they're they're acting this drama from their us but they're the same guys they are in nineteen ten that gives a certain futility to the country because you know that it's not going to turn out anyway different than this just an interesting thought but it's it's strange the way to shoot a film and i as part of the poetry film to get to the woody strode relationship where destroyed was a football player and wrestler before it became an actor actually very few people know that what he strode and kenny washington where the first black players in the national football league so they're the jackie robinsons of the nfl and they deserve credit for that and kenny washington was big star ucla and.

wayne stuart stewart ford mike willington kenny washington nfl ucla football
"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"To cactus rowers that's just like it is such just a simple and beautiful and emotional saying so yeah i would say that public in our six one half dozen the other for the the mid in the reality one of the things that i think ties a lot of the main characters certainly john wayne james stewart and woody strode in the film is a village and you know bility based on a different collection of morals right or a different collection of kind of societal codes or whatever you wanna call them the interested in that comes from nobility is that it can often seem like this called lofty pumps aloof thing but there's also always like you say empathy and emotion and a hot to nobility that definitely comes through in those characters in the phone vera miles as well i mean the reaction when her character haley initially mentions that you know she's a literate and the fact that she's kind of like well you a one hand she kind of is aware of that show coming on the other hand she's like but i never she's very kind of proud of who she is and how she's got without it you know so does this wonderful pride in ability that i think is is under cut by the woman's humanity of it in a weird way it's always a way that i think of kind of old english characters when people talk about sort of england in the stiff up lip and all the rest of it a lot of that kind of rose tinted spectacle version of the old english colonel or whatever it is in his rutting country estate have there's always that humanitarian humility to the pride ability and i think that's kind of this movie definitely plays on that as well i think in the stick up late thing i think it's it's opening new at how much that has to do with community because it is about know holding strong together as bound as saintly about being an individual whose distance.

haley john wayne james stewart woody one hand
"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Implicit dick allergy to the west i wouldn't say and with that too there's multiple times or somebody says up to the effective i hope you guys remember ray or they smell my name right in the paper everybody wants to be remembered but the memories that share is you were to say aired are horrible memories nurse is one part toward the end were pete maxwell's retelling one of those stories and ilie the kid and and his lady friend it is walk out in the middle of the story they want to be remembered but they don't necessarily want to hear anybody else's memories correct totti sparked got his horse dole jay showers stolen jumper del real or touted got even though each you already although ratner and jays is blanket him through the neck everybody in this film is somebody like if you watch this movie in your fan of westerns you're just going to have a field day with it because there is so many familiar faces it's not like italy but the third guide left it's like oh well that's that's this guy and that's this guy over here just every time they introduce new character in there are so many characters because of the way that this story is told every time a new character gets introduce you just like oh why there's jackie lem old their slim pickins there is elisha cook jr just like over and over and over and if you're a fan of peckinpah westerns it's like oh will there's you know this guy from this movie in this guy from this other peckinpah film and you just see more and more of these faces it's kinda like those gun fighters at the beginning of once upon a time in the west where it's like there's woody strode those jackie aloom and the third guy who was from the spaghetti westerns so it's just like kind of you know the passing the torch with this but at the same time like i said kinda.

ray pete maxwell totti ratner elisha cook peckinpah jays italy woody jackie aloom
"woody strode" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"woody strode" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"So they were basically what they're trying to do is put to put pressure on the city almost a have to create a second venue and legally this probably could have been overcome but i think the l a politicians the calcium commission they didn't want any uh any controversy they wanted to open up the market is much to eastern uh to eastern sports franchises which indeed was the case turned out to be the case so they basically um the commission turn to chile walsh and said would you agree to sign a black player and and have in chile while should absolutely so the the the player that the sign was kenny washington who had been star in ucla affected had been there uh had played at ucla with jackie robinson so katie washington was in scientific team and then they decided this being of course nineteen six that he needed a a roommate so they also sign woody strode who went on to be a hollywood actor and that was the three integration in the nfl some people say was the integration of the nfl actually hit the nfl had been integrated up until the early worries about this was the were the reintegration of the nfl and it all came about because the rams have moved from cleveland wanted the la coliseum what and and and were at an were forced to integrate the team and so the rams k washington woody strode then of course uh a marion motley and bill will of the cleveland browns the for them came to be ninety forty six was now called sort of the forgotten four of the four guys who reintegrated bnfl and based on that reintegration um we had then uh over major league baseball the they're taking a look at the nfl and at the uh all america football conference saying well.

marion motley america cleveland browns hollywood woody katie washington chile baseball bnfl the commission la coliseum cleveland rams nfl jackie robinson ucla kenny washington chile walsh