35 Burst results for "Woodson"

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"IHeartRadio. We are produced by a mighty group of women and one amazing man. Erica Goodman, Margaret, Sarah Horowitz, jessamyn Molly, and Justin Wright. With help from Lindsay Hoffman, Barry lurie, Joyce Cuban, Julie sopran, Mike Taylor, and Emily young. Original music is by Justin Wright. If you liked this episode of in fact, please make sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode and tell your family and friends to do the same. If you really want to help us out,.

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

07:37 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Thinking about the need for windows and mirrors. We know that most of children's literature has been written by white people. And most of children's literature has been written by men and most of children's literature is actually been told from a male or a boy's point of view. Including which I have never understood Jacqueline, so many of the classic books about animals. And you're like, why do the frogs in the toads need to be gendered male? Or the ducks or the cows? And while certainly there are more women authors or are more authors of color, there are more women authors of color. We're still up against a cumulative history that is overwhelmingly white and overwhelmingly male. Do you think the publishing industry is doing enough to help ensure that there are more voices given a platform given an opportunity? And if not, what more do you think needs to happen and what could anyone listening do to try to help hasten the arrival of real representation? It's so much to do. And one thing about publishing is it's a business. And publishers look at numbers. And they make assumptions sometimes based on those numbers. Organizations like we need diverse books have been doing the work to really change what's happening in publishing and get more books by folks published and then publishers get nervous that those books aren't going to sell. Even though I remember looking at the bestseller list at one point and there were 8 people of color on it. At the same time as parents as teachers, it's really important to get the books. And that doesn't mean to buy them. It makes a difference if you go to your library and take that book out, publishers are going to look at that. Publishers need to get out of their own way and understand that there's this community of young authors out there who just need a chance to get their story told and have platforms and will do their part to help get the book into the world. But yeah, it's changing slowly. I first published in the 90s and I was one of very few as there was Walter dean Myers in Virginia Hamilton and then my kisses. But you can name them. I can name them. We were all friends. But that highlights I'm so grateful you had that community, Jacqueline, and it also highlights the challenge that you knew everyone's name. It was and the rooms were very white and the award ceremonies were very white. So I do think the support of writers and their stories makes a huge difference to publishers, the demand for more books like that. I always say, what is your child's library look like? When I was looking for schools for my children, the first thing I looked at was the classroom library, because that told me a lot about the teacher's choices that told me a lot about what the tone of the classroom was going to be. And what the narrative of the classroom was going to be. And I talked to the teachers and librarians, and I talked about diversity. And some people are comfortable with diversity being one or two people. I'm not. I don't think that's diversity wanted to people of color. So I think when we're talking about publishing and creating change, we're not only also talking about the number of books they're publishing, but who is in the publishing house doing the work? How many editors of color? How many publishers? How many publicity people of color? There's so many levels of it. And there's still so much work to do. But again, we have that power to make that change by using our voices by using our wallets by using our library cards to demand that change. I'm so curious, Jekyll, what questions do young writers, especially young women writers ask you and what advice do you give? A lot of times they ask, how do I get published? And I say, don't worry about that now, because they're like ten. And that's the age to be worrying about the publishing industry. That's the time to be telling your stories. And I say, write the stories that really matter to you and show them to the people, you trust, and who make you feel safe and who make you want to keep writing. Do not show them to the people who are going to destroy them. There's constructive criticism in this destructive criticism. And I tell them what Dorothy Allison told me years and years, decades ago that everybody has a story and everybody has a right to tell that story. So don't let anyone silence your story because the world is waiting for it. And I do believe that about young writers. I mean, I think, can you imagine the stories these young people are going to tell? It's going to be amazing. You know, I am so ready for it. I think they have so much grit, so many survival skills. They've learned so much. They're so smart. It's going to be phenomenal. So I am just always effusive. When young people ask me about anything but publishing, 'cause I'm like, let's get these stories on the page. And I always say, look up. You have to walk through the world with your eyes open, or else you're not going to get the story. Yeah. Amen. One last question, Jacqueline. Is there one statistic or fact or anecdote that you can share that either really inspires you because it enrages you or it gives you hope about where women are and where we could be. I would say thinking about it right in this moment, I think about people like you, I think about roxane gay and trustee macmillan caught them and Jamil hill and all of these women who have podcasts now who are speaking truth to power and being heard. And I think about our young women and older who actually have access to this kind of information just by putting their earphones in. So this is huge for me the fact that we can have this conversation in this conversation can go out to lots and lots and lots of people and they can continue the conversation. It feels grassroots and it feels empowering and it feels world changing. That's what I'm excited about today that we're talking to each other and we are telling the truth to each other and in doing so we're protecting each other and lifting each other up. So let's continue that. Well, yes, Jacqueline, thank you. I listened to the radio a lot with my mom when I was a little kid like local public radio and literature Arkansas. And I remember being so excited when there would be like a girl's voice on the air. And so when you said that, I haven't thought about that in so long. And to know that my children, your children, thankfully won't have that experience because it won't be strange. To hear women's voices is something I'm really grateful for and proud to be a very small part of. Thank you for being a part of it. Thank you, Jacqueline so much. You can find Jacqueline Woodson on Twitter at Jackie Woodson. And I highly recommend all of her books. They are important and beautiful and powerful moving stories. Her latest is a picture book called. The year we learned to fly. And thank you all so much for joining me for this season of in fact. It's been truly inspiring to celebrate women's history month with so many amazing women. And while we celebrate progress we've made toward a quality across the board, we know we still have a long ways to go. I hope you will share these incredible women's stories with your Friends, families and beyond. Thank you for listening. In fact, is brought to you by.

Jacqueline Walter dean Myers Dorothy Allison ducks Hamilton Jekyll Jamil hill Virginia roxane macmillan Jacqueline Woodson Jackie Woodson Arkansas Twitter
"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"You mentioned your mom wrote poetry and poetry also plays an important role in your books, including your memoir, Brown girl dreaming, which is written entirely in verse. Was it because of your mom that you were drawn to poetry or do you find it's sometimes just inevitable for what the story needs? Part of it is because when I was a young person, I was very afraid of poetry. I thought it was this secret language that only dead white men understood basically. And it wasn't until I was made aware of the works of Langston Hughes and Nikki Giovanni's poetry. I first heard her reciting on an album on a record album that my mom had. I didn't make that connection that was politics because I was like, what is this? This is going straight to my heart. And so when I started writing, I knew that the way things sound it was important, the way things looked on a page was important. The way a line ended was important. And I learned that was poetry. I love that. And everything I write, I read out loud, so that makes a difference too, and how it sounds. So I've thought about your book harbor me quite a lot in the last couple of weeks, because just looking at the crisis in Ukraine and that there were clues to 3 million refugees. And in harbor me, it's a group of kids who are aware of often issues that we think aren't appropriate for kids to learn about or to think about. And yet issues that affect so many kids in this country or around the world, whether issues relating to incarceration or the fear of having to leave your home, and so I just wonder, Jacqueline, what stories do you hear from people who've read that book or any of your books where readers say to you this really hit me in this way or this really affected me? So many, you know, I think the thing that happened with harbor me is I was talking to young people and then the pandemic came. And then I started getting letters from young people who would say, you know, this is my life. I am Haley. I am Amari. So harbored me was like both heartbreaking and healing because I heard so many stories of so many kids across lines of race across lines of economic class, the stories of their fear and their heartbreak and the places in which they felt trapped inside their own skin. One of those stories and harbor me is about a white boy who moves into a predominantly black neighborhood and what that means for him to suddenly be other by no fault of his own. He's walking home and he's getting his next laughter. He's keeping this a secret, right? That there's this down low bullying going on. And then the way the kids rally around him and say, we will not let this happen anymore. And I think that's another story that kids talk about is like, that's unfair. That shit happened. You know, why would they do that? And I remember going to a school. This was with visiting day and visiting day is a story of a girl whose dad is incarcerated and a teacher said, well, we don't need to read this book because no one in this class has any one in prison, and of course that made me mad, and I'm like, I'm going to read that book. Yeah. And then when I read it, one kid raised his hand and he's like, my dad's in prison. Another kid raised his hand. He's like, my cousins in prison. My brothers in prison. And there were about 6 kids who knew someone who was incarcerated and the teacher said, I never knew that. And I said, because you never opened this door for them. And we have this beautiful conversation where these kids have been living with the shame of it. And I think of that often how we, as adults, we too often get to decide what the tone is in the room. What that tone is going to be, and what kids are going to feel safe talking about. And harbor me came this huge conversation among all these kids talking about which character fit their own particular narrative. And it was so great to see that and teachers talking about, okay, we're going to have an art room now. You know, we're going to have a space where adults give kids the space to talk. And it doesn't even mean having to leave the room, but being comfortable in our own silence. I find even with my own kids, if I sit very quietly, I hear things I won't hear. If I'm actually talking, or if they are aware of my presence in the room. And just being able to be in that space where young people are talking about all of these seemingly very quote unquote adult issues and it's like, no, these are their every day. I do want to ask about Brown girl dreaming since it is autobiographical. And so much of your work is wonderfully in the world of fiction, but how and why did you decide to share your own story? I was trying to figure out how I got to this point of being Jacqueline Woodson. I had grown up Jackie, the regular girl on the block, you know, one of four children. And I wanted to go back to the beginning and I was falling apart through the three years of writing that. And it's so funny, 'cause I would just write pieces and I'm like, this is not making sense. Why isn't it coming out as chapters? Why does this even matter? It felt so deeply specific and my beloved part. It was like, just keep writing. And then what was your partner and your family friends? What were they saying on this journey? They were like, oh, Jackie's falling apart again. She must be writing another book. Jackie's cranky again. She must have had a bad writing day. Like the same thing they've been saying for 20 years. But I remember going to my friend toshi Regan. She had read a bunch of these little pieces, and I said, why am I even trying to write this? Nothing was happening when I was born. Like, this does not matter. And she's like, what are you talking about? This country was on fire when you were born. And it completely unlocked it to that first poem, I am born on a Tuesday, February 12th, 1963. And it really began to make sense why I was telling this story. And I really started thinking, I'm going to tell this story in the context of American history, because none of us are existing outside the context of our country's history. And then I thought I was going to talk about my life and my mom and all this. And in the middle of writing and my mom died suddenly at 68. And suddenly that door closed and I was like, wait a second, I had questions. There were things I wanted to ask you. And then the memoir changed, and it became about myself in the context of my mother, right? Because we are on these journeys because of the journeys our parents were on because of the journey their parents were on and all the way back in time. And that's when all of it started making sense and all of it started having this other history to it. And when I finally got the book finished, my beloved editor Nancy Paulson just had her hand on my back the whole time. I was still saying no one is going to read this. And so I was stunned. I still am stunned by the journey that book has had. I've talked to book clubs where the Brown girls are all Indian. You know, all southeast Asians are all Asian and to realize as so many people who see themselves as non white saw themselves in this book, but what really surprised me were all the white boys who came to me. Who wrote to me. It's like, I love this book. I loved your grandfather or I wonder what happened to your brother. Everybody seemed to find some part of themselves in this book. And then I get these letters from white men in their 70s who knew my grandfather who knew hope and that he taught me baseball, your grandfather was the nicest man in nelsonville, and that blows me away. So just being able to get these.

Nikki Giovanni Langston Hughes Amari Brown Jackie Jacqueline Jacqueline Woodson Ukraine Haley harbor toshi Regan Nancy Paulson nelsonville baseball
"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:20 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"All have a right to walk through the world safely moment..

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:12 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"We're celebrating women's history month. And since the month is never enough, or keeping it going a little longer. I'm talking with trailblazing women at the top of their fields about their personal journeys, the progress women have made and how far we still have to go. Today, I am so excited to be talking about books in the publishing industry with one of my all time favorite authors, Jacqueline Woodson. We know that the stories we share with our kids influence how they see themselves and their place in this world. And yet, studies consistently show that the majority of main characters in American children's stories are male and white. In fact, in 2018, one city found that there were more animal and non human characters than non white characters in books published that year. And from 2019 to 2020, the percentage of children's books written about racially diverse characters are subjects grew by only 1%. Jacqueline is written more than 30 books for children and young adults, complex, beautiful stories that usually center around girls, women and people of color. One of my personal favorites is the middle grade novel harbor me. In it, a group of 6 kids get together after school each week and what they call the art room. That's AR TT for a room to talk. With no adults present, they share their feelings and open up about the very serious challenges they and their families face. Jacqueline has written two books for adults. Another Brooklyn and red at the bone, but she may be best known for her middle grade memoir inverse. Brown girl dreaming. It won multiple awards, including the 2014 national book award for young people's literature. And for years, it's been a staple in classrooms across the country. Though, as you'll hear later, recently there have been districts trying to ban it and it's not the only one. It would take a very, very long time to list all the awards and honors Jacqueline has received, but some of the highlights include serving as the poetry foundation's young people's poet laureate from 2015 to 2017, being named ambassador for young people's literature by the Library of Congress in 2018. Receiving a 2020 Macarthur genius fellowship, and the 2020 Hans Christian Andersen award, which is the.

Jacqueline Woodson Jacqueline national book award Brooklyn poetry foundation Brown Library of Congress Hans Christian Andersen award
Dinesh Reflects on the Teachings of Thomas Sowell

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:46 min | 3 months ago

Dinesh Reflects on the Teachings of Thomas Sowell

"I talked a day or two ago about Thomas soul and it's for me it sort of refreshing to do this in contrast with critical race theory. And of course, there's a new book out on Seoul. It's called maverick a biography of Thomas sol, it's written by The Wall Street Journal writer, a Jason Riley, and I've kind of been making my way through the book. But as I do, it also flashes my mind back to my friendship with Seoul over the years. And the way that he has been a mentor to me. Years ago, when I published my book at the end of racism, this, by the way, is my most scholarly book. If you haven't read it, it's. A giant book, several hundred pages, 2000 footnotes. And the book was a little controversial because it talked about the reason why you have group differences in academic achievement and economic performance. It attributed those differences not to race, not to biology, but the culture. Even so, Glenn Lowry, prominent black scholar who was at that time affiliated with the American enterprise institute, another guy named bob Woodson resigned from AEI, they sort of, they broke with AEI and it was a supposedly all over my horrible book, and at that time I was, you know, this was only my second book. I was a young scholar, so it was kind of a problematic for me to have these luminaries distancing themselves from AEI was causing problems for AEI, but to my defense rushed the greatest black living scholar in the country, Thomas soul, who basically said that he had read the book extremely carefully, and it was the best book on race relations written since Gunnar modals classic work in American dilemma, published several decades earlier. Over the years, I got to know soul and his wife quite well, his wife is also an economist. And I thought interesting as I would talk to them about racial discrimination and they would go, you know, dinesh when people think of race discrimination cases. They think of the sort of classic civil rights situation going back to the 50s and 60s a black guy and a white guy apply for a job, the black guy is better qualified the white guy gets the job. Hey, that's racial discrimination. And they go out of a hundred cases dinesh today, only one or two I like that. The vast majority of cases have nothing to do with that at all. They are all based upon statistical issues of underrepresentation. So a black eye applies to our job. He's actually not qualified. He doesn't get the job. But then he sues and he claims that blacks are underrepresented this corporation and because blacks are, let's say, 12% of the surrounding population in San Jose, but he wasn't hired at this Silicon Valley company. They're obviously racist. They need to implement affirmative action policies, so both soul and his wife said that is actually the normative. That's the normal case that is now fought out in

Thomas Soul American Enterprise Institute Thomas Sol Jason Riley Seoul Glenn Lowry Bob Woodson Gunnar Modals The Wall Street Journal Dinesh San Jose Silicon Valley
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:06 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The south explode too many people too many years enslaved and emancipated but not free, keep marching and fighting and getting killed so that young people like me can grow up free. You know, it just fell into place and the rest of the book began to make sense and everything from, you know, where my mother was during the civil rights movement to the fact that my great great grandfather was part of the Civil War. Just surprised after surprise and with each one, I kept saying, we were here. We were here because I think the thing about our histories and our ancestors, it feels theoretical, right? It feels almost like something that's so not tangible because it's just a story. But the more you investigate the stories, the more I did, the more I realized that I am so part of a long line that I didn't just wake up this morning, Jacqueline Woodson, that is because my mother and my great grandfather, my great great grandfather. So there were so many surprises. As I was reading Brown girl dreaming, I was struck by the way you wrote about air. The word first shows up in this sentence about your father catching a football. Coaches were watching the way he moved, his easy stride, his long arms reaching up, snatching the ball from its soft pocket of air. That sentence astounded me. You then go on to talk about air throughout the book, you write about how there is too much air between words and the lilt of her words, a breath of warm air moving over each leaf and this about your grandfather's illness. His cough moves through the air back into our room with a light is almost blue, the white winter sun painting it. And Jacqueline, as I research this, I found that there are academic papers analyzing your use of air and dirt in Brown girl dreaming. I didn't even know if you know this. No way. I had no idea. Because I was like, I wonder if there's anybody that's written about this that I could ask her about it. And I found that there is an academic paper about your use of Aaron dirt. And I'm wondering about how conscious you were of at least the theme of air as you were writing. That's wild I had no idea that people are doing that kind of research on me. I think the air thing for me comes with the juxtaposition between the country and the city. And having made that transition as a young person. And when I think of the past, when I think of the south, when I think of Ohio, when I think of so much that has come before me, I do think there's much more air in that. I think of this moment and the city is being much more confining. So even in writing that scene, football dreams when I'm talking about my dad, like I see that moment as this very outdoor moment, you know, lots of white space, lots of sky, lots of field. And a lot of times when I look back on Greenville, that's how I remember it. When I look back on the past and the places that I can't touch are see anymore, I remember them as being much more open than the present spaces that are much more confined. On your website, you state that you once wrote a book in two weeks and it only needed a little revision, but the next book took four years. And I'm always astonished to find out that musicians have what the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Michael R Jackson calls dead trunk songs. The songs that don't make it to an album or to a show. And given how many books you've written, do you have stories that you've decided aren't worth pursuing when you start them or dead trunk books? I definitely have dead chunk books for a long time. I did not. I remember I was trying to write this book from the point of view of a horse. And it was a horse that was this girl's support animal. It just wasn't working. And I'm sure there are more there. I have another story that was called when the red dirt rose, which was one of my early books about the country. And I think it didn't make it as a book, but a lot of it ended up in other books, unlike the horse. Jacqueline, I just have a few last questions for you today. The first is about your Macarthur fellowship last year. You won one of the most prestigious honors in the world. The Macarthur genius award and I read that you're planning to use the grant money to expand the residency program you founded for people of color. Can you talk a bit more about the program, how you chose the name and your goals for it? Yeah, it's great. It's been great. We actually have a fellow here now. It's called Baldwin for the arts named after James Baldwin. And modeled a lot after McDowell, which was, as I said, earlier was my first residency. But gave me a lot of support in helping me figure, not financial support, but figuring out the design for Baldwin. So when we bought this property, we were looking for a space that was big enough. It's for acres, so and it has four buildings on it that we are renovating into studios for visual artists, composers, and writers that are bipoc, so it's for bipoc people. And I really wanted a safe space. I really wanted a place where people could come and not have to explain anything. I think as a fellow, even though the fellowships were phenomenal, I was often one of few people of color there. And I really wanted to create a space also modeled after cave condom, which I feel like changed the narrative of poetry in terms of thinking about black poets and getting their work out into the world. I wanted to leave something like that behind. So it's been a lot of work. And it's great. My last question, what is the release date of your next book and what is it about? The next book is coming out. I think in 2020 two, and it's called the year we learned to fly. And it's illustrated by Rafael Lopez and it's about two kids who are cooped up in their house and have to use their head. And it takes us back to the middle passage. And Virginia Hamilton's book, the people could fly. And that idea that black folks the way they freed themselves from enslavement was to fly back across the ocean. And that's coming out. Then that's a picture book. I'm also working on a middle grade that's sitting on my desk. I'm not going to say anything about it because it's not done and I'm superstitious about that. I also just finished the screenplay for red at the bone. That's so exciting. So, so exciting. Jacqueline Woodson, thank you for creating such beautiful work in the world and thank you so much for joining me today on design matters. Thanks for your great questions. It's so nice to talk to.

Jacqueline Woodson Aaron dirt Jacqueline Michael R Jackson football Macarthur genius award Pulitzer Prize Baldwin Greenville Brown Ohio James Baldwin McDowell Rafael Lopez Virginia Hamilton
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:15 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"At what point after last summer with mason, were you able to stop working side jobs and rightful time? So in 1991, I went to McDowell for the first time. That was the first artist residency that accepted me. I had been applying and that kind of changed my life and at that point I was working part time to no, I'm sorry, 1990, I went to McDowell. And then in 1991, I got a fellowship at the fine arts work center, which is a 7 month fellowship. He moved to provincetown from October through May, and basically they give you a stipend and a place to live. And that was the point where I said, okay, I'm going to take this leap. And I stayed in provincetown for 5 years because it was so much cheaper to live there. And I worked part time. I started teaching and writing for one of the local magazines to help make ends meet. You're usually working on more than one book at a time. How do you develop the story ideas? When do you know that this is something I want to pursue for a book? Pretty early on. I have the idea for the story and I have the characters voice. I think a lot of my books are character driven. I don't know what the character wants always or how they're going to get it in the narrative, but I do have a sense of place and some of the stuff I'm trying to talk about are work out for myself, because I always think all the books I'm writing, I'm trying to work out something for myself. Pretty early on. And of course, it falls apart. Of course, it becomes something completely different than what I thought it was going to become. Of course, it's a puzzle, like when you look at something like red at the bone where I'm trying to figure out so many things. But early on, I have the characters and a little bit more than that. Do you write a book from beginning to end? Or do you write your plots out of order and then piece them together? Or do you just sort of sit down and let the work surprise you? I led it to surprise me. I never know what a plot is. I just think you put two people in the room and get them talking. You have conflict. You have plot. You have it all. I do try to go from beginning to end for the first draft. And sometimes I'll get to the middle and go write the end and then come back and write toward, especially when it's falling apart and I'm not sure what I'm trying to say. And then writing that last line helps me understand where I'm going. When you say falling apart, what do you mean? I mean, it sucks. Something you wrote yesterday that sounded so amazing. You wake up the next morning and you read and you're like, this is, this is trash. And you think you have an idea that's a strong one for where you want the book to be carried to. And it's not. It's just superficial and dumb. And, you know, you're using tropes and cliches, which is the biggest fear for me, is like I'll pick up a book and read a cliche in it that I've written. So it's a lot of rewriting a lot of reading out loud when I get off this podcast. I'm working on a book now that I'm going to I need to just sit and read out loud and figure out what's happening and what I need to fix. You've said this about the stories you want to tell. I wanted to write about communities that were familiar to me and people that were familiar to me. I wanted to write about communities of color. I wanted to write about girls. I wanted to write about friendship and all of these things that I felt were missing in a lot of the books that I read as a child. And Jacqueline, you have, and I was researching the level of diversity in children's books now, and found a statistic from 2018. I couldn't find anything much more formal about 2021. But I learned that diversity in children's books as recently as 2018 looked like this, 50% were about white children. 27% were about animals or fantasy characters. 10% were about African American children, 7% were about Asian children, 5% were about LatinX children, and 1% were about American Indian children. So from what I understand, things have only improved marginally since then, three years ago. And I don't expect that you should be able to solve a problem you had no hand in creating and or almost single handedly trying to change. But given this problem is clearly established. What do you think it's going to take for publishing to make material changes in regard to diversity equity and inclusion? Publishing houses have to change. I mean, I think about someone like Debbie Reese, who has the blog American Indians and children's book, who's trying to single handedly change the narrative of the scarcity of books for and about and buy indigenous people. You look at the LatinX numbers, and there are a lot of LatinX writers. Why are those books not getting the shine or publishing? And then you go to the publishing houses, and they're white. You know, they are so white and but publishing houses need to change. And there's a reticence. I think people are not wanting to give up the power they have as publishers as editors as publicists. I mean, even my speakers bureau that a couple of years ago, they sent a car and I was like, really, you sent this card out where every single one of you except one Southeast Asian woman is white. I would be embarrassed to send that. And I remember writing in locomotion, you know, about white blindness, people not being able to see the whiteness around them. You know, from the point of view of this 11 year old boy, because I think kids see this, right? But I do think that's what the that's where the change has to come. I mean, at this point, you know, I'm Jacqueline Woodson, so I'm a safe person to publish. And what about the Jacqueline Woodson's of 1989 who no one was looking at? So I do think we have so much work to do. I remember in the early 90s, people were trying to do away with the Coretta Scott King award because they were saying that, well, now that's some black folks have won the newberry..

McDowell fine arts work center provincetown mason Debbie Reese Jacqueline Jacqueline Woodson Coretta Scott King
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:20 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"But yeah, I grew up in a very religious household. Bible study on Monday at home, Bible study on Tuesday at the kingdom hall. I can't remember what Wednesday was. Thursday was ministry school, watchtower study, and then out and field service on Saturday and back to the kingdom hall on Sunday. So there was a lot of religion in the household. And a lot of rules outside of the household. We didn't pledge the flag. We did celebrate holidays. A birthday parties. We didn't curse. It's just what was, right? As much as I'm Jacqueline Woodson, I was a jove's witness. It was all part of the same fabric in this way. Do you follow any type of organized religion now? Oh, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. I definitely consider myself a very spiritual person. And I definitely have beliefs from both my Jehovah's Witness upbringing and my Muslim upbringing that I hold on to. I think one thing I got from the religions that I grew up and was a deep empathy, a deep understanding of people that allowed me to be a writer, but no, in terms of organized religion, I don't ascribe to any because I just think that there's no way to be fully human and not have to be kind of a hypocrite to live that kind of life. You've written about how by the time you were three years old, you could write the letter J you love the sound of the letter and you promised yourself one day as you were practicing that it would be connected to your full name. But that became a challenge when you got to the queue. And I'm wondering if you can share with our listeners what happened? Well, the Q is a trick letter. I understand. Even the K is hard, but my full name is Jacqueline Amanda Woodson and I struggled with the letter Q to the point of becoming Jackie, you know, because it was shorter and easier to write. But it was interesting because I really, from a young age, I understood the power of letters and words on the page and how they transformed a thing. When I was growing up and trying to practice my name, I couldn't do the H in Deborah, which is my formal name D, H and that is how I became Debbie. Oh, that's so funny. I know two bees together so much easier than R 8 8. I guess they couldn't do the cursive, right? Trying to write them in cursive. It's so interesting because when I'm signing books for young people, I realize a lot of them aren't learning cursive anymore, so they don't know how to read it, which is mind-blowing to me that my signature is going to become obsolete for a lot of people who haven't learned the language of cursive. You read an article about you where it stated that you don't know if a is your favorite letter, but you know you like it a lot. And so would it be the curse of a or the Roman a or which a on the curse of a by far? I just think it's such a beautiful letter. And I love the way it looks on the page. I love the way it shows up. So often. And I don't know. For me, of course, it feels always like a beginning. The beginning that it is. To so many things. Check when you stated that when you were growing up, it was your sister who was the one that was considered smart. That you had a hard time reading, you had to read things over and over for the words to make sense. You've talked about this quite eloquently in your TED Talk. Yet you fell in love with reading and writing. Even though it was so difficult, it still was something that you were pulled towards. Yeah, it was a challenge. And I knew I knew I had an inside me somehow that it was just coming out differently. And I think that if I had been born now, I probably wouldn't be the writer I am, because it meant people having a certain kind of patience, but it also meant me not getting tagged as dyslexic or something which would have put me into programs that would have made me have to find trick ways to read faster or to write faster. And I think doing my process was the process of becoming a writer. Taking that time really deconstructing words and the way authors got stories on the page. So I do think that behind that quote unquote struggle was the makings of me as a writer. And so I don't think I ever felt any shame about it. I always felt even as a young person that I was right and the system that was in place to say that the way I was doing it wasn't the right way was wrong was a broken thing. And even with my sister and my older brother who were both very academic and off the charts in the way they learned, I just saw that is their thing. They just learned differently. And because of the system that was set up in our House, which was that they had to help me get to where I needed to be. I didn't fail, right?.

Jacqueline Woodson kingdom hall jove TED Talk Jackie Deborah Debbie
"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The new season of design matters with Debbie millman starts in April. The episode you're about to listen to originally dropped and march of 2021. It's so funny 'cause even when I talked about being a writer, there are big fear was like, don't go spreading our dirty laundry, right? And I always thought the characters in my head are so much more interesting than what's happening in my real life. From the Ted audio collective, this is design matters with Debbie millman. For 17 years, Debbie millman has been talking with designers and other creative people about what they do, how they got to be who they are and what they're thinking about and working on. On this episode, Jacqueline Woodson talks about writing for children and young adults. It was Madeleine lingel who said when you write remembering the child you were, because the essence of childhood doesn't change. As a child, Jacqueline Woodson loved to tell lies. There was something about seeing her friend's eyes grow wide with wonder that she loved. She got into trouble for lying, but didn't stop until 5th grade that same year she wrote a story and her 5th grade teacher said, this is really good. That was when Jacqueline Woodson understood that a lie on the page was called fiction, and that could win you accolades and awards. Flash forward a few decades and many stories later, and she is indeed one many, many accolades and awards, including a national book award, several newbery honors, and in 2020 she.

Debbie millman Jacqueline Woodson Madeleine lingel
"woodson" Discussed on The Best Advice Show

The Best Advice Show

06:16 min | 9 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Best Advice Show

"Hey, it's the best advice show. I'm Zach, today I'm so excited to get off of zoom and into the real world. Yeah. Yeah. Surely with some shares and art studio with her son. It's right off the highway on the west side of Detroit. But once you step inside, it's peaceful and warm. Her work covers the walls and it's stacked in piles on the floor. That's a collage of recent one. Wow. It's about I did a whole series on my family. Miss Woodson has been in Detroit since 1938 when her parents moved the family from Tennessee. She was just a baby. My great aunt. Today she's one of Detroit's most celebrated and beloved artists. She makes big colorful figurative paintings. And she's kind of obsessed with horses. I do a lot of horses with writers, women, writers, writers. After I leave, she's going to get back to one of her paintings. She's going to work on the front right leg of a burnt orange horse, galloping alongside a short haired woman dressed in white. But each one is a challenge, you know, and because you want to get another. Attitude. Within the work. Her work is part of permanent collections at the Detroit institute of arts and the Charles H Wright museum of African American history. Gretzky arts recently named her their eminent artist of 2021. They wrote about her, quote, decades of success as an artist, paired with her exceptional, and tireless commitment to ensure educational and career opportunities for all artists have ensured the story of art in Detroit is far more inclusive and honest than it would have been without her efforts. It is also insured her place as a revered and renowned pillar of Detroit's creative community. Miss Woodson has offered creative advice to students for decades. And perhaps the most foundational art lesson she teaches is this. Well, there are no wrong answers in your seeking to express an idea. And there's more than one way to get your idea. Across. Three plus three is 6, four plus two is 6. And 12 -6 is 6. And since there are no wrong answers, when we're starting out drawing as kids or adult beginners, miss Woodson teaches us, we don't need erasers on our pencils, and we do not throw our work away. So occasionally, I would hear a crumple crumple crumple of paper. Can I have another sheet of paper? What happened to the last sheet of paper? I messed up. You weren't pleased with that. No. Did you turn it over on the other side? I just want another sheet of paper. Said, well, let's say we're going to use all of it. I said, and remember, you have to keep all your drawings because we want to see the improvement. Can't see the improvement if it's in the wastebasket. Before we go, I'm going to leave you with a lesson. You can try at home today. You need 5 sheets of I was going to say typing. But nobody takes anything more. 5 sheets of paper. And draw a circle, freehand, hold your pencil so that your hand is not touching the paper. So your pencil see your hand is up. And then place the pencil point on the paper and using your shoulder in the motion in the whole motion, draw the circle and it can be big to take up the whole paper and go around. As many times as it takes you to see the circle come out. And remember if your hand is making the motion. And you do that. And then you do four more. And then you can put something inside of each of those circles. And now we're racing is that right? No, oh, do not erase. Sign it and date it. And put it in a little put it in a folder. This may be your beginning. My name is Shirley. Let's syn and I'm an artist. I'm a painter. I do collage work. And mixed media. And some new things on board. Always new things, huh? Yes, always. If you're in Detroit, it's not too late to catch Shirley Woodson's solo show at the Detroit artists market. It's called why do I delight? And it's running until October 23rd. I put a link to it in our show notes. To see some of miss Woodson's paintings, you should follow us at best advice show on Instagram. I posted a bunch of them there. The kresge foundation just put out a beautiful new monograph called a palette for the people, the vibrant world of Shirley Woodson. You can download it or order it at no cost while supplies last, I put a link to that in our show notes as well. What a joy it was to spend some time with miss Shirley Woodson. I hope it was for you.

Detroit Miss Woodson Charles H Wright museum of Afr Detroit institute of arts Zach Gretzky Woodson Tennessee Shirley Woodson Shirley kresge foundation Instagram
FBI investigating Missouri cops who let dog bite Black man

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 10 months ago

FBI investigating Missouri cops who let dog bite Black man

"The F. B. I. has opened an investigation into the arrest of a black man in Missouri during which cell phone video shows three white officers allowing a police dog to repeatedly bite him according to a statement posted on the Woodson terrace police Facebook page officers were called last Monday to a report that a man had broken into a business the man threatened officers they warned him the dog would be used if he continued to resist arrest cellphone video shows the dog biting the man's foot as he yells out in pain for about thirty seconds cops get him on the ground the dog is a bench really pulled off then the man is up stumbles and the dog lunges at him again biting a leg for another thirty seconds until the officer stops the animal the man was treated at a hospital and released he hasn't been charged with any crimes I'm Julie Walker

F. B. I. Woodson Terrace Police Missouri Facebook Julie Walker
"woodson" Discussed on She Reads Truth Podcast

She Reads Truth Podcast

03:55 min | 10 months ago

"woodson" Discussed on She Reads Truth Podcast

"What's interesting is the psalm. Seventy nine is written after the people of experience. What moses has talked about so you have the destruction of jerusalem. They've experienced the consequences for their san and just the depth and the pain that they're in on that they've seeing that what moses has talked about actually happened in as a cry lord a you said we have messed up. And moses told us to return he moses told us that the way back is confession and repentance and that we ought to walk in your ways and we need you to do what we can't do and so it always pulls me to. You know our need. For god's redemption atonement that the problem that plagued israel plagues us and that. It's only through jesus in just the depth in the pain but also the willingness of god to listen and to respond and they i mean they call on and remember his compassion whether they've experienced they. We've heard about your compassionate. i know it. Well they yeah. So they know the story of the god of their ancestors and they call upon his character trait of compassion. And the three of us here. And those listening we actually. We've heard about god's compassion to and we can call on at the same time. Yeah i mean those two verses are just it strikes me what like this is our reality. We are so weak. We need the help and the salvation and the atonement that comes from from god alone. And it's that these same god whose holiness and justice and all you is is detailed throughout the pinch to these books of the old testament is also a god who listens to us when we cry out to him and who provides shoes..

moses jerusalem israel
Versatile DB Charles Woodson Enters Hall of Fame

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

Versatile DB Charles Woodson Enters Hall of Fame

"The eight member class of twenty twenty one was inducted into the pro football hall of fame one day after the class of twenty twenty was enshrined in canton former colts and Broncos quarterback Peyton manning helpline this year's class manning held the NFL record for career passing yards and touchdown passes when he retired after winning Super Bowl fifty manning was joined by two receivers Calvin Johnson Andrew Pearson as well as defensive backs Charles was that John Lynch guards Alan Faneca and Tom Flores who coached the raiders to two Super Bowl titles as well as the lights go to scout bill nine I'm John Merriam

Manning Peyton Manning Canton Colts Andrew Pearson Broncos Football Super Bowl NFL Calvin Johnson Tom Flores John Lynch Alan Faneca Charles Raiders John Merriam
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"They don't ask your race There are colorblind organization neutral. Mix com use the code. Eric now bob i gotta talk to you about. Why do you have hope. I'm talking to bob woodson. Seventeen seventy six nights in the woodson center your black man in a world that has gone crazy were race. Hustlers and a cultural marxists have tried to take over the conversation with regard to race in america. So what gives you hope that what you're doing matters at the woodson center. People are motivated when they know. Victories are possible not by injuries be avoided and reading your work about the group in the eighteenth century and england. Just twenty people just to be clear. My book amazing. Grace which is about william wilberforce. He had a group around him that they call them the clapham group because they lived in clapham. But you're right. It was just twenty or so people. They changed the world. They changed the whole nation even though that written economic interests was on the side of maintaining slavery. They persuaded them to change it. I believe our group. What's center can have the same cultural impact the group head and so. That's my motivation. A so that's why. I believe we can make the change when i talk about wilberforce in my book. Amazing grace a lot of people are aware of it. A lot of people aren't. But i always say that the reason that i wanna talk about wilberforce because it gives us hope that a handful of people genuinely changed things so dramatically. You almost can't believe it seems made up but it was their hearts. Were right before god. They tried to do things but it is about networks. I mean you know the fact is that you know you you you work with other people. It's not just about you And networks sometimes important so that we know. I'm not crazy there a whole bunch of people here working with me as you have at the woodson center Who know that this is. This is the way to go. And that's why i want. I want people to know that you guys are. Are there now. Are you just in the dc area. Where where is the woodson center physically. There was a son as headquarters is in washington. Dc but we have two thousand five hundred restaurants leader whose leaders in thirty nine states black white red brown who apart network our family of healing agents so joseph's as we call them they are an army ready to be a they are the cultural insurgents. Who still believe in the values and virtues of this co founding values and virtues of this country they are real believers. We're just we want armed. And they are the new patriots. I just hope that somebody who has a burden for this issue We'll go to the woodson center website and trying to connect Whether with you in dc or with with some of these branches because people really need hope they need to understand that there are others who see what they see and who working toward real solutions. Not just saying this doesn't matter this really does matter We've only got a minute left. Bob what should we leave my listeners. With let them know that there is a consensus among low-income black america. That america is worth fighting for them and they are real patriots. And i think if america's gonna be saved it's going to be done because of low income blacks around the country who have risen up and saying this is our land and we are going to protect it and that's that's the data so powerful. I mean literally tell people the reason i voted for. Donald trump is because i care about poor urban communities minority community. If you care about those kids and you just want virtue signal and go with the democrats you're a hypocrite and god sees what you're doing you folks. We need to do what works. Not just what makes you feel like a hero in your white country club or wherever it is you are online bob woodson. I just love talking to you. Folks go to woodson center. Where seventeen seventy six nights bob. Thank you everything you do thank you..

woodson center bob woodson clapham group wilberforce william wilberforce clapham america Eric bob Grace england patriots dc joseph washington brown army Bob Donald trump
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Bob. Woodson with seventeen seventy six unites and the woodson center. So bob you said the best way to fight critical race. Theory is to give a microphone to the people. He claims to speak for black people in america. Absolutely and that's what's inside of sylvia. Ben stolen is a woman a mom who lost a teenage daughter to urban violence many years ago and she has taken that hurt and that pain and turned it into a positive force and she's now working for the woodson center and she is organized. Two thousand five hundred other moms from around the country and they're called the voices of black mothers united and they are clearly. They took out a full page ad in usa today supporting the police. Two weeks ago. They had a conference where they invited police officers to come with the the various moms and they spent a day in a have discussing ways that they can better cooperate in have that communities protected but again the mainstream media will not publish this and so we are reaching out to other of police officers and we are. They have come together in five cities. Eric to cooperate and as a result of this level cooperation. Homicide closure rates have improved because these mothers have worked with the police to generate respect and trust to build a bridge of trust between the police and urban communities and that movement is spreading so the left does not represent. These people. Do not represent black folks. Well look i already knew that. Of course but we realized that when someone who is black talks the way you're talking they're marginalized you're not invited on to nbc They just don't want to hear from you. So we really have a media An an an a culture ineffective dominated by leftists and they do not want to acknowledge that you exist. I was talking to. I don't know if you know c. L. bryant i was with him In birmingham alabama this weekend. And i thought i've not heard of him before. There's so many people black americans who think utterly differently than they are you know supposed to think quote unquote according to folks like biden and you don't hear from them that ultimately bob strikes me as at the heart of our difficulties in the countries that people think. If you're black in america you think this way And you're here say no that's not true. But there's so many others like you. That i know whether it's clarence thomas or herschel walker but they never appear outside of quote unquote conservative media. No but i also think conservatives who really believe in the nation they need to invest the way the left invest in in the in the naysayers. We really need a major investment so that these mothers voices of black mothers united and others. We would like to have the money so that we can have weekly commercials that celebrate a heroic actions undertaken by police to protect and save that. Serve their community. Well this is look. It's one of the rings. Have you on this program is. I hope there's somebody out there listening some millionaires or billionaires. Who say i wanna help. Where can i go. What can i do one of the reasons that i have gone as i said is i want people to know about the woodson center because many people just don't know what to do and i think the least you can do if you have. Money is write a check to somebody who's on the right side of this and who's who's who's making an effort you guys have done tremendous things but i can only imagine trying to compete for money in this insane. World is not easy because we're critical of the race grievance industry and the poverty poverty pimps people on the left do not fund us and so but we are speaking out telling the truth we have real remedies eric. I'm talking now to a community based group of ex offenders and people who have Who want to come up with internal strategy but but the cure has to come from within white. People can't do anything about the self-destruction that is going on in the vacuum But what we're trying to do with. The woodson center is to demonstrate to the nation that we can create an island of peace and some of the most violent drug infested neighborhoods. We done it before twenty three years ago in washington in dc. What's whitsun senate. work with. A group called the alliance right ben and we went into a gang area that fifty-three burdensome defy script back every two years and as a result about community based intervention violence. It went from fifty three in two years two zero in twelve years in that community so we've demonstrated if you invest in healing agents within the community suffering the problem then we can really reduce violence and promote harmony in these communities. It has nothing to do. white american. Do nothing to address the critical problems facing us today. Well it's interesting because you've been doing this for a long time and you know you know whereof you speak. I hadn't known you until The colson center gave you the wilberforce award a few years ago. And i'm always astonished. When i meet somebody like you and i think what. How have i missed this person. And it's because the world in which we live. Let's be honest that that in the mainstream media They allow people. You know whether. It's going back to jesse jackson wral sharpton or any of these race hustlers. Somehow they have persuaded foolish White liberals that they speak for black americans. They don't speak for black americans. I know that you do but isn't that we're in a big battle in the media. We really are a but somebody ass mother teresa one time. Wasn't she frustrated that she's not most successful because there are three million people who need she can only minister to three hundred and she said god doesn't require a successful faithfulness and so we believe we are trying to be faithful to the remedies that we work and we're just hoping and praying that the resources will be made a bail us so we can demonstrate to the nation that these troubled black communities can be healed. Through god's grace what. The healing must come from within the healing agents that are indigenous seduce communities and appointing accuse finger at white america and systemic..

woodson center america L. bryant bob Woodson sylvia herschel walker clarence thomas Ben Bob biden nbc Eric birmingham alabama colson center jesse jackson wral sharpton eric dc senate
What Is the Best Way to Fight Critical Race Theory?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:46 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Best Way to Fight Critical Race Theory?

"Bob you said the best way to fight critical race. Theory is to give a microphone to the people. He claims to speak for black people in america. Absolutely and that's what's inside of sylvia. Ben stolen is a woman a mom who lost a teenage daughter to urban violence many years ago and she has taken that hurt and that pain and turned it into a positive force and she's now working for the woodson center and she is organized. Two thousand five hundred other moms from around the country and they're called the voices of black mothers united and they are clearly. They took out a full page ad in usa today supporting the police. Two weeks ago. They had a conference where they invited police officers to come with the the various moms and they spent a day in a have discussing ways that they can better cooperate in have that communities protected but again the mainstream media will not publish this and so we are reaching out to other of police officers and we are. They have come together in five cities. Eric to cooperate and as a result of this level cooperation. Homicide closure rates have improved because these mothers have worked with the police to generate respect and trust to build a bridge of trust between the police and urban communities and that movement is spreading so the left does not represent. These people. Do not represent black

Woodson Center America Sylvia BOB BEN Eric
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Mr bob woodson. He is part of seventeen seventy six nights in the woodson center. Bob i hope just looking at your face just cheer because i know you're a scene voice in the midst of the madness okay. I wanna talk about critical race theory. you identify as a black male. Is that right yes okay. That's that's most your life. You're you're in your seventh decade here as blackmail so you speak from experience in the civil rights world before it went crazy and woke You wrote an article at the policy review called a better way to fight critical race theory. What's your thesis in this article. The safe is is not the first of all the so-called anti-racist are the new racist must be very clear they are propagating a theory. That that hearkens back to the days of racism where they're saying that we should be judged by the content of our character but the bottom color of our skin. It wasn't esoteric debate on campuses for many years. But then right. After the george floyd and other incidents the radical left has has has migrated into the public domain and using it now as an instrument to attack american whites attack. Democracy is being used as a pervasive strategy to really undermine the values and principles of the nation of social just and of course. Let's just be clear that what they're trying to do is they're trying to get people to think racially another words. If i see you as a white guy you see me as a white guy sees a blackout when you see that i and when you focus on that it makes you a racialist whether whether we're racists or not the point is it makes you look through the lens of race which you and i know as christians as americans. We know that that's wrong no matter where it goes no matter where it's coming from. There's something unhealthy about it. And it undermines our unity as americans. It undermines our unity as believers. So i think that's the first thing that needs to be said people say what's wrong with critical race theory. The first thing i would say is that encourages people to think about race more and not less. It really does. But it's destructive to all americans particularly black americans because what is really saying. Is that personal responsibility is it has no role in our future that all americans who are white are privileged and therefore guilty of white supremacy and all blacks victims to be pitied and patronized. And where do you go from there. Once you begin to talk and so but the pushback from that is not to ban it but we should do is is. The best disinfectant is some sunshine. I so what we should do is challenged those who are propagating. This destructive of theory to prove how does it improve the quality of life of the people either black white brown. Or how does it improve. The quality of life does it increase performances in schools. And so does it promote the kind of unity that we need to address the problems confronting america so no matter what you think of the actual theory. The question is does it work and the answer is no but i mean. Couldn't anybody guessed that it feels like anything. That's comes out of cultural marxism already you know. It's inherently destructive the they will never build the utopia they talk about. They want to destroy what we already have. But they have never in the history of marxism whether economic marxism or cultural marxism. The they never. They never seem to get there and they they. They pretend that we're in this struggle. Eventually we'll get there. But you and. I know that the reason. We have cultural marxism because standard marxism. Failed that in china. Even they know it doesn't work. They can't work on that economic system but now they're saying but but let's try this but you're saying this will never bring the harmony they they're pretending no like i say the best way to combat but first of all is to confront white there are two groups of people. I guess too bothered me. The most eric they are self flagellating. Guilty white people and rich angry entitled black people who exploited and and this this grievance and and also it's been like a parasite on the rich tradition of the civil rights movement is destructive to all americans what some people are well intended but misguided. They believed that somehow because of of the shootings up off police officers on a small number of blacks. They're saying this is an example of injustice towards blacks and they are for critical race theory of response to injustice. And that's the is false and it's not true and so what our way of combating it is to allow people who in whose name they say. They are acting low income black people to speak for themselves. Eighty percent of them are against a defunding. The police way we got time. Somebody says something like that. I gotta stop everything. Say that again because that is unbelievable. I've never heard that good. Eighty percent of black people. Polled are against define the police. Sixty percent of blacks coleman asked to what extent is racial discrimination of barrier to a successful future sixty percent. Say not at all. And that's why the best way to confront critical race theory. Eric is to give a microphone to the people in whose name they say. When we come back. I want to pick up on that folks. I'm talking to bob woodson. You need to know who he is. We'll be right back. Bob woodson.

Mr bob woodson woodson center george floyd Bob america china eric coleman Eric bob woodson Bob woodson
Critical Race Theory: The Anti-Racists Are the New Racists With American Civil Rights Activist Bob Woodson, Sr

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Critical Race Theory: The Anti-Racists Are the New Racists With American Civil Rights Activist Bob Woodson, Sr

"I wanna talk about critical race theory. you identify as a black male. Is that right yes okay. That's that's most your life. You're you're in your seventh decade here as blackmail so you speak from experience in the civil rights world before it went crazy and woke You wrote an article at the policy review called a better way to fight critical race theory. What's your thesis in this article. The safe is is not the first of all the so-called anti-racist are the new racist must be very clear they are propagating a theory. That that hearkens back to the days of racism where they're saying that we should be judged by the content of our character but the bottom color of our skin. It wasn't esoteric debate on campuses for many years. But then right. After the george floyd and other incidents the radical left has has has migrated into the public domain and using it now as an instrument to attack american whites attack. Democracy is being used as a pervasive strategy to really undermine the values and principles of the nation of social just and of course. Let's just be clear that what they're trying to do is they're trying to get people to think racially another words. If i see you as a white guy you see me as a white guy sees a blackout when you see that i and when you focus on that it makes you a racialist whether whether we're racists or not the point is it makes you look through the lens of race which you and i know as christians as americans. We know that that's wrong no matter where it goes no matter where it's coming from. There's something unhealthy about

George Floyd
"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"woodson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Unwilling to look at the evidence in the election fraud that was a staggering thing. Because nobody says how you have to rule but would you look at the evidence. The fact that they wouldn't even look at the evidence. It's a chilling thing really that they are already playing politics. They're already abandoning their roles as arbiters of the constitution when when they do things like that so they are human beings are capable and something like that. That's a debate. There's two sides of that debate but when it comes to human life life life. There's no debate on when life begins. I mean this is just shouldn't even be a matter. You don't get to legislate away the right to live a whole group of people. But that's what the supreme court did in one thousand nine hundred eighty needs s. It needs to be undone for secondary. I forgot i was talking to lila rose. It's kind of funny because you see some black and white. Of course it is black and white but very few people rarely people rarely phrase it life and life and death is black and white your dad or your life but no in between i mean i think the issue recently was that the president or jen psaki or who was it that said an nc posey weather but say one answer. They refused to answer whether it is a human being at fifteen weeks. They no. there's only one correct answer but if they admit it yeah it does their entire justification for russian. I mean i look. I think it's safe to say that. They know it's a human being and they still think abortion is fine and they just they. They qualified in their minds. They don't they don't they. Don't see life as sacred right. And i think that all the conversations that we've been having it's all to the good more and more people are hearing about this hearing the arguments and you know and i know that people make up their own minds they listen and they they know it's a baby and so i think that there is a. I'm very hopeful. Frankly let me just ask you though when you said that the abortions have decreased. We just got less than a minute. What can you give us any statistics on that just to yeah so for years they were topping a million abortions and now according to the numbers from macaroni. This is planned parenthood researcher. We're down to eight hundred thousand a year and that's been dropping so we're down hundreds of thousands of fortunes in the last two decades and that's amazing success lives saved it's fantastic. We're we're out of time lila. Rose congratulations so on this book. Fighting for life becoming a force for change in a wounded world by lila rose. Thank you thank you eric. Neither folks just what yes. Did you guess i have as my guest..

jen psaki lila rose supreme court lila eric
Will the New Supreme Court Be Brave and Overturn Roe v Wade?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Will the New Supreme Court Be Brave and Overturn Roe v Wade?

"Given the new supreme court the new. The new justices that are. Do you think ravi way roe. V wade could be overturned in the next few years. Do you think it's possible you think how would that happen. It's definitely possible that roe v wade case law is so bad even pro-abortion legal experts say it's so bad it doesn't make sense. It doesn't hold together. It's constantly shifting precedent. Why abortion is so-called. Women's right it's not. It's killing a child You know that takes intellectual clarity and courage from the supreme court justices and they're typically supreme court's really Tries to be very moderate. They don't like to do anything dramatic. They definitely don't like undo pass precedent. That's only been done a handful of times in american history right to right. The wrongs dread scott and other terrible cases like that. So i think it's gonna be a hard push for them. But i think that someone like justice. Clarence thomas has it in him. The courage the clarity the intellectual clarity and with the right leadership on the court. They should undo the damage bro. They should just say this isn't invented. Human rights to kill a child doesn't exist. The state has an interest to protect these children. The fourteenth amendment ensures equal protection under the law that should be for all humans including pre-born humans. They're not you know less than a born human Do i think they're going to do that. With this case. I think that would be a long shot. Just because they're kind of timid by nature a lot of these justices and some of them are just outrageous tonight to say cowardly. That's another correct word to you. Back the fact that they were unwilling to look at the evidence in the election fraud that was a staggering thing. Because nobody says how you have to rule but would you look at the evidence. The fact that they wouldn't even look at the evidence. It's a chilling thing really that they are already playing politics. They're already abandoning their roles as arbiters of the constitution when when they do things like that so they are human beings are capable and something like that. That's a debate. There's two sides of that debate but when it comes to human life life life. There's no debate on when life begins. I mean this is just shouldn't even be a matter. You don't get to legislate away the right to live a whole group of people. But that's what the supreme court did in one thousand nine hundred eighty needs s. It needs to be

Supreme Court Roe V Wade Ravi ROE Wade Clarence Thomas Scott
How the Fight for the Unborn Is Gaining Ground and Thriving

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:57 min | 1 year ago

How the Fight for the Unborn Is Gaining Ground and Thriving

"Is the battle for the unborn different today than it was when you began your organization. It's so different in a good way. I mean there's so many more voices younger voices speaking out for change and on behalf of the pre-born mothers the abortion rate has declined in the last ten years to in some ways historic lows. Pro-life legislation is at an all time high at the state level unprecedented pro-life legislative game attribute that to. I think it's a lot of factors but primarily the energy and enthusiasm of the fight. I mean there's millions. I mean live. Action has five and a half million people following us following along and we have other organization live. Action has how many myself and live action. We have over five and a half million people following our work and fifteen million people reaching weekly with our work and and these are mostly young people young women. So that's the backbone of our movement and i just i didn't that didn't exist ten years ago and it's exciting to be part of that in other pro-life groups The founded and grow into amazing work serving mothers and need and families as well as educating and getting involved in politics. I think i was at the pro-life march a few years ago. And i remember saying that i think that the trend part of the reason the trend has been changing is because of science in other words. Ironically we know things today that we didn't know we have ultrasounds you have pictures of your unborn siblings on the refrigerator and so it's not worth. It's not a thesis. You can see actually that this is a person. This is my brother. This is my sister. This is my grandchild. It's it's become a thing. Technology has enabled us to see the humanity of the unborn and so science. The more we know a from from science and technology we have the the more clear it is that this is a person and obviously nineteen. Seventy-three was very easy to talk about it. As a as a bunch of cells or the blob or something. It's less easy to do

Welcome Home Mike Woodson

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Welcome Home Mike Woodson

"Indiana brought a legend home and speaking as a former player not as a broadcaster in a former coach. I couldn't be happier for mike woodson his family and for us woody. I mean i think. I speak for a lot of guys when i say congratulations. Welcome home and so happy to have you as the head coach of our program man a man. I appreciate that very much man. It's good to be back. What are you get the job. And i've always told people like you get a college job. I don't know how it is in the nba. You get a college job. And it's fricking crazy with the phone calls guys want jobs guys calling for other guys to get jobs recruiting. What's been your priorities. Since you started. Well the players right now the priority you know yes i have been bombarded by a lot of calls. I'm probably and i'm not exaggerating about a hundred calls. Oh yeah behind I mean. I still get calls. I'm answering the came on sunday. So i mean eventually i'll get back. 'cause that's just me i i i return all calls to say thank you or i can't help this guy that's important for me But my my priorities right now is trying to figure out who's gonna stay who's who's leaving and You know we gotta get a team put together here. You know quickly. So that's what. I've been focusing in all right now. What's what's your process for doing that. Well you know. I i've said and i spoke with each player individually and I've had them in a team setting. I'm going to meet with him tonight. all the guys. Just count it. Try to get a feel for where it is. And i'm watching a lot of tape right now and players as well. I mean that's kind of what we do as coaches and and i'm watching you know how we play last year because that's important Discount again a feel of the players that are here so But my main focus. Dan really right now is to sit down with these guys. And it's been tough you know. It's been a tough season for these guys with the pandemic and archie. Getting let go. I mean that's from a mental standpoint. These kids are they're they're somewhat crushed. So i'm trying to uplift them and tell them how much i love 'em and until much i want them to be a part of this great 'institution in his you know this tradition of a basketball because there's a lot of tradition here man. We gotta get back pocket.

Mike Woodson Indiana NBA DAN Archie Basketball
Florida Republicans offer bills banning transgender athletes

AM Tampa Bay

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Florida Republicans offer bills banning transgender athletes

"A Florida's a step closer to having a transgender sports band. House subcommittee passed a bill that would require athletes in high school and college to play on teams that match their sex at birth. Highlands County Republican Kaylie Tuck sponsored the bill, and she says it'll ensure women and girls compete on a level playing field. But Broward County Democrat Marie Woodson says the bill marginalizes and demonizes the transgender

House Subcommittee Kaylie Tuck Highlands County Florida Marie Woodson Broward County
Peyton Manning Selected for Pro Football Hall of Fame

Bob Zadek

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Peyton Manning Selected for Pro Football Hall of Fame

"Heads the class of 2021 in the pro Football Hall of Fame. The doors of the pro football Hall of Fame of swung open toe welcome the class of 2021, earning their gold jacket this year or quarterback Peyton Manning wide receivers Calvin Johnson and Drew Pearson. Defensive backs Charles Woodson and John Lynch guard Allen Fan Icka coach and quarterback Tom Flores and scouted journalist Bill Nunn, Manning, Woodson and Johnson were elected in their first year is a finalist. The class of 2021 will join the class of 2020 in separate ceremonies during induction week, and Canton, Ohio, later this summer. I'm

Drew Pearson Pro Football Hall Of Fame Allen Fan Icka Tom Flores Calvin Johnson Bill Nunn Peyton Manning Charles Woodson John Lynch Football Woodson Manning Johnson Canton Ohio
Peyton, Woodson, Calvin Johnson lead HOF class

The Dennis Prager Show

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Peyton, Woodson, Calvin Johnson lead HOF class

"Peyton Manning was awarded his spot in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Saturday in his first year of eligibility. Also going into captain this summer offensive guard Allen Fat Icka wide receivers Calvin Johnson and Drew Pearson, defensive back Charles Woodson and safety John

Peyton Manning Pro Football Hall Of Fame Allen Fat Drew Pearson Calvin Johnson Charles Woodson John
Game changers: Manning, Woodson, Megatron headed to Hall

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Game changers: Manning, Woodson, Megatron headed to Hall

"The doors of the pro football hall of fame of swung open to welcome the class of twenty twenty one during their gold jacket this year or quarterback Peyton manning wide receivers Calvin Johnson or drew Pearson defensive back Charles Woodson and John Lynch guards Alan Faneca coach and quarterback Tom Flores and scout a journalist bill non manning Woodson and Johnson were elected in their first year as a finalist the class of twenty twenty one will join the class of twenty twenty in separate ceremonies during induction weekend canton Ohio later this summer I'm Tom Aikens

Drew Pearson Tom Flores Calvin Johnson Manning Woodson Peyton Manning Charles Woodson Alan Faneca John Lynch Football Johnson Canton Ohio Tom Aikens
Retired NFL star Jason Witten named head coach at Texas HS

The Rich Eisen Show

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Retired NFL star Jason Witten named head coach at Texas HS

"Rivers isn't the only recent retiree getting into the high school coaching biz. Jason witten he's just going to be a high school coach liberty christian down in argyle texas announce a witness. Its new head coach today. A liberty parents. I guess his kids go there. What if you're a high school coach and you just like you. Should you start looking over your shoulder and every single go. that's retiring right. I don't see tom brady. And peyton manning jealous payton can do whatever he wants mine and he is doing whatever you want still.

Jason Witten Rivers Argyle Texas Tom Brady Peyton Manning Payton
Brooklyn Handyman Accused of Three Separate Killings in same Apartment Complex in New York City

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Brooklyn Handyman Accused of Three Separate Killings in same Apartment Complex in New York City

"A serial The killer doctor. hunter Fauci rest did scheduled say, though, for arraignment after he went today. on 66 to wax poetic year old about how Kevin nice it Gavin is working for Biden suspected of company three murders Compared to that what nitrous Donald Trump. senior He housing did complex. say that if 75 Carter G. to Woodson 80% complex and the Brownsville Of Americans section get on Powell vaccinated Street in Brooklyn, 75 and to Y 80% PDS of Americans chief of detectives get vaccinated is running Harris. that Mr. will be back Kevin to normal Gavin sometime this was summer. arrested for three murders Yeah, One of look. Keep that occurred hope alive. between This is what we're praying 2015 for. This is the goal, of course. and unfortunately, But how's it gonna happen 2021 to me? For example, if you're not watching the local at news the Woodside today, you may not know Houses. this. Residents But we of are this complex in this held a state, press conference New York State yesterday. We are due to run They are asking out of in vaccine New York City doses to a immediately today. install Today surveillance we're gonna be out cameras of it. So at how the are complex we gonna cameras get were 100 asking million to be put shots in hallways. and in these arms how we're gonna So get certainly through this and be as OK the person by this summer. is already in the For building the most part outside cameras of West in Virginia. hallways as well as in Every stairways state and seems elevators you're running out of doses conserve to daily. be caught People's Yeah, actions. they're even running The city out in says Florida The installation Governor has decided been delayed to sustain. due to Cove Just in 19. get me some vaccine. Give me some Tell

Hunter Fauci Kevin Nice Carter G. Gavin Donald Trump Woodson Brownsville Biden Powell Brooklyn Harris Kevin MR. New York State New York City Virginia Florida
No surprise: Peyton Manning a Hall of Fame finalist

Drive Time Sports

01:09 min | 1 year ago

No surprise: Peyton Manning a Hall of Fame finalist

"Finalist for the Pro Football Hall of Fame have been announced, and I am not at all surprised at the list. Ah, you have paint Manning ever heard of him? So Peyton Manning, Charles Woodson, Calvin Johnson and in Jared Allen. Have all been named finalists. There are also rendezvous Barber, Tony Bacilli, Laroy Butler, Allen Fan Icka, Torry Holt, John Lynch, Clay Matthews Jr to Sam Mills, Richard Seymour, Zack Thomas and Reggie Wayne. Those are the finalists for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. I can't quite think of Have to go back and look, I think that's pretty much everyone that I would have moved. Send in the next round. You pick five as many as five. Right? See guy. Go, Peyton Iago! Woodson. I think you go Megatron rather gate. Ah Ah, I probably hang onto Jared Allen. I go John Lynch.

Pro Football Hall Of Fame Rendezvous Barber Tony Bacilli Laroy Butler Allen Fan Icka Clay Matthews Jr Sam Mills Charles Woodson Zack Thomas Jared Allen Calvin Johnson Peyton Manning Torry Holt Manning John Lynch Richard Seymour Reggie Wayne Peyton Iago Woodson
North Carolina State University closing campus dorms due to coronavirus

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

North Carolina State University closing campus dorms due to coronavirus

"Com. North Carolina State University has told students remaining in university housing to go home. Acknowledging a rising number of Corona virus clusters occurring in both on campus in off campus housing Chancellor Randy Woodson says starting on Thursday, students in university housing should schedule a time to be Moving out of on campus

North Carolina State Universit Randy Woodson Chancellor
Cowboys' Prescott doesn't get deal to replace franchise tag

First Things First

05:15 min | 2 years ago

Cowboys' Prescott doesn't get deal to replace franchise tag

"Not Deal for. Prescott and the cowboys could not agree to terms on a deal that would have the quarterback between thirty three and thirty five million dollars annually with a hundred and ten million of that guaranteed. So Daf will now play this season on the thirty one point four million dollar franchise tag. He will once again on himself this season if there were reports that the two sides were close, they clearly were not close enough. WHO's more likely to regret? Not Getting a deal done deaf Prescott or the Dallas Cowboys. I'm going to say. Despite the fact that I believe is going to end up the highest paid player than Patrick Mahomes in NFL, history I Dak is going to get the money that he ultimately wanted I think he's going to be franchise tag this year franchise tag next year and then hit open free agency. But here for deck that in the in the pursuit of that money, he's going to become an athlete that I. Don't think any athlete wants to be which is your name is not your name anymore? It's not Dak. Prescott is having a Joe Johnson Joe. Johnson stopped being Joe Johnson. He started being Joe Contract because no matter how good he was, he was never going to be able to live up to that contract. And I think Jack is setting himself up to be a little bit richer than he otherwise would be. Be a guy who can never live up to that contract, and the reason I think Dallas is not gonNA regret this, even if they back on the quarterback treadmill is because the the worst thing you can have in this league. Wild does not have a quarterback. The worst thing you can have is a vastly overpaid quarterback. If you don't have a quarterback and find a new one, you can go try to find one if you have a vastly overpaid quarterback. You're just stuck and so I think Jack is going to get what he thinks he wants in this the most money in. Have ever gotten aside from Mahomes I. Think he will end up regretting it because you have a great organization, you have great skill, position guys, and if he would've just signed for Carson, Wentz plus ten percent, no one would've held it against him, and instead this contract and the negotiations around at wild. You're going to be the narrative surrounding him for years to come. See I disagree. You think that it's it's. I think the worst thing to have is a mediocre quarterback. Any shot at the super. Bowl and I'm GONNA throw to a clip of Darren Woodson in a second, but I think in our minds if it's been glossed over that, it was troy and then Tony, but there was a the drew bledsoe Weirdo error there that they were in a bad spot. If we can take a listen a Darren Woodson please hubs. In, the world when you have quarterback purgatory. Where you can. You're not good at that position. That position is holding you back from winning games, and there was a time before Tony Romo era. Where there were four years, we went five and eleven. In a week, totally struggled at that one position in in today's game that one position is means a ton means wins and losses gotta get you over the Hump in when you don't have that Clare in that position. It's a huge struggle. I'm. So. Bryan. I think this eventually gets done I. Don't know if he gets franchise again. I think that we just moved the goalposts and a long-term deals going to get done. They like each other. Dak wanted for the cowboys wanted five I. Don't think the answer is. Let's get divorced just because we can't agree. I think this eventually get works gets worked out and I. Don't think anyone has any regrets long-term. The cowboys ended up regretted. Just a bit because I think that goes out and has a very good year. This season with Mike McCarthy Mike McCarthy comes back in after winning a playoff game or two, and says we need to have Dak back now. The cowboys have to pay him that long term contract, which is going to be a little bit more than they would have had to pay him this year. Here's the question that I've always had. If if the cowboys don't love, why would they ever want to sign him to a five year deal versus the forty deal if you don't love them then? On to a four year deal, you can get rid of him quicker. Why would you want WanNa longer contract if you don't love him, and you don't know exactly what he is for your football team to me I think they know who back is they just don't WanNa, pay him because they see him as a fourth round pick. A guy that has played well in this career hasn't quite got over the Hump. I don't think they want to pay him if I'm back Prescott I, feel like I'm in a great position to meet the floor. The absolute four is thirty three to thirty five million dollar contract that you can get from some other team after the season. If things don't work out for you here in Dallas, I think a team like Jacksonville. Teams that would need a quarterback was still need a quarterback next year and would be that open market possibly if he doesn't give franchise in the floor to his contract would be that deal that he turned down this season from the cowboys.

Cowboys Joe Contract Dallas Cowboys DAK Prescott Jack Dallas Darren Woodson Tony Romo DAF Joe Johnson Joe Mike Mccarthy Mike Mccarthy Patrick Mahomes NFL Clare Bryan Bowl Jacksonville Football Wentz
Black Lives Matter protest turns violent in London

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Black Lives Matter protest turns violent in London

"Clashes erupted in central London on Sunday after a largely peaceful black lives matter protest tension escalated as police tried to clear a junction in parliament square blocks by protest is just a short distance from prime minister Boris Johnson's ten Downing Street a number of people were seen being arrested and put into police vans the police saying later Tuesday the twenty had been taken into custody the demonstrators we're running against the death of George Floyd on may twenty five in Minneapolis which is sparked demonstrations across the U. S. since Charles Woodson of this month London

London Prime Minister Boris Johnson George Floyd Minneapolis Charles Woodson
"woodson" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"woodson" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Had a great guest on Sunday Bob Woodson former civil rights activist who has rejected the Civil Rights mob for liberty and he takes on the sixteen nineteen project I want to give an example let's go to cut twenty Mister producer from life liberty and Levin go you started this seventeen seventy six project to counter this distortion of the history that these historians talk about absolutely you know my doctor there are two ways to prevent people from competing want to deny them by law the way we did on disaggregation but the more but the more insidious way is to convince them that they don't have to compete that because of their history of oppression that your presser is obligated to be responsible for your future that is a recipe for absolute disaster for people this says if you're robbing and killing one another it's not your fault if you're having babies out of wedlock and not taking care of them it's not your fault if you're eating too much in your overweight it's not your fault is it so it's it's it's structural and distant that's like in the sixties the doors were locked from the outside and so we forced to open those doors but sixteen nineteen says the blacks those doors unlocked from the still locked from the outside in seventeen seventy six we say no as C. S. Lewis said this is a door that's locked from the inside you have the right of self determination and in the six sixteen nineteen said that these conditions of the of of history or dictate your present and we S. the seventeen seventy six offer evidence to the contrary they say that capitalism is hostile to the interests of blacks well there are twenty blacks were born slaves who died millionaires how was that possible if slavery were responsible for the kind of people one example one woman biddy Mason was born in eighteen eighteen the Mississippi and she couldn't read or write and her master are moot he was a Mormon and moved to Salt Lake City she walked behind a wagon four thousand miles tending to the to the sheep she had three babies by him and wish you got to lose to Salt Lake City he moved to California and that was a Free State a judge freed her and as a result she was a midwife and she earned a dollar fifty a day she saved her money for ten years and purchase property in what is now downtown LA and got into real estate and eventually when she died she was worth about six hundred and seventy thousand dollars and she is the founder of the A. M. E. church that still operates in the her great grandson became one of the wealthiest blacks so there are countless stories like this blacks in that period who achieved against the odds in those traditions continue now Bob Woodson is in charge of what he the Watson center which she credits been there almost forty years in Washington but it's reaches in every major metropolitan area what he tries to stress individual merit individual accomplishment individual responsibility and accountability he rejects what he calls his race hustlers he said as soon as the federal government started spending all this money on the welfare state he knew it would be a sham you know will be a Chamonix he explains that why would people who rely on this money in the bureaucracy and politics and so forth why would they want to solve these problems then the money would run out but he's much more take a look on the subject and I but he he was a tremendous guest and this is why I'm doing the show I want to be here one more cut twenty one go Bernie Sanders almost every stump speech he gets big applause he says America is racist from top to bottom how do you react to that well first of all it's just I bristle every time but because it's so when something but I remember some years ago in Washington DC of the clan that come to town to break a little bus and five thousand people were trying to get Adam and so the Washington post came down into ward eight one of the most dangerous communities here in Washington with a lot of violence and they have to seven year old man if he was going to join a demonstration against the plan is to bring them down have been given these drug dealers so his reality was the condition of drug addiction and violence in his community was not race white people are not in these communities robbing people and creating the murders and so the realities of people who have to live in these troubled community is very different than those who posture on television and in and just have a shorthand way of somehow speaking to the needs of of black people so that the only thing that's of interest to black America is race that's insulting you see a huge disconnect between the way the media reports what's going on in these communities or even the politicians who supposedly represent these communities speak about these communities that question makes sense there oh sure for instance we know about the Starbucks situation in Philadelphia about these two men dispose of gotten locked up and I followed that because for us our hometown what happens what happens is these two men came to Starbucks and they just saw it on Friday and they didn't order anything and the and so the the manager asked them to leave and like what they call the police well the the Washington post reported that they were locked up for for being in Starbucks that's not due to the police asked them on three different occasions to please leave and they refused to police a directive so therefore they were arrested for refusing to police but the reporters left that part out and only be polar that they were arrested for being in Starbucks and that's when Starbucks you know caved in M. and this is where the race hustlers had a field day because they're consulting contracts was signed so Starbucks closed down for half a day to teach race sensitivity to its employees which is one of the biggest growing rackets in the country and no soul but the shows you where we are the sad state of race in America I want to take a quick break now because there is one more clip of the great Bob woods and I want to play for I told you he's he's inspiring he's really quite a brilliant man and he has spent his life committed to trying to prove these communities in a completely different way than the left will be right back.

Bob Woodson
"woodson" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"woodson" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Famer rod Woodson for the next hour we're going to hear for the defensive coordinator of the Kansas City Chiefs steams bag nolo we'll also hear from a stalwart of the Niners defensive my defensive tackle deforest Buckner later were also going to check back in with a Superbowl from forty years ago and we're going to hear from the guy who is holding the Super Bowl for the sixth time on fox Joe Buck the night's broadcast of five days to Sunday on Westwood wanna sponsored by credit karma get your truly free credit score and free credit monitoring from credit karma download the credit karma app today credit karma here's to progress rod it is good to see you you obviously have had a full day you've been traipsing all over the city of Miami talking to everybody about this game is a changed your opinion on anything not yet you know I you look at discount is I think it's going to be a great game one thing I can say for sure they're gonna score more points they did last year let's thirteen to three game it you know people say it wasn't as bad a game is the score may indicate but in this office of world people do want to see points it's interesting to that everybody's talking about the offenses on both sides it's got to insult you a little bit that there hasn't been as much conversation about defense not really you know you think that their strengths for you know the forty Niners it was their defense throughout the whole year but the way they ran the ball in a champ should gain it made everybody forget about the defense of how good they play throughout the year just for the fact that they carved up a really good defense for the Green Bay Packers faculty for United front attack and what did I love about what tiles done he's so much like his dad Mike where they're running that outside zone they running inside so they're gonna cut the backside it's one cut get down hill and the difference between what might be eight in Denver throughout his whole career and what Kyle has in San Fran these guys can run but you know he's got all the running backs for the forty Niners can get down hill fast and they get to the second level so quick now kids city linebackers are not great linebackers with your date they played well this defense played well I think they played well so much better in the second half the year they did the first half of the year but if they can't stop his run I mean Patrick homes in his group unity is being throughout his short tenure career in the National Football League it's going to be set on the sideline just like your Rogers were you in the first half a game in the chapter and I think that's part of the way that San Francisco is going to be able to deal with that the other part and I had this conversation with our friend Tony Boselli last night as we received it opening night the fact that if San Francisco is capable of getting pressure with four and that's going to be a big key to this game then you're sitting back with seven you're probably sitting back in it you know it three deep you're probably sitting back a whole bunch of different places Patrick homes is not going to have those deep chunk throws he's gonna have to be patient take dumped down throws and they're hoping that that he would be impatient and make a mistake very similar to what the LA charges did for two games very summer they come from the same tree the defense coordinators and you look at it but the charges please guys twice here every year they know who they are they India's they know what the systems are they know how fast I re queue is San Francisco they don't not yet I mean so they have that speed now they can't get pressure to front for they've done it all year long their linebackers Alexander's probably a blessing that he got her because Warner had to step up to the forefront that second year player to play I mean that second year linebacker from B. Y. U. has been outstanding player form now you get Alexander back so that front for and the linebackers can all get it after the quarterback and they can cover people that back in I know Richard Sherman I think which is going to be fine it's the other guys for them if they don't get pressure on on four Moseley from Witherspoon can they handle the speed because what they're going to do for the cancer chief they're gonna get a trips they're gonna put ten at number two or three three they're gonna put seventeen and number two they're going for fourteen and number one eighty seven at the sight of flexi Mao bigoted Chow twenty six McCoy and child means they're gonna be spreading right by the tackle he's going to chip also going out what's your answer on the defense side and if they get the protection I don't know if whether spoon and mostly can hold up over the long stretch of how fast these guys are because what I saw two weeks ago with him in three weeks ago they start running the deep over and they normally when touch when tennis at three here is a deep speedo so gold's always Crossfield Ian's up about twenty twenty five yards across the field ten for those of you not watching right in front of me sorry kill kill kill now he's going up any sitting about eighteen yards de so we've taken that safety grabs his attention and in seventeen hits over the top of it at the heart and that's hard me these guys can run and that's one thing that they didn't do in the previous weeks the day started doing and I'm like nobody has an answer for that yet so I'm curious to see what Sam Cisco's answer is to that formation and what they can get accomplished gonna be interesting stuff we're gonna break this down even further as we continue along in this hour all the fame rod which don't forget to join us this Sunday for Super Bowl fifty four Kevin Harlan Kurt Warner joining the cellular opening Jeez Sterrett tour of all the excitement to the Kansas City Chiefs of the San Francisco forty Niners Jim gray hosts the pre game show at five eastern time super Sunday started four Super Bowl insider begins a three curtain I'll kick off our coverage with Super Bowl preview at two PM eastern time I got a Westwood One sports dot com for more details if it's the Superbowl it's on Westwood One up next the guy on the Kansas city side is trying to figure out a way to stop the rushing attack of the forty Niners defensive coordinator Steve's Bagnall Westwood One this is the road to Super Bowl fifty four sports leader you can cross the.

rod Woodson defensive coordinator Kansas City Chiefs deforest Buckner