35 Burst results for "Woodson"

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:57 min | 2 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"They wanna do something but they're allying themselves with people who are causing harm to black communities that tremendous irony and tragedy and pathos that they wanna do something but they don't know any better and they were having crt seminars in their churches. They don't know that this stuff is harmful go to the woodson center. Get a copy of lessons from the least of these. If you wanna do something check that out. You must see that. Even more than i do that there are a lot of evangelical or mainline. Protestants their so lost on this issue. They wanna do something. But they're they're just getting sucked in to be a lamb and that kind of thing while. I'm trying to get in on a race game but i'm going to organize a group of r. Ease certified ratio exorcist. See are yeah. we're gonna. We're going to be teaching. You know we're gonna be i b l. e. training b. I b l e. That sounds familiar. I can't put my finger. Well now do you guys do stuff in churches. What do y'all do what we've done. First of all we have authored curriculum for teachers and we have like eight thousand downloads. The first two weeks when we subsidy seventy six so some of our members have testified before state school boards. And in a couple of instances in ohio and other places those school boards have rejected. Sixteen one thousand nine hundred and except in seventeen seventy six. We're also developing curriculums and we've spoken to charter school representatives. He's their parent groups. Come to say corporations coming to a saying we don't wanna do critical race theory training to give us an alternative sorrow. The worst along with our colleagues are developing alternatives to race. We've training and so we need your help to help us do that. But please if you want an alternative to race. Grievance training our call in fact instead of c Crtv it should be die. The yeah well no seriously. I don't know how harmful this stuff is. And they're getting sucked in. So i wanna say folks if you're watching on youtube for example..

Sixteen first two weeks ohio youtube eight thousand downloads First one thousand nine hundred seventeen seventy six seventy six
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"One point four million dollar mansion. They spent three leader spent three point. Two billion at purchasing a number of upscale homes in white areas secured by the police. And they're doing what marxist leaders do at is accumulate resources from others and then celebrate themselves by purchasing accumulating wealth for themselves this following the marxist tradition. I mean it seems to me. The more i talked to you and think about this stuff. We really seems the media is the problem in other words that if they did not give a megaphone to some of these Folks the we wouldn't know about them. We would listen to common sense but you know. They're not they're not having you on cnn or they're basically sticking to a narrative and they don't really care in other words they're not actually asking black people what do you think there's sort of assuming a condescending paternalistic ultimately racist way that they know what blacks thinking that they're going to deputise whom they choose even if it's not in accordance with most of the black people in this country well. I think it's even worse than you know i. I grew up in segregation. I was stationed in the south and mississippi in the fifties and early sixties. But there's a part of me that long so the old fashioned big because nothing is worse than people who don't respect you enough to believe that you are capable be agents of your own uplift progressive whites or determining what other standards that blacks bar. There's even a teacher now. Who would fuse to accept. An essay written about dr king because dr king used the word negro and they determine that negro is offensive to blocks. Nobody asked black america whether it is but they are and i would not be surprised if that didn't result in the demand for them to remove dr king's statue just as they did in rocks in rochester. New york with frederick douglass statue. So i don't think there's any end to wear the progressives are going but the only thing that can stop them and what what's in center and some seventy six is trying to do is to provide the means for every day working men and women can blue collar and low to speak for themselves to stand up and say these progressives do not speak for us we speak for ourselves. The woodson center is trying to get the resources to provide that kind of platform and if the networks won't produce it. we will develop our own way of communicating. This pro-american supportive agenda. I hope that there are some Some people of means listening to this program who will cut a huge check the woodson center because if we do not step up and support those who are speaking the truth. I don't know who else there will be to blame. Folks we've.

Two billion One point New york three four million dollar three point fifties mississippi rochester dr king marxist negro early sixties south american america seventy six black woodson center
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:53 min | 2 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Clarence page. I know of both of them. Clarence page is a american. Jd vance is a white america jd. Vance wrote hillbilly elegy and grew up in a very economically depressed culturally depressed white community so y you bringing him into this conversation because i think he leads on. Both sides are using race to divide us and so and so that whites living in trail parks voted for trump is portrayed as bigots which is not true they were voting for trump because the present it gave them a voice on issues of economic global capitalism. What they were against and low income blacks are not given a choice. Either boyce are being exploited and so what we wanted to do with. The woodson's center is recognized. That blacks low income blacks have more in common with low income blacks than they have with those beats who purport to represent them on either side. It's extraordinary isn't it. That what you're saying about the elites. I mean when you talk about black lives matter this is marxist women lesbians. They claim to speak for blacks but most blacks in america have biblical values even if they stray from those biblical values. I think that's part of who black. America is the people who go to church and some people come in and they say we speak for black america. And they're putting forth an anti family anti church doctrine it's a marxist doctrine but somehow the media the white elite media they love it they eat it up and they present them as legitimate voices in the black community. What makes all black lives matter. Just right for progressives because anti-god anti-family so they are the right conduct. Black folks as far as progressives are concerned even the black panthers and others in the past. They did not quite fit because they were not hostile to the family or hostile to those values but the black lives matter or just the right fit for progressive because they're anti family but they also typical of marxist like the organizer of it now the corporations have given ninety eight million dollars and while other black lives matter Soldiers are breaking into stores and looting stores. They are busy buying mansions in white areas..

trump ninety eight million dollars Jd vance Vance both Both sides America Clarence america boyce american black blacks marxist
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:56 min | 2 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Well let's look at the some facts. I know that's strange word to us today. But the very fact that eighty five percent of the rioters and many of them destroying black businesses are white black out. There engage in this kind of violence. I certainly is a profile of the people who have been writing for europe oregon at burning bibles and whatnot. But again when you look in this fund police campaign the pulse eighty two percent of blacks and poll to ask about defunding police. They are not supportive of defunding. The police sixty percent of blacks poll. When asked it racial discrimination is a principal barrier to your progress. They answer is no and so the question is where is this great outcry from the black community that says that institutional racism is a principal issue that they're facing but has always been the case though bob. This has been peddled. Since you know. Jesse jackson and al sharpton. They claim to be speaking for the black community. But many of us know. And you're telling us they don't speak for the black community but but they they take that on. And somehow i don't know if it's corporate interests or or a media interests deputize them as spokespeople for the black community when you're telling me they don't speak for the black community. What would think about the statement. Al sharpton made at the funeral of george floyd at this blows my mind. Al sharpton said that white america has had their foot on the neck of black america for three hundred years. That's why we have never been able to progress and be all that we could be. That's a that's a first of all it's a lie and it's also. It's a profound statement of of impotence for someone to say that we have not been able to progress but we have. The worst center has documented the fact that when we were denied access to hotels medical schools insurance companies. We built our own. We had our own wall street's and yet people like al sharpton can presume to speak for black america and but again they were four studies over the course of twelve years by the joint center for political and economic studies. This is a liberal think tank in washington. Dc when they survey blacks every four years to ask them in order of importance. What are the critical issues. You're facing race only came up. At eight percent. It was healthcare it was economic development but yet these facts are never presented is as if someone said. If you don't have fact-based truth than lies become normal well lies about what is what is representative of black. Interest is become big normal today. That's why we're doing. The woodson's center is giving a voice to the voiceless in the black community. That's why we brought together two thousand five hundred black mothers of children who lost children to urban violence. They are saying we support the police..

Jesse jackson Al sharpton sixty percent george floyd washington al sharpton eight percent twelve years two thousand three hundred years eighty two percent today eighty five percent five hundred four studies joint center for political and four years europe bob first
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Either folks sometimes on this program. I like to talk about current events but not now and yet. I'm going to talk about current events sometimes current events or unpleasant but if you have talked about current events in their unpleasant you wanna find somebody who is pleasant and who gives you hope we have as my guest today my friend bob woodson now bob woodson. You may have seen him on tucker carlson. You may have seen them on. Laura ingraham he's blowing up. He's on the tonight show with johnny carson. He's got a guest spot on chico. And the man coming up. Unbelievable bob woodson. Welcome to the program again there. Are you really going to be on chico. And the man. I just love it. You don't think so. They cancel that show about forty one years ago. I know yeah and now it's just called the man well. Let me ask you some serious questions here bob. We're living in a tough time in this country race has just become you know the word du jour and right now. We've got some trials. Some things going on. I just want to talk to you about all of it. So what is your perspective. You've been in the civil rights world for many decades now and you're trying to bring real hope to people. So what do you make of you know. Kind of a media circus that is happening right now with some of these trials and some of these different cases that are coming up. Well i think we are reaching a very dangerous time very dangerous time. I think we're getting to the point. Where either gonna choose community or chaos and with the radical left. The progressives have really seized upon the whole racial issue in america the use in their arsenal to kinda bludgeoned country. They don't really care about justice for blacks but they're just exploiting this because they know that is a deeply emotional issue in the country and they're able to drive the agenda and really use race as a political weapon to seize power the very fact that every time a white officer assaults or kills..

johnny carson bob woodson Laura ingraham today tonight america tucker carlson forty one years ago bob many decades
Welcome Home Mike Woodson

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

02:38 min | 3 months ago

Welcome Home Mike Woodson

"Indiana brought a legend home and speaking as a former player not as a broadcaster in a former coach. I couldn't be happier for mike woodson his family and for us woody. I mean i think. I speak for a lot of guys when i say congratulations. Welcome home and so happy to have you as the head coach of our program man a man. I appreciate that very much man. It's good to be back. What are you get the job. And i've always told people like you get a college job. I don't know how it is in the nba. You get a college job. And it's fricking crazy with the phone calls guys want jobs guys calling for other guys to get jobs recruiting. What's been your priorities. Since you started. Well the players right now the priority you know yes i have been bombarded by a lot of calls. I'm probably and i'm not exaggerating about a hundred calls. Oh yeah behind I mean. I still get calls. I'm answering the came on sunday. So i mean eventually i'll get back. 'cause that's just me i i i return all calls to say thank you or i can't help this guy that's important for me But my my priorities right now is trying to figure out who's gonna stay who's who's leaving and You know we gotta get a team put together here. You know quickly. So that's what. I've been focusing in all right now. What's what's your process for doing that. Well you know. I i've said and i spoke with each player individually and I've had them in a team setting. I'm going to meet with him tonight. all the guys. Just count it. Try to get a feel for where it is. And i'm watching a lot of tape right now and players as well. I mean that's kind of what we do as coaches and and i'm watching you know how we play last year because that's important Discount again a feel of the players that are here so But my main focus. Dan really right now is to sit down with these guys. And it's been tough you know. It's been a tough season for these guys with the pandemic and archie. Getting let go. I mean that's from a mental standpoint. These kids are they're they're somewhat crushed. So i'm trying to uplift them and tell them how much i love 'em and until much i want them to be a part of this great 'institution in his you know this tradition of a basketball because there's a lot of tradition here man. We gotta get back pocket.

Mike Woodson Indiana NBA DAN Archie Basketball
Florida Republicans offer bills banning transgender athletes

AM Tampa Bay

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

Florida Republicans offer bills banning transgender athletes

"A Florida's a step closer to having a transgender sports band. House subcommittee passed a bill that would require athletes in high school and college to play on teams that match their sex at birth. Highlands County Republican Kaylie Tuck sponsored the bill, and she says it'll ensure women and girls compete on a level playing field. But Broward County Democrat Marie Woodson says the bill marginalizes and demonizes the transgender

House Subcommittee Kaylie Tuck Highlands County Florida Marie Woodson Broward County
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:12 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"A hopeless story of it from the white gaze of black existence. If a black person had told that story would be completely different. I actually in thinking about the book in the last twenty four hours realized that the only being because i can't even say person you'll even being in the book that had a name was under the dog nobel ted a name And they never hug each other which is not the southern way. you know. there's so much but but that's the first and as a kid. i remember. That was the first day i was like. What are their names. Especially as a writer and especially as a young person who wanted to write and realizing that it was written by a white guys like what message are kids of color taking away from that in terms of who they can be as writers. And i think that's the that's what we've been trying to talk about for so long. This is what dr rubin sims bishop talks about. This is what we need. I books as fighting for is like what message are we giving our young people when we don't have the books that represent them. When we serve have books that are not written by people who look like they do you write about social economic physical sexual and racial issues and mostly your characters learn about themselves and grow a new awareness about themselves in your books but raining. It's never cheesy or preachy or heavy handed. How do you balance this sort of innate optimism and hopefulness in your books with char topics. It's funny because I think a lot of people wouldn't think the topics are hard. They're just our every day lives. I mean in terms of early on when we were talking about segregation like it wasn't like this heartbreak of segregation for us was a celebration of community and and the power of numbers. And you know the way we can take care of ourselves. And i think the same when i'm talking about something like i hadn't meant to tell you this and the story of a girl whose father is abusive for so many. That is the reality. And it's tragic reality and it's also their daily existence so for them they have to be able to find the hope to get up every morning inside of that reality and so for me as a writer. That's where i go to it's like It was madeline lingle. Who said when you write right remembering the child you were because the essence of childhood doesn't change until i go back to who i was at a certain age and remember this stuff that was glorious and and that's not hit people over the head because that's the also the first rule of writing for young people as you can't be didactic. Go back to where the light was to where the sun was. And what was the reason that we did continue to walk through the world. I you know. So i remember reading all those books about queer kids and they always either committed. Suicide tried to commit suicide right like that was the ending. If you were hit in the seventies and even early eighties and for me like that that's not an option. And i don't think there should be an option for anyone and so when i'm writing about these topics that are real life what i really tried to go to is is the nuance of all that. That means it is the hope. It is the struggle it is the reward and the growth. And that's what comes to the book. My three favorite books of yours are your i of course last summer with mazen. I love that book. The children's book the great sophie blackall illustrated pecan pie baby. And your memoir brand girl dreaming. And when thing i loved about pecan pie. Baby was the emotion that you write for a little girl who was anticipating her mom's new baby and you rate this from jesus perspective some days. I just sat on my stoop thinking about all the years. It has been just me and momma about as drinking hot chocolate and telling silly stories about the mornings. I jumped into her bed when it was still blue. Pink outside snuggling up to her while she tried to keep on sleeping in three short sentences. You know so much about how jia feels. How do you do that. it's unlucky. Thank you thanks for reading that to You know the book has such a special place in my heart. Our kids a six years apart. And and i always think about you know when you make that decision to bring a second child into the world what you gain and what you lose and what the child gains and what the child loses and and it is about you know getting rid of your darlings and for me reading out loud to get to the essence of what the moment is. It doesn't mean a whole lot of adjectives. Just like take me into the moment and then take me out again and and trust at the moment on its own without a lot of extra words around it makes sense and by the time. I wrote pecan pie baby. I was already a mom. And i had gone through hundreds of picture books with a whole lot of words in them. I was going to do that to parent. You know the kid will come to bed and there would be a bug and it's like this is like the bible now. We're not reading this today. Go get me someone who has about four words in the book. And i'm good but yeah it really was. I really in that book wanted to get to the essence and also really represent what it means to be family. And and then i found out that you don't even lake pecan pie. What is it like to work with. Illustrators you've worked with such a range of illustrators relationship is between the visual and the verbal. it's i get to choose my illustrators which is lovely so means my editor helps me a lot with research I used to go to the library. And just sit and go through books and books and books until i found someone i loved and once i choose my illustrator. I'm really not allowed to talk to them at all. So we work in different ways. Well they'll send sketches. So i get to see sketches with james ransom and this is the robe. What he did was he sent me. No he's like. Tell me what when you wrote this book. What were you thinking. And what were you trying to say. And i wrote him back and then he went off and illustrated it and then like with something like the other side. I saw sketches. And i thought their clothes were little wack but i like the sketches and he went on and it and it wasn't until i got the book that i realize he had set it in the past and that had not been my intention for the book so i was and some of the struggles. Like in some of the sketches. I think you know one thing. Was sophie like the hair. I don't know why illustrators can't you with black folks are here like you know are here isn't just one style. It isn't just one way..

james ransom six years today first sophie blackall madeline lingle second child jesus bible first rule dr rubin sims last summer seventies one thing one style early eighties first day four words hundreds of picture books one way
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:02 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"It's like like something you wrote yesterday. That sound is so amazing. You wake up the next morning and you read you like this. This is this is trash and you think you have an idea. That's a strong one for where you want the book to be carried too. And it's not it's it's just superficial and dumb and you're using tropes and cliches which is the biggest fear for me is like i'll pick up a book re cliche in it that i've written so so it's a lot of rewriting lot of reading out loud when i get off this podcast. I'm working on a book. Now that i'm going to need to just sit and read out loud and and figure out what's happening and what i need to fix. You've said this about the stories you want to tell. I wanted to write a communities that were familiar to me and people that were familiar to me. I wanted to write about communities of color. I wanted to write about girls. I wanted to write about friendship and all of these things that i felt. Were missing a lot of the books. That i read as a child and jacqueline you have and i was researching the level of diversity in children's books now and found a statistic from two thousand eighteen. I couldn't find anything much more formal about twenty twenty one. But i learned that diversity children's books as recently as two thousand eighteen looked like this fifty percents were about white children. Twenty-seven percent were about animals or fantasy characters. Ten percent were about african american children. Seven percent were about asian children. Five percent were about latinos children and one percent were about american indian children So from what i understand. Things have only improved marginally since then three years ago and i don't expect that you should be able to solve a problem. You had no hand in creating and are almost single-handedly trying to change but given this problem is clearly established. What do you think it's going to take for publishing material changes in regard to diversity equity and inclusion publishing houses have to change. I mean you know. I think of someone like debbie ries. Who has the blog. American indians and children's book who's trying to single handedly change the narrative of the scarcity of books for and about am by indigenous people. You look at the latin x numbers and there are a lot of latin x writers. Why are those books not getting the shine or publishing and then you go to the publishing houses and their weight you know they are so white and but publishing houses need to change in. and there's a reticence. I think people are not wanting to give up the power they have as publishers editors publicists. I mean even my speakers bureau a couple years ago. They sent a car. And i was like really sent this card out. Where every single one of you. Except one southeast asian woman is white like i would be embarrassed to send that and i remember rating in locomotion you know about white blindness people not being able to see the whiteness around them from the point of view of this eleven year old boy because i think kids see this right But but i do think that's what the chain that's where the change has come. I mean at this point. I'm jacqueline woodson. Salama safe person to publish. And and what about the jacqueline woodson's of nineteen eighty nine. Who no one was looking at. So so i do think we have so much work to do I remember in the early nineties. People were trying to do away with coretta scott king award because they were saying that well. Now that's black folks have won. The newbery is like no i mean. How many at that point. One person of color was winning every ten years. And then we had a puerto bell say because latin next are not getting the shine that they should be getting it the the work the publishing houses the need for people to really not only understand how important these books are but that they can sell if we put the energy behind them. Because i think that's the other argument that well people aren't buying those books i remember. They said that until terry mcmillan published right now. I remember having an argument with an editor at outright which was a writer's conference back in the day about buying books and that's why publishers don't publish them and i was blown away. I mean so. I do think there is so much that can still be done. 'cause i i walk into these classrooms and you know there are a couple of my books on the shelf and i am the black representation even though i know that there are so many other authors out there doing the work and when we look at asia numbers when we look at latin x numbers when we look at the of indigenous people. Those shells are struggling to say. The least i discovered we need diverse boom which lives at diverse books dot org and. I think that it's a a really interesting place for people to go for resources. If they're looking for specific books yeah we need verse books as an amazing organization and at really doing the work to increase visibility and And get those books published. Kwami alexander has a imprint. Chris myers has an imprint. A number of people have imprints where they're publishing books about by an for and about people of color. I mean therefore everyone and thereby about Which is another important thing. Because that was one of the things publishers doing they were publishing books supposedly quote unquote far a certain group of people but they were not necessarily written by those people. Well i actually at that. Segues perfectly into the next question that i want to ask you i. I've been thinking about your comments about disliking books. That don't offer some type of hope. And you've pointed to the book sounders an example of a bleak and hopeless novel in that book. Traumatized me when. I read it in junior high school and in prep for this. I read the wicked pedia entry yesterday. To sort of ref- ameliorate is myself with. The plot actually started weeping while i read the wikipedia entry and it is a really heartbreaking hopeless story but then i realized that sounded was written by a white man. Exactly exactly. that's why i hate it. You know it's a it's a white perspective on a black family and at the beginning of the monkey says he some an old black man told him this story or something like that i. It's so broken in so many ways. I mean you know all all hats off to sicily tyson and the crew that killed the movie very different from the book but that book was constantly being put into the hands of young people the newbery it would never win the newbery today.

terry mcmillan Ten percent Five percent jacqueline woodson Chris myers Seven percent yesterday one percent fifty percents Twenty-seven percent next morning three years ago latin One person tyson wikipedia today early nineties american eleven year old
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:37 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And macarthur genius award jacqueline woodson. Welcome to design matters. It's so nice to be here. Divvy thank you. Jacqueline andere stand. Your favourite is earth kit as cat woman. Kid is anyone But i wasn't a batman fan until earth. A kit showed up. I mean my brothers were huge watches. The show and i could care less and then i was like wait a second. Who is this actually a big of her nineteen fifty-three album that bad ertha which i'd like to think was a source of inspiration for her role. On the batman television series she was such a royal villain and you know and looking back on it. I can't believe she took julie numerous place because she should have been the original on the telephone. I mean julie newmar was hot like the thing was allowed to have hips right. The first time we. I remember seeing someone whose body whose curves were extenuated in that particular sort of way you can tell as a kid. I was looking real hard. So yeah jecklin. You were born in ohio. You lived in nelson ville. Before you and your family moved to a segregated neighborhood called nickel town in greenville south carolina where you lived until you were seven. How did your family explain segregation to you. At that time i actually lived in columbus. My grandparents lived in nelson. Ville and nelson ville. They were the only black family there for my memory of it. And then when i went back as a teenager you know we would definitely the only black folks in the area. They still have the nelson ville house. I don't ever remember my family explaining it. It just was. It was like nickel town was a safe place to be. This is where all the people we love live. This was our hood right. This was our neighborhood and it wasn't even a question. I don't think. I really started understanding the of segregation until i began learning about it right and that it was this sanction. Thing that for me it was just like. Here's my safe black neighborhood where all my people are in doing. My research came upon an interview where you were talking about your son and how. He's almost offended when people have questions. About how your family exists in the world or when he walks into a room where he's the only kid of color because it's just not what he's ever known and i think about sort of how the world has shifted now and the hope that i have for the next generation you know i think that one. He is emmy even in literature. He doesn't wanna read any books that don't have people of color represented. He's just kind of like why. Why with this exist in the world and at the same time. I think that his existence in a very multiracial world is very intentional on me. And my partner's part. I think there's still many many homogeneous families out there my daughter who's eighteen. He was talking about for a long time. She didn't know. Families could be all one color experience and i do think that. Of course to live inside the village and community we've created takes a certain amount of work and openness that. I think people still aren't willing to do. And i think there are a lot of communities that are still very segregated and someway when you were a toddler you did a series of advertisements for. I believe it's called syrup not yes and in ebony magazine and even though you were only two years old you looked a lot older so much so that the ads often featured you as a school age child. And you've written about how you think of this fondly because it was technically your first job and i'm wondering how did you first get into modeling. I have no idea. I think at the time we were in south carolina because aleka is Stands for alabama georgia says. Yeah i remember a photo shoot and the first ad featured kids from all over the country right and the ad was children everywhere. I love alica syrup and it was my sister brother and i. We were the new york. Kids which i don't understand because we weren't in new york full-time yet and so the ads were me. Saying i wish they elegant seraphin school to and looking. I think it was more about my luck. This kind of wistful look not looking directly at the camera. Kind of looking away. Like i was wishing for something that fit what they were trying to execute in the advertisement. Why didn't you continue modeling. You're very cute baby. I don't think i don't know. I think that my mom is not a mom manager. Like that is not who she is by any means and i think she was also. She had three kids. She was a single mom she was trying to make that leap from greenville. To new york city she and my dad had separated and and it was. I definitely got paid for her. She got paid for that work. It just wasn't. It was never anything i'd ever want to do. In my life now as a grownup but as a kid i look back on it and ask the same question like you know come on could have made a lot of money. Who wasn't even an option. Your parents split up or as you put. It fought for the final time. When you're older brother was four. Your sister was nearly three and you were just about one. You didn't see your dad again. I think for fourteen years it was about thirteen. fourteen years. We moved to new york city and my mom and dad were prettiest throw we were estranged from the what's inside and you know. My mom really didn't like my dad. I don't think he was a good person to her for many years. I think also they were very young. I mean my mom had me. She was twenty two. My dad was twenty four and to think about that to be that age and have three kids already It's just unthinkable to me. Of course. I had my first baby when i was thirty nine so it really is unthinkable but yeah so so. I didn't know who my i knew who he was. I knew all about the. What's inside of the family. But i didn't know my father personally for a long time when you reunited with him you've written about and how it felt as if it was a puzzle piece had dropped from the air and landed right where it belonged was my dad. Yeah was it difficult for your mother to see with your dad at all. My parents divorced when i was eight. I didn't see my father for five years when we were reunited. It was hell for everyone in interesting. You know my mom and dad got back together. So yeah yeah. I don't recommend and they stayed together for about five years. So so that's when. I remember my dad man so they had separated but they divorced and then after that period of time they divorce like my mom's like i'm going down to the court filing the papers i'm done with this man But what it did allow for me. Was this chance to build a relationship with him. that wasn't fraught because at the newly in love and some ways but my relationship with him and with my aunties and the whole inside continues today whereas my mother you know he and my mom didn't speak again after they officially divorced after they split up the first time. Your mother and siblings moved in with your grandparents in nickel town. Your grandmother was jehovah's witness. My father's second wife was a jehovah's witness. How much did that influence you as you were growing up. Oh lopped because it was the religion in our household. I mean we were jehovah's witnesses. There wasn't like grandma could be something. You couldn't be that thing but but yeah. I grew up in a very religious household like we. You know bible study on monday at home. Bible study on tuesday at the kingdom hall. I can't remember what wednesday was was ministry school watchtower study..

jacqueline woodson columbus fourteen years south carolina nelson five years julie ohio tuesday eighteen three kids nelson ville new york four seven wednesday bible nickel town Ville eight
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:19 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I want to remind my viewers. We're doing a fundraiser. With food for the poor Folks we want everybody to participate it's amazing organization They're helping people going through a tough time. They're reputable We gotta give back. We know that go to our website taxes. Talk dot com. Click on the banner. We need everybody to do something. Bob what should we talk about in our remaining moments together. I would like to spend a little time talking about that. My book lessons from the least of these. What i've done is taken forty years experiences. I've had of walking in these low incomes amenities and and working with grassroots leaders. Who have come up with solutions in the face of these troubled communities. It's an inspirational aspirational. Book is called lessons from the lease of these available on amazon. Because acquaint you with the woodson principles. I still ten principles. Stat explains how people are able to find redemption restoration and recovery. In some of the most difficult circumstances that people face because people are motivated. Eric when they are exposed to victories that are possible. Not constantly reminded them of injuries to be avoided. So if you want to To know and learn about how people have overcome difficult circumstances how they have triumphed in the face of oppression. Go by the book lessons from the least of these lessons from the lisa. These by bob woodson. Helen's have been out bob. I don't remember when that came out. December fifteenth yes. We're waiting 'til segment to plug it for crying out loud lessons from the least of these bob woodson seriously bob. I have a passion to get good information out to people. It's why do the program but People need to do something people need to understand. You have homework folks I if you can go to seventeen seventy six nights dot com check out the resources Go to woodson center dot org share these links with friends..

Eric Bob December fifteenth amazon bob woodson forty years Helen dot com ten principles Talk dot com nights center dot org woodson seventeen seventy six
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"They were socialist and their goal was to destabilise To promote income redistribution in america. And the way you do that is to Flood the system with black using blacks to To to flood into the welfare system. So you had millions of blacks coming into the welfare system in the seventies out of time bundy unemployment rate in new york. A black men was under four percent. It's unbelievable. I guess you know we have to talk about. Bmi always say bill is a marxist organization that is harming blacks in america. If you care about black people in america you need to understand that b. l. m. is harming them but guilty white people who don't have the guts to look at the facts. Were the guts to speak the truth. They go right along. They're giving money to be a lamb. They're putting it on their social media and they're actually harming blacks but they care less about actually helping blacks than they do about virtue signaling that they look like they're not racist absolutely and the very fact that the most severe problem facing low income blacks is by prime. And so what black lives matter and the social social justice warriors. They have this assault on defunding police and as a consequence it means that the policing in those communities as the climb with the consequence that the murder rate is soaring in those communities. And yet when you look at what are the remedies that are being proposed by this administration. Talking and companies led by blacklock matter. They talking about having numerical quotas for allowing more on boards of directors of more of blacks Numerically in these companies. What does that have to do or are addressing systemic basis. What does that have to do with reducing violence of these. It's it's a kind of bait and switch game. We use the demographics of those. That are hurting. Most as the bait and when the remedies arrive the switch of curves and the money goes to people who are not suffering the problem. And that's why this is such an outrage that we will be talking about systemic racism. I don't even know what that is. Well listen he ear black man and so you can say that but You don't need to be black to see what's going on. I mean as a as an american who does not define myself or identify as a person of color. I still care about what happens in those communities. Because those are my fellow americans and i am and have been for a long time really sick at what i see and so i really treasure people like you who are willing to speak out on this because it is so hard to find good information on this and the democratic party..

america new york millions seventies Bmi under four percent democratic party american americans blacks
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:31 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"All right bob. some people know you. some people. Don't get involved in civil rights For many decades now. When did you get involved. Like what year seriously did you start working in this carrying nine hundred and sixty four. I about twenty four years old. I took over of a civil rights organization westchester pennsylvania. It's about thirty miles west of philadelphia to home a barrel The home of baird. Yes i baird. Rawson is from westchester. Does the school name for him and barrett usa come through with dr king. It others And so i was I had unseated. An older leader took over the westchester human relations council which was the leading civil rights organization at the time. Wow so you met. Baird resting. And dr king met dr king once but barrett rushton many times when he came through What people don't realize that national civil rights leaders came through and brought the media attention to local issues. But what they were supporting is our fight to desegregate the schools and into housing and so that would attack the The the press and so. That's how it worked all right so bob. Look you've got a tremendous History you seem too young to have been that old in nineteen sixty four but just the idea that you have seen how whatever we want to call it. The civil rights movement whatever it is how it has changed over the years and how it had a christian base it had biblical values Deep respect for the family for the father in black families and you have seen how all of that has changed very very dramatically. Even senator moynihan way back liberal democratic senator moynihan wrote that Paper on how. It was the destruction of black families and the loss of black fathers that that was killing The black community and people even then were saying shut up. We don't want to hear about this. That's divisive. That's what i don't know what what were they saying. This is a cultural difference that you know black families are supposed to be broken. And we don't want to address that. I mean it seems to me like soft racism. The soft bigotry of low expectations. But it's also undermining it's very interesting time soul points out in his work that the biggest reduction in poverty in the black community occurred between one thousand nine hundred forty one thousand nine hundred sixty. It went from like eighty two percent down to about forty five percent in one thousand nine hundred fifty one thousand nine.

westchester barrett rushton eighty two percent one thousand nine hundred fort one thousand nine hundred fift nine hundred Rawson westchester human relations co about forty five percent about twenty four years old dr king about thirty miles christian westchester pennsylvania nineteen philadelphia moynihan bob barrett usa four
Peyton Manning Selected for Pro Football Hall of Fame

Bob Zadek

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Peyton Manning Selected for Pro Football Hall of Fame

"Heads the class of 2021 in the pro Football Hall of Fame. The doors of the pro football Hall of Fame of swung open toe welcome the class of 2021, earning their gold jacket this year or quarterback Peyton Manning wide receivers Calvin Johnson and Drew Pearson. Defensive backs Charles Woodson and John Lynch guard Allen Fan Icka coach and quarterback Tom Flores and scouted journalist Bill Nunn, Manning, Woodson and Johnson were elected in their first year is a finalist. The class of 2021 will join the class of 2020 in separate ceremonies during induction week, and Canton, Ohio, later this summer. I'm

Drew Pearson Pro Football Hall Of Fame Allen Fan Icka Tom Flores Calvin Johnson Bill Nunn Peyton Manning Charles Woodson John Lynch Football Woodson Manning Johnson Canton Ohio
Peyton, Woodson, Calvin Johnson lead HOF class

The Dennis Prager Show

00:15 sec | 4 months ago

Peyton, Woodson, Calvin Johnson lead HOF class

"Peyton Manning was awarded his spot in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Saturday in his first year of eligibility. Also going into captain this summer offensive guard Allen Fat Icka wide receivers Calvin Johnson and Drew Pearson, defensive back Charles Woodson and safety John

Peyton Manning Pro Football Hall Of Fame Allen Fat Drew Pearson Calvin Johnson Charles Woodson John
Game changers: Manning, Woodson, Megatron headed to Hall

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Game changers: Manning, Woodson, Megatron headed to Hall

"The doors of the pro football hall of fame of swung open to welcome the class of twenty twenty one during their gold jacket this year or quarterback Peyton manning wide receivers Calvin Johnson or drew Pearson defensive back Charles Woodson and John Lynch guards Alan Faneca coach and quarterback Tom Flores and scout a journalist bill non manning Woodson and Johnson were elected in their first year as a finalist the class of twenty twenty one will join the class of twenty twenty in separate ceremonies during induction weekend canton Ohio later this summer I'm Tom Aikens

Drew Pearson Tom Flores Calvin Johnson Manning Woodson Peyton Manning Charles Woodson Alan Faneca John Lynch Football Johnson Canton Ohio Tom Aikens
Retired NFL star Jason Witten named head coach at Texas HS

The Rich Eisen Show

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

Retired NFL star Jason Witten named head coach at Texas HS

"Rivers isn't the only recent retiree getting into the high school coaching biz. Jason witten he's just going to be a high school coach liberty christian down in argyle texas announce a witness. Its new head coach today. A liberty parents. I guess his kids go there. What if you're a high school coach and you just like you. Should you start looking over your shoulder and every single go. that's retiring right. I don't see tom brady. And peyton manning jealous payton can do whatever he wants mine and he is doing whatever you want still.

Jason Witten Rivers Argyle Texas Tom Brady Peyton Manning Payton
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | 5 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Fused to give up the not defined by what their opposition tells them they are but they're the find by that by strength they have resilience. They're also very transparent. They willingly share shortcomings that they had when blacks white low income people get together. They don't talk about race. They talk about how they overcame the broken this in their lives. That's why i'd say. Eighty percent of my closest friends have letters in front of their names. Them we'll be right back folks. I'm bob woodson woodson's.

Eighty percent bob woodson woodson
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:26 min | 5 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Really house and in fact they're using race as a proxy for using it to to undermine the basic civic institutions of the country. The very fact they used. George floyd to say they're pursuing justice for blacks but what black lives matter did and other radical good right away. They migrated from justice for blacks to denigration of the american flag burning books in portland identifying the christian cross as symbol of white supremacy. So if you look at right now in these. Liberal cities like like tacoma washington seattle and portland with those riots have continued for nine months. Who's getting arrested variety. You don't see black people out there getting busted this has been taken over the civil rights movement and its thought have been hijacked in an us against this country. They don't care they don't give a damn about what happens to black folks and the fact that corporations are Spending billions of dollars to black lives matters when up a fraction of that money were to go into these low income navy neighborhoods where the woodson center operates fund some of those homegrown solutions that reduces violence encourages kids to learn But there's no investment in this because again it didn't fit the racial narrative you've got one group of wealthy blacks who are providing race remains training for self flagellating guilty whites and so that's the new narrative that is permeating society and the and who are the losers low income. Blacks whites and hispanics are the losers in this new race grievance industry. It's a cash cow. it's i have to say again. This is where we're at a crisis. Point in america wear true americans either have to step up or they're going to be. They are part of the problem. If you are spending your money at one of these corporations is giving money to black lives matter you better think twice we're gonna have to Talk than the other side of the break. Come talking to bob. Woodson the woodson's center woodson's center dot org folks you need.

nine months George floyd portland Woodson billions of dollars america bob twice woodson center one woodson's center tacoma washington seattle org civil rights movement one group christian american black hispanics americans
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:36 min | 5 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"What's going on. But i wanna talk about that in a second I wanted to announce so people understand. What's coming up today in our today. We have a doctor and a scientist. His name is joshua swami dos said Indian he is a brilliant brilliant scientists. Doctor who's written a book on genealogical evidence for the common for all of us who are alive if the billions of us were live and those who were alive entertainer dead that we all have a common ancestor in one couple about six thousand years ago. I'm not going to stay if it's adam and eve or even adam or who it is or adam and steve. I'm not gonna comment. I can't wait. I think it was bill and betty schwartz. It could be. That's the impression i got so but anyway now are to. We're going to talk to him in our one. We're going to talk to our friend bob woodson. That's in a couple of minutes. He's seventeen seventy six unites. Heroes civil rights activists in the sixties. And and just a wonderful human being but okay so just to the news. Real quick number one. I got that twitter jail. They gave me new suit of clothes and ten dollars and Twitter and youtube. Youtube were still. There's still not allowing us to put our videos on youtube and twitter. So i want to remind you ladies and gentlemen what i have prophesied in the past under the unction of the holy spirit. I have said that you know there's gonna come a time when these places are going to start to lock us out. They let us out for twenty four hours. Now it's been a week clearly. They are being threatening and they're using these tactics so that we don't post anything controversial because obviously if we post anything controversial. I guess about the election fraud. Which of course Unfortunately probably happened rights. Even come and done it in this free country. They're gonna shut us down so probably on youtube and on twitter. I will be more careful about posting that kind of thing. Which is why you have to follow us at eric. Metaxas dot com. There is a sign up for a newsletter. If you can't sign up just email us because some people say that their email will not go through. I don't know what what's going on. We keep trying to get the. But you've got to get our newsletter. We're sending them out very often almost every day. While i'm doing this book launch. But i do want to say that You need to follow us also at rumble. We've only begun to rumble. But we're putting the videos that the fascists and communists at places like youtube and twitter that they don't want us to share or going to be sharing those at rumble so we do need you to go to rumble so you can follow you. Know the really divisive hateful speech that that album tonight love to spew just for laughs so but i do want to get back to to mike lindell before we go on and it's very important today is holocaust remembrance day and by the way tonight we're doing another global prayer. Meeting call will send an email out to my list. Aircon texas dot com but a out tonight a little bit about bon. But i just have to say that. This is really serious where we are right now. Anybody who believes this election was not on the up and up is being labeled a conspiracy theorists a troublemaker. Potential violent extremists. Okay let me just be blunt. despicable like. The people who are engaged in that are engaged in despicable anti american behavior. And you need to know that because we've not had this in america you'd have to go back to the fifties and the mccarthy scare To come anywhere near it but in a way this is different because there are no communists there are in other words. This is this is not about finding out who are the few that this is. This is nonsense. This is the proverbial gas lighting. So they've they've come after me and they've gone after mike lindell very hard so i wanna be blunt. Mike lindell is a friend. He's the main sponsor this show for the love of the country and the love of freedom. Do not ever shop at kohl's or bed bath and beyond or heb stores there are others. I think it's mayfair stores. We don't have them up here but not only. Should you not shop at those stores ever until they reverse their policy which they may. Let's let's hope that they would but don't ever shop at those stores and please please spread the word. Tell your friends that their policies are anti american anti freedom. When you try to shut down a hero like mike lindell. You don't have to agree with the guy you don't if the like you could hate him but to shut him down to try to cancel his business to try to hurt him and his employees financially because he dares to speak his mind and trust me when i tell you he's not saying anything divisive or or you know this is just pure pure evil on on the part to these folks they simply want to shutdown anyone with whom they disagree. It's vicious it's wrong. It's anti-american if you if we the people do not stand up against this we deserve to drift into a kind of you know liberty lists state of bondage. We may not become china tomorrow. But the is we're drifting in that direction where we have government surveillance and government intrusion in our lives. We have to understand what's at stake Can i just add. We're not talking violence here. We're talking about a pillow fight. Okay think of pillow fight. This is really serious but think about it that they are trying to do this. I mean we'll get into this in in other shows. But i just want to be clear. How wrong this is. How wicked is and how you have a voice. You have a okay. You know you say well. Maybe my vote wasn't counted in this election. Vote is counted. How you spend your money and if you don't spend your money at kohl's in bed bath and beyond in heb stores and mayfair. Whatever it is you. They're going to notice it. But you've gotta tell your friends. I just want to help understand how sick it is that they would do this. They carry tons of products made in china in the stores. You know that and here we have somebody who All has stuff has made in america. He's a patriot. He's given tons of money to wonderful causes and they decided he's a devil. And we're not gonna i'm gonna tell you. He's the main sponsor this program. He's a friend and it's not only because of that is because of If i never met the guy. I know what he's doing what he's sitting for people to try to do this to him so i want to say. Please don't ever shop in those stores. Please tell your friend. You've got to spread the word not to shop in those stores and if you want to buy his products and that's another way that you can help him and you can help this program by as products at my pillow dot com or my store dot com. You can buy most my books that my store dot com instead of buying them at amazon and Use the discount code. Eric send a message because folks this is. This is a real battle. I mean the nastiness this is the nastiness of where we are today that these corporate behemoths who are total cowards. I mean these are the kind of people who in germany look the other way because they said we don't wanna company to wonder. What do we need to do hitler. That's that's normal. That's normal cowardice. But in america we call it out. 'cause we still do the freedom on airwaves like these to call it out some asking you to do what you can. It's vital it's vital when we come back. We're gonna talk to bob woodson in our to. I've got more of an update on what i did yesterday a. You're not going to believe what i did yesterday. So that's an hour or two We'll catch.

Mike lindell bob woodson yesterday mike lindell youtube Youtube amazon Eric Twitter ten dollars twitter germany america adam twenty four hours bill joshua swami tomorrow china today
Brooklyn Handyman Accused of Three Separate Killings in same Apartment Complex in New York City

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:59 sec | 5 months ago

Brooklyn Handyman Accused of Three Separate Killings in same Apartment Complex in New York City

"A serial The killer doctor. hunter Fauci rest did scheduled say, though, for arraignment after he went today. on 66 to wax poetic year old about how Kevin nice it Gavin is working for Biden suspected of company three murders Compared to that what nitrous Donald Trump. senior He housing did complex. say that if 75 Carter G. to Woodson 80% complex and the Brownsville Of Americans section get on Powell vaccinated Street in Brooklyn, 75 and to Y 80% PDS of Americans chief of detectives get vaccinated is running Harris. that Mr. will be back Kevin to normal Gavin sometime this was summer. arrested for three murders Yeah, One of look. Keep that occurred hope alive. between This is what we're praying 2015 for. This is the goal, of course. and unfortunately, But how's it gonna happen 2021 to me? For example, if you're not watching the local at news the Woodside today, you may not know Houses. this. Residents But we of are this complex in this held a state, press conference New York State yesterday. We are due to run They are asking out of in vaccine New York City doses to a immediately today. install Today surveillance we're gonna be out cameras of it. So at how the are complex we gonna cameras get were 100 asking million to be put shots in hallways. and in these arms how we're gonna So get certainly through this and be as OK the person by this summer. is already in the For building the most part outside cameras of West in Virginia. hallways as well as in Every stairways state and seems elevators you're running out of doses conserve to daily. be caught People's Yeah, actions. they're even running The city out in says Florida The installation Governor has decided been delayed to sustain. due to Cove Just in 19. get me some vaccine. Give me some Tell

Hunter Fauci Kevin Nice Carter G. Gavin Donald Trump Woodson Brownsville Biden Powell Brooklyn Harris Kevin MR. New York State New York City Virginia Florida
No surprise: Peyton Manning a Hall of Fame finalist

Drive Time Sports

01:09 min | 6 months ago

No surprise: Peyton Manning a Hall of Fame finalist

"Finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame have been announced, and I am not at all surprised at the list. Ah, you have paint Manning ever heard of him? So Peyton Manning, Charles Woodson, Calvin Johnson and in Jared Allen. Have all been named finalists. There are also rendezvous Barber, Tony Bacilli, Laroy Butler, Allen Fan Icka, Torry Holt, John Lynch, Clay Matthews Jr to Sam Mills, Richard Seymour, Zack Thomas and Reggie Wayne. Those are the finalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. I can't quite think of Have to go back and look, I think that's pretty much everyone that I would have moved. Send in the next round. You pick five as many as five. Right? See guy. Go, Peyton Iago! Woodson. I think you go Megatron rather gate. Ah Ah, I probably hang onto Jared Allen. I go John Lynch.

Pro Football Hall Of Fame Rendezvous Barber Tony Bacilli Laroy Butler Allen Fan Icka Clay Matthews Jr Sam Mills Charles Woodson Zack Thomas Jared Allen Calvin Johnson Peyton Manning Torry Holt Manning John Lynch Richard Seymour Reggie Wayne Peyton Iago Woodson
"woodson" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

Jalen and Jacoby

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Jalen and Jacoby

"I scratch your back on every level high school college. It happens so therefore if jerry west os this man two point five million i believe we may look up so and they're gonna be selling out of court. Because i did end up playing for the clippers. They did bring paul george. If that was the ticket judge for georgia's contract the low the discount disc will see. We will see because. I'm sure there's no sort of contract between these two parties but something tells me there may have been an arrangement and if there was as you mentioned they will settle out of court. We'll keep you updated on that story and we have a new versus battle matchup. The we can't wait to announce to you right. Got watching jalen and jacoby got it. Jaylen undertake presented by bullet. Frontier wishy highly awarded high risk and enjoy responsibly hottest. Happy welcome back to jalen and jacoby first of all we want to give a shout to charles woodson for joining the show from the golf cart and also give a shout to say johnson of florida wish speedy recovery. Charles you gonna get some of the greatest receivers in the history of nfl. Who do you feel like currently is the best wide receiver in the league. And before you ask her. I talk so much about how to position has changed it. Used to be a size. They used to land up.

jerry west paul george jalen Jaylen jacoby clippers georgia charles woodson golf johnson Charles florida nfl
North Carolina State University closing campus dorms due to coronavirus

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:22 sec | 10 months ago

North Carolina State University closing campus dorms due to coronavirus

"Com. North Carolina State University has told students remaining in university housing to go home. Acknowledging a rising number of Corona virus clusters occurring in both on campus in off campus housing Chancellor Randy Woodson says starting on Thursday, students in university housing should schedule a time to be Moving out of on campus

North Carolina State Universit Randy Woodson Chancellor
Cowboys' Prescott doesn't get deal to replace franchise tag

First Things First

05:15 min | 1 year ago

Cowboys' Prescott doesn't get deal to replace franchise tag

"Not Deal for. Prescott and the cowboys could not agree to terms on a deal that would have the quarterback between thirty three and thirty five million dollars annually with a hundred and ten million of that guaranteed. So Daf will now play this season on the thirty one point four million dollar franchise tag. He will once again on himself this season if there were reports that the two sides were close, they clearly were not close enough. WHO's more likely to regret? Not Getting a deal done deaf Prescott or the Dallas Cowboys. I'm going to say. Despite the fact that I believe is going to end up the highest paid player than Patrick Mahomes in NFL, history I Dak is going to get the money that he ultimately wanted I think he's going to be franchise tag this year franchise tag next year and then hit open free agency. But here for deck that in the in the pursuit of that money, he's going to become an athlete that I. Don't think any athlete wants to be which is your name is not your name anymore? It's not Dak. Prescott is having a Joe Johnson Joe. Johnson stopped being Joe Johnson. He started being Joe Contract because no matter how good he was, he was never going to be able to live up to that contract. And I think Jack is setting himself up to be a little bit richer than he otherwise would be. Be a guy who can never live up to that contract, and the reason I think Dallas is not gonNA regret this, even if they back on the quarterback treadmill is because the the worst thing you can have in this league. Wild does not have a quarterback. The worst thing you can have is a vastly overpaid quarterback. If you don't have a quarterback and find a new one, you can go try to find one if you have a vastly overpaid quarterback. You're just stuck and so I think Jack is going to get what he thinks he wants in this the most money in. Have ever gotten aside from Mahomes I. Think he will end up regretting it because you have a great organization, you have great skill, position guys, and if he would've just signed for Carson, Wentz plus ten percent, no one would've held it against him, and instead this contract and the negotiations around at wild. You're going to be the narrative surrounding him for years to come. See I disagree. You think that it's it's. I think the worst thing to have is a mediocre quarterback. Any shot at the super. Bowl and I'm GONNA throw to a clip of Darren Woodson in a second, but I think in our minds if it's been glossed over that, it was troy and then Tony, but there was a the drew bledsoe Weirdo error there that they were in a bad spot. If we can take a listen a Darren Woodson please hubs. In, the world when you have quarterback purgatory. Where you can. You're not good at that position. That position is holding you back from winning games, and there was a time before Tony Romo era. Where there were four years, we went five and eleven. In a week, totally struggled at that one position in in today's game that one position is means a ton means wins and losses gotta get you over the Hump in when you don't have that Clare in that position. It's a huge struggle. I'm. So. Bryan. I think this eventually gets done I. Don't know if he gets franchise again. I think that we just moved the goalposts and a long-term deals going to get done. They like each other. Dak wanted for the cowboys wanted five I. Don't think the answer is. Let's get divorced just because we can't agree. I think this eventually get works gets worked out and I. Don't think anyone has any regrets long-term. The cowboys ended up regretted. Just a bit because I think that goes out and has a very good year. This season with Mike McCarthy Mike McCarthy comes back in after winning a playoff game or two, and says we need to have Dak back now. The cowboys have to pay him that long term contract, which is going to be a little bit more than they would have had to pay him this year. Here's the question that I've always had. If if the cowboys don't love, why would they ever want to sign him to a five year deal versus the forty deal if you don't love them then? On to a four year deal, you can get rid of him quicker. Why would you want WanNa longer contract if you don't love him, and you don't know exactly what he is for your football team to me I think they know who back is they just don't WanNa, pay him because they see him as a fourth round pick. A guy that has played well in this career hasn't quite got over the Hump. I don't think they want to pay him if I'm back Prescott I, feel like I'm in a great position to meet the floor. The absolute four is thirty three to thirty five million dollar contract that you can get from some other team after the season. If things don't work out for you here in Dallas, I think a team like Jacksonville. Teams that would need a quarterback was still need a quarterback next year and would be that open market possibly if he doesn't give franchise in the floor to his contract would be that deal that he turned down this season from the cowboys.

Cowboys Joe Contract Dallas Cowboys DAK Prescott Jack Dallas Darren Woodson Tony Romo DAF Joe Johnson Joe Mike Mccarthy Mike Mccarthy Patrick Mahomes NFL Clare Bryan Bowl Jacksonville Football Wentz
"woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"woodson" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Kioko, who has? he's from Puerto. Rico which makes him in American citizen. He has a monolingual, Spanish speaking parent that he has to translate for and the hatred that gets thrown at him because because his mother speaks beautiful language and the ridiculousness of that and. The fact that People's cultures constantly getting called into question and the thing about harbor me is I started writing that book a long time ago. I mean we've been dealing with mass incarceration in this country for a long time. We've been dealing with deportation in this country for a long time. We've been dealing with economic disparities for like long time, so so taking those kids and putting them in the room to talk about these questions that I've always had and that you know lots of kids have. Made Sense to me. I WanNa ask you about this particular moment, because kids on top of everything on top of these issues that we've been talking about about racial justice about the protests about black lives matter we're also they are also dealing with this corona virus and lockdown at home, and away from their friends, and all kinds of challenges that are associated with that. What are you hearing from them about this for about this sort of confluence of challenges right now? My son complains about teachers, not knowing how to use ill. I. Think that's one frustration for the young people you know. They're so ahead of us. In terms of using technology and here we come. We also like okay now. I gotta get to zoom call without like. How do we do this again? It's like. Zoo. So so I I definitely hear the frustration and the thing. My son said the other day was like I'm forgetting how to socialize with people, and that broke my heart because it is we. Are you know where pods where you know doing are sheltering where? Trying to figure out how to stay engaged, but we're engaged with a screen at the same time telling them to have less screen time you know it's it's all of these I don't know kind of contradictions going on and at the end of the day. They're like okay. So when is this thing going to be over at the same time? They're learning how to negotiate a main. Automatically! Put on their masks when we. Go into a store, and and again going back to their resilience, and their ways of being able to. kind of move like water with the Times is always. Gratifying Is that the hopeful. What's hopeful about this moment? I mean perhaps the pandemic offering them a chance I don't know to look up and see what's going on in their world. Even though that sounds contradictory, because of course, they're staring at screens the. Screens and everything, but there's something hopeful about that. I think I think there is a chance to more. There's gathering I mean even the family gathering getting around the table and having truck thoughtful conversations with your family. I think in terms of. Even engaging deeper via zoom right knowing that when you see that person, you're seeing inside their house. You're seeing inside their living room their bedroom. And you have a another kind of understanding of I think people are reading. More people are talking more, and even the marches and New York, you know people are heading to the marches and. And being allies and doing the work that needs to be done. Well Jacqueline Woodson was such a pleasure talking to this hour. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Anthony Lewis Great. It really was. That's Jacqueline Woodson she's the acclaimed author of Brown girl. Dreaming the day you begin after to pack and D foster the forthcoming before the ever after among many other books listeners, you continue the conversation. Get the on point podcasts at our website on point radio DOT ORG. You can also follow us on twitter. Find US on facebook at on point radio. Thanks for listening I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point..

Jacqueline Woodson Puerto Kioko Anthony Brooks twitter Anthony Lewis New York Brown
Black Lives Matter protest turns violent in London

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Black Lives Matter protest turns violent in London

"Clashes erupted in central London on Sunday after a largely peaceful black lives matter protest tension escalated as police tried to clear a junction in parliament square blocks by protest is just a short distance from prime minister Boris Johnson's ten Downing Street a number of people were seen being arrested and put into police vans the police saying later Tuesday the twenty had been taken into custody the demonstrators we're running against the death of George Floyd on may twenty five in Minneapolis which is sparked demonstrations across the U. S. since Charles Woodson of this month London

London Prime Minister Boris Johnson George Floyd Minneapolis Charles Woodson
Dr. Allen Berger: Overcoming Anxiety And Fear During Quarantine

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

11:40 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Allen Berger: Overcoming Anxiety And Fear During Quarantine

"Dr. Berger what can you tell us to help us cope with these massive psychological challenges in these massively weird times? Well I think the first thing that want to say is that Were all experiencing anxiety to some level right now. That is the new normal today. We make a distinction between fear anxiety and a lot of feeling fear. Because there's a real threat out there Dr Taback and really help us understand that. So our reaction to this. The fearful part of it is quite appropriate. That's the reality of it but I think what will be important today. Bill is for us to make that distinction between fear anxiety in to talk about the anxiety. Part the fearful part. We need to do what everybody's telling us to do in order to to stop the spread of this thing in into you know decrease our risk of being able in getting the covy nineteen and that's different from anxiety. Well no that's that's the fearful part. That's the appropriate. Reaction of fear is taking the steps necessary to protect yourself. The anxiety gets in in when we start imagining. What's going to happen so when we leave right now? We go into the future. You see as soon as you start imagining catastrophic outcomes. I'm going to be in in bad shape emotionally. How does this get all the worst for someone who might be home these days? Who's already been struggling with some kind of addiction or challenge with alcohol or drugs? How did they get through this? Yeah that's such an important question. Look in and we're all trying to mobilize as many resources as we can to reach out to people that are isolated. And it's a weird thing. Isn't it where isolated but in some way were even more in community now than before and I think that's an important thing for us to realize were really connected right now and we really need each other more than we've ever in addiction and recovery. We talk about. I can't but we can and that whole idea is so important at this moment more than ever. I mean if we can remove ourselves really from this particular you know terrible crisis that were in in just sort of look at it from a bird's eye view there's an amazing message in the global nature of this disease. Right it's to me. The message is one of humility mean. It's really right sizing us in an incredible way. Isn't it Dr Data? And also just how universal this is we are all human beings. We're all going to be vulnerable. We all need to take care of each other and take care of our planet. I mean you can debate back and forth global warming this or not. There's no debate here when it comes to corona virus and it's almost as if the forces of nature have said Wake Up People. You need to be banding together to work for a common goal. Not just corona but the health of the world's for your own sake. I love that. It's it's almost like nature is saying. Hey everybody wake up waking up a wake up call. It's a big wakeup call for some of US. Like myself or watching. Cnn All day long and and you know watching those numbers on the right hand side of the of the screen continue to go up and this is. The stress gets more and more overwhelming. You you do find yourself even if you're not struggling with things like depression normally or addiction You find yourself kind of different. It does something to you just listening to. What's going on in the world and then dealing with the am I gonNa get it or any of my family members going to get it. What should I be doing to protect myself at home? And this is weird because my business could be falling apart. Can you give us some ideas on steps? We can take personally to try to manage that kind of thing in. How can we recognize if we're not managing it? Well yeah that's a very important question. Bill American Psychological Association came out with some guidelines and one other top guidelines was limit your exposure to the news right now. Now that's not the same as saying you know. Become an in on ostrich. Stick your head in the sand in and don't pay attention to what's going on but we've got to find a balance between being informed but at the same time taking care of ourselves and so limiting exposures important thing. That's what I started to do. A give myself a ten minute quota. Ten minutes I get to watch news a day and that's it and then the rest of the time you know. I'm engaged in other things. So that's the first thing right is really pay attention to limiting your time. That's GONNA help people with their anxiety a lot. So tell me what what are some of the other things? I've heard about diet and exercise and sleep but Maybe you can kind of help part listeners. Understand what are the steps that they should take to try to keep as healthy as possible? Let me put it in the context of this concept in addition to our physical center gravity. There's an emotional center gravity and when I keep my emotional center gravity over my two feet. Then I cope a lot better. Try Give this virus by emotional center gravity or what's going on in the world my emotional center gravity then my wellbeing depends on what's going on around me and today that's really bad news. Your it said it's pretty common. It's critical Woodson. It's what we're all doing and see this. Is the opportunity. See if we used. This is an opportunity to become aware of ourselves in how we function. What's our habitual ways of thinking and feeling we've got an opportunity to really do some phenomenal growth. So you say that. The there's a difference between fear anxiety you alluded to that. Would you say fear would be the rational perspective of the challenge that were under at the moment and that the anxiety irrational portion of that? That's correct so if I stay grounded in in in respond to my fear appropriately. What am I gonNA? Do you know the steps that we need to take to stop the spread of this and to protect ourselves. You know. Finally we're talking about everybody putting a mask on before you leave the house you know if there's no host for this thing to to survive in and we're going to be able to stop the spread of this thing so that becomes an incredibly important thing and I think that's what they did to finally get control the Spanish fool back in nineteen eighteen so from day to day perspective to sort of move in the moment and realize that right. Now you're fine. You're not sick this focus on what's good. Let's do what I can do what I am in control of. Let me take control of that. What is what is your recommendation for. How the average person who may have just low level anxiety and even more so those people who have a heightened level anxiety. How do you keep people away from delving into that? What IF SCENARIO WELL. That's such a great question. Let me tell you how I work with that. My office right. There's a rational part of me that you just referred to. There's a healthy part of me that that responds appropriately situations takes care of myself from a rational basis will. There's also a part of me that I call my anxious self. Now that part of me can take a situation like this and come up with all kinds of catastrophic outcomes. I'm GONNA get this. I'M GONNA die in a hospital loan although saint. That's possible outcome whether that's going to happen for me or not is yet to be determined so when I start to project into the future. I've got to start to think about that. The side of me. That's projecting into the future is the part of me. I need to deal with so I need to start separating myself from the part of me that's making me anxious and see. This is a very important step in terms of being able to now manager anxiety. Well or would I would say in the way I'm talking about now. Manage are anxious self. But do you think that on some level that the human being with our existential reality that to some extent this anxiety you put yourself through the what if in a way to try to prepare yourself in the event that it takes place thinking that maybe that may cushion the blow to try to put yourself through the potential horrendous aspects of the future so that you will not be shocked in unprepared if were to take place? We call anticipatory coping. And you're right on. We do that right. We anticipate these situations was it. How NEAT WELL. It is if you do it once maybe twice but when you do it a thousand times in you run through a scenario over and over again. You're no longer preparing. Now you're throwing yourself into a big into a panic right. You're going to have a panic attack. I do go down that road of what if and then I have a real myself back To rational thought how do you really yourself back could tell us what you do. The first thing that I do say okay. You know what you got a job to do. Focus on what's going on right now. Number one Suai become try to become more philosophical and I say it's here now anyway we all know that we're dying eventually We don't want it to be tomorrow. We don't want it to be two weeks from now but we all know. We've been preparing for this in many ways our whole lives and so. I try to be philosophical about say it's GonNa Happen. But let's focus on what's good. Let's focus on what we can control. Let's talk about the psychological stress on medical staff who have to deal with this every day. Not only do they have a concern. They have to even if they claim they don't they. They have to have a little bit of concern for themselves in this case multiplied by just an overwhelming feeling of lack of control because this virus seems to have its own trajectory and they get surprise suddenly. There's there's a patient he was doing well a few minutes ago. And all of a sudden now they're crashing and need to be put on a ventilator. How our healthcare workers supposed to deal with that kind of stress? You guys are all in my prayers right now in terms of what you guys are facing here. Here's what we know bill. Is that when you let the situation control you? Then you're GonNa have the best possible response to it. No let me explain it. Because intuitively that seems what do you mean? You're abdicating any responsibility for letting this situation control you while the opposite is true. You see if I go into a situation thinking I'm GonNa Control Everything in Dr Steve. You know this better than most if I think I can control everything. That's going to be happening in front of me. I'm setting myself for for some big trouble because then I become fixed in my response if something has to be a certain way if it's supposed to look like this then. I'M NOT GONNA be able to respond to what it is and what we know. Is your coping increases when you let go of what's supposed to be happening and you start to deal with. What is if I let go of all of my rules of what's supposed to be happening bill? I can respond much better inside every one of us. In every one of those M- those healthcare professionals right now is an incredible ability to adapt into deal with situations as they

Bill Bill American Psychological As Dr Taback Psychological Stress Dr. Berger United States CNN Dr Data Dr Steve Woodson Suai
"woodson" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"woodson" Discussed on 1A

"Com slash safety. Hi I'm a new Rhody and I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes were exploring big ideas about reinvention making amends and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me. This is one A. Returning now to our conversation with Jacqueline Woodson and her year of return experiences Jacqueline you write about how you experienced a kind of double consciousness. While they're belonging at at the same time not belonging and I think you started to allude to this a little bit a minute or two ago. What does that feel like to you is is that feeling? That that you feel can be reconciled. Yes I think it is. I think it is feeling I have here in this country right. I am of this place you know I. I'm from this place but I really I'm in this place but my I of this place I don't know I'm very American in so many ways and in so many ways. Not You know the same with New York. I grew up in the south until I was seven. And so those imprinting years. I'm very southern so I feel kind of outside in New York all the time and so getting to Ghana and seeing everyone who is my complexion Or darker or a slightly lighter Walking like ideal you know our language the way we speak is different but the openness is the same feeling very southern to me And then it not being my place. Right it. It's kind of For me in the end it did feel like yes. This this is this is how I will always walk the world and yeah in more than one place. Talk a little bit more about that. That two feet in two places or feet in multiple places feeling because it's fascinating you know it's a it's a it's it's at once Kind of A. It's a gift right when you look at it. Positively if I didn't have feet in so many world I wouldn't have been able to write thirty two books. I mean you know it's it's kind of it. It's what bills empathy is how we begin to understand And at the same time I do wonder what it would be like to exist solely in one place in one body as one being and that's never been the case for me So so going to Africa. I didn't go to Ghana. I didn't feel like I was going to be completely outside of simply by the color of my skin I knew that some part of me was going to have a belonging there But I didn't know that I would at the same time feel This outsider ness and where the outsider would play out. It played out You know of course in economics. It played out in language. I feel like I can't I played out. I moved differently than a lot of African women even though my daughter moves like the African women so that was all very interesting to me. Will you said that there isn't enough space in the New York? Times travel section to to capture the enormity of this experience. I hope we've gotten closer in this time we've spent together On the air. But if you could go down a road that you haven't explored yet in writing about your trip to Ghana or your children's experience or your experience with your partner I don't know of. What do you think that would be I think I would. I would want to go down the road of my children who identify as black and biracial right. You know. They always say we're black and Biracial to to make sure both of those parts of themselves are are acknowledged. And what does it mean to be black and Biracial in Ghana What it mean to be completely immersed in an African culture for say five years ten years. What would that look like for them? I think there are so many roads and I also think I want to hear other voices I wanNA. There's so much room to write about this to write about our experiences. As African Americans Caribbean Americans and as Africans So so I have the roads that I would like to explore but I also am always so interested in the voices of other writers telling these stories. We've talked on this show before about how American journalistic views of Africa can be so very narrow you mentioned before the idea that Africa's one thing of course it isn't. This sounds like an opportunity to broaden that perspective make it even more granular than before to get more voices talking about the personal experiences visiting Africa exactly. Well we talked a little bit earlier about what you really wanted to get out of. This trip was some truth. I I suppose that's what writers are always looking for whether they're fiction or nonfiction writers. At least I hope so. I think the truth ultimately is what you're looking for do you. Do you think you got it. I think I got some of the truth. I think there are many of them and I think each time I go back. I'll get some more but for me. I feel like the truth that I got was that I am of that place to and And that matters that that I can go there. And and even with the sense of belonging I felt to also feel that sense of belonging and next time to go and explore what that truth means and how that truth manifest with more time there with knowing more people with doing more stuff So yeah you're it's you know I think as writers we're constantly searching for the truth that matter to us and by extension matter to a greater good in a bigger world and I'm I'm at the beginning of him and I think sometimes that that sense of belonging that you get a little bit of a sense of your first time you go to a place that can give way to a sense of longing to go back and be part of it and maybe that's in your future to Jacqueline Woodson author of Brown girl dreaming and read at the Bone Jacqueline. What a pleasure. Thank you for joining us. Thank you.

Ghana Jacqueline Woodson New York Africa Bone Jacqueline Rhody NPR partner Brown
'The Bachelor': The Women Blow Up on Peter for Bringing Back Alayah

Pardon My Take

02:30 min | 1 year ago

'The Bachelor': The Women Blow Up on Peter for Bringing Back Alayah

"Pete took Victoria F on a one on one date to a surprise chase. Rice concert turns out Victoria. F Dated Chase Rice before four. Coming on yes I mean our guy chase is like Charles Woodson back in the day like you know two thirds of the world's covered by water one-third by Charles Els Woodson Chase Rice is dated two-thirds a world so I'm two-thirds of the world's covered by water the other third is by chases ropes. Yes let's keep it classy. He's a lover his season. He no he is his vocal inflections. Yes is come. He's just a good dude. P Then took the woman on a group date to the Cleveland Browns stadium where there was traumatic place on pickers house. They played a game of tackle football coach by Josh cribs and Hanford Dixon. Also also I guess on the show when Chris was saying like all right. We're going to Cleveland and usually that's where all the girls like. It was just like everyone who's just blank face. WE'RE GOING TO CLEVELAND. And they're all just like oh I love when they do that. So that's an old real world trick when they were like and your trip is Argentina. And then when you're going to Yugoslavia of Lia ship and then Eliah whoever you guys remember got sent over love you assault was your map from nineteen eighty seven. It was not Yugoslav anymore shows now respect Croatia Vania. I actually did that on purpose so that I wasn't offending occurrence country. Okay didn't want to get cancelled. Elias shows back up and ask him out of fashion that lived in Yugoslavia. You guys are missing. The most part Alaya showed up. She got home last week so she's not on. The show actually had death squads that that executed people that were fighting against Nazis. So this is kind of a pattern for you in today's episode absorb get Alaya. Who got sent home last week? Shows back up and ask Peter to let her come back in and he did The other girls. That are pissed at Pete Heat and some threatened to leave so is this an empty threat or they actually goal-bound. I don't know this is like a union situation. The the rest are unionizing. Potentially that's that's what it sounds like. Well I mean the whole show is about roses so they're probably LDS say true. I don't get that joke but I I get I bet you it was a good one. Yeah you've probably really noticing roses on twitter. The twitter now. You actually haven't God that's it. Okay great I mean. That's the worst last. But that's a pretty every clip number. What happened Eliah

Charles Els Woodson Chase Rice Yugoslavia Chase Rice Charles Woodson Twitter Cleveland Browns Stadium Pete Heat Cleveland Rice Eliah Victoria Hanford Dixon Victoria F Elias Josh Cribs Chris Football Argentina Assault Peter
‘Richard Jewell’ and Olivia Wilde’s Offensive Portrayal of the Late Journalist Kathy Scruggs

The Big Picture

10:04 min | 1 year ago

‘Richard Jewell’ and Olivia Wilde’s Offensive Portrayal of the Late Journalist Kathy Scruggs

"Brian on your podcast with David Shoemaker. The press box talked a lot about the controversies around Richard Jewel. Let's unpack some of those quickly before we start getting into the nitty gritty of the film Maybe you can help us understand specifically what role. A person named Kathy scruggs plays in this. Yeah she plays a problematic role. I think we should say she was a big figure. In in the coverage of Richard Jewel. She was a co byline on the very first story in this movie she is kind of a suggestion of a character. More than character. Actor probably The big news of courses that they in the movie they suggest or I guess more than just right she sleeps with an FBI agent. Yes after he gives her a tip yes that they are investigating Richard Jewell. Yes it literally say. She does not literally say I will now sleep with you because you have given me this information But that happens in rapid succession in the span of thirty seconds. It's kind of like the trump Ukraine call. Oh it's a quid. Pro Quo don't have to say it. We know what happened. It was a perfect bout of sex for information as trump might say and Olivia Wilde. And I think you're talking about the delivery. Wild has suggested that she was a relationship with this. FBI This is. This is again some reporting that none of us were aware of before this. That's not what's Woodson the movie the movie is high. Sure Gimme some information and I will do you a favor and then the FBI agent played by. Jon Hamm mm says Oh so we are doing this. which would suggest that they were not doing this before the exchange of information? Yeah Yeah So. This controversy has swallowed the movie up in a lot of ways and I did not think that was going to be the case. And over the course of the run up to the release of the Movie Warner Brothers released a statement sort of defying the Atlanta Journal. Constitution's rebuttal of the movie. They were very proactive. In identifying the fact that this is a movie and there is some fictionalization traumatisation happening here. I wanted to talk to you guys especially about what happens when a movie takes liberties like this is generally speaking. For Art's sake. I think we should always be doing doing this. There's the movie should always be stretching and redefining and re imagining and re contextualising these stories to tell better stories that it's not the job of movies to make good journalists. It's the job of journalists to make good journalists but this seems to be a situation where cleese would obviously the director and and grandfather grandfather of this film. hasn't very specific points of view about authority in the media and there is an expectation that he brought a lot of those ideas. Do Do you think that the movie suffered greatly because of this conversation or or is this just something that we talk about on podcast. Because we're all in the media. Dave Weigel political writer had a great tweet where he said all this controversy convinced fenced liberals that they didn't WanNa see Richard Jewel but the controversy wasn't big enough to convince conservatives that they could own the lips by seeing Richard Jewel. So it Kinda put Richard Jewel in this weird have state I'm with you. I'm all for historical fiction and broad license to do it. The exception I would make is in a case like like this because you could have just picked a random person but you picked a real life reporter who's not famous and you're telling the world the one thing you should know about this woman other than that. She broke the story. Initially but Richard Jewel being under investigation by the FBI. She slept with somebody to get the information. So I think if you're going to do that and then take the additional step as wild suggested that this is based in reality this isn't billy ray writing the screenplay allow. Let's make something up you owe it to show your work in some way whether it's an op-ed whether it's an interview or something because this is beyond this is not famous people. Having a conversation in the White House is a real person sue. This is a a very pernicious and well-established trope in movies about female journalists female journalists in movies are always sleeping with the sources which you know I should just go on record in case you you are not as involved in the media as we are. That's not what happens in real life. We're not all sleep with our sources just so you know. That's not allowed. But when I saw this movie. It was a couple days before the the kerfuffle started and I was so shocked. I thought that either I assumed assumed that. This journalist Kathy scruggs portrayed in the movie was not a real person and then when i Google that it was she was I was like okay. Either there is. She wrote a memoir where she literally said. This happened and I did this. And this is how I got the story in my involvement or else she's dead and friends it's option B because otherwise I was like how do you get away away from this with from a liable perspective. It's so blatant. And so and it stands out and the other thing is just it really it. It undermines the movie. I don't understand why you have to do this. Because this is a movie about how the media was responsible will in in and ruining rituals life which is like. That's fact right that is that definitely happened But to put in this seemingly fictionalized or unsubstantiated and like gross comment on a female journalists in the movie undermines all the legitimate if if tricky cases that Clint Eastwood and movie wants to make about the media's role in American politics in life I completely agree with this man was trapped in his home mm-hmm with his mom for eight days while people everyone in America thought he was a terrorist who had set a bomb and blown up people and it wasn't a case of some of these cases of guilt or innocence. Where it's Oh? He was a little bit involved but he wasn't no he was completely innocent. And Somehow you've done this and taking him him he's no longer the sympathetic figure and the journalists who was part of a team with the JC that made mistakes in covering him. And we're not skeptical enough of the government's evidence evidence and case you've turned them into the into the sympathetic figures. I just don't get it at all. It's a bit of a confounding thing I think a lot of journalists are struggling with the movie for the exact reason you mentioned. Amanda which is that I. I think it's actually quite a strong film in one of Clint's best movies and last fifteen years and it's been completely cast aside and a lot of ways not the Clinton needs another successful movie had plenty in his career but it's a movie that metastasized as a lot of ideas that he's fascinated by kind of like libertarianism in the pursuit sort of like a single man's pursuit of success in the face of a lot of people working against him the Atlanta Journal Constitution response to this though. I think has been a little little bit curious. The long piece that they that they published a sort of profile. Kathy's life I think in some ways was very helpful in terms of saving her reputation specifically early about these kinds of allegations but also revealed a person who obviously had a lot of struggles in her life. Who who did some things that are I think just on the page people will look at me like Oh? Maybe she didn't do that but she was that it's Actually like I thought hyper generated new conversation around her life and around the movie Brian. What did you think about? The idea of trying to memorialize is her in. Defend her in the pages of the paper like that. Well I thought one is I think you just want to give her an identity. You know she is she's been. She's not really much character as I said in this movie. Clint Eastwood doesn't really care about the media in this movie. Other than as there's this noise in this thing that's happening Richard. You didn't care about the way that story got written was very interesting actually is a bunch of editors editors and writers kind of putting that together imperfectly as often. Journalism is so they were trying to give her an identity. I think we've Kinda gone now over the falls where we've corrected is using this horrible. Oh stereotype that got into this movie and now we're kind of excusing. What the paper did and all the media did and saying? Oh Her story. I saw held up. No they didn't one guy was innocent and two there were actual mistakes in the peace even in the first piece in the paper together which so. It's totally understandable. Hannibal that the paper wants to do this. But to me at some point it becomes okay. You're giving us one identity. You're telling us the real story behind your life and then there's this conversation about what the media did to Richard Jewell. which is it's actually kind of separate one thing? That's a little lost in the conversation around this. I want to get your perspective on an Amanda is when you're making something let's say you're making a podcast or you're working on a story story or you're making media company every day you're collaborating people. And you're interrogating all of the choices they're making on a regular basis. You have questions about things. The Livia Wild Defense of the character is one of those things where you think that at some point you might ask a question. You might not just presume and I guess that's questioning maybe the integrity of what Olivia while saying the defensive. Her character but movies take a long time even even one day Clinton movies take a long time to make. There's a long time in the making so how. How did how was not not everyone on the same page with this? What am I going to say? Movies do take a long time to make but relatively this was like a very quick movie At least in the filming like this was filmed over the summer of two thousand nineteen and it's December and now we're watching it so that's pretty wild and and it does really seem like Olivia Wilde. Got wanted to takes and it's like go okay. This is the performance going with which is it's it's a caricature I think. It's pretty generous and cruel version of a reporter which is fascinating because Libya while the daughter of journalists so i. I wouldn't say that this is a portrayal of empathy eighty and understanding at least from what I've seen Granted you only get to take her to but she the material is not there on also. Her interpretation of the material is pretty pretty intense but it definitely seems like it wasn't examined at the time and it certainly seems like no one anticipated this and no one got on the same page about their talking points because Libya has been all over the map. And I'm you know what I'm not sympathetic. With the fact that she's answering search for somme choices. I like this movie directed by Clint Eastwood. It's written by Billy Ray. But also she knows what she's doing. She read the

Richard Jewel Clint Eastwood FBI Kathy Scruggs Olivia Wilde Atlanta Journal Brian Billy Ray Reporter Amanda Clinton Jon Hamm David Shoemaker Libya Wild Dave Weigel Google Woodson Ukraine Richard Jewell.
Rams stay in playoff hunt, end Seahawks' 5-game streak

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Rams stay in playoff hunt, end Seahawks' 5-game streak

"The Seahawks are going to have to try again to clinch a spot in the playoffs A. P.'s mark Myers reports the five game winning streak is over after running into a strong defensive effort by the rand the ram stay in the playoff hunt with a twenty eight to twelve home win over the Seahawks Robert Woodson Cooper cop car touchdown passes from Jared Goff and Todd Gurley rushed for seventy nine yards and a score the defense frustrated Russell Wilson sacking him five times with an interception while keeping Seattle's offense out of the end zone it's only touchdown came off a fifty five yard pick six by quandary digs being five rams remaining games behind Minnesota for the final and FC

Seahawks Mark Myers Jared Goff Todd Gurley Russell Wilson Seattle Minnesota A. P. Robert Woodson Cooper Seventy Nine Yards Fifty Five Yard
Rams stay in playoff hunt, end Seahawks' 5-game streak 28-12

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Rams stay in playoff hunt, end Seahawks' 5-game streak 28-12

"The ram stay in the playoff hunt with a twenty eight to twelve home win over the Seahawks Robert Woodson Cooper Copco touchdown passes from Jared Goff and Todd Gurley rushed for seventy nine yards and a score being five rams remaining games behind Minnesota for the final and FC wildcard spot safety Eric Weddle said every game is like a playoff game now we're still playing from behind we can but this when go for nothing if we don't back in next week SO four when mode we got one amount went out to get in and that's our focus Seattle's only touchdown came off a fifty five yard pick six by quandary digs mark Myers Los Angeles

Jared Goff Todd Gurley Minnesota Eric Weddle Seattle Seahawks Robert Woodson Cooper Mark Myers Los Angeles Seventy Nine Yards Fifty Five Yard
Rams stay in playoff hunt, end Seahawks' 5-game streak 28-12

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Rams stay in playoff hunt, end Seahawks' 5-game streak 28-12

"The ram stay in the playoff hunt with a twenty eight to twelve home win over the Seahawks Robert Woodson Cooper cop car touchdown passes from Jared Goff and Todd Gurley rushed for seventy nine yards and a score the defense frustrated Russell Wilson sacking him five times with an interception while keeping Seattle's offense out of the end zone it's only touchdown came off a fifty five yard pick six by quandary digs being five rams remaining games behind Minnesota for the final and FC wildcard spot mark my years Los Angeles

Jared Goff Todd Gurley Russell Wilson Seattle Minnesota Los Angeles Seahawks Robert Woodson Cooper Seventy Nine Yards Fifty Five Yard
Tuning Up: Gibson Guitars Sings Sweeter Song

Business Wars Daily

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Tuning Up: Gibson Guitars Sings Sweeter Song

"AH from wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily happy Friday France. Maybe one of the things things you look forward to on the weekend is going to hear some music or perhaps playing some of your own today to celebrate our three hundred episode of business wars daily. We're going to take take a look at two icons of the Guitar Business Gibson Guitar and fender recently our sister show business wars to deep dive into their decades long rivalry and today we're going to catch you up on where the two are now. Gibson guitars been on a rocky road to say the least the company was founded in nineteen o two and named after Kalamazoo Michigan Inventor Orville Gibson over the decades it became known for its high quality instruments particularly guitars played by Les Paul Elvis Presley Jimmy Page and bb be king among many others less Paul of course had a guitar named after him but in recent decades Gibson Star began fading in the nineteen eighties instrument sales slowed as kids chose synthesizers and video games over guitar strings over time that trend continued by the early two thousands more and more musicians composing and making music digitally under CEO Henry Jessica Gibson attempted a risky strategy to try to reduce Gibson's reliance on selling mainstream mainstream guitars. He wanted Gibson to become what he called a music lifestyle company with that as its New Strategy Jessica wits lead Gibson into buying buying an assortment of consumer electronics businesses making head bones turntables in speakers but what about guitars will according to the Nashville Tennessee and between twenty ten in two thousand fifteen the company's sales grew from three hundred million dollars to over two billion dollars but the business model was hollow just go lewitt's had also tried to reinvent his electric guitar business pioneering several attention-getting innovation some of which like a rocket shaped guitar and electronic robot tuning. Learning machines were mostly rejected by guitar purists. Many Gibson loyalists complained that quality dropped prices rose in by two thousand fifteen profit margin's dropped to a meager four percent meanwhile Gibson's most famous rival thunder was doing quite well founded by a Radio Repairman in an instrument lover named Leo Fender Back in Nineteen forty-six vendor is famous for its stratocaster and telecaster guitars. The company also invented an electric bass. Call the P. Base the precision bass which became a foundation for rock and roll like Gibson fenders instruments appeared in the hands of world famous artists from country to our beat Iraq in the nineteen eighties eighties and nineties fender custom crafted guitars for Jimmy Page Eric Clapton Jeff Beck Merle Haggard Stevie Ray Vaughan and the list goes on while Jessica Woodson his team were pursuing doing an aggressive strategy that took the company away from its core business fender to was expanding but in an arguably healthier less flashy fashion the company added Digital Products Guitar Students along with upgraded amplifiers and other basics by early twenty eighteen gibson was in debt to the tune one of half a billion dollars and filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection some wondered whether this would be Gibson Swansong or if the one hundred sixteen year old company could be saved last October Gibson name new leadership and the company emerged from bankruptcy now. It's getting back to basics. No more rockets shaped guitars electronic robot tuners crazy futuristic takes on its mainstay. Les Paul Guitar Today. Gibson offers two basic lines of its classic classic guitars modern and traditional many players feel like qualities returning and that the guitars while still expensive or no longer wildly overpriced and under engineered appeared. The company is slowly getting. It's Mojo back. Fender is at the top of its game but keeping an eye on Kitson. Hey Vendor knows its biggest. Competitor isn't down for the count to make sure it would compete with Gibson. Fender has sharpened up its budget minded imports made in Mexico and China. Those instruments were designed to undercut Gibson price in rival. I Will Gibson's affordable brand episode on at the same time fenders producing high quality more expensive guitars right here in the United States of America. It's not easy for icon at companies to maintain their relevance for more than a century but with help from their fans that's just what both Gibson and fender have managed to do at least at least for now for more on the twists and turns of one of America's great musical rivalries check out our series Gibson guitars versus fender our sister show mm-hmm business works from wondering this business wars daily at this week's episodes were written edited and produced by Elaine Appleton edited and produced by Emma Cortlandt are executive producers Marshal Louis created by for Non Lopez or whatever I'm David Brown and we'll see you next week.

Ceo Henry Jessica Gibson Gibson Guitar Gibson Star Gibson Swansong Leo Fender Les Paul Guitar David Brown France Les Paul Elvis Presley Jimmy Page Eric Clapton Jeff B Kalamazoo Mexico Jessica Woodson Paul Michigan Nashville Tennessee America United States Kitson