20 Episode results for "Woodside"

IBM on Red Wings Oil and Gas HSE Podcast  OGHSE102

Red Wing's Oil and Gas HSE Podcast

24:47 min | 2 years ago

IBM on Red Wings Oil and Gas HSE Podcast OGHSE102

"In a global industry, where anything can happen, where mistakes can cost far more than dollars. One oil and gas sales expert, one, hey, Jesse professional and the greatest p p provider on the planet must come together to men, one brand one mission, Red Wings oil and gas HSE podcast with Markle occur and Patrick Pistre starts now. It's more coordinate show is for everybody has an interest in HSE in the oil and gas industry. Wrought to you by Redway the leaders in insuring. Your people go home safe. Everyday joining me today is my temporary. Co host page Wilson how you doing page pretty good arly temporary house right now? We're both temper. It were both temporary hosts and San Francisco because we're at the IBM think converse. Right, right. And Russell couldn't make it. So, so we decided to Russell favor and step in and wrestle. Not actually just talking to ourselves Ori. No, no. We're not. And I'm not interviewing you your viewing me. We're actually here with Scott Kimmelman associate partner chemicals and petroleum in industrial industries for IBM Anita lunch break offered at title. Yes. My favorite would seriously Scott, you'd have known each other for longtime fan of several. The shows you're the reason IBM parted with us. Thank you for that. But talk about something that y'all done that you have this case study which just find incredible. And if you're in HSEN only gas, you're an operations toward industry, where give you a link to go. Download this thing you need to read this. So I wanna start with this case did this public information from a real incident from where I o GP, I o GP and sale took a real incident and y'all go we're able to help determine root cause extremely quickly and accurately. But I wanna kind of back from their this type of stuff, these type of reports are all over the place. They tend to be a filed away and file Cavs paper. It's really hard for companies to leverage all that historical data. But they can't do it can't they. Absolutely. And you know you mentioned paper and I think a lot of folks go straight to I got all this paper at I deal with this paper, and we find it's actually more useful and more. Active star with the digital, you know information that's a little more recent because we're you're really trying to do is make sure that your AI models understand the data can extract meaningful information. And then going back and converting those paper documents into digital are actually fairly easy using some, some other technologies that we have. Yeah, that's really cool. So in order to build that data leak, you can need to mind, to actually draw HSE results, you now have the tools we can do it fairly quickly fairly active out some key punch nece for for hundreds of years. Absolutely. That what we found, and I just came from a different session with, with some of our researchers. Right. The ability for humans to generate information is actually causing a bottleneck because we can't process all that information as humans. Right. So we have to find a way to allow systems to help us also do that mostly automatically right? And then we step in and fill in the gaps at someone comeback, this case study. So let's talk through this. And then we go back to. To the technology and the business results. But this case, they find fascinating. So this is a real real incident. And then what did y'all do this real incident? So typically, when your trying to understand trends, or patterns in health and safety, or if you have a team, this can be going and doing some work, maybe they're working on a particular type of compressor or something, and they're not familiar with it. You wanna make sure that you understand what experiences? Other people have, you know what did they not do that? We should probably think about it takes forever to read through these let alone, even find the right incidence. That would be useful. We are able to take that each incident and extract all the causes controls equipment activities of but do that at scale and bring all that information back essentially instantaneously. So in this case, it's basically machine fill over and king, the rest on the edge of the secondary pipe rate and just barely missing the pedestal. It's actually fell about eight meters and the appropriate followers system integrity, the basket kept me from getting hurt, but it is still yet. Sheen topple over and almost catch the pipe rack. So you have a bunch of data here, it you can easily read through this. But when you read through this humans cannot recognize the patterns recognize the words, the sentences are, but there's patterns that are there that humans can't recognize but y'all are able to come in here and what did your able to? So what rebel to do is actually find all of the key concepts that an expert would be looking for whether it's what was the cause or the controls that were put in place for what was the activity that was happening and expose that automatically and instantaneously for the user sensitive teams of people porn through his trying to figure out what actually happened to actually get to the root cause? And if you've been industry in length of time, you know what usually happens? They try to quickly get to root cause, but it's typically not root cause it's typically, Joe didn't have his gloves, or in this case it could've been cited put a chalk Senator wheels. And they go well guys fault. No could have been that guy was tired. Could he worked long shifts? It could been. He wasn't trained properly chalks. It could be leadership thing. It could be that for a very long time. Nobody fussing for not chalks wheels. And so that sort of stuff humans can't really get out. But the machines can can't they? Yeah. I think you really hit on it, there is, when you think about what was the cause there's some normal buckets, that we use if you think about was it a procedural issue with that human factor. Maybe they didn't have the proper work direction because it's not this person did do the thing it's they weren't told how to do it correctly, and that's really the root cause, and I think by taking the knowledge of our experts says here, the categories of things that I should look for and here are examples of those, you train the system on examples, and then it can find all the other instances of inappropriate work director or lack of. And so let me tell you from a cultural point of view in our industry and only gas, the HSEN guys kinda stuck, and especially if you have a bad incident, you bring a third party out there. Here's what really goes on. If your internal there's. Incident and let's say is a leadership problem, that means genie. Go to your superiors say it's your fault. Do you think that happens honestly, people it rarely have now, now here's the bigger thing. Imagine they hire your third party to do it in investigation guessing rights, you that check, it's then are you? Tell them that your fault. It's in police people know, hate mail. It happens. I've seen it all the time. What's cool about this is the machine doesn't care machine is going to get to root cause, so you can make those changes so you can make sure that your safety metrics, go up. Every doesn't have opinions as an doesn't have a bias. Yeah. And I think that part is enormous from the business point of view that, that's exactly the, the elimination of bias. That's really what, what the heart of it is, whether it's trying to understand why an incident happened or in another situation where you might be, you know, making a decision on a piece of land that you want to invest in right? Everybody has an opinion. And they're gonna go find the data the sports their opinion, right downton. It's called conference. Nation bias and there's a whole bunch of even somebody like me who's been trained to do research cannot help introduce bias into that data. So then you have you have to validate the data. And let me tell you. That's a long laborious expensive process to get that, right? Where's right now with IBM it's just done. All right. So we talked about this, this real incident that we're good. Give linked to download enough telling people you need to read through this now want to back up and go back to the side of the story, so you engage with with Woodside. And how, how did that process or wide Woodside decide to gauge IBM said the CEO, Peter Coleman? I decided that, you know, he had a he had a problem in his organization of retaining knowledge, just as a general, general challenge, right. Started with major capital projects. Right. When you do you know a five ten billion dollar project. A person that led that they has he said, they get gold watch and they're gone. Right. And, and that's great for them. But from an organizational perspective, some big gaps. And he looked around the market and sell that IBM was was the leader in the space and said, hey, I'm ready to start my journey and I wanna partner together. And then we work together to find the right places to apply it, which was major projects and health and safety. I love the, the word partner because that's really. What I know IBM. That's really what you'll try to be. You don't wanna be vendor. You wanna be a partner to the companies you work with so IBM brings the technology and the subject matter expertise, heavy hitters to the table, Woodside has an issue. Right. And so what happened next once he decided to explore the capital expenditures, HSE metrics. What did I be doing that? So what we did was LeBron a team of technical experts, and we sat shoulder to shoulder with the Woodside team. Everybody was co located and the Russell Penske was the head of cognitive science. And he said that, you know, you couldn't tell the IBM from the Woodside folks just sitting shoulder to shoulder working together, the understood the problems, we understood the technologies. And together, we work through what was it an expert needed to find. And how did they find it? And then together we were able to train the system to, to find those nuggets. So in effect, IBM had actually learn a decent amount of Woodside's business. Yob salou. Lutely. Absolutely. We have, you know, folks, who actually come from the industry, you know, the we bring in, but nobody knows clients business like they do. I won't do wanna stop there. So if you're like me, and your old fuddy-duddy, and you think of IBM a box builder, they don't do that anymore. You'd be surprised at IBM has geoscience geophysicist petroleum engineers, working for them, actually interviewed John Mattes. And on my show just recently. That's right. Yeah. You talk about such better expertise. John has a flu, so he's not here. But it's really cool that, I beam invest in people like that, because the people's make the difference that knowledge that have my hands on the drill bit knowledge. You know that's what's such apart as right? They, it's not just about a technology. It's knowing how to apply the technology to the business problem as quickly as possible. And it's they really do that, that translation, so to speak. And I love how you focus on the business. It's not the technology solution is a business solution that just happens to be most the time a tech solution. Right. All right. So you gauge of Woodside your team gets their business. And then I bet their team gets learn some stuff you do some of the heavy hidden in artificial intelligence machine. Learning cognitive that sort of stuff, you know, it's really interesting how a lot of companies are exploring a an advanced analytics and again we love to partner with them, but they need to build their own internal capability as well. Right. So a lot of times there's an enormous amount of knowledge transfer and collaboration on these solutions. It's not tell me what you want. I walk away and build it. And come back, you know, you're literally, I said, working together hand in hand. This project is this project still ongoing Woodside. We have a number of different projects with them was still working on the on the HSE one to at. So did the HSA in the to the project lead to other projects, because they saw the difference, you could make their business? Absolutely the. Well, I really interesting. They were I think really kind of on the forefront of how to approach this again. He understood Peter understood was a journey. He's ready to start his journey and what they did was they set up, what we would now call garage it in a sense, the idea that you have a core team that understands how to frame a business problem and how to quickly evaluate the technology as applied to that problem, and they've gone through and done probably dozen or two dozen projects where you know, even in, you know a month or two weeks or even a week, they can evaluate use case decide if they want to move forward on an they do you know they spin up a couple extra folks and they often they do it. And I think that. Approach has really served them well, in terms of focusing on the business problem, can I get the value if I can great? Let's move on if not. Okay. Great idea. But it didn't work. I love that idea. What is it? Methodology -application develop is called agile where they do sprints. So, so what happens is the whole team comes idea. They work their butts off and they stop the value, what they do. And they disregard stuff. Is it court what they're doing and do it again? That sorta like what you're describing on very impressed with your with your DevOps knowledge. But yes, it is called agile. And I think it's really about you. You have to be okay with projects that don't work. I don't know that I would call a failure people talk about failing fast. I will call it learning fast. Yeah. That's really what it's about. And we've they and other clients have had these garages where not everything works. And if you expect everything to work, you're setting yourself up for failure. Yeah. Hitting the interesting thing so that it's not failure. What you're really doing to set priorities as you go through this process. You'll just. Other business problems, you can solve but maybe you don't wanna solve that this week or this quarter this year. But now you can put a hierarchy together. What's the biggest impact problems? You can solve the biz and work your way down. So you're not wasting your ternal resources. Absolutely. It. It's amazing. How many derivative uses of solution, you'll find it? I can't share a lot of the, you know, internal details, but a number of the solutions have actually gone on to have second, third fortune rations, which are similar capability, but solve whole new business problems, which I thought was fantastic. Yeah, absolutely. As Scott even doing this for little while this project with Woodside. Was there. Some big learning vents a working with them. But, you know, I think one of the things that, that we and they learned was that there, there will be challenges, right? There will be things that, that don't go right? There will be times when, you know, the communication may not be exactly what you wanted it to be. But because everybody has a partnership mindset, it's just like any relationship. Right. If you want it to work. Work. You have to be willing to talk about the things that you think how that didn't work. Let's not do that again. Right. And I think that was really there's always the technical earnings. Right. The technical part is obviously there, but I think it's really the expectation that you're going to work together and you're both in it for a joint positive outcome. Do find it funny that even though we're in this fast tech of which, I love by the way, absolute love that is still runs down boils down to people doing business with people. No matter what when things I love at all gas industry. Yeah. So when you think about that, that journey that y'all did with Woodside, and you'll had learning experiences is that journey of learning with partner. So the basic when you engage with what you'd call a client is that journey actually starting to be compressed. We get stuff done quicker than you could done a few years ago, 'cause y'all have learned absolutely, you know, if you're not learning, you're, you're definitely going to be extinct, and I think, what was what's been really interesting? And, and from this, and I would say the garage approach is probably. One of the most useful learnings, which is a lot of times, folks do when they want to test something out. They say let's go scope a project, right? Well, we all know what that means that gets bigger and bigger and bigger until it's gigantic program. What you need is to set some boundaries on it can't take longer than this. I can't spend more than this. And what that does is it? It's not that you're saying you don't wanna spend money or that you don't wanna put time in, but by putting those constraints on it, you force the teams to focus on the thing that is truly differentiating that you've never done before. So you one of build a new application, and you already know how to build a friend, Andy already know how implements carrying all those things. Why are you spending time money, building that you should focus on the eye or the, the analytics, or whatever it is? It's new and different and do that in three to five weeks. If that works then go onto the pilot, but again, only add and do the things that you aren't sure that, you know how to do or you're not sure that they're gonna work to me those construe. Saints actually force you to be so much more focused. That's been fantastic. So HSE we're industries a holes always been a big data industry, all gas, HSE's also collects a lot of data. So if a companies out there, and they're looking to improve their HSE metrics, what would be and no, every case complete different. But what would be like the normal path that IBM would follow work with somebody new. I think the, the, the most important thing is what outcome are you trying to achieve? Are you trying to gain insights around a particular area said that you can improve your safety programs, which is a more systematic approach? Are you trying to improve the awareness of your team's doing work on a day-to-day basis, which has more of a kind of an operational focus? I think that the, the first thing is, what is your objective? Once we understand the objective jointly. It's what information do I need to help people make decisions that they're gonna make. And that really helps us zero in. In, and then I think the, the next step would be what assets exceleron there's solutions already exist today because you know, as we've talked about at other times there we already have capability in this area. I drop data in today and start showing you insights from your health and safety, your unstructured data. And so, I think that's really short sweet the, the process, we go through. All right. We're getting close to wind down the show, Scott. It's time for the Red Wings, safety tip of the week, you have a safety for audience, you know, being from Florida. You know, it's generally pretty warm there. Now I if it snows about once a decade, but I was travelling to the mid west and picked up my rental car was middle of the day, and went to the client next morning. I got up and the windshield was covered with us. So what do you do you get your, your scrape round up? Well again, Florida's so it doesn't occur to me that I should see nice paper. So, of course, I had to get out my driver's license and scraping. Manship. That's a really good tip. If you're if you're north Mason Dixon line in the US, or anywhere in the world, and there's a chance of ice, make sure you have an ice cream or something. Very simple. Two dollars can make a huge difference. I want to roll back into work with Woodside yell started off capital projects. HSE project that spun off to other things, but I'm guessing IBM actually learned. And so, by learning from Woodside if other companies out there wanted to think about engagement, IBM round, whatever. HSE metrics HSE results, whatever it's what you learn from your other clients, actually didn't benefits your future clients. You know, the industry while everybody has a nuances in their business, which are very real. There's definitely kind of a core set of knowledge and learning that that comes in with with every project. And I think that's what that's what we're able to bring to folks. Cisco artificial intelligence. Right buzzword, only gas industry. The vendors have been using it way too much. I've interacted with Watson. It's real right y'all been doing it for a long time, y'all e world leader, nece when you'll ply things like artificial intelligence to things like HSE metrics, the results have to have to be good. I mean just just the ability to keep one person from slipping or one person from pulling shoulder, or even worse must make you feel good with the end of the day that you help to company help, make sure that they're people go home as good. If not better than when they came to work that day, that's really the best thing about about the job. Right. Is, is getting to work for a company work with clients to build solutions that really do change the world right in many different industries? And I am particularly excited when I get to work in the health and safety space, because it makes such such an impactful difference. And, you know, you know, the most dangerous time for folks on their way to work or their way home in the car, right? But we wanna make sure that everybody goes home that may not a love that right? So you're out there. You have a business run. Right. We all respect that, but your heart's in the right place, IBM wants to make sure. Sure that people go home. I mean just incredible. All right. So let's roll over to the usual stuff. We have all only acid Vits, if you haven't joined a Syracuse and happy hour joints last Tuesday of every month if you went to page, you know, now that people don't have to type in oil and gas global network dot com. D L. How awesome it is to not that out? So we finally got her hands on OG Jian dot com. So you go to the website go chicken, the pages of vents, and you see all of our vents. We have several happy hours happening in the next couple of months. We'll be reoccurring. We're in Dallas Midland, the bay area. We act actually going up here tells Oklahoma Denver, Colorado, probably five or six Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Yeah. So if you're not in Houston area, we're bringing the monthly happy hour, you, if you want to maybe participate in that I am looking for sponsors, happy hours. It's a good way. Get your company in their information from a bunch of oil and gas people all over the US for now presume, we'll go International USA year, so it's really cheap and it gets five hundred bucks a pop to sponsor. One of those reach out to Julie put a link in the show news. If. She can help you with that. And then if you're interested in all vents that we go to as press and more, where we bring the podcast sign up for a monthly events newsletter. It's free. We stick all of its in your inbox once a month. And we don't spam you which is very important, which is very important. And then speaking of spanning Lincoln, Joan are Lincoln group Microsoft's a really good job. They're clean linked up. Arlington group is that over two thousand page. I had I so I don't do that anymore. I don't I let Julie do that. I I'm sure we're well pass. That's this compaign to this show and all the others in page. I can't even remember how many we've watched something new shows we have only gases week only all on gas this week. We have all in gas HSE, which are listening to you own gas industry leaders, my show on gas startups, but Jacob Colin then on gas, onshore would just in go Chang, and then on gas, legal arrest with Sarah Soner, and we got what six more working with Anassa? Once we launched. Coming to an oil and gas niche near you. We're actually doing this, and Scott so much. So great have year on the show. We're gonna put a link to the study. Joe accident. It's actually not a study. It's actually a practical example. But if people wanted to learn more about IBM and how you work with only gas. I know you don't know the offi top head. We'll put a link in the show notes, but y'all have dedicated all guess practice. Although y'all call it something else other than gas. Yes, we did. Sources at which is which is fine. So we'll put a link in the show notes not confusing. And then Scott if people want to reach out to you personally your own Lincoln. So that's Lincoln's, probably the best way. Yep. Yep. So we'll put a link to Scott's Lincoln profile on their Scott. No, you're busy at the conference. Thank you for coming in sitting here talking to page. Like I said, we love IBM not just because you sponsor of one or shows because the difference you're making our industry. So thanks for joining us. Absolutely. My pleasure. Page ready to get out of here and very ready. All right, folks, don't be afraid to give good to go for the great. Next week for another exciting episode of Red Wings, oil and gas. Hey chessy podcast a production of global oil and gas network. Learn more from Marc let court at nodal point dot com. Connect with Patrick Pistre at lean oilfield dot com. From insta- to Nundy to do and beyond. Scott. What's the craziest thing you've seen in the field? I was in India touring a tile factory and the first thing you do when you make late tiles is you put the clay into this, you know. Oven if the hopper hopper. Okay. So I was in India and torn Attaya factory and the first thing you do making clay tiles is to throw the clay into the hopper. And I thought it was really interesting that the safety great that went over. The hopper was actually open. And the people were standing on the great throwing it into the opper- and what's in the hoppers, what people need to know these gigantic teeth. I'll never forget these long white arms, like a foot long each and each each tooth was like three inches long and horror movie, I, I was literally imagining, what would happen, if I fell into that. I was quite concerned that is crazy, folks. You see something that you hear different country? It's up to you say you know what? Stop the job. I'm not staying here while you're so scary stuff. Good jobs.

IBM HSE Scott Kimmelman Woodside Woodside partner Russell Penske Red Wings Cavs Peter Coleman San Francisco US Patrick Pistre Joe accident Red Wings Wilson associate partner
Is Big Philanthropy Destroying Democracy?

Tiny Spark

31:21 min | 2 years ago

Is Big Philanthropy Destroying Democracy?

"Welcome to tiny spark a podcast of the nonprofit quarterly. We take a close look at nonprofits international aid and philanthropy, I'm Amy costal. In today's episode. We're going to be challenged think differently and more critically about the role of flan therapy and the powered wheels in so many sectors of American life robbery. She's a professor of political science Stanford University Nico directs the center on philanthropy and civil society he's been on tiny spark before and we decided to reach out to him again. Because recently wrote a new book it's called just giving why philanthropy is failing democracy, and how it can do better in it riche asks what role philanthropy should play in a just society adjusts -ociety that would play a role in which human beings voluntarily used their private resources for the assistance of other people in. In other regarding or altruistic orientation, and it would involve perhaps the activity of people who were doing something different than trying to bypass a dysfunctional government or to try to operate away that was meant to go around the inefficiencies of public infrastructure or of the marketplace philanthropy cannon should have a role in a just society. But I think the public policies we have a social norms. We have our essential to making sure that it plays that role. And I I want to talk about that. I by just starting with the title of your book, which is just giving why philanthropy is failing democracy and how we can do better. And before we get to kind of the meat of your book. I wanna talk to you about the use of the word democracy in the title of your book and throughout your book, you use the term liberal democracy. Right to refer to the kind of government that we have in this nation. But you know, as you well know, I think increasingly there's a lot of people who feel at the bedrock of our democracies actually falling away. Whether it's around the anti immigration rhetoric that we're hearing whether it's around voter suppression falling wages crumbling public school systems on affordable higher education. I mean, the list just goes on and on. And so because I think many people are questioning the very bedrock of our democracy today. Talked me about your decision to to use that word in the title of your book. And what do you mean when you use the word democracy by democracy? I mean, a system of government in which political equality is one of the most important values and political quality means among other things that we have an opportunity to read. Register one by one each citizen counting for one vote. Our preferences about our representatives or elected leaders and periodic elections and beyond that that every citizen have an opportunity to exercise some political influence, whether that's through conversations with other citizens and civil society, whether that's through campaigning on behalf of their preferred candidates and part of what I think is an interesting tension. Just right there on the surface between philanthropy and democracy is that philanthropy is almost by definition activity. That's practiced more by people who have more money since they have the ability to give more of it away. If they wish and philanthropy is often used to try to change or influence public policy. So amongst all the dysfunction in democratic government that you describe the ways in which our elected leaders now are far more. Responsive to concentrated either corporate interests or private interests or the ways in which elections are the subject of contest between competing donors rather than the competing. Preferences of citizens philanthropy is not an obvious good fit with a democratic society. Especially if what we're talking about as big philanthropy. So let me give you one, you know, living example of this or concrete example of it. You know, I live out in the bay area. And there's been a lot of discussion in the past couple of weeks leading up to the election about propositions see in San Francisco, which is about homelessness, which is a huge social ill at the moment in San Francisco. And rather than kind of I log about the ideas of the city council or even of the mayor newly elected London breed the debate over homelessness in San Francisco is being conducted mainly as a argument between two billionaires Mark Benny off from Salesforce who supports proxy. Inject Dorsey from Twitter who is opposed and it's a sign of the dysfunction of our democracy that be cover a public policy issues like homelessness, not as a matter of competing policy proposals from our elected officials or from civil society organizations, but as an argument between two billionaires why has it come to this? Well, among the reasons for me, it's come to this is the unnecessary and unwelcome, I think social attitude that we have at the moment in the United States about big philanthropists. So sometimes I think that what we have at the moment is a society in which the people who have amassed enormous mountains of wealth in the marketplace, and are in that respect hugely successful examples for other people as entre preneurs do everything they can legally to diminish their taxation two zero and in that respect withdraw as much as possible from participating. A democratic society as a citizen one amongst many. You mean by what would have been a big tax guest by the tax competition where they could affect the distribution of those tax dollars through their vote for their preferred candidates and by withdrawing their tax contributions as I say, mostly in legal ways, they then take a further Texas vantage to set up a private foundation an ounce themselves as a grand philanthropists who will distribute courting to his or her preferences alone, a bunch of public benefits other people and in return for this series of activities, expect the gratitude of the rest of the citizens for all of this. You know, the short way I'd put this as that big philanthropy is an exercise of power and wherever there's concentrated power in a democratic society. The civic attitude toward it should be scrutiny. Not gratitude. So I think gratitude to our big philanthropists fine. Fine. If at the end of the day, the exercise of their power is to support democracy, but that we shouldn't begin with gratitude, we should begin with scrutiny. The way that you've described are major donors in this country, the wealthiest among us is pretty skeptical. You know, you you note that they are giving in order to reduce their tax burden that they are setting up foundations they can carry out their own kind of pet projects, and that kind of thing, and you know, the other side of that coin, of course, more generous one would be to say, you know, they're simply, you know, utilizing the laws that we've made in this country, and that they are trying to do as much good as they can with the money that they have how would you respond to that? Right. They're trying to do as much good as they can with the money that they have as a private individual who is answerable to no one else. So they're not acting as a citizen. They're acting as a insulated unaccountable donor, and to be clear, there are philanthropic activities that I think are one. Wonderful and support of democracy, but not the mere declaration or intention of of undertaking philanthropy. There are ways in which thirty undermines democratic societies can be paternalistic and substitute the judgment of the philanthropist for the beneficiary. There are ways in which philanthropy can undermine the equal standing of people. There are all kinds of moral dimensions. And political dimensions of philanthropy that I think we overlooked today and the book really aims to try to uncover and bring to the surface, he's various issues so that we can stare at them in the full light of the day and examine them in some larger frameworks that the policies we have channel philanthropy for the better rather than the worst. And let me emphasize here. This is not a partisan view. It's not a complaint about people who have left leaning political views in their philanthropy or right-leaning political views. This is not an argument against the coke brothers or against Tom style. Or George Soros this. About any philanthropist who tries to wheeled her power by converting her private assets into some form of public influence, and you talk about a very specific example of this in your discussion of local education foundations, right? This is a type of private giving at public schools that has grown quite a bit in recent years. First of all what our local education foundations and what concerns you them. Yeah. This is something I I experienced as a parent here in the bay area location foundations are either independently organized public charities five a one c three organizations that are designed for the purpose of raising additional private dollars to supplement the public budget of the local public schools, sometimes they're organized us sort of off shoots of adjuncts to parent teacher organizations parent teacher associations, and the thing that I discovered living here. In the bay area was that the local education foundations often had pretty professional people working for them who were seriously engaged in the project of raising money, as if it were on behalf of, you know, say Stanford with a massive development office, and I thought to myself, well, this is certainly understandable from a parent or a sort of civic point of view, the public budgets of the schools in California have long been woefully tended to as underfunded public schooling. And parents think that they're supporting public education by sending their kids to public schools and think that they're supporting public education further than by making charitable donations to these local education foundations, but the underbelly of this that I wanted to write about was guest, twofold. I it seems obvious that wealthy towns, basically, wealthy suburbs can raise significantly more private funding to supplement the school budget than. Big cities or poor areas. Ken, and I went out and collected some data and showed exactly that Palo Alto. No surprise will raise a lot more private contributions to the Pelata schools than East Palo Alto will. And the thing that's objectionable about this from policy standpoint is that the local education foundation is a public charity under the law and therefore all the contributions to at our tax deductible. So we have federal policy here that provides tax advantages for these charitable contributions to your own kids public schools that subsidizes the worsening of inequality that one would think the government is responsible for redressing in the first place and one last thing about this is the idea that parents who make these contributions understandably do think that they're doing something to support public schools. There's a self interest involved as well and maintaining their property values or increasing the educational advantages of their own children. But they are in the process because everyone has a limited amount of time and a limited budget on which to do anything charitably. They're not addressing the root source of the problem in California, which is the school finance system. And I see almost no local education foundations raising a ruckus about what goes on in Sacramento and the problems of public funding of education. And instead we have Palo Alto. Just trying to solve the problem on its own by asking parents and Palo Alto for two thousand dollars every year per kid as a charitable contribution and just to give people an idea of the kind of money were talking about that are raised by these foundations for public schools, you write the amount of private money raised in Woodside and not say very wealthy and of neighborhood in the bay area right behind Stanford. That's right where the captains of industry live. It's often said well, you write that the amount of private money raised in Woodside exceeds on a per. People basis the amount of public money received per pupil in some low income schools in California. That's right. Woodside has a single K eight school to public school district with one school in the district. And with the many many wealthy people who live in the area who make extrordinary contributions to the Woodside school foundation on a per pupil basis. Woodside has more private dollars per kid than they do public dollars for kids and other places in the state and remember this isn't just an opening up a big funding inequality between the Woodside school and say, he's Palo Alto. It is coming at the expense of all tax payers in the United States because these are all tax advantage donations to the Woodside school foundation, and you break down the fifteen largest local education foundations in the bay area ranked by net assets in the year two thousand. Thousand. So this is data. That's actually quite old. That's right. So we can only imagine given the incredible wealth cumulated in the hands of so many especially in the bay area since two thousand we're looking at Woodside school foundation number one net assets of eleven million dollars a little bit more than that with net assets per pupil of twenty four thousand six hundred ninety dollars, right? Yes. It's basically a privatized public school. And let's just take a break to hear word from one of our sponsors who helps make tiny spark possible. The foundation directory online is a smarter faster way to fundraise for nonprofit grants had F D O dot org. Backslash tiny new subscribers. Get ten percent off your first annual subscription. Just enter promo code Spock ten. Why is this okay on what basis can America's wealthiest residents put forward their money into a public school system? That's supposed to be educating everyone, particularly in light of the fact that so many schools in this country are struggling for basic school supplies for proper, you know, lighting and all kinds of things I on what basis is this thought to be a good thing. Yeah. Well, let's inhabit for a moment. I think the point of view of parent who lives in Woodside. So they're going to say something like the following that they're wealthy enough to send their kids to private school. But they want in fact to support the public schools in Woodside, and they send their kid to public school rather than a private school. And they're unhappy about the school finance system in California that under delivers in the amount of money per pupil that they think would be appropriate to spend. And so arises then amongst people who are extremely good at organizing. This is a high capacity. Highly educated town, they organize a local education foundation to try to supplement the public school dollars in so doing, of course, bolstering their property values and advantage in their own children. But the story they're going to tell is that this appointing a public entity rather than actually withdrawing from the public school system altogether. And they have a point to make about that. There's an understandable motivation there that would be familiar to almost anyone listening. But the kind of thing that you have in mind and asking the question like how could this possibly be a good thing? How do we arrive at this moment has to do with the peculiar set of laws that we have the United States that allow so many different things to count as public charities and describe it in the book as we have kind of anything goes attitude about five three public charities the IRS a-? Cruise over ninety nine percent of the fully completed applications for public charity. Five a one c three status. Every year. We have the most kaleidoscopic definition of the public charity sector of any other country. And so a donation made to the Woodside school foundation from the standpoint of the law the tax advantages that attached to a terrible the nation is just as valuable as a donation to a soup kitchen to an art museum to Stanford University to hospital the law treats all public charities exactly the same and gives them the same tax advantages as anyone else. So as a result, we have charity here that instead of helping the disadvantaged is exactly the opposite. Giving to the local education foundation with side is wealthy people making charitable donation to further advantage wealthy people. And that seems to me perverse. And it also is an example of another misconception. I think that many of us have about philanthropy in this country. Which is that it largely serves the poor. Right. What does the data actually tell us? Yeah. That was really surprising to me to research this and then find this out. So like, I think most people when I hear the word charity or charitable giving. I have in mind the historical roots of charity, which is alms giving or assistant for the disadvantaged assistance for the poor. And I just assumed that the vast majority of travel giving that it states went for that purpose. And it turns out that's completely wrong that in the most generous accounting of all charitable giving the states which last year was over four hundred billion dollars at best a third of all charitable giving goes to assisting the poor or assistant the disadvantaged. The vast majority of it goes to. To places like the institution. I teach at Stanford University sort of elite higher education or cultural institutions or to religion. Which also unusually that states is counted as a charitable enterprise, so we have a picture of chattel giving the US in which charity does not mean assistance for the poor. It means something quite different. I guess I'm curious about what you would have those wealthy parents in Woodside do instead because I think many of us, you know, want advocate for our own kids. No matter are income level. And we wanna give them the best schools possible. And what should those parents be doing? Instead sure give two responses to that. The first is that the aim of the book is less to give advice to individuals about what they should be doing their money and more to try to examine the public policies. We have that allow these different. Behaviors the giving wealthy people giving to their own kids public schools to count as just as worthy a form of charity as giving to a soup kitchen say so I want to emphasize that I'm not generally in the business of giving moral advice to individuals having said that with respect to the parents and Woodside or in Palo Alto are in scarsdale or wherever it had turns out to be. I'd point out that the kind of thing I hear people say Woodside, which is something like the following will if only the state could get its act together and get a school finance system that allowed children to have a decent per pupil educational opportunity, then we wouldn't have to raise all this money. And I want to say then to people that sounds like the first best thing to do. In other words, get involved politically direct, your considerable attention and money to the task of reforming the school finance. System, which will have the benefit of advantage. Ing all of California's school children, not just those Woodside the philanthropic giving should be a small thing in the side say on the order of spaghetti dinners or car washes to support whatever extracurricular activity there is at the school that seems to me time honored way of civil society, and parents and people coming together to support the school, but not professional fundraising organizations, which are meant to bypass the root source of the problem, which is the politics of school finance. You talk about the role of foundations quite a bit in your book. And you have said that America's foundation's which now hold some eight hundred billion dollars in assets from what I understand actually benefit from inequality. How so why do you say that? Well, the the kind of necessary background condition for the. Creation of foundations is economic inequality. If there were a much more equal society, and which we didn't have billionaires millionaires numbers we do today. We would see less philanthropy. So one of the interesting background conditions of land therapy is this relationship between outsized inequality and then growth in philanthropy, or as I think I put it in the book that wealth inequality might be a photo to civic comedy. But it is a friend to private philanthropy and the rise of Flint p in the past fifteen or twenty years seems to me a direct outgrowth of the rise of inequality the United States, and is not the fault of the wealthy. No, not necessarily the laws and public policies that we have that allow wealth to be accumulated at the rates at has been today. Jeff Bezos having. Whatever it is fifty or sixty billion dollars are not the fault of anyone personal loan. They're all kinds of dynamics that go on in the marketplace that have allowed the outside wealth to cumulate in the way, we have all point out that I'm persuaded by the idea that this is not a natural activity of kind of capitalistic society. But it's partly a product of the laws that we have. And the decisions we made with respect to taxation tolerance various forms of a monopoly, your concentrated in industrial -sition for companies, and we could and indeed should have a set of policy changes that would diminish the number of billionaires. We have there's nothing essential to the operation of a healthy marketplace or a healthy democratic society that requires lots of billionaires requires opportunities and incentives for people to take risk and to create entrepreneurial efforts in the marketplace, and in civil society, but it doesn't require the out. Size in equality in wealth that we see that had states and elsewhere today, we recently interviewed on gear Dardis about his new book winners take all and in that conversation. He suggests that he's hearing a bit of shift among the very people that you're describing now the wealthiest in our country, particularly those out in your neck of the woods and Silicon Valley are seeing the inequality before them, and realizing that it's just not tenable and perhaps morally questionable, and that he seems to think there may actually be kind of tied under underway in which some of these wealthy people. The power brokers may indeed decide that the system does need to be transformed in the ways that you've just described. Do you have any sense on the ground of that about whether the tide is turning it all among America's wealthiest with respect to how they? See income inequality. What needs to be done about it? Yeah. I see some grass suits that. I suppose if it's possible to talk about grass shoots amongst millionaires and billionaires the the sober kind of reflection of anyone who's done well in the marketplace is that there's an awful lot of luck involved in. It's not all the talent and hard work of a hard charging entrepreneur. So people find themselves joining a startup company in Silicon Valley and working really really hard and doing great things for a couple years, but then finding themselves with extrordinary wealth as a consequence of it. And most people I meet in Silicon Valley don't think that they somehow deserve to be a billionaire as of really ingenious work for five years, and they feel like they were in the right place at the right time. And they then see what's happening in the rest of the country, and indeed and other places in the world with the rise of. Various forms of populism left wing populism and right-wing populism and see this as a threat to their own personal positions and to the civic fabric of society, more generally. So you see the rise of millionaires and billionaires in Silicon Valley who are happy to say that they would prefer higher tax rates personally, and that you get public policy ideas. I'm sure you've heard of this one already in Silicon Valley, it's popular to say that people should consider universal basic income in order to provide basic guarantees of a decent minimum for every single person. And I think that's a much more popular position. These days amongst wealthy people than it was before. So I don't want to scribe too much significance to this yet. It's early days, and our politics are an perilous state so in my more optimistic moments. I think about American history and going back to the first gilded age. And then there was the rise of. A kind of antitrust movements in an effort to rein in the rampages of the plutocrats of the era. And it's also the case that two world wars helped to level the playing field in certain ways and get the country and the citizens all on the same side. I don't wanna say that. I'm hoping for another World War Notre to reunite the country, but in my darker moments. I sometimes fear that that might be a necessary condition. Wow. You know, your book is one of the few that have come out recently that really critiques and criticizes philanthropy and its role in democracy, and and fuelling wealth inequality and the center for -ffective floppies, Phil cannon wrote an op-ed in the chronicle philanthropy responding to these books, yours included, and he writes, this he says sometimes amid all our hand wringing about what could be better in philanthropy. We forget basic facts about its Brett and growth and most important the good at does dramatic decreases and childhood mortality, worldwide environmental and civil rights advances in the United States. And so many other accomplishments are signs of the contributions of philanthropy all around us. And he goes on to say the fact that some of the progress we have made seems now to be imperilled or that there is too much. That hasn't improved doesn't diminish the role of philanthropy. How would you respond to that? I have a partially sympathetic and partially critical reply to that I admire the work that Phil began does of the center for effective land through. But one of the things I say in the book is that we need to understand to what end we want philanthropy to be effective. And I don't know that I've heard a good answer to that from Phil Buchanan because if he's roster philanthropic achievements is as scattershot as the one he described philanthropy has been affected at bringing about of a right of good outcomes. The story I'll me want to hear is how to understand the conditions. When philanthropy is affective at supporting what democratic ideals we have. And we can all point to our preferred list of philanthropic successes or failures. And what I think's important understand is the interaction between philanthropy and democracy and to frequently today. Anthropoid undermines democracy rather than supporting it. And that's a failure of our public policy less than the failure of any individual philanthropic preference robbery, professor of political science at Stanford University and co director of the university center on philanthropy and civil society and author of the new book just giving thank you so much for joining me. Thank you for having me, and that's tiny spark. I'm curious to hear your thoughts about this conversation, and your ideas about the role that philanthropy should ideally play in society. Do you think philanthropists can be doing more to make our society more equitable should donors get the same tax break, if they give to a soup kitchen or say their child's elite public school, but a snow just leave a comment on N P cues website nonprofit quarterly dot org or you can tweet us at tiny spark underscored Borg, and you can get in touch anytime by Email were at podcast at N, P Q, Meg dot org and subscribe to our podcast. On any platform, Stitcher, podcasts radio public. And if you like what you've heard today, it'd be great. If you could rate us on I tunes to help more people. Find out about our work robbery shows recorded at the studios at Stanford University. And today's program was produced by Freddie, Boswell and get an Chaudhary tiny spark is a podcast of the nonprofit quarterly. Thank you so much for listening. I'm Amy custody. Oh this program was produced by the nonprofit quantity, which is solely responsible for its content. This podcast is made possible by grunt from the William and flora Hewlett foundation.

United States Woodside Woodside school foundation California Stanford University Silicon Valley William and flora Hewlett foun robbery professor of political science America Palo Alto Woodside school San Francisco Woodside riche Stanford University Nico Texas
Monitor Show 11:00 01-07-2021 11:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 5 months ago

Monitor Show 11:00 01-07-2021 11:00

"The best of bloomberg business week every business day market sell up at spreading around the globe. Bloomberg businessweek podcast with carol. Massar talk about the volatility trade. That tripped out many as breaking global business finance intech news along with smart analysis. We know that that is going to be sure and steady the bloomberg business week. Podcast about the mark to gotta talk about. The fed. news loosened today on bloombergradio dot com the bloomberg business app or subscribe on apple podcasts from the financial capital of the world. Twenty four hours a day bloomberg dot com on the bloomberg business app and bloomberg quick tape. This is bloomberg radio. This is bloomberg markets with glenn and polls weeding. We'll technology lead us out of this crisis. We don't know how many companies can accept people by on their roster. Bed seems to really flexed. Its muscles role in virus risk breaking market news and insight from bloomberg experts to ring out that by the dip mentality. That takes time overlooking a more damaging. Great kimberly does the yield curve matter. We're booking late twenty twenty one early twenty twenty two were really feel quote unquote normal bloomberg markets with vonnie quinn and polls on bloomberg radio. Coming up we're going to chat with cam in crisis bloomberg macro strategist get his thoughts on the markets given all the news of the past twenty four hours plus dennis woodside president of impossible foods. The company is cutting prices fifteen percent to compete with before. Get the latest on that strategy. First let's go to greg jarrett bloomberg news four a bloomberg business flash back socks.

bloomberg Massar Great kimberly carol fed vonnie quinn bloomberg radio glenn apple dennis woodside greg jarrett
Update: Wie der Nahostkonflikt mitten in Israel eskaliert

Was jetzt?

09:42 min | Last month

Update: Wie der Nahostkonflikt mitten in Israel eskaliert

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Mto foon hello. Power highs is on polish. Immaculate facets tag on houghton matthias vosper dorton and. he's annoying night nece- yet to minus to conflict Award on on kinda the meal Decent moment Spy's in the southeast asia debt side of visted infrastructure. Recruitment who dea at hamas these Towns headings wounded severe A whole Lifestyle was mckeon the Always garnished is even Hamas had the escalates. You're not in conflict news from unfunny debacle. Vodka trim doesn't zofy kitten of inside Vitals and finish man Hamas named decided. I guess leg on Woodside sevilla of fox v Hancock in inland come and Does feel the dimension Outside of beautiful at amish too. I'm unstoppable Divide soviet mops kind of ice Loose it on this being hatched Klom hidings Land because he lived in had lagunas. What from google league. Because i do buy decisions on avant four but as it's not released Does he v conflict in inland in mainland israel. 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Hamas gaza xuetong tel Hatton yudin Mto foon houghton matthias vosper dorto nece Woodside sevilla coskun Sagnol Donald shaw Hughley Paul dunker qaida schefter bochum collins c amazon colosio mckeon
232 | Follow the Leader

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

10:01 min | 9 months ago

232 | Follow the Leader

"Welcomed Aaron monkeys cabinet of. Production of Heart Radio and Brim and mild. Our world is full of the unexplainable. And if history is an open book, all of these amazing tales right there on display just waiting for us to explore. What's The cabinet of curiosities. Being the first person to accomplish something can be both a blessing and a curse. The lack of precedence can be frene. There's nothing to live up to know legacy to overcome. However, being the first comes with its own set of problems. For one, there's nobody to tell you what to expect. One man didn't need anyone to tell the odds though in fact, he was the person reassuring people right before they did something risky. This man you see was a surgeon. His name was Evan O'Neill Kane and he was born in eighteen, sixty one to Elizabeth and Thomas Kane Thomas was a civil war hero and the founder of the town where they lived Kane. Pennsylvania Elizabeth was a prominent doctor in the town after Thomas's death in eighteen, eighty, three Elizabeth Evan and Evans. Brother William founded the Woodside Cottage Hospital right there in Kane. One year later, Evan graduated with his medical degree in Philadelphia before returning home to practice at the Families Hospital the facility was unique in that the doctors who were not part of the Kane family often found themselves at odds with Evan, and the rest of the clan. For one when Evan became chief surgeon, he insisted his diagnosis be the final word when it came to a patient's treatment. Even if he wasn't their primary doctor complaints by the other medical staff resulted in Evan and his assistant being forced to give up a little more control of their hospital. But Evan didn't let it stop him. His job has always been to put the patient's needs i. Know he did this in a variety of ways. One of which was as a railway surgeon if a rail worker was injured out on the tracks, Evan would travel from the hospital to the scene of the accident and stitch the patient up in the field. These incidents inspired him to come up with new ways of performing cleaner more efficient surgeries when not in. The sterilized environment of the operating room. For example, he drafted a paper describing a method of infusing the body with intravenous fluids. While away from the hospital, it prevented hemorrhage induced vein collapse. Thanks to the ten needles supplying the fluids. Instead, the design was modified by Manning Edwin. Hassbroek. But the technique described by Kane in his original paper is still in use today. Looking back though some of Kane's I weren't so great asbestos bandages may have been a breakthrough when he invented them one hundred years ago. But today they would pose a serious health risk. Still he did come up with a way for surgeons to not only stitch-up head wounds in the field but also see effects of the damage more easily by using mica to make tiny windows the brain. But perhaps his greatest achievement was his contribution to surgery itself in nineteen twenty, one ether was often used as general aesthetic for all kinds of surgeries. No matter how big or small it was dangerous and in many cases holy necessary Cain was sixty at this point and had already performed roughly four thousand appendectomies. It always used a general anesthetic like ether but thought a local anesthetic might provide better results as long as the patient could handle it. To prove this, he scrubbed his hands and perhaps for a test appendectomy, he used a new kind of local anesthetic called Novacaine to numb the area instead of a general anaesthetic which put the patient to sleep. Novacaine. Had recently pushed out cocaine the local anesthetic of choice since it was far less dangerous and less addictive. Evan prompt patient up on a few pillows injected them with Novacaine and got to work the surgery took longer than usual. But Evan was an expert. He cut through the necessary tissue to remove the patient's appendix and seal the blood vessels before stitching them up and sending them home the next day the media was in awe of Evans Skill newspapers printed article after article about the Miracle Surgery, which didn't just use a new kind of anaesthetic fairly new method of dissection. Mirrors Nevin had needed mirrors to see what he was doing. His patient hadn't been like the other four thousand operated on in the past. This was different because this time Evan was the patients in fact, over the course of his career Evan O'Neill Kane operated on himself three times. He performed a follow up surgery on himself a little over ten years later when he was seventy years old, the plan was to remove a hernia. He'd gotten in a horse. Riding accident. It was back in the operating room just thirty six hours later though stitched up and ready to get back to work. And I know some might call that being a show off. While, that might be true. I'd prefer to think of it as more than a little curious. A person driven by their beliefs can do incredible things. They can do immense good for the world like helping those less fortunate than themselves. They can also inflict pain on those who don't share their beliefs. then. In rare cases, they can change what others believe as well for better or for worse Martin Luther for example, kicked off the Protestant reformation. When he nailed his ninety five theses to the door of the WITTENBERG castle church in fifteen seventeen he was declared a heretic by the Catholic Church and forced to go into hiding still his beliefs made people question their own and he changed Christianity. Forever. Stephen Nicholas had also changed things in the year twelve, twelve steven of. Town in northern France claim to have heard the voice of. God, this voice according to Stephen had told him to gather as many people as he could find and marched them into. Them, where they would push out the Muslims living there and reclaim the area for. Christianity. Stephen traveled all over France preaching to crowds about how God had sent him on this mission. This crusade though some weren't swayed by his sermons, Stephen was able to garner support from over thirty thousand believers who followed him across Europe. Unlike, the first crusades that were launched in ten ninety, five Stevens Endeavour lacked two big advantages first, he didn't have the backing of the Pope and secondly he and his followers were without weapons instead of swords, shields and spears his followers, carried crosses, and flags. That didn't bother Stephen though who was on a mission of peace not violence when it came to those living in the Holy Land even though invading another country that way was automatically an act of hostility. Meanwhile in Germany, another crusader was building his own army. His name was Nicholas and he hadn't been spoken to, by God instead it had been an angel that came to him with a similar directive. Like Hannibal in the year two, eighteen, BC Nicholas led his thousands of followers over the elps in order to reach Jerusalem and while Stephen and Nicholas were marching their orders from heaven. The Catholic Church was getting nervous. They hadn't sanctioned either of these movements. So they viewed them more as potential enemies. Any immortal man with the power to convince that many people to follow them halfway across the world was. Fear. The thing was Stephen Nicholas were not men. They were boys twelve year old boys and their followers were children to tens of thousands of children who had been coaxed away from their families to March with the purpose of placing indigenous people in the name of their own religion. As Stephen and his band Crusaders reached Marseille they were tired and hungry and wild with Zealotry Nicholas Group didn't fare any better once they finally crossed the Alps into Italy. In fact, it's believed that both armies disbanded at this point many gave up and returned home to their families while others stayed along the Italian coast and found jobs, their plan had been to work until a ship came in that would carry them all to Jerusalem. Sadly quite a few children met unfortunate fates they died at sea some became beggars on the streets or were sold into slavery a very small collective did make it to Rome though where they hope to get a blessing for their mission by the pope himself, instead he gave them a pat on the back and sent them home. There is no way twelve year olds were going to carry out a crusade by themselves. So how did two young boys managed to convince thousands of other children to follow them all this way? We'll stephen happened to tap into a collective of children who believe that they had been put on this earth to perform miracles. Nicholas on the other hand used all sorts of other methods to lure children to his 'cause like impassioned sevens the promise of miracles once they reached Jerusalem and Songs Nicholas gained a bit of a reputation for his use of music to draw children to his cause, and because of that, the legend has it that he was the inspiration behind a chilling character created around the year thirteen hundred. That's hail also involved in musician will follow hours to go on a journey although his followers were not kids. But rats. A musician named. The Pied Piper? I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities subscribe for free on Apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. PODCAST DOT, com. The show was created by me Aaron McKie in partnership with how stuff works I make another award winning show called Lor, which is a podcast book series and television. Show and you can learn all about it over at the world of Lor Dot. com. Until next time. Stay curious.

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Closing down coal from the inside

The Signal

17:39 min | 10 months ago

Closing down coal from the inside

"This is an ABC podcast. even. Better. Love. What haven is one of Australia's biggest coal miners and it's been in the science of climate activists fees. The company's annual general meetings are regular target for protests and sit INS and in recent years, activists have used shareholder motions to try to force discussion about climate change. Now, the tactics shifting and activists say they've found a new weapon, they WANNA shutdown, whitehaven coal from within. So how are they going to do that or is it just a start? I'm Christine Gate a Nice David, Smiley and today on the signal. We hear about the latest trend in shareholder activism. What does it mean for a strategy is big coal miners and their impact on. Crisis has been and. Always felt deeply passionate about. Cross. Sweep it under the rug. And Talk. Today I founded the Sydney Group of school, strike the climates. So fit assay compared to last year concerns about climate change of kind of being pushed somewhat down the list in two thousand, twenty of Covid nineteen. But obviously, that doesn't mean the issues going away or that climate activists have been idle. In fact, the from it and look the attention turns back now two ways to stimulate the economy off to the covid shut down. There is this new focus on Australia's mining and energy sector to create jobs and we focus. You can bet that climate activists a gearing up for another big fat to yet for sure and increasingly that fight isn't just being waged at street protests or marches, it's happening in big city boardrooms. And at the annual general meetings or AGM's, which is where board members update the shareholders on the company's performance, right so what we're getting at here is a phenomenon as shareholder activism, and now there's this new iteration of it in the ABC's environment reporter Mike Slezak can explain I guess let's stop by introducing the concept of shareholder activism. It's like an emerging phenomenon. Can you just sketch out for us in general how this works? So. Shareholder activism takes a few forms I guess but at its core, it's when people who own shares in companies publicly listed companies. Use that ownership of the company to try to drive some action from that company. So in the climate space that normally means doing more on climate change so you know either. Lowering their emissions or disclosing more about what they're doing in relation to climate change stuff like that. and. One of the cave forms of action that you can take a shareholder is is to lodge shareholder resolutions at. AGM. So as a shareholder you normally can. Vote Agm's, and if you get enough shareholders together, you can again normally depending on the constitution of the company lodge resolutions that that ask the company to do something. So. Basically, if you've got shares in-company, you've potentially got the power to tell the management how they should be running things right and Mikey. Says, in Australia perhaps unsurprisingly, a particular target of this team has been resources companies particularly oil and call, but activists also been targeting some of our big investors like the major banks as far as I can tell, the movement really kicked off in. Australia in about twenty eleven with one with with one resolution put to Woodside Petroleum which asked them to. Disclose more about what the what the risks of climate change are to the business. And about five point, six percent of. Support of shareholders supporting it. So I'm not a huge amount of success. But since then it is absolutely picked up dramatically. So there were a smattering a few kind of shareholder resolutions on climate change. Lodged voted on between then and twenty you know through two, thousand, fourteen, fifteen sixteen, and then after twenty six picks up dramatically. When these two activist groups market forces is one of them and the other is the Australasian scientific for corporate responsibility I. Say. Start organizing them and you just get lots more of these resolutions being filed and a lot more success cannot confirm. It plans to immediately withdraw all credit exposure to its oil and gas clients and refuse to finance any oil and gas infrastructure. Now, I've been a customer of Suncorp for maybe forty years are being loyal with you all that time however, forty years of loyalty now hangs in the balance I'll put it to the board that this policy is greenwash. Designed with no other intention to result in no material change to I ends Ed's lending activity while boosting the whatever appearance in Zen has been somewhat sustainable. Okay and in line with that trend monkey says lost year was especially notable. In twenty nine, thousand, nine, there are at least fifteen. Climate resolutions blessed on AGM's of companies in Australia. And most of them got double digit support. So ten, fifteen, twenty, percent support a bunch of them got thirty percent support or more, and then in twenty twenty, there's been about five resolutions lodged so far on climate change. and. Four of them have got more than forty percent support and one with Woodside. Again got more than fifty percent support, which is the first time that's been saying here, and if you get fifty percent support what happens what does the company today now this does depend on on the constitution of the company but. Not much. Basically advisory. Saying the asking the company to do something but. This is a message from more than half of the ownership of the company saying we want you to do something. which is very significant. You actually see you say sometimes, Companies Act not always on climate change issues, but on other issues when you get ten fifteen, twenty percent of shareholders saying that they want want them to do something. So whilst it doesn't bind the company to do anything usually it's a very significant and will you you would expect we'll. We'll say an outcome because if they don't act the way, shareholders want their other actions open to shareholders, which we've seen in other circumstances in other contexts. So shareholders can vote against remuneration of directors they can vote to not reinstate board directors. So they can sort of control the company through those other names. Okay now as Mikey says, this kind of activism far has focused on trying to table and pass resolutions calling on company boards to do more about climate change or to transition away from fossil fuels pasta right this year death an attempt to do something more radical. So what having call is an Australian pule play coal mine. They just mind call that's what they do. They will be the processing of coal and other sort of associated activities. And eighty percent of the call they produces them. We'll call. So call that's basically used to generate electricity as opposed to the kind of call the mind to to help make steel. And so. The other resolutions put to Whitehaven and other pressure put on them to try to. Encourage Them I. Guess I'll ask them to come up with a plan for transitioning a wife from this being their only source of revenue. And those haven't got anywhere and so. This group market forces, which is a kind of group of activists. That are associated with friends of the Earth Conservation Group. They've organized resolution that's co-signed by Molin. One hundred shareholders of Whitehaven asking them to prepare a plan for how they can wind up their coal operations. In, line with the Paris Agreement. So they arguing that in order to stop warming at one point five degrees, Celsius? That we need to. Stop. The use of Cova Generating Electricity entirely globally by twenty forty whereas Whitehaven's plans to continue producing obviously into the FA sable future. I mean literally like Turkeys voting for Christmas right I mean, what are they guesting that? What are they suggesting that what would do if it if it ceased to do the thing that it does? Exactly it sounds kind of not doesn't it? Right? It's you've got these people that are earning a company saying please wind up my company. Now, two things important to say that one is the resolution isn't literally saying shut down the company, the cle-, kind of implication of it. But it saying, please disclose a plan for how you will wind up your coal operations. Right. In this resolution, the activists kind of no, they going to lose but their executive director Julian. Vincent says, that's not the point. At the end of the day whether it's a high or low. What matters most is the behavior from the company so These resolutions aren't really designed in order to achieve a particular of the designed to get a behavior change from a company, and we've seen previously resolutions that resulted in ten fifteen percent of the vote have resulted in the company actually going about the chimes skull for in the first place. So where we also want to say a degree of support. But most importantly we WANNA see. We're here to say that plan the plan. Is the plan that we want to say is the end result of this work. I also asked. Montaigne Waldo what he thought about the resolution now Montan Waldo was a was a lawyer partner by Mackenzie select twenty years is now separated from them and formed this climate change advisory group called pollination, and he says, this really is not a stunt that it's really serious. This is a serious shareholder resolution about the core value of the company and its long-term viability in a marketplace where investors a moving away from fossil fuels and coal. So in no way that a stunt with it will get universal shareholder approval is in some ways need not the issue because it is drawing attention to the issue which many of the investors themselves are entirely. On. What have been called saying in response to this. So they they say a bunch of stuff they're not coming commenting directly on the resolution itself, which is not unexpected because they'll be engaging directly with shareholders on this over the coming little while before the AGM. where it might get voted on. But. What they do say is that they they think coal. And they talk about the high quality coal that whitehaven produces in Austria they say that they call Compla- a raw globally in reducing. Greenhouse. Gas Emissions. So they argue that the if if people replace around around Asia. For instance, if those countries replace some of the call, they currently burning with call that whitehaven produces that will lower emissions because it's a it's a hot quality call. So it has more energy per per unit of call. They also, they also point out that. They've. been a bit of a later in some respects by. Doing this scenario analysis where they look at what the future might hold for call on greenhouse gas emission scenarios and tested their business model against is, which is something that. That climate activists have been asking for companies to do for a long time. The consideration here for companies and for shareholders is is sort of like Dole mixed in with this question about what the world's going to look like in the future, what what what kinds of assets are going to be a safe bet for the long term you've spoken to. One of the biggest superannuation funds in a strategy ride, which has had a look at assets like this has made some quite drastic decisions. What can you tell us about? The way that institutional investors are thinking about stocks slack like coal companies. Yes. So look there's a couple of things to say about that one is that we've seen we've seen. Big investors all around the world. Take. Quite a hardline stance on thermal call now. So blackrock the world's biggest fund manager. has pulled out. Of A lot of them will call already and has announced that they're doing that as have a lot of as well as have a number of Stralia in super funds so I spoke to. Lisa McDonald WHO's the head of Responsible Investment at first state? Super. First sight is one of these companies that have have divested from them. We'll call. So they've said that they're not going to invest in any. They don't GonNa stay invested in any company that has more than ten percent of its business as the McCall and so she said that. This resolution that they're putting forward is pretty much in line with their thinking. At first State Suppo you know active ownership and using the tools available to us those tools being engagement shareholder proposals voting at AGM's, and really using our ownership rights is really influential however, where we form of you after engagement that there is no ability to influence A. In the outcome of the product or the service, then we will make the decision to divest. We did that with tobacco in two thousand and twelve and move recently done that with them call we believe there is a risk of stranded assets in Tomoko made the decision to divest. Win Dig investors like Super Funds talk about. Call. As a stranded asset, what they mean is it's just not as valuable now as it once was, and that's why you have these funds selling out of it and decisions like that potentially affect everyone or at least anybody who's ever had a job and has a super account. So what might that mean coal companies like Whitehaven in the future you said that this is a trend that you've noticed inustry. going. Back kind of several years now, and it's also something that's happening all around the world in terms of institutional investors buying up. Companies which they may consider have in court Tyson stranded assets. What do you think happens next so look I think that this particular resolution is really unlikely to get widespread support it kind of sounds insane right and that's because. Why would you be vested in Whitehaven call if you think the business is such a bad idea that it needs to wind up right if that if that was your view, you would probably have divested by now and we've seen a lot of groups divest that said I suspect suspect there will be some people supporting it and what the activists say and what in fact our annual analysts say as well is that it's not just how many people support these motions. These resolutions that GM's that matters because once they get on the agenda, it becomes a topic of conversation between the investors, people that owning the company and the board, and that can kind of build a life of its own and that's what really matters. Because in the end as we said before in the end, these resolutions don't bind the company to do anything. Anyway what really matters is what they're talking about. How serious the taking issues. But in general I think that also. It's just looking at the trajectory of this type of resolution industry. It would be really surprising if we didn't say resolution the lack this bachelor this one getting really significant numbers really significant support at GM's. That's Today Stephen and I, will be right back here in your feed. The same tomorrow we'll catch you then by by. You've been listening to an ABC podcast discover more great ABC podcasts, Live Radio, and exclusives on the ABC Listen Up.

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Filling In the Ruts with Daren Young

OC Talk Radio

34:53 min | 4 months ago

Filling In the Ruts with Daren Young

"If your life is going smoothly this week. I'll be surprised. Had a smooth beginning to your year. How about the nature of life today. I'm just guessing here. But i suspect by haven't gotten a yes from you yet. Smooth is an expected ideal much more than a reality experience with any frequency many years ago. When i was a young minister i ran into a middle aged pastor at a meeting of pastors. We called it a presbytery. He stood out in the crowd to me. He seemed cool is dress was elegantly casual his hair combed handsomely without perfection or gel. His smile was quick and good. Humor seemed to follow conversations. Ready with my newfound theological precision. I approached the man along with a few like minded friends to check them out further. It really was not too unlike dogs and a dog park sniffing out another breed. He greeted us with that twinkle in his eye of one who knew what was coming and he was up for the task. It didn't take long for the kidding. To begin as he played with our minds allowing me to call attention to the small smooth stone he wore on a chain around his neck knowing. I was giving him the very obvious opening that such an adornment the fired. I don't remember the story. But i do remember the conversation which followed it. It was about how sin played into preaching. Did he tell people. They were centers in need of a savior or did he soft pedal that part of the gospel message. Let me tell you about the people who come to. My church said all week long. They're told they are not good enough. They don't sell enough. They don't work fast enough. They aren't charming enough. Where energetic enough enough and they don't produce enough for the bottom line now he continued. How am i supposed to tell them. They aren't good enough righteous enough holy enough spiritual enough or godly enough and expect them to believe we offer anything different from the world. He made his point today. We have someone who knows a few things about rough roads ruts and pit holes. He pays them for a living along with his over. Two hundred and seventy employees meet their young for our show on filling in ruts. Welcome there and the church and thank you glad to be here there. And i described as a guy who fills in the ruts. Would you like to give me a more sophisticated description of your company. Drako what you guys do. We are a pavement maintenance company and a construction company. We have A concrete division An asphalt division. We also have a fence in iron division and We cover Work in the bay area as well as central valley And we've grown it to be one of the one of the better companies in the bay area and it's been fun now i know. You don't like to brag. Darren bureau humble man but twenty twenty s going to be remembered for a lot of things but for you. There's some good things that happened your company last year. Tell me about that yeah i. It's hard to understand how this has happened. But in this pandemic year we've had the best year that we've ever had and our sales. We just got our numbers Finished and it's almost eighty one million dollars of a business which is ten million dollars more than we did last year which was our best year ever and so it's hard to explain But i know that a lot of it has to do with the customers that are here in the bay area You know the the tesla's the apples You know amazon. These companies are are still going gangbusters. And we're able to meet tough schedules with the manpower that we have and That's really the main secret is being able to meet their schedule and we. We've been able to do that. And that's why we're we had such a good year last year and we're looking forward to another good year this year. Now tesla we're in california used to hearing about the fact that they've made decisions to move to texas or that but you in the meantime were paving their park what what was it like paving the parking lot for tesla out tesla is complete chaos. So they have this huge facility in fremont which is like a mile or two miles from my office and it is literally chaos in all ways they want. They will call you on monday. And say i need the bid by wednesday and the job starts on friday in. It's a big job and Not a lot of people are able to meet those schedules and And most of the time we are which is like i said. That's what's really been. The secret to this. Year is being able to meet super aggressive schedules. Amazon's another one. They're building warehouses. were they were. They have their little vans coming through twenty four hours a day and three chefs and they want that they that facility built within two months and it's a five month job and So that's that's really been Are fortunate right so people obviously gonna go. What in the world the do unchurched shirts and why are they talking about. 'having all things i mean. That's just a dirty job. Eighty million dollars or not. I mean you're really in the year in the ruts and mass and you didn't start out as the big executive and i've been remind was reminded earlier when we talked. You know. it seem almost every one of our guests who's a man will somehow bring up his bother and so As we as. I talked to you you know well. Yeah who's your he hero. You know barron it has to do with your dad but You know tell me a little bit about what happened to you. It's sixteen because it doesn't start out with dad at a real high place in his life. does now. well you know. I had a great childhood group but grew up in a neighborhood in suburb and You know it was. It was very good and then When i was sixteen just about to graduate high school My dad went bankrupt. And so we lost everything You know the house the the cars. My mom went from driving a continental mark. Four to a corvair station wagon that leaked about two gallons of oil a day and You know we were. She went to live with the her add And i went to live with my dad in the apartment in fremont and it was just a game changer. Just a complete game changer. Wow i mean talking about hitting a rut in life whenever you have bankruptcy going through it. But i'm picturing at sixteen. That's really at an age where you still not that much aware of you know parents bringing home income and and what it means and then all of a sudden you had to write you like you got to work. Pretty quickly didn't you. Yeah yeah. I had to my brother on the other hand. was fortunate that he Got to go to cal. Berkeley on academic scholarships. He was valedictorian. Super smart guy. He got all the brains. And i got all the looks what happened in our family. But that's been said before. I suspect yeah but So yeah so. He went on to college which was good for him. And i was kind of stuck with my dad and fremont and of course. My dad wasn't really around much. So i was kind of on my own. I wasn't kind of on my own. I was on my own But yeah learn how to work and had the drive the ambition and you know i i did okay in a win. The in the board game life If you've ever played that there's an alternative to go to school and that really delays being able to make money in that game but anyone who's played it much realizes probably the option you oughta go because there's rewards for the rest of the time and so your brother got to go that route. You didn't in somehow. What i've experienced is i've just gotten somehow in my life to know the guys who didn't end up being able to go the school route and be ridiculously successful but somehow they keep in reminded that they did the erin secure that they didn't go to school. I don't get that from you. You're too busy to be insecure about that orange. i'm i don't. I didn't. I never liked school anyway so i think it was kind of a blessing that i didn't have to go to school. I kinda learn you know. Learn it the hard way you had a christian background at least you went to. You went to catholic church. You learn catechism and that kind of thing but spirituality wasn't a real important thing in your family through any of this was it no no my dad. didn't believe For most of his life my mom was was a you know devout christian but She didn't appeal to anybody because of her cat. Wish you went about it. was you know. Beat you over the head with it all right so so put yourself to hear your dad's buying grub you end up taking over the business. Learn he kinda turn a tight you the trade though right you were out doing driveways around the area right. Yeah yeah so what happened. Was i went to work for spice factory. And i and i didn't enjoy what i was doing because they had me on swing shift and I was complaining at a family dinner. I'm sure and he said darren. You should come for me. Because now by this time he had gone back into business. That's what guys like him. do they get it. They go out of business and they go back into business and he had a really good account with you hall and he was doing well and so i said okay. Yeah i i'll i'll come to work for you sounded great. He'll teach me. You know construction. And i literally started as a labor learning how to shovel And everything was great for a couple years and then in nineteen eighty. Two when interest rates went to sixteen percent U-haul decided to stop all construction. And so we found ourselves back in redwood city with no work and Before he had gone into business for himself he had worked for a guy in redwood city. That did driveways and redwood city is very close to very affluent neighborhoods like atherton portola valley and woodside. These are huge houses with huge driveways and tennis courts. And that's what we did right. We did driveways and and tennis courts but It was pretty hard you know. We're in a recession and it was pretty hard to sell work. And i didn't know what the heck i was doing and So he hit the skids again. At at some point he came to me and said look. I'm not going to be able to get out of this. The irs has got me tied up. So why don't you go get your license. And i'll come to work for you and teach you the business. You can buy my equipment I'll write a note for. I think it was fifty thousand dollars to buy all of his equipment. Which was you know. It was all junk at that point. Nothing nothing to be proud of But didn't really have a choice right. I mean we're kind of stuck it's like well. You could go back to work at the spice plant but what your dad going to do. And you know my mom and dad they separated. They divorced but they always stayed together somehow so he was taking care of her as well and So i kind of felt boxed in at that point Did what i had to do when and again going to get your contractor license. You know that's going to school. I've never been much of a school guy. But and that was hard for me. But i did it. I i got my license and And he taught me the business he taught you the business and we we. You know we talk a lot about recovery around here. Were there any substance issues. Involved like the often is in these stories. Oh my dad's sure. My dad was. I'd like to say a functioning alcoholic but sometimes he wasn't a function most the time he was But yeah it was. It was a struggle. His his alcoholism Is what caused him all of his problems. Basically that was his downfall was he would spend too much time at the bar with his buddies and not enough time watching business and You know i. I watched it from you know from the sidelines and i just. I couldn't understand it you know. I'm just like oh why are you. Why are you doing this. And i didn't understand you know addiction at that point as well as i do now and So yeah it was. It was one of those things. He was great until until noon. He'd come into the office early and You know he'd we'd work on stuff bids he's teaching me how to cost jobs and how to bid jobs in and around eleven thirty and say well. I'm gonna go get a sandwich. I'll be back in head to harry's hoffbrau in redwood city and that was it he would not come back he would be sitting at that bar from twelve o'clock until seven o'clock that night rolling dice and hanging out with his buddies. All of his contractor buddies were the same you know have the same. Mo and I was kind of on my own to figure it out. You know every afternoon And then i you know. I stock up my questions. And when he came in the morning. I'd get as much as i could out of him and Is there was some tough times. There's there's some disappointment and you call them ruts. Yeah we had some ruts but you know my dad's hero of all my stories and i loved him a lot and he loved me and that was that was what kept things together right for us. We have a lot in common that way people know my story. You know they wanna say you're giving your data break because you you know. My dad was a drunk but he too went to work and he'd go to a different kind of bar than your dead. Did you know they had fancier names. And they'd talk insurance and the other person would get drunk and they'd call the secretaries they all switch the insurance from this category to that category but it was still the same story. It was still drunk every day after lunch in it and it's hard but the new we don't have time to get into the details. The bottom line you were quick study you saw those nice houses and he said i think i want one of those in your business. Started to succeed while he was. He wasn't being very helpful. But you were started multiplying your business. Didn't you yeah. Yeah it's it's it's amazing. You know it was. It was easy to have success and You all you had to do is return phone calls and you know. Do the right thing when you know construction right when things when you make a mistake just fix it right. Oh show up you know how. Many people have had experiences with the contractors. Where they say they're going to be there and then they don't show up so by doing all the right things and again at these very nice houses and of course you know. I'm having to listen to motivational speakers and read all those books to keep myself. You know positive and learn sales and techniques and zig ziglar was one of my you know one of my mentors and He basically said you know you can everything in life you want. If you just help enough other people get what they want. And i looked at those people that own those big houses and i thought well. I'm going to help them get what they want. Which is a nice driveway in the process. I'm looking at these nice houses. Saying well i would like one of those and he said well you know if you write down your goals and you write them down big and you read them every day and you keep focused on. You're going to get whatever you want. And so i was kind of naive and wrote down. I you know the big house on the hill with the big driver. I mean i knew exactly what it was and just kept working hard and Ended up in up there. We'll just jump to twenty five You've already had Some significant success. You're basically at workaholic. Though you're going seven days a week you're you're running a gun and we haven't talked about your bride at all who i really got to know before i got to know you and She put a foot down. One day didn't she. She said era They've got to change. I'm not willing to be the work with. Oh yeah yeah she. At one point she said okay but he you know we have two kids now this point and she's like you can't work seven days a week i need you. I need your home on sundays to spend time with the family. And i said crate because i was tired. You know i'm like okay. I'm kinda glad she put her foot down there and then another time You know she was working fulltime to and raising the two kids and doing the housework and all the chores and i would. I'd work hard. I'd get home late. i'm tired. I'd sit on the couch. Turn on the tv. You know have a beer. And when she came out and said hey buddy yes what you know. I'm doing this. She named off all the things she was doing him. She was right not only that she'd mow the lawn on the weekends. Because i was working right and she said look you just need to pick a chore right. Just pick a chore. I'm like pick one chore. And she's like yeah just picked one shore. And i'm like okay. Well i'll i'll pick cooking. 'cause i think i can do that better than you anyway. And she's like that's fine. I go so. I don't have to do laundry. Nope i don't have to do dishes. Nope you just you. Just make the dinner for the family every night. And that's good. that's good enough and I guess what family dinner was last night and i cook dinner for the whole family grandkids. Everybody because that's that's my job. That's what i do. You know that stories almost identical to mine. I did the same thing. But i was a bit dimmer. It took me four. Yeah took the responsibility for dinner but really it meant well unless i had a good excuse and then it was still stuck on. My wife took me four years to figure out now. Doing dinner really meant dinner. And but now what a joy we can talk about cooking all day in in. You're a good cook too. I mean i had the same thing. I said i'd like to cook. She didn't so. I thought my food was better But what kind of how to turn something into fun That is fun for you now. Yeah it's great way to unwind for me to come home from work and just you know prep and cooking. You know one of my one of my love. Language is is serving others. So it's an opportunity for me to you know. Give her a nice dinner and You know. I wish the kids would have appreciated growing up. But you know i had this thing i used to say you know. I said you know you don't have to like it. You just have to eat it. I've term my son. Is the biggest food snob in the world. everybody he he at the age twelve. I think asked for steamers for his birthday party. I thought oh. I'm in trouble. Something else happened. Though when it came to church for the first time in your life you really decided. Okay you're going to go to church and Man you dove in like everything you dove in headfirst and it was all just perfect wonderful experience on. Life's been good ever since right. Well you know. The diamond import was good. I'll i'll definitely tell you that But yeah there's been some ruts There's been some ruts in my spiritual church. Life and church hurts and Seems appropriate place to talk about it so So i mean i see the story. Is this here. You go you the pastor dream here. He gets his it Driven businessman who's really never been involved in church that to buying it hook line and sinker has a personal relationship with jesus comes in the door and doesn't just say okay. I'm going to help the offering plate a little bit. You know big businessmen that's always nice. You got on the worship team. You know how sang your. They're setting up chairs. This is kind of this startup. church that's experiencing success and an. How did it feel you. She'd never been part of anything like that before. You know it was it was. It was exciting. It felt really good and the thing. That was most fun for me. Was the people that i met. You know a bunch of people that thought like me and Felt like me and we you know when he joined the church. We had this awesome pastor. That was energetic. And he would. He would do his sermon. And i'd be like this guy. This guy left. I mean he would be speaking to me. And i was just eating it up. I was just eating it up. I was love it. Everything applied everything started to make sense in my life. Because you know up until that time I knew i knew. God was there but i didn't know you know who god was and how he worked and and we had us a small group that we put together from that church and It was it was a crazy. God thing because we went through all of us in that group there was twelve of us. All of hit some really strange ruts that Together we kept each other together. I mean some really really crazy stuff happened and we look back at it. The small groups not together anymore. We look back at and go. Wow what a what. A god thing that was for us to all have gone through what we went through all be together. I mean we're still close friends but we we're not small group that we had So that was interesting interesting to be just to see it. All come together in a real. I mean just cutting through a lot of pain and a lot of struggles is not the same name of the church on the front door anymore. They can emerge with other wounds. You saw the pastor. Go through stuff. That was heartbreaking for you. 'cause you knew the inside scoop right and How many how many years. I mean you worked day in and day out and was i'm the best motivations in the world that church and just never really had the leadership to take off. Did you know like. I said the guy that started the church when i joined. He was there and he was he was he was the guy right he he could get right into your soul and and preach to you in a way that you know is is fulfilling right is is life changing but he ended up divorcing his wife and so the leadership decided he had to go. He could no longer be the pastor which at the time i was so new to the church. I didn't understand that. I'm like well that's crazy. Everybody gets divorced. My parents got divorced. I know everybody gets divorced. Why would why couldn't he state. It'd be the pastor right well he couldn't and and the reality is. We never really found a replacement that could grow the church as much as we tried At one point we lost our building because they were going to tear it down and build houses and And our pastor said well that's it we're done and You know we got together. We like the. The leaders of the church and a lot of the guys were in construction. A lot of my brought in And we had the you know we had capabilities that other people didn't have the churches didn't have so we. That's where we met you right. We we did the campaign to raise. The funds raised more money than i ever thought was possible. Bought a building rebuilt it and that was kind of the hot another high another high point. Was that time in my life. We were we were just on fire and but again that pastor wasn't able to take full advantage of it and just wasn't people were just leaving instead of people coming people were leaving and you watch the congregation shrank. And then you get another pastor and he's not able to do it and keeps shrinking and eventually it gets to the point where you get there and you look around and it's so depressing because you just go where where did everybody go right where the hardest thing in the world. Oh to watch the church decline. Oh i mean talk about pain and enhance our diet. Lobbyists dirt's Before i get just the to the end one time you out at the grill in your wife came out in asked you where you two year old. Had you seen your two year old. Tell me about that you. Yeah christmas day. And i wasn't at my grill. I was building my grill. Had gotten awebber one of those gas. Weber's christmas and so me and my dad were out there on the deck in the back yard and we're putting this together so excited because we're going to cook christmas dinner on it and she comes walking out of the back door and says where's hunter and i'm like i don't on building this grill. And she just gives me that kind of disgusted look and goes through the garage. The garage leads to the front yard and front yards where the street is and we live at the end of a private street. But still you know you. Don't want two year olds running around out that are unsupervised. I got up and turned around. And i don't know why i looked at the pool and i couldn't see the pool because there was bush's covering it i could see just part of it and i could see that there were ripples and i stood up so i could see the whole pool and i saw my two year old basically floating face down in the deep end And screamed call nine one one and ran over to the edge of the pool. You know he's wearing one of those ones easels fuzzy onesies that those guys wore back then pulled them out of the pool. I don't even know why don't know. Cpr never learned cpr. But i pulled amount. I set him. You know belly down on the side of the pool. An i turned his head my pushed on his back just kind of gently. And you know. Water came gushing out. Picked him up again. He threw up a bunch of water. He was kind of out of it. and at this point my wife had comes running back in. She's screaming hysterically and my mother's there and my mother. I don't know what she said to my wife but got her to just calm down and picked so she took the baby away from me and you know held to his chest and he slowly came back to And it didn't take but a couple of minutes the fire department is show up and check him out he had hypothermia so they they put them in the in the ambulance and took off my my wife's shirt and put him on her bare skin. So that You know it could warm him. Up and Yeah that was. That was my christmas day. Everything turned out fine. He had a little bit of water on his lungs but nothing that needed any you know he had hypothermia was the worst thing but the i remembered the the fire department would come by every year and my wife would make him cookies right and they would say you know. Nine times out of ten story doesn't end this way. Nine times out of ten it's too late and So you know that kid. That kid He's he's been a few ruts in my life he that's not the only right with that guy right. He's he's a he's it. Just tell me the short dummy this short. Because i mean you love that boy A lot and ended up caused a little more heartbreak. And it's laugh storing and to be able to let you tell because we are time's almost up but tell me about that because that man. That was hard. Yeah so he's he's he's he just turned twenty nine family. Dinner last night was about his twenty ninth birthday and You know he's he's one of those. Adhd kids with you know dick's alexia and he's got some challenges in getting him through school has Has always been a challenge to send them away to certain schools because he just couldn't do what he needed to do and and then he struggles with addiction so we've had several times where That's been a problem Currently a got him talking to a therapist that is helping. Because you know the holidays come around. Birthday comes around. And that's when he tends to you know lose it Something about holidays. Something about birthdays. an addiction. Those seen those seems to put those guys over the edge and But knock on wood today. he's okay you do more than knock on wood. I asked you about business than what it was like. Being a christian in the business world and is said in the business world. If you're grounded in christ people know it. You're not one of those guys out there with bumper stickers on all your trucks saying jesus saves would you mean by that people know it. Well when you're when you have a faith right you you understand that it's bigger than you and it's kind of relief that it's not all on me you know god's in charge of this and so you have a confidence and You have a need to do the right thing in. No it's just amazing. How many contractors Like me are not driven to do the right thing. They're driven to make money and You know zig ziglar was my motivational teacher. And he was very devout christian. And i didn't know at the time but later. On as he got older he started to do more speaking the gospels and all that stuff and just all tied together all make sense and so people just people know that you're going to do the right thing and and if things go wrong you're going to take care of it because things always go wrong and then my guys right my employees. I started at the end of a shovel and orders like to be young. People aren't doing you know jumps in skips to get into construction. I mean these. These millennial kids aren't really looking for a job shoveling asphalt or trailing cement or building fences and so you know it's hard work and i appreciate what these guys do and and they know that i appreciate them and they're also you know there were ninety five percent mexicans here and and they're they're based in crisis well they're family oriented men that that you know have faith most of them and they just appreciate the appreciate working for somebody that that really cares about more than making money right. It's not about making money. It's about making opportunity for the guys at work here. The money will come right. You just have to have the right attitude. And and it shows shows up we'll learn. I wouldn't say anything about this. But i'm gonna say something as we close before it. Do you saw me in the midst of work. After i had left the pastor and then you saw me at my bottom one my life was just caving in and he didn't give up on me and that's kinda just i think a lot of who you are but when i asked you to come to the show you ask me why me in went on to express confusion as to what you would have to offer. I was not aware of your record breaking business in two thousand twenty. I didn't know the story about hunter. Almost dying at the bottom of the pool. I just knew that. Darren is the real mccoy. He lives his faith in a hard times and in the good times his facebook page is filled with active pictures of him on skis watering snow. Visiting beautiful places with grinning wife were at his side maybe a new litter of puppies on a horseback ride there and indeed does a good job at having fun but facebook isn't reality is it. We don't post pictures of quiet moments in depression as we agonize over the employees who could lose their job. If we make a mistake we rarely hear successful. People talk about their doubts and insecurities failings and depression. Life is hard and decisions need to be made often at the most in opportune times. Many people today are experiencing a time. That seems very unsettled. The pandemic has been a punch in the gut political unrest and controversy reach a new division levels sparking conflict and families and personal relationships. Few of us have experienced before what direction where we take. What will the future hold. one of. The most outstanding leaders in the history of the world was in such a time when he stopped and took stock of the people he led he. He summarized all the world views which had competed for their allegiance. Then he revealed his decision and before taking a poll. He famously said ask for me and my house we will serve the lord. But what if this happens or what. What did that happens. Would what about sickness or financial ruin or death or paralysis. Another famous leader said this fram convinced that neither death nor life nor angels nor principalities nor things present nor things to come nor powers nor height nor depth nor any other created thing will be able to separate us from the love of god which is in christ. Jesus our lord. It's worth a thought. Enjoy god today for church. This is john bash.

tesla redwood city Drako fremont atherton portola valley tennis Darren barron bay area woodside Berkeley ziglar darren
CBS2 NEWS PM NEWS UPDATE 03-13-21

CBS2 News New York

01:25 min | 3 months ago

CBS2 NEWS PM NEWS UPDATE 03-13-21

"Hi i'm jessica more and here your news headlines from cbs. New york police block off streets. In yonkers neighborhood is negotiate. A barricade situation officers initially responded to the home on livingston avenue for a welfare check. Shots were fired right now. No injuries reported police in queens are searching for suspects after a woman was shot dead. The thirty-seven-year-old was an innocent bystander. Just steps away from her home in woodside. When she was hit friday night police say the suspect or suspects appeared to be shooting at someone else rallies held in new york city and across the country saturday marking the one year anniversary of the death. Brianna taylor taylor was shot and killed by louisville police during a no knock warrant activists are calling for changes to policing in brianna 's name some americans are starting to see stimulus payments deposited into their bank accounts already president and biden signed the cove. Relief package into law. On thursday individuals will receive up to fourteen hundred dollars. Bright and brisk saturday with a high of forty six degrees and colder overnight. A high of fifty one on sunday but blustery with more wind monday. It's mostly sunny and colder with a high of thirty nine. Don't forget you can get the forecast and local news headlines on our streaming service. Cbs in new york. It's free it's easy and it's always on just go to. Cbs dot com or find it on this tv s news app. I'm justin moore with cbs news.

Brianna taylor taylor yonkers Cbs jessica woodside queens New york brianna louisville new york city biden new york Cbs justin moore cbs news
Streaming In Place: Lucifer S03E11

The Televerse

30:57 min | 1 year ago

Streaming In Place: Lucifer S03E11

"To the televise streaming and hello everybody and welcome back streaming place today. We are not joined by the Toyota but we have lots of old school. Was I talk about today to talk about for season? Three eleven city of Angels. And and we don't get any call around city of angels movie references unless. I MISSED THEM. Which as possible because I have not seen it But nole you do get the words if you want them words. Do I get call dish? Call this what do I get for cold this? I totally forgotten what I call this yesterday. You said I feel like wrestling is something that Lucifer should be dead and did you. Who did say that? That's the thing I did say that but were talking about. Mma though that's why it's an ish. Oh it's completely different. I I feel like accounts for cultish. Elson cancer called Ish. I feel like Toyota was here. She be very much on my side about. This is obviously very ish but that's called is called I also I think as I'm saying it out loud I think we need to add another level. Where if you sort of kind of get it. It's called ish if you get it. And it's a reasonable prediction. That's called it and if you get it and it's unreasonable and it makes no sense at all. Then it's you called. Well get it. I do yes listeners. It's because it's because Scotty and Keenan's last name is called. Well that's that's that's a last name joke it's a well it's it's very indies. Uhm Joke But but I think he's good. I'm here for it so there are lots of. We can start here but I feel like we should start where I where the picture for this episode on the website is GonNa come from. That's with amenities chasing chicken. And that will montage. So there's a lot to enjoy the fact that it this is one of the leftover episodes. They filmed in season two but intended for season. Three that's part of it. I was basking in the light and the costuming and all these things feeling so comfortable and familiar because it was the season two team doing them And you know the hair makeup and everything feeling much more in. I know that I just need to come to terms with it gives. It's not gonNA change the season for but I'm not there yet anyways but there's also just the the whole montage is just delightful is so much fun and I thought thought I was at my like limit with The he's the best Whatever the that song is not clearly. I'm not here for it. So did you guys enjoy that montage as much as I did or was that just kind of giggling myself no. I don't think you're winter yourself at all. I think that you just had so much. Good fiscal deadpan. From DB would site in that sequence especially like facially of trying to figure out how to pretend even though no one is paying any attention to them this jim how to make it look like you're straining to lift something or for heavy And it kind of reminds me of like what they'll do like later slash earlier with else trying to do the devil face error type of thing and how that gets played so I think this is a nice call forward. Call back depending how you want to slice of due to production weirdness of how it's played but it's no it's very very funny and I appreciate it like the idea of the training montages. Not Getting stronger or anything. But it's so that you don't just beat the sky into appall by accident learn restraint and I like that is like the joke on top of everything else and the chasing rooster not being able use your powers and it's just it's it's very good. It's very sweet. And so I very much enjoyed alison. How'd you feel about it? Yeah I feel like the training Monta. The this episode is really about to scenes which I've got some calms with the episode. As a whole mostly think is really fun but I do want to get into the stuff that sort of bugs But really it. If the only justification for this episode is the scene at the end and then the training montage that is them trying to create a training montage Where it's like. Hey look he's training so we have a training montage Then that's reason enough. I thought it was a really delightful Performance for both of but Woodside in particular. He is very funny in this episode and the jokes don't always super serve him but this was a great use of his straight face His sense of timing His muscular torso like it all just sort of work together to be very very funny. Yeah Yeah there's a lot there's a lot to enjoy in that in just like because there. There's all different sorts of montages that we've seen in in dramas than also in comedies parodying. That and I cannot think of another show that has had a do tone it down a little bit Training like entree training sort of which is what this is is. I took my measuring hat to them. Because it's hard to find a new take even completely on the training montage into just like go with the most training montage song that you can in just fully embrace. That Salinas is yet. I really do that yet. There are there is some stuff here that doesn't quite track. And I of course immediately thought of Knoll as you said that Ellison and the incorrect precinct things. We need to get over. So we'RE NOT WE'RE NOT GONNA know my partner like pokes me when they're in the wrong precinct. Faith how do you feel about that? I just went shut up. Shut up you know how I feel. Don't rub salt in this room. that Also as much as I enjoy the return to some of these dynamics it is almost jarring to be tone it right the pace right so that it does feel kind of like whimsical. Oh remember when they hate each other. Oh Yeah I'm glad they don't anymore. So they did tone that down so that it would. We would enjoy spending a full episode with dynamic rather than the energy that you have when we see them in the beginning of season one which that would not be an enjoyable full episode if there were you know at each other that way for the whole thing but yeah there are some things that maybe don't quite go and I also think there do you. What what's that the most you were the well the you know at its best. I was thinking about some other episodes. This is the point where I talk about here. I go again one of my favorite episodes of TV ever which has being episode of leading up tomorrow. Which won't spoil but which includes a very fun montage so like there were good comparison episodes that were coming to mind as I was watching But I was also thinking a lot about stranger in strange lands An episode of lost often considered among its worst. If not. It's very worst. Because it's the origin story of Jack's Tattoo and as I was watching the episode. I couldn't help thinking like man. They had a good idea for this story and then just felt like they needed to give us way too. Many like I didn't need the origin story of Lucifer's license plate. You know what I mean like. I didn't I maybe actually didn't need the origin story of two. Marcus makes a good point Taco Tuesdays first of all why is chloe acting like she invented Taco Tuesdays declawing Taco Tuesdays? So that's super nick. I didn't like I just. I don't actually know that I needed Khloe and Dan in this episode at all. I felt like it was a little distracting and loose forgetting his weird leg. Khloe sense when they were at the wherever they were watching. The flight may didn't really need that Although it was interesting to see sort of a glimpse of maybe y Khloe and Dan's marriage didn't ultimately work in the end Like I think that was valuable but there was a lot of leg. Hey I bet you're wondering where this came from there you go. I didn't need half of it And I think it distracted from the things that worked really well because the episode got interesting for me Every time Lutheran amenity all started talking and not bickering The big obvious point. Obviously being amenity all saying leg. Yeah you know I needed somebody clever and evil and loose reaction to that so Yeah I guess it was fun and fantasy and I was down with about half of it. The part that's ends up for me like that is actually are seen with chloe in Charlotte. Because as much as I enjoyed that scene. I don't buy it for a second. Charlotte is a better lawyers. Matt and Charlotte would not be spouting off like the killers allegedly at that time also. It was terrible. She would be also good terrible wigs. I feel like this is Jamie an outlander situation that we've got with maize. That is bad. It was bad wig very bamboo but so while I enjoyed you know getting to see chloe. Meet Charlotte. We already know when we first introduced her that she's got a history with the department. The people know her This didn't feel like it tracked with WHO Charlotte was before mom. This felt like it was if it was like an origin story for Charlotte. After mom which doesn't make any sense. So that's unfortunate Marcus SAYS CLOTHING. was good though and Kansas. I really did enjoy Mandel. Filing a police report especially in his outfits was a very much. Hello if you're rich I'm single the look you put together for himself so that he could be very human and go by Human Police Report Yeah I respect your laws humans I will seek your human justice yeah. Drying the drawing was funny of House also not a good is not good. Where do I find this Mr Olen turn? It's such ridiculous line but I absolutely buy it like would I totally sold. It would just the right amount of humor and yeah is very good. It was very good in. How do we feel about the porn shoot? Was that a step too far. A R- you guys game for it. I think it works like okay like I like that. The joke is a deal in the scene in no one else which I think is kind of the important thing But yeah otherwise. It's kind of it's fine Like I was also just like to. I didn't know the so many portent Porsche Los Angeles. We'll I valley second. Yes so it was that that was fine Yeah it works okay. I think But also they just wouldn't let anyone wander onto those sets is kind of the other thing they're like they would know that a mini deals not there any of those scenes. Yep No that we wouldn't get to see him talking about his Rod. You Know I. I'll give them that young and holding the squeegee. Yeah and was a window Washer and I really appreciate misty canyons. Hold good set of Improv. Like I'm just going to go with whatever this weird script changes I can. Just go with it and it's just like that is topped here. That is topped your acting. Right there yeah. I think she was great. Actually she you know I I was not at all interested in like Lucifer. Being Lucifer on the SAT. That didn't whatever fine. I'm bored by But what I did appreciate was the fact that mystic canyons was so ready to yes and everything amenity deal said and then really handled the transition to way. He's dead and the scene. That came after really really well I think a maybe even a slightly better performance script deserves That's Taylor Black as the actor. She is great a very accomplished pivot. I thought it was terrific And lose for whatever but amenity. It's it doesn't make any sense but I'm willing to accept it just for the site of T. Woodside standing in those coveralls holding that squeegee just like being it just was very solid. A sight gag the tallest posture so very tall extremely muscley no facial expressions just primo. Yeah a Marcus wasn't Charlotte introduced working with the DEA to bust. Traffickers sounds right but like she already had pres like everybody. The precinct already knew her from previous work. Yes but I don't remember. This is an instance in which I am not encyclopedic enough to know sorry quarantine brain. I've got no idea Okay so what? What else stands about the road? We haven't talked about the fight yet. We should you know get into some of the heavier stuff with maybe a lucifer. But did you have either? Like how does she feel about maze and her first taste of earth? I really liked her weird Like sieff knockoff. Outfit from the DOOR FRANCHISE MINUS THAT REALLY. Just terrible whig. Just the worst week is just like literally use her own hair right now and just you. You're fine just style it a little bit and you're good But yeah that was also just kind of weird and delightful The stabbing instruments No now with that is sort of but not so I think all of that works but yeah. I think it's just a lot of like first time on Earth hijinks except for Lucifer who hadn't been here since the seventies The late seventies no less so generally it's fine But I also just wonder like in my brain. We'RE DISCO IN SEASON TWO. So yeah but yeah. We should talk about the heavier stuff in a minute. Well also if he hasn't been up since the seventies does he have TV in Hell Housi- watching porn to know Misty Canyon. If he hasn't been on earth since the Seventies Jones he doesn't sleep no we know he sleeps. Yeah I got nothin' I guess he has a TV in hell. But then wouldn't he know that he needed an updated suit Again worth it for the sight gag of Tom. Ellis just rocking the hell. Out of that suit Like looking really really good and ridiculous at the same time but not green novelty t shirt not nothing is ever. GonNa top the green novelty t shirt. Maybe by favorite piece of costuming in the entire show but it was a good suit. Yeah says so. Good in ridiculous. It was amazingly both. Yeah Yep exactly about the fight In my ongoing legends of tomorrow Rewatch with The call dishes We were watching crisis on Earth X. There's a line that the Tom Cavanagh version of airborne and says I love that. We have to specify that right says to the Nazi version of Oliver Queen where he says something something something and you should be ten percent less brooding and I thought about that line during that fight which was just a little too much I have issues with my brother and my dad for me. It was his. The cinematography was great. It was shot really beautifully. The blood splatter was upsetting and intense and the performance. Were good but it was just like a little a little much for me. Greatly prefer what comes after. I think that that's far more interesting. That in the The Dylan in the case of the week that we have discussed Just disappearing and then reappearing on the beach. Also good but Yet the fight did not do it for me. Am I alone there no I said I think I agree with you? I think the fights really good Emotionally in part because of the fact that it feels so much like a throwback to season one type stuff that it just it doesn't. It's not interesting anymore to see this Since they're in different places now So I just I wanted to latch onto it more but it just it just reinforced things that we already knew as opposed to eliminating something. We didn't know which is what the substance extensively about And it just never clicked in to a new character perspective for me. It suffers in comparison. I mean it can't help but pale in comparison to the fight at the end of wingman. And she's one and the fighting the beach and this is yes brother fall like I did. And it's very similar here. But is coming from Amana. Deal where he won back and if if they had that moment the kind of undercuts the moment that happens the parallel moment. That in their timeline happened. After you know what I mean so yeah it. I think it's fine you know. There's IT's entertaining is fun in the in the in the moment but it doesn't have the impact that it should be because we've already seen them have this fight even though it's in their future and when they did have this fight felt more much much more potent because it was coming out of choices that both of them had made rather than mostly just one of them So yeah it was fine but I think could have been better if they hadn't gone as as overwrought emotionally at that point We have Scotty says I cannot focus on a manual story because I don't care who daddy thanks to. Strongest is his strongest best boy. That in and of itself isn't anything. Physical Strength is ultimately meaningless. It doesn't tell me anything about either of these characters so amenities whole sorry scrolled school. Back Down Okay. So many deals whole thing this season in the thing when any of So manuals whole thing this season and a wet Lucille's with the loss of strength or power by question becomes. So why do I care? What does it mean? It's so less interesting than characters desire in than what any of those desires in any way Yeah I wholeheartedly agree That they're so hung up on their daddy issues. Which makes sense. But we've been at that point for three seasons they keep circling back to it and I apologize to everyone but when Scotty said about daddy thinks is the strongest best boy and this is something that my partner. I both immediately did during sodas. Why can't they be strong in the real way? I can show you how to restrung ill way. I know that we can be strong in the real way and I want to inspire you say yes she seen it. I would have seen it I just. I had a different musical reaction. Which is that. I was thinking about All the rich white folk are going to argue. We'll a kiss from daddy right. Like succession does a better job of this particular idea. I guess unsurprisingly. But yeah don't need to know who's going to get the kiss from Daddy How'd you guys feel about then? Are where we end. Relief Things Yeah I really like that. I'm pretty ambivalent about this episode overall but I think that That last scene is really just really well. Done in general It's good that it's a dialogue free affair It's also interesting to learn exactly the context for how Lucifer got away with staying on earth for as long as he did That was cool but but really I think if the one seen that justifies the existence of this episode. Is that training montage. That's not a training montage then The other is watching Maze Force herself despite her obvious emotional upheaval and physical repulsion to cut off looser swings. Like I think that scene was really really well done And as an example of something that I didn't need to see I'm glad I saw as probably the turn to phrase that I think is worthwhile like I feel like I learned more about both of those characters in that moment and what Lucifer's relationship to his wings means to him. Which makes it relevant this season. Even if most of what happens in this episode is not So yeah I think that that scene is very good. Yeah I did not. I was surprised by mazes emotion in that I would have expected her to be more excited and less emotional in that way more like enthusiastic or like grim in determined. You know kind of thing so I that was really interesting and not what I decided sorry. I'm just nodding. I don't really have anything to add to that. Because it's very good. And I think both Brandon Elyssa. Really really good at it. But that's it like again. It becomes like larger thing about this episode of that Alison. Very accurately pointed twos. I I didn't care about a lot of these questions so we didn't need to know how Lucifer got his license plate. No I yeah I just how did he get his licence plates? Because it fell off the car that but that was a different license plate right right so he. I assuming stole that car still didn't know how to drive that car. And we see the license plate fall off see. I didn't think it was his car. I thought I thought it was in it and then had decided. He liked that car until later he bought one. Oh see I assume that he just kept it. So you definitely just kept up. Because why would they show us then how when he went to register it they would have seen that it was stolen from the Vin number. That is making sure. But but he's the devil yet but yet the fact that that wasn't clear to me like that didn't make any sense. I would never have made that connection. I thought it was just like Oh. We're having fun with. Oh yeah no see. I think I don't know why else would have made a point of being like look. The license plate fell off. Yeah because it's not. His license plays car right. But it's going to be but I'm Markus would like to remind us That a he can turn anything on and be. Don't think about it. Thank you Marcus also Scotty as the senior lose ripples of strawberries pants and Egypt also pretty stupendous. Yes yeah I agreed. Okay well if anybody has any thoughts they wanted to Us To chime in on our particular moments. You enjoyed her questions about drop into the chat. Otherwise I think I we`ve. We've had a lot of criticisms criticisms for this owed but I did really enjoy it. I just had fun through this one. I liked getting a bit of a break from some of the things that are happening in this season. And just sort of going off for an episode before we dive back with Kane and everything that's going to entail Did you guys appreciate us or would you have put this upset somewhere else in the of season very you know. I sort of like it here. I like I like a little deep breath before you get into the craziness. I'm not sure that I would have felt any better about it. Had been anywhere else and I don't obviously didn't hate this episode. I think it's fine But I think actually maybe it's pretty well positioned. What did you know? Yeah I was actually thinking about that a lot today of trying to figure out in my brain I was like where would this have gone and season two and then I was like but where does it belong here because sometimes I'm always like kind of wishy washy with that. The deep breath episode after doing like a big reveal or cliffhanger but that kind of the that kind of an episode can just be very very frustrating. But here I think it works okay and I also just kind of wanted to get back to the main action but it's fine like it doesn't it didn't like upset me at any rate way shape or form But I don't know without having seen the entire season three at this point I'm not sure where else I would put it without like kind of digging in maybe like after the episode that should have been titled. Angel Ing Dumpster Fire. Maybe doing it after that episode Maybe to really reinforce this idea of Lucifer as a minute deals test. I think probably would may be given a larger thematic resonance then it kind of has here bud that aside. I think it's fine cues a enjoyed the disappearing shower of falling bills and reappearing to frantically. Confess and yeah. We haven't talked about the case of the week at all but That see but it was very good on deluded and didn't make a whole lot of sense. If it was fun I also knew who shot deal immediately. Yeah well yeah like. I recognize that actor. Yeah I know I know who that actors he did. It also says if the show going she can escape blithely over committing to any kind of theological. Specificity it's hard to get specific about. What a kiss from daddy actually means in. Yeah that's Get it the more you want. The engage with their daddy issues as the American character building for the forgiving season. Or just for the show the more you need to nail down what that actually means. And what the what? They're he history is and what their experiences with their father are. And if you're trying to avoid talking about that then it rings falls if you because we don't have anywhere near enough information to appreciate their daddy issues Like he's like oh no desperately someone else. What are stakes of that? Why does that seem? And the I I agree of event. Just general like wanting to be the favorite but very mess up like why is he? I don't want to be my parents favorite child. I think that would be messed up so like why. Is there such a competition amongst siblings? You know like how were they raised such it. Prompts me to think about him wonder about other things at the show? Never GonNA engage with Marcus. I feel like it's just pride. Yeah be but I liked that line from Lucifer that a pride is also your vice to cement. Take some of these things. They have in common that their sin for both of them is pride just manifest in different ways and as my parents his favorite. I don't know like why bother competing either. Like just how can you know Well this will wrap up our conversation about this season three episode eleven city of Angels. Tomorrow we are back to the season Arc with a after twelve all about her details in Alabama elbowed her. It doesn't really tell us anything. Do we want to take any swings? You know we'll show eve right. Okay we're GONNA I feel like I feel like it's to swing after meeting. Cain But I don't know I got nothing. I will say this for my memory. It is GonNa be a bumpy ride so on that. That's my favorite friends. It's very very good on that reference. We will in things for today. So thank you to our Frenchman hanging out in zoom. Scotty Keenan and Marcus always appreciate Chang. If you guys and thank you for listening back tomorrow to wrap up week nine streaming in place out of your Lord okay have a lovely day everybody by A.

Marcus Scotty Keenan Lucifer Charlotte chloe Toyota Misty Canyon partner wrestling Charlotte Khloe Mma Tom Cavanagh Los Angeles Woodside appall Monta jim Salinas Kansas
The Australian Mental Health Prize winners

All In The Mind

28:57 min | 2 years ago

The Australian Mental Health Prize winners

"This is an ABC podcast. Today on all in the mind insights from to humble champions of mental health advocacy treatment and research, the do winners of the twenty thousand eighteen ustralian mental health award. Jan mcmahon. Look on incredibly privileged and proud, but you know, the heroes in in all of this. Leonardo's with meat Lewis that test have the courage to face each day. And those of my friends and colleagues who choose to do the advocacy work, which is just often had work. So this award is also for them and professor given Andrews treatment works, it shouldn't cost anomaly. You can recover and not relapse and be able to say that so part of my life anymore, and I'm busy and thanks guys. But I'm busy goodbye. Hello. And welcome to all in the mind on our in. I'm Lynn, Malcolm. More from Gavin Andrews later. Jan McMahon is the founder and executive officer of the private mental health consumer care network. The peak straighten advocacy organization for the private sector she's tirelessly pursued bit outcomes for people living with mental illness since nineteen ninety seven. Jan has appeared before ten parliamentary inquiries and was formally recognized with the middle of the order of strata in two thousand eight award for her work with mental health consumers, and cares. What inspired Jan McMahon's work in this field was her own lived experience of mental illness. She knew something wasn't quite right for her in her teens and was eventually referred to sokaiya trysts in the years that followed she was treated in and out of sock yet trick hospitals in South Australia. It was a very dot time for her. Yes. Look it was a time when I would essentially get up in the morning art, get dressed just someone came to the door, then are tend to lie on south and Woodside to myself channel, eleven o'clock. You will get up, and you do the vacuuming or the washing that was the way I operated, and I got through each day just doing little things and putting myself on the line so to speak. Yes. It was a very dark time in my life and very difficult. Not only for myself, but my children, and my husband did you receive a diagnosis that was helpful to you. Look. I did. Yes. Then it was several that followed. I guess it's a bit. Like that isn't it was Sakari can't take a blood test. And and know exactly what the problem is. So several appeared of the next few years. So what helped you emerge from that very docks base? You must have baning. Look, I think frankly, it was the support of the professionals without K from Sakari tryst. I certainly it wouldn't be alive today. So it was that support. I was saying the conscious tweet clay, and I pulled me through. In late nineteen Ninety-six when you were in and out of psychiatric hospitals in South Australia. You came across a trial looking at with a home support for psychiatric patients could reduce hospital visits. How did you respond to that? And what did that do for you? Look, I was invited to provide that lived experience perspective. And I've got a lot to thank them for the Ramsey healthcare here in South Australia at that time. It was my experience that when I was an inpatient and the hospital door closed behind me. There was no support. There was nothing other than seeing my subconscious than seeing my GP so same to me to be very good idea. If you could be visited in your hun by psychiatric knows mental health nurse who would be able to support you in your own hun. Now that then meant that it would extend they inpatient admissions to be less and less in the period between to be longer and longer. So that was a doctor, and we still have some private hospitals across the strategy is still offering that that community service or the hospital in Harlem, if you like so how did it feel at that time to be actually us CT for your opinion and your experience to feed into the mental health system? Look, I was very privileged relate. And I'm not sure why I was chosen, but it certainly changed. My life in minutes to have a reason to get up in the morning. To have something to do that. Meaning fall through the day rather than sitting there thinking about myself, and my difficulties it allowed almost a diversion. I guess, but very welcoming diversion to think about other things so the whole point of having something to for people with mental illness or employment. Even something meaningful to is just so important after decade of giving voice to people's lived experience of mental illness, you turn your focus to borderline personality disorder. Why was that look there was one so person who had the courage to raise her voice about the very poor manner in which people with borderline personality disorder were being treated in not under the mental health system. But the hill system abroad. And as an advocate and working in the consumer movement. If you like I felt it was that righteous the way he's treated, and so I felt it was my responsibility to also add my voice, and the more I became a way of some of the issues, and certainly the needs of paper with bay payday it meant that. I just couldn't let go I needed to continue to raise awareness to improve services wherever I called. And I guess that started a ten year journey to the point where here in which just in the process of setting up specialized BPD service, which I'm very proud of. It has been a highly stigmatized condition, and it's police did. And the other thing about this condition is that people are divided about how helpful the actual dog. Gnosis of bay PD is what's your opinion about that? We could change it to anything we liked, but that stigma I think would follow no matter what we called it. So I'd rather put my energies, frankly, into raising awareness accepting people with the disorder that it is a genuine mental illness, and so access to public and private mental health services is a write in strider in this Dina. Some if you'll k contributions in this area is being involved in the development of the NHL NHA see clinical practice guidelines for baby d and the national training strategy. Summarize what the main differences you wanted to make in these areas. All. I went to the Commonwealth flew to Cambre and said, we need to things we need a task force on a clinical practice guidelines to God services, in the way, they plan and deliver services for people at bay day. We didn't get the task. We gotta ministerial expert reference group. Who's report I must say didn't go anywhere in that. There was no action. But the NHL MSA clinical practice guidelines are the concrete the guiding delivery of services across the strata. So that's something that I'm incredibly proud of. And the other that you mentioned is the national training strategy. Again, was my belief that if we can up school clinicians working at the coalface to be able to provide beta treatment for people. With bay payday who do present. Then that's got to be a big step forward in not only accepting BPD is genuine mental illness. But saying these folk are distressed that distressed for a raisin. Let's see what we can do to help them and Hilton get through. And I guess the really important point Lynn is to to remember, the people be payday can recover as against some other mental illnesses that you just can't you can maintain and manage BPD, you can recover, and that's a good news story. I guess so why is it so important that people with lived experience of mental illness are involved in shaping policy and programs in the mental health system in my mind patient centered care is looking at what are the issues and the of paper with mental illness and designing service to meet those. Issues and aids rather than perhaps clinicians policy PayPal bureaucrats finances designing a service, and then expecting consumers to fit that so advocacy in my mind is exactly that is talking at the very beginning to tick Ulli, the issues nays and make sure that any services predominantly in primarily looked to address those and that to me is what the essence of lift experience advocacy is all about so do you think that we get better at listening to the voices of those in the community who have lived experience. I'm not sure that we doing as well as we could. I would like to think that one day. It would just be an automatic thing. We starting to plan service. Let's get the folks in who would be affected by this service. And let's in design the service men lot of money has gone into mental health in this country. A lot more is needed mind you, but I do wonder sometimes with that money could be better targeted by st- on the experience of PayPal with the particular mental illness, and when that happens, I think we've fundamentally achieved what we needed to. When it comes to your, advocacy and campaigning, would what are you? Most proud of. I think the establishment of my private mental health consumer care network. I think we are now the recognized Paik a stroll in advocacy organization for the private sector and just being accepted. I guess as an equal partner around tai-bo that Mike spiritus are as important and others. But my experiences are as important to anybody else. And I'm a cool to into of experience and expertise anybody else sitting around table in terms of policy development, and so forth. So I'm incredibly proud of that too. And I get the feeling you're not finished. You hit. Whatever asking me in win. A my retiring, I say I'll go too much today. This do too much to do. And what is the most important focus for you in the immediate future. Gating the bathing of that lived experience voice through everything here in South Australia. We don't do it terribly well here and to be able to actually make a difference. Here would be amazing politician once said to me, John if you can get clinicians saying the same things that you are and family members saying it makes a very powerful agreement for change and the colleges the Koch both in the national office end here in South Australia have been remarkable in support. So I think that networking that partnership of clinical component to that of a lived experiences. Something that we need to continue to do. What does it mean to you? Linley word. I'm just so so incredibly honored and so privileged and proud, but you know, the heroes in in all of this Lena, those with mental illness that have the courage to face each day, and those of my friends and colleagues who choose to do the advocacy work, which is just often had work. So this award is also for them. Congratulations. Jan mcmahon. Do win of the twenty eighteen ustralian mental health award. You'll with all in the mind on our in. I'm malcolm. Psychiatrist professor Gavin Andrews Shays, these years ustralian mental health award. He explained to me how we came to work in psychiatry always bored with its and I spent time in the drama soak producing plays and chick often absurd so on and when I got to be an intern a junior doctor ended up looking after the ward where people who attempted suicide word. I feel like a pig in mud. I've read it all and I knew the people got trapped by their own personality by the people I lived with and terrible things happened. I found it interesting and the stories professionalizing, and so that was a lie down. And then I thought from an article in the journal that the bar chemistry. Schizophrenia would be revealed if not this year the following year. We're talking about nine fifty nine. So I thought right. Get into the specialty you like it. You think it's going somewhere? Kevin Andrews work in the mental health space over a period of sixty years has had a fundamental impact on the way mental disorders are diagnosed and treated in a strata and around the world. He's responsible for preparing the first ever sit of clinical practice guidelines in psychiatry. He's also developed the first national survey of mental disorders this helped to quantify the Brits and scope of mental illness in a stray area. What we got out of that is that we asked have you ever had x do know that all mental disorders dimensional. In other words, depression, si- simplify you made criteria for major depression. If you have a period two weeks, so said and blue a loss of interest and pleasure in things difficulty, concentrating feeling that you've wronged other people and feeling that you'd be better off dead. So you've got three of those five than you meet criteria. No, lots of have a month or two when we sort of a low below par, and we don't have interest in things that used to give us pleasure. And that doesn't mean we have depressive disorders part of being human you have a disorder when you made criteria. The survey is all about asking people arrange of questions and then calculating do they make criteria for one disorder or another and in in the two thousand seven survey. Forty five percent sid they'd had symptoms that matched criteria at some point in their live. An only ten percent had had symptoms in the past months that matched criteria. So four out of five while seventy percent if you wanted to be picky for out of five had recovered and mostly they'd recovered without treatment. So the common mental disorders, anxiety, depression substance. Spews a barn lodge transient for most people. And so what do you mean by recover all cure from mental illness? What are we talking about the we'll take Nick -ly? You mean that the person no longer heads symptoms that match the criteria that they weren't distressed by whatever symptoms. They still had and they weren't disabled. They could work in love, and they were will and that they don't have any risk factors that are going to eat erode them. But we did some follow ups on people with treated to use after retreated them. And one of the replies. We got seemed to be perfect. It said what are you guys want slow part of my life anymore, and I'm busy, I'm rightful and all that rubbish but come on. And I thought no powder my off anymore. That's cute. In two thousand six Gavin Andrews was awarded an order of strata facilities to mental healthcare in a stray area, and for international contributions to suck can't treat. Your search? One of his initiatives was the introduction of cognitive behavioral therapy or seibt in a strata. Well, it was two colleagues of Mon who were really the people who thoughtfully introduced to do our department and browbeat us all until we adopted it, and I think they retard and I was lived holding the baby and snow. This is not what you hold someone else's by. And you get Nana forward. Very humble. It's true cross Mahut and hope to die. So what is it about cognitive behavioral therapy? That is so promising that it works on it's quick. And it's the plot. Commonsense. Examine the thoughts that you have inside your Monde that associate of feeding everyone is looking at me, and we'll see that I'm a dick hid therefore on become socially phobic avoid and therefore I'll be sad and miserable. Because my life's not going anywhere. Teach people to examine these constructs that that what is the evidence that everyone sees you as useless. Well, none actually it's how I feel. Ron well, why don't we practice ways of entering situations and mastering them and coming back and thinking, no, I did that no-one said nasty things. In fact, got under NAS conversation with someone they same pleased with me. So it's a sort of many experiments in reality testing and challenging the negative sorts. Not in a pollyanna why? But in a serious on exploring what's happening to me. And I'm learning from it. And that's why would see BT we've just done a big measure analysis. The average person after treatment is over goes on improving. The follow ups was three to thirty months in everage of twelve months, but lots of studies, and what is is that people are putting into practice. What they've learnt. And cvt supper comes habitual a bit like when you learn to ride a bike when you're ten. You know, your wobbly to start with. But so the two months later you roaring down the hill with your hands off the handlebars guy. Luke, mom. Is very skills-based, and it's very practical. But what we're learning more and more now too is that many mental health problems arise from trauma. So how does it apply to those situations? Let's talk about PTSD post traumatic stress disorder fifty percent of a stray liens report an event in their life where they felt that they were going to be superior Asli harmed in some way, back LA kings cross a large man with boots was putting them in a new thought, I'm gone. One all more PD candidate events part of people's lot for half the population. No four out of five people just gradually put it behind them one out of five. Count put it behind them the memories, keep intruding and not MS or indict on when something reminds them of it, and they feel that almost back there again, and that terribly defeated and traumatized. So what do we do? Well, the person tells you of this in about twenty to thirty minutes in they go can't talk about this anymore. And you've recorded it. Well, there are fun has and I go home, and you encourage them to listen to it and the first couple of times, I listen to it. It's sending in distressing. But by the seventh repeat they're going pretty boring, really. So the comeback. Look just tell me again what happened and now they again run along for twenty or thirty minutes, but they're going deeper narrow member in things that happened at one level. They say if only are done this wouldn't have happened to me, I'm partly to blame the not partly to ply. But you know, we beat ourselves up, and you could have recorded it on their iphone or take it home. And I got back with you just keep doing that. Until I say, I don't think I need to come anymore. I'm sleeping not bad. We're not think about it. I'm sad and horrified, but it doesn't corrode me. Like it's used to. Thank you. You've also been very supportive of with based programs for mental health. Why do you think that they're so important now? Well, LeBron a dozen studies in the literature to show sadly that Goodwin based programs equal ineffectiveness to seeing a good therapist. And that's really very embarrassing. I thought I was a gift to patients. And my computer programs do as well. So it's a lay down zero from then on because that shape, they're reliable. What's in the computer program is what you get? You can do them in the back of Burke because the airwaves work and call. It is guaranteed, and none of those things really describe clinical practice. Sadly, it can't get CBT in western Sydney or western Melbourne. If you do go, you have to pay because the clinical psychologist charging on top of what Medicare pays and in this culturally live in if you've got a job, and you have to take half a day off to go and see that octa you'll be doctors wages, so it's about ninety bucks to go and see someone over and above what Medicare will pay them. So ten sessions is on hundred bucks, and are complete course on the web at the most. Is something like fifty nine ninety five. What are some of the ways in which the mental health system needs to change to see further improvement and further recovery and also our societal ways in which we can change to even prevent these mental health issues. Yours as hard core. Sorry, very two very hard questions both together. I think the mental health proficient gives it self a hard time. I keep saying this not enough money. There's an emergency. And there is in part because of course. The state's run the public hospital system where people who are psychotic very ill hospitalize sometimes against their will. And the state start resorts them properly and people are brought to complain. And doctors, of course, tend to vote with their feet and go into private practice with a paid handsomely by the Commonwealth. And I think we should abolish the state governments my only solution, and then we could be optimistic about it all working. That's nice Kevin. That's very helpful. Listeners will love that. Good. Want to society do already it's changing once upon a time, Tony Johm and others began to survey people and write a case history of depression, put it out to the public. And so what you think this is and I go that's just a lack of spine tell the person of backup not sick. You do the same thing. Now, people say that seems like depression to me and there are treatments you should encourage them to get treatment. Joy thing. We've turned that corner and notable people are saying I had a hard run in with depression sports, people which naturally goodness me if you play rugby, or if you pay us rules, you have to be infants civil and here you're saying on a rough time goes, and that's changed. How people view people who are having our uptown. So I think those things are good. I think we're moving in the right direction. So what's the K message you'd like to get across to those experiencing mental health problems, and they cares treatment works shouldn't cost anomaly, you can recover and not relapse. And be able to say that so part of my life anymore, and I'm busy and thanks guys. But I'm busy goodbye. Congratulations to professor Gavin Andrews and Jan McMahon winners of the Twenty-eight teen ustralian mental health award. You'll find more information about them on the all in the mind website, thanks to producer, alleviate Willis. And sound engineer Andrei shopping off I'm in Malcolm seeing Tom by now.

Jan mcmahon South Australia Gavin Andrews professor depression disorder NHL Commonwealth Kevin Andrews Lynn Woodside Malcolm ABC Andrews Harlem PayPal Leonardo Sakari Sakari
EPISODE 79 - The Original Slaysian (Feat. Slayrizz, VICE)

Asian, Not Asian

1:16:11 hr | 1 year ago

EPISODE 79 - The Original Slaysian (Feat. Slayrizz, VICE)

"Yo what up eighty knows. It's fumi. Obey what's going on. Everybody just wants to make a quick announcement before we start the show regarding our monthly live live show hack city city. If you're not miller is a live comedy show the mike and i host together once a month market and it's just been incredibly packed every time we're getting like one hundred twenty one hundred fifty people every time and even though we just moved venues it's just getting out of control and some of those who come out from different towns different countries they complain because they can't get seats and there are true fans so we hear you and when we started doing is we're going to charge for tickets now and we hope that <hes> that'll be a better way to organize events. If you buy a ticket in advance you are guaranteed seating so there's none of this. You don't have to come early anymore so he was showing up like four hours early which just insane because the wednesday workweek so. I don't know what you're doing with your life but now if you get investigate you'd have to worry about that and as long as you get there by fifteen. We got seats for you so please please please. We hope this doesn't really impacting attendance still going to be an amazing show and also this is a great way to compensate are comedians and a lot of the comedians have actually been guests on the show like jewish can smugly ably bryant park so if you're interested in coming out to the next one which is going to be september eighteenth that a._p._m. Canal street market google. We're on a bright so google haxhi comedy any event bright and i'll be there or if you do that you can go to our instagram page at asia not asian pod in click on the link in the bio. They'll take you to the event event bright page on your mobile phone so we really really hope to see you. There really means a lot to us that have been coming out. It's been a lot of fun <hes> so yeah we hope to see you at the next one on and enjoy the episode by asian of injuries so we so so fucking whoa the guys together through stealing place. Maybe you can look me up. I don't care i don't okay. Hey what's up. Everybody welcome to asian not asian podcast podcast asian guys from asia talk about american issues. No american cares there's about. I'm your host win. Real quick shuttle tour network listening party presents at canal street canal street radio. You can check out those guys instagram at listening party presents and at canal street market also if you're listening on your phones right now please take a screen shot and posted on instagram stories tag us at asia not asian pod and tell me what you're what you have for breakfast just this morning. Ooh tell me what you have breakfast and c._g. Confronted jeff of that and put that on their own animal retweeted and that's how we become friends if you're listening to it on your iphone through the apple podcast app. Please please please please please please leave a review on the i tunes that helps a lot and it helps us get on different curated lists. Yes we've been able to get sick. Yeah and we'd like to do it again and big. Thanks for anal by anal. We mean asian not asian listeners o or do we mean eh. You'll never know never know never know never know page on this week because we're recording a lot episodes asleep man. We're running out of people who give shelter so if you've donated and you're like hey where's my shout out. It's probably coming in the coming weeks so please be patient story of the week you good yes okay so the week is i i so i'm trying to tell a story without giving any clues or names because i don't wanna embarrass this person but i have permission to tell the story. Okay okay. Yes say so what happened is i have. I have friends who are single non-canadians single word okay and this particular friend. I have is dating this new boy <hes> <hes> who is. I don't even know if this is mentioned for sure. I don't know again. I'm just mentioning this detail for. I don't know if it's real related to the problem that they're having but he's vietnamese views. America shouts from westminster. I don't wanna give any details is telling you where he's from and my friend is white other. Dating eating and things are going good. They just introduced sex to the relationships now. They're having fun. People fucking fucking. I thought maybe sex was like a a dog or something like that. Somebody would name a dog. A sex like super walmarts sound good boy sousse anyways no is this a person right and they recently start hooking up and it's going great. Everything's great he's hawkeye. I really smart great job. What could go wrong what could go wrong so dan as then but as the to start to get to know each other something something was reveal about him that has been bothering her and it is the fact that vietnamese boyfriend is a little weird about money and by weird. I mean i guess stingy is the word frugal if you want to be a little nicer now i'm gonna give you some examples of what happened right. So there's a couple of things it's like he'll do so like she said that there were different signs and then there was like the final one that made her like really upset the little examples where he would do something like you know if the red dinner or something he always like wants to go dutch. He's never liked paid for anything even though he asked her out right. They're still like they're not boyfriend girlfriend. They're like still dating stage so she felt like again female power and all that but it's like wouldn't it be nice if somebody paid for you at some point right or also like hey just pick it up and i'll get the next one. I got you do that to each other. You're not necessarily mantech thing right so that was the first thing that kind of bothered me anything right then. They tried to go to a comedy show or something and he said hey you wanna go this comedy though she she said short and he's like okay. I'll get the tickets you get. The drinks said that got to her via text. <hes> that's i mean i was going to do that anyways but you brought it up a little against not saying anything and then the third time it happened she were they got upset. Is he invited her over to his house so that he could cook for her. He was gonna make like sushi or something yeah and he's getting all his he he he's going to the supermarket getting ingredients inspire blah and then she texts her saying like hey on your way to my apartment and could you grab a list of some and she was like this as we were like you asked me to come over to your house like isn't that how it's supposed to work like if you know what i mean like i'm going to cook for you right so she was like this is really weird but like i don't know i'm gonna call him because i've been feeling weird about this money thing <hes> she calls them and she's like hey like i was going on and then he hears that he hears us. I she can hear that. He's at the supermarket so she's like wait. Are you the supermarket and he's like yeah. He's gonna picking up stuff at the dinner and he's like oh. Why can't you just pick up. Those things is that i just that you just texted me yeah yeah yeah. It's like silence and he goes well. I just want to make sure you're contributing one day and then she got upset. She's like dude. Whatever like this like you. Just is totally killed. The romantic vibe still went over but she was like this isn't hot anymore. You know what i mean. This is not the sex is not any and i think i talked about it and she's got upset that like if somebody was really going through a financial thing financial struggles then of course you would not expect this person to like pay for things. I'm like yeah but she's a little upset because he is wealthy is a very good job. His family is pretty wealthy now. Now i think his excuses at one point maybe they didn't have a lot of money but and he spent a lot of money on his self like for example. He was very expensive clothes yeah so it's like you're gonna you're gonna you're gonna spend hundred bucks on your shoes but you can't buy me fucking dinner easy right one of those one of those attractions right so it's interesting. I think i don't know if the fact that is vietnamese itemises really contributing to this. I think a lot of being stingy is not just an agent stereotype stereotype for jewish people for a lot of people immigrant people in general yeah i mean it's it's like whatever but i don't know i don't have a lot of discussion about like. Can you relate to this because i was actually trying to protect the viet she was like is the thing and i was like well. I don't know because mike buys me shit all the time. I think it's because he knows i'm poor. Now that's true what had money. I think i bought people things but now i'm sup- report but you know so. I don't know what do you. What do you think i to be totally fair. I don't think it's a vietnamese thing because i know because do i do think that vietnamese people have a weird thing about money but that ends up manifesting itself in like sort of weird ways so you know my my classic joke is like binny's people are the kinds of dudes or people who were like you know lisa mercedes s class yeah and then like but then live twenty two a two bedroom yeah. That's how they they roll like. We'll we'll we'll we'll save money and be really stingy and certain things and only eat rice ice and cook at home all the time but then we'll also floss in the fuck in <hes> louis vuitton bag yup yup. That's how we are. You know we're we're on the section eight housing and we have lexus so i i it's a weird. I don't know it's weird thing. I don't know if that's manifest. If that's what is happening here i think i i can. I can relate to him because i catch myself doing this. All the time. I kind of keep tabs and do this with gina cheese. We've known each other for a decade okay. We were married and i'll catch myself going how come i didn't have to share bank account. We don't share bank account but with me. I know we're speaking. We're much closer to challenge you to what i don't. She's ready behind so she yes my neck. I think i've had a weird like money money thing and i it. I have to consciously be like hey you know like this is like a team thing and we have to think about that. Did you learn that behavior because you. I know you didn't grow up rich but i also know like you weren't like super super poor. We weren't poor. I wouldn't say we were poor. I would say though that again our our relationship with money like vietnamese people because we came here. We didn't have shit and whatever it's we're. We don't we we don't know what to do with money. Do you know what i'm saying like. We're we're not like a lot of my family. We're not super savvy with money like we do a lot of investing. Here's here's a great example. We had a house in in fremont california which is in the silicon valley area shit. We had that house in my family for maybe like fifteen years and my grandparents live there and we sold it in. Let's see here. What year was that. Maybe two thousand and five or four something like that like after i graduated needed that house which we sold for maybe three hundred thousand dollars worth easily one point two million right right right. We are that bad they will be like oh at this might be a good investment. Let's get the fuck out. We just well. I'm trying to say is that we don't have an understanding of money. We're <hes> that is like informed and by like i dunno i you know a a certain kind of savvy and and like love and stuff like that. We just kind of like keep tabs of money. You what i'm saying well we you know we're going to kind of keep our money in like in the in the mattress type shit yeah so. I think the way this kind of works with him. I don't know if this is again. I don't know if this has been a meeting thing. I think it might just be like a relationship thing you know. He doesn't want to spend this much money on this other person. Maybe he is like using only child. I don't know maybe he's not into her. That's other thing it could be that that. I don't know though i mean i you know to kind of push back on on your friend like you know like what you now you gotta pay your own way. Sometimes terms and it's not going to be cool like people paying for you know. I think it's it's not it's again. It's like this is a society thing but when you bring up money it kills the vibe. That's just what happens right right and so it's like in the context of romance it's annoying. I think that's her complaint. Why are you always bringing to see. I think that's very that's a really interesting thing because people never talk about money and then it ends up just being like whenever people don't talk about something like somebody ends up paying way more. You know all my god. Oh that's happening somewhere yeah. I gotta see what i'm paying thirty bucks fucking birthday party for twenty seconds yeah that's all i hate top us. As soon as you not talk about like someone is taking advantage of that maybe not even consciously but it ended up happening and i think maybe this this dude forever. Ever reason is okay with talking about it and it's killing the vibe or whatever whatever so again don't want to say. It's a vietnamese thing yeah other than we do kind of have like we don't you know have a a relationship with money. Which is like you know like again like very nuanced. You know i like that. We should get a different perspective on this or everybody quiet onset quiet onset. That's why we are getting ready to film the scene for the movie but stuff with mike and action okay. Yes what's my motivation here. Exactly with this scene involving cucumber on anisia put that in the bud as this is called but stuff with mike but do it on the bed here okay bed. Just try it just trial. How do you feel i feel like a natural i. I don't know i don't know i. I just feel awesome. I feel that as an artist being hindered by this bet yeah yeah. Do you have specific mattress. You have in mind that you would like to use for this. Particular blurs seen what the cucumber well. I was really hoping that perhaps we could use a helix sleep mattress on her that what is that helix. Sleep is a mattress got a quiz. It just takes to mason completed matches your body type and sleep preferences and vegetable preferences to the perfect mattress for you still preferences d._d. In what a what a intricate yeah why wouldn't that they have whether you're aside sleeper hot sleeper like a plush or firm bed cucumber or carrot or potato with helix. There's has no more confusion and no more compromising on average mattress. I haven't heard that helixsleep was even awarded the number one best overall mattress pick of twin team by g. q. and wire magazine and also also cooking with veggies magazine. Oh i love that man yeah. They had a great spread with nicole kidman. Yes let's go to helixsleep dot com slash last asian take their two minute sleep quiz and they'll match you to customize mattress. That will give you the best sleep of your life. They have a ten year warranty and you get to try it out for one hundred nights risk free. That's awesome. We definitely put it. Get it to the sets. Yes and we could use it yup and they'll even pick it up for you. If you don't love it but you will. Helix helix is offering up to one hundred twenty five dollars off all matches orders for our angels at helixsleep dot com slash asian. That's helixsleep dot com slash asian for up to one hundred twenty five dollars dollars off now. Let's get to it. We should yes yeah from from a woman actually right. That'd be good just to figure out what's going on romantically right how all kinds of subtle so our guest today. I guess hopefully you're gonna light. Us is a rapper based in new york city from queens. Vice magazine described her as quote on gupta. He's already making noise. Magazine described filipina popstar with magical asked chaps their words not mine awards yup. She's also a cost play queen instagram which i love to get into so let's give it up for the very wonderful the very amazing slavery eh you everybody on the show so many sounds sound effects like a purring sound is just so i am you know sound affects yeah <hes> okay. You wanna hear a cat. One here like my cat sound. Whoa whoa was that ever. Come in handy when you're in bushwick and they have like the cats that are just around you or you use it four cats flirt. You'll use this like the us ever in your music. You know the cats. I've been trying to incorporate that. I don't know how i'm working on it. I'm one but hey guys thanks. Thanks for coming on. I wanna start here. You heard us talking about this money situation stingy boyfriend kinda yeah. I don't know if you're dating relationship but but i'm sure i'm sure you've been around. You know. I'm trying to get engaged. Okay as part of the plan yeah. It's part of the plan twenty twenty s coming up and this finger looks lonely. Oh get engaged in engagement mode engagement. Tell you what are you. What are your thoughts on a guy who might talk about money this way. How does that make you feel it. What's your thoughts on that. Do you think he's being cheap or do you think he is you know like maybe maybe he doesn't. He's not into her or maybe he's. He's being so cheap. I n a relationship. Are we. In a secret like this like you said like people don't talk about money and when they talk about money someone might end up paying for more like bucket. You know if if you broke then that's what it is not broke but that's i don't. I have an issue with that. I don't stingy like what's the deal. I undoubtedly a red flag for me for anything not even one thing because then you make me seem like i'm inconsistent financially but you're not paying for anything i don't know. I don't know it's weird. I mean your rapper. No are you. Are you rolling the dough. You know like we're grow. We're all right. Don't make a lot of money i don't. I wouldn't use the word stingy but i try to be frugal no but also i'm going to be fair yeah. Oh yes let something i i i. I'm not gonna say when it comes to money. If i say it i gotta pay it. What does that mean. Whoa if i say i'm gonna pay half. I'm gonna pay. Have you say it yeah. When you say it i gotta do it. We have to make an agreement and being an artist also like you're working with a lot of entrepreneurs so we all know that money can just disappeared disappear so i like to keep all of my relationships like really good with communication so that makes me feel weird that your friend is like has a guy like that but that's just me so you think maybe like he's got. There's some other thing he's got going on interesting interesting <hes>. There's another emotional level up exactly you're talking about so you're getting. Are you dating anybody right now. Okay she wasn't dating and she's trying to get engaged. Alexis allies try to have him. Come here really hey. He's not here my my. My mom is here though that's good enough for me and my mom and my sister <hes>. How did you guys meet up in high school. It's an an artist to artist thing that you could could never just like money could never buy what <hes> yeah dope relationship. He's been my best friend for oh god. Is it going to be ten in years. Yeah them well. Let's talk about that a little bit about your upbringing because i i read a little bit about you and your queens filipino viagra i like. I bet she's from woodside. Where are you from woodson is he from. What's i'd i am not from. What's the big filipino community. It's a big filipino community there. I wanted to be from what side isn't that you wanted to wanted to be from. What side by the way this is also my first official podcasts at i'm on. I've i've never been on one guy exclusive yup but one of them is like this take. This repeated heated a bunch of times exclusive cleans. Susan exclusive with slavers. Tell us more about queens. Man like is there. A big filipino community raymond said there's that what's it called billy joel or whatever jolly beat out that we just lost. What's the name of that one vietnamese place. Bruce springsteen is sound l. similar jolly holly being jolly. Be growing up now i. I guess there's only one there so yeah. <hes> really really cool thing that i did recently. I started the lodging on youtube right because i mean like the money's there to my first video. <hes> <hes> on my channel is literally a mutt bong and it's hor of me going to the jolly. They just opened up in manhattan. Is it good not what is good the one in woodside. You bet you so you've been you've been though of course they'll tell us what because i don't know if he doesn't know he doesn't know about what it means that filipino community they tell us a motor springsteen billy joel joel. It's okay it's okay. We got approval. Please only lever pockets oh lord. I can't believe that's the first time i heard somebody not pronounced jolly minutes. You literally learned about just this morning getting ready do but they're not always talking about jeff from ohio ohio cool mid west. Go i love. I love the midwest so so you grew up in queens. You got you got a law self-confidence different what happened well. That's a good way to put it. What happens well. I'm gonna answer the jolly thing i they will lead. It all started at the jolly jolly off with the hot dogs and that's really a fact like for sure jollies a statement. That's what it is. What does what does mcdonalds means. America does diabetes well yeah. It's that pop in basically dave walks through so growing up. I didn't grow up in woodside. I always wanted to be in like in an asian community and i unfortunately grew up in one. I was like more isolated. I grew up in a story of queens. Actually i know that a story will come out to shout out to all the greeks talents that basically like raised me <hes> out there yeah <hes> wachovia okay. Oh yes yes yes. I was in a cal was in a catholic school for a very long time and my parents are straight from the philippines. So i'm first generation. I would say well off kansas first. You're second to me well second technically first generation immigrant and then the child if you're born in america is on the second select a one point five. Oh what did you grow up here. Were you born here. I was born and raised in new york baby. That's right seconds so yes. I'm okay i'm second generation and yeah like i was one of the only asian people in my catholic school interesting because you're the my what i'm picturing being catholic school lease from where i grew up in mid west. It's like conservative. Girls are supposed to express themselves uniform you can't you can't be sexual all this stuff right since like no now i see you and now you've got going on right. It's like the back to my question is from it comes from me. Being gene is located for salt will what feels like so long because my parents were super strict. Uh i've always been sassy always get that from your grandma or somebody who's i go from. Being i guess like i don't know i thought it was just me until i started watching like the filipino channel which is like what the hell's the the filipino channel is t._m._z. He s like the filipino channel on american cable television. Now it is but before it wasn't <hes> filipino filipino nicholas was hard to access growing up for me okay because i've never been to the philippines right. <hes> my parents came here. My mom is a nurse yup coarse salt of course. She's a nurse so she herd mentality. A reason me here is kind of like she's very well-spoken. She doesn't have the filipina accent yeah. She's she's out there. We will talk to her. She's very komo. She's live. She's not like me or she's like. He's a philippine nurse. She's like even more. She's more because she's like witty. She got the gift of gab. I never met a filipino auntie like my mom even though she's my mom but anyway yeah so she kind of had the mentality of we're in america. There's nothing for you in the philippines. Really i think she'd never really wanted to expose me to the philippines but my father <hes> was a farmer in the philippines so he was always super proud and still houses accent living strong till this day always taught me everything about being filipino and it always was such a conflict because i was going to a school that was predominantly white and i wasn't open to community. I wasn't allowed to go out like there was a a lot of isolation. When i say isolated i mean i wasn't allowed to go out like straight home and wasn't doing good in school because i felt like i was. It wasn't what i wanted to learn yeah until i went into the arts. Where does where does jolly becoming into shelly beasley. Jolly beat comes in where it's like. Oh this is something that why people heard of that has something to do with my culture that i'm proud of so i always i always felt the home and expressing myself within my filipino because it made me different man i was able to teach a lot of people about my culture or what will be noise. You wanna know what's crazy. I don't know if you've ever heard this and i want to say this on kids. Were so mean why kids are so mean to me. They did not know what filipino was <music>. Okay like they're like philippians. I didn't even know what that was. The bible happened happened. No louis things and these kids are like well and this was back in the day so they were like you know you let lucy liu but you also look like jaylo but you can't be both so you gotta pick one pick one. We've got big jaylo. I can't pick i love both so that was also one thing i think that came to my like upbringing was like what i was lucy liu and jaylo at the same time live to powerful you feel like your connected with like the filipino culture now because there are a lot of filipinos took. A community is what i meant because there are a lot of filipinos in new york now. I feel like rep that in your music friends like oh my god. I'm i have philippino friends. Now guys like you know what what is cool. It's a it's a thing it's dope. Oh this is a very important thing about my upbringing that i think people any listener would probably relate to this especially nowadays. The internet thriving and socially thriving in this day and age like my space was my upbringing. Where do you mean the website the website and like take the subcultures that would form on my space that had nothing to do with anything and you just find all these different cool people on there and i felt so lit knowing that oh you got a my space vibe. Oh my god thank you absolutely nothing because no because like four four okay rumor. I don't know if you had eight years. Zanga okay eight years. I love san also kind of think about that era era of internet like my space and yeah we make fun of it because it was kind of crazy but that was what was cool about it you you go to facebook. You can't change shit on there right. It's so controlled controlled and even the feed even shit that you can control. Which is your update. Your facebook controls that because it doesn't get out to everybody but on my space you could do when you went to the background. You can change your friends. Your your top roads dramatic moment. You lost you friends. Yea put the put them in the right order. You put me weird music up. You'd be putting your posts shit ever and so that's what i mean like. I think for you going up in mice is based on my spit mice. Be higher you the back and protect your back because that's what's cool like you kind of got like all these different things happening at the same time and a works. You know even though i it's like a lot of stuff i think that also helped with my individuality as well because these kids don't. They don't even know about that. Yeah they don't yeah i feel like my generation was literally. I of what's going on now. It's just faster now and people through my space yeah. Are you kidding me like in person. Yes what what kind of people oh my god my producer that literally he you know the okay. Oh my god you you guys don't know this guy's better know this. Y'all know the cats addy. No cats had daddy dance do ever it was trending back in the day back in the day to show us yeah. It's like the u._s._b. Regular what is no no. It's like <hes>. I gets is like a collie type b i. I don't know but it's like literally they go. They go oh she oh shit. We got raimodno in the cat. Daddy was nothing no. It's not hard. It's not even a filipino. I told on a second here. How do you know this. How do you know what it is it a filipino thing it's not like a california razer cameraman by the land the dougie the dougie. I heard i heard okay so it's in that same yeah yeah okay. Okay okay be born. Y'all know soldier boy era your i like ringtone rap or one of those songs that became trending because it had a dance and then chris brown jumped on it and the world started caddying but the guy who produced that as my producer now and whereas the foul mice be anybody nobody through my space. I did not so my friend who's he was my age. He met a girl in my space okay and she was very cute. She went to different high school school. Now and i remember everybody was like called him a freak. Make fun of them and like i participated in that competition a little bit because this is like two thousand and four right it was just unfathomable weird to meet someone on the internet right. You just you just didn't do that. That's actually the one thing my parents told me not to do is like don't fucking sell shit on craigslist on your own because you don't see now now. We literally only meet people through right. I've never met anyone real life in the last year but i just think about that kid nick and i'm like that guy was a trailblazer blazer dude. He's like yeah i mean they dated for a while now but the confidence and cat i want to kind of segue aguayo into because we've been doing research and stuff like that so you're you're slayer is also go by yeah. Care is originally well cavers. That's my like the tag name like okay tagging tagging to have multiple names. I have multiple names because dow was originally the name. I used starting off in rap. <hes> because g unit was popping back then and i was like well if i'm gonna be in g unit and i'm gonna for dissent sent to sound good fifty cents says gee unit fifty cent k. ribs. Oh that does sound amazing racing but then later. I love that larger you you have slaves. What's that oh god okay. Slavers is icon iconic literally yeah in my adventures ventures in the arts finding my identity and the arts i started to establish myself in like the queer community in the gay community <hes> <hes> because i've always kind of felt comfortable in a straight space plan asiatic trying like it's a lot it's industry right now. I hope you're barely containing. You know what i'm saying. It's like the walls are taking off about to be destroyed down with our strategy. Sergio energy straight things also talk about boring dances aw macarena garden straight is the mockery machine. I don't see that absorbed street. Interviews took it from my head coach ships being around the gays and like i guess identifying defying as queer eventually because i'm like you know what this makes. Everything i've ever experienced as queer space has made more sense in my life than my whole like almost twenty years years of living as a quote unquote straight percents country income so slave risk comes from y'all know what bogeying is what voting all oh man okay. Well you know voting. Vulgarity is is an expressive dance that originated in harlem new york where you basically it's very flamboyant <hes> and the gays the the black people in harlem invented a way to pose and dance at the same time like cover a volk all. That's why it's got like performance. That's a very definitely release. The inspired a lot of moves. Oh i'm sure i've seen that music videos and stuff yes yes. Madonna was known for mainstreaming somewhat bowl. Oh great yeah. They played at every day ago like one of those songs they play like on the radio but yeah i started to involve vol myself in the gay community in the ballroom community. The ballroom where we're talking happens the ball where you get fierce and in the house of lab asia which is the first house ever to run new york city. The houses are like in to quote paris's burning earning which was the first documentary to ever speak about ballroom. They were considered a gangs but they didn't fight right performed yeah. Oh it's bad even even fiercer. It's been very fierce like it's very important that we talk about that aspect of time. It was in the eighties so very new oh yeah yeah. This is very new and you were living in new new york. Yeah i wanna live in eighties but like i involve myself in vogue and i was go go dancing actually in a lot of gay parties where i guess i was so fierce. The house saw me and they're like she's. She's it. She's got picked up the house just like in one piece. Not the manga the magi. You know how there's pirate gangs <music> peace now will now because of somebody else had told us another one of our guests at explain you get into one piece street account. Oh yeah no yeah now. This is a good segue to yes because you you know when i was growing up anime and manga it's kind of like with my space and meeting people in it and it was it was the cool like no and it was it was it was very fringe. You know you had to go out of your way to find animated stuff and i think by the time i mean now now. It's like super mainstream. Everybody got. We got like everything's translated and everything like that and people are all about it. When did you start getting into 'cause you're also a cause player. I think that's really interesting because i feel i've interviewed 'cause players and along with a long time ago. I do swear ooh ooh. Is that what you think. These articles mean nothing rut surname a._b._c. news legit i have i have some n._b._c. News article where i went to an interview players and it was really cool so oh yeah so yeah so <hes> i i do feel that a lot of 'cause players you know they're they're performers obviously and they have a lot of different things going on but like have you always been real into it and some of that and when did you think hey you know like why not incorporate this because i wouldn't draw the straight line from one to the next editor rap yeah. I love that shouldn't draw both to together. That's why i exist. You know to like bring it to the forefront warfronts who actually cost plays at their performances like i've i just had the opportunity because i was performing nonstop like maybe the past two years have been so iconic like saul iconic just been booked nonstop and and i'm like okay flex yeah 'cause. I've you know i've been doing this on my own for a long time and to be booked every week for a gate. That's a big deal right as a performer dude so i think it was. I've always been a fan. I've been awful about cost play play play itself so let me because i've always been a huge fan but i'm like but i never wanted to do cost play and another anything wrong with that but like what is the interest to cost play in the same umbrella as the interest to animate like other related. How do you get into cost by from anime or was is cost but like a separate thing. Oh no. They're not they're married. They're married like if you if you are a manga junkie. You probably know cost player. It's the same family. You're the cost player that i know. You're the you're the one i want so you always do obscure ones and i'm always like damn. I wish knows about that. Because the other day you posted a cost play of this anime mitch and nobody knows about well that one i i know you know who knows about meet you go black anime. People know everything about me because really that's obscure ass intimate i it is i've seen it too but this because i'm like i love anime dumb of the company who december champion. That's why i got into it. Yeah you're right. They know all about that. What was the first like anime. You got into the first anime ever got into the queen of anime enemy sailor moon. Oh that's a good way to get into it a great way to get into anime and i being just a fan like i'm telling you i i started as an illustrator. I did not ever think i'd ever actually cost play right. I've just been a fan. The internet gave me access to pop in cost players and all those costs players just so happen to be in the west coast. West coast just had a lot of pop and asians that i was inspired by it so i was like i need to go there. I need to go to these conventions inventions. No i'm too insecure but i followed up on it. Because i was a big fan anime. Being my sanctuary it ended up being my life and i decided to cause play also because i'm like what am i waiting for. What am i actually waiting for inanimate. What am i doing like. I just thought that maybe i wasn't like it's a tough. It's like a competitive kind of thing 'cause play ballroom in a way yes exactly. It's also because i'm like oh. I don't know how to so like i don't know how to so. I don't know how to build like who who do. I think i am getting into cost play. There's so many great cost players like like so many great ones that i've been inspired by and that i've seen are like wow that's that could be me. What makes a good cost by person because let's just by the outfits. No you have to make it can make a bite from amazon is gonna look like shit custom made to your body is to speak on that. You can buy a cost play on the halloween halloween and you do the cost. Play is not just dressing up. You got to be that yeah. You got to be the body that character and i think another reason why i didn't do kospi because i'm like. I don't have big cities. All girls had been and and i'm like i'm not trying to go into something. I'll have big insecurity right all insecurity. I don't think you know what since. I was getting books much. I'm like you know what fuck it and i have a song called if it ain't foreign it's boring us anime references in that you know what i'm about to just embody this whole thing like i can be a fan but if i can the actual cost player. Maybe it'll be good because i believe that that's should be a thing anime and wrap is actually a trending thing <music> our back then what the fuck right yeah but to do it like let's see who's really a rear intimate ben because everyone's anime fan now. All of a sudden are y'all gonna cost play at your show duties references nonstop like are you going to do. The side by side post on instagram are you. Are you ready to we judge because 'cause players were judged. Their whole lives like loving animate. I feel i feel like a little bit salty about like accessibility the of enemy now because these you had to do back then just get a quality and i watched <hes> about to hear i watched. I <hes> you know what ten she me. Oh my god i had to look it up. I tell you i had to watch that through my ooh. I've definitely seen this right. I love it yeah. That's great. You're right big boobs. Everybody's got a big boost for shit. Yeah so i'm back in the day. I had to watch anime tension. We had to watch it through <hes>. There's a fan sub network so like a fan subtitled subtitled. The using software subtitled the anime themselves right. They actually translated. I had to learn japanese and translate it. Then that was then that videotape tape was then sent around through a network like the underground railroad like the different people and you. If you wanted to watch chip you had to put yourself on the list on the internet like okay next after this per anyone could do and you could do it. It was completely like at the time was the enemy circle. Not that big the tension. There's only one guy with tension me. There's only one there's only one there's only one there take turns. You had to wait months. It would take months and you would have to wait for and then like i remember we got the we got the box and we'd watch it and it was lit and then we would we would send it to the next person ah look on the list knicks senate the honor roll like it's a completely honor system. Say fuck the system then like you know you would never anime again the risk that you watch that show trust unity. That was really what it was about so you have to like senate around and my sister. She never got good enough japanese to be able to do that but she she was in the network and she helped by kind of move that she was real big. This is working for the newer. She was real real big. It's a pencil boards principles. No pencil thing being that you put behind a piece of paper you can write on it. Oh yeah an actual war but it has a lot of different <hes> there's like you know all sorts of different kinds of pencil boards with different characters at that going for that so anyway so you had to do in order to get it and then she would you know she would <hes> my sister's would cause play and anime expo expo west coast. Tell me now. I'm so bad at remembering the enemy my name's okay so it was it was it was the asha nelson who's the most famous anime director that gbi people yeah so. It was one of his films. It was like you guys yeah the miyazaki movies it was a total. It'd be funny yeah. She was in the anime where it's like. <hes> okeke the witch. She did that one but her most famous one is. It's the anime may where it's like <hes> prince morton okay. That's awesome okay she was she was there was a lady who's like like <hes> whose like the enemy the bad the bad guy. He loses her arm at the end. All yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah you don't talking about. This is a minor character no minor more minor than than percents but like she was that one item for the only time i played i played as you you did but it comecon. I was made it easiest for me and my friend. He's waiting for this to be here. Yeah yeah you did you brought the energy the energy we've been talking about like football and stuff loy oy know me and my friend we were one of the crazy eight just wore black masks from bill aw we had swords and honestly we were perfect. You and your boy fixed dough because i was about to ask you. What did you make fun of your sister but no it looks like you always cool man and and we will walk around and of course the best part of being a crazy eighty eight. Is this other crazy. There's other crazy eighty and you can get together eventually so you would meet a bride wearing the yellow of course you have to fight. I was like i was in my twenties for you. You know i didn't know that about. I was like not about so. I'm not going to be made but fortunately suits suits like i don't till this day. I do not know how to solve whoa whoa this is. Just i'm figuring it out as i go. You are making it on your own yeah some but some of them i bought fought. Sometimes i can't finish something like okay. Oh there's a show this day <hes> i just have to pick something up d._i._y. Like fine nine pieces and put it together. That's still considered cost especially now for sure right yeah. This is interesting. I always felt that the cost land anime con. Is there such such a fucking nerds but i feel like i'm beginning find out that like there are some costly people orders like fucking cool yeah okay. Let's talk about it. Talk about talk about talk about it. Who who these people me. It's generational yup. I feel like it makes complete sense like i said accessibility with the internet that of course people are going to be cool quote unquote cooler now but they've always been lit always been passionate is lit to me. Oh yeah true it is also very cool that everything that i once was like made fun of his now like the most poppin shit on the market. You're yeah right. That's true. I so funny tweet by bryant park. It was something about. I'm going to tweet but it was something about your love. Kimchi goes quote and it was like by the guy who made fun of me for bring kimchi. Food is the first place where this happens right like there's this thing that people are doing and then like they're moore's law is made fun of doing your thing and then fast for fifteen years later. Now it's available in fucking wholefoods. Its authenticity love it. You know where you guys really set like me. I was super sensitive about out that food stuff like that hurt. My usually really really hurt me your carried on to till like maybe like only a couple of years ago. I'm like you know what i need to get over. It like <hes> yeah. I'll super-sensitive. I was like i can't even be easier. My mom always told me she tried to teach me like don't make fun of anyone's food. Nice because like someone is about to eat that like someone is about to be putting the you know that in their mouth so it was like don't make fun. Nobody wants food that happened because people would make fun of her being food but then i go and this is what you and i have in common we always i have. I still have the most extreme vietnamese food yeah. Which is the fertilize duck egg blue. We call it. <hes> what do you you guys. Call it <hes> we wanted. We call that we call it. Hope vi butler vit lot so means like like v means duck like you know it's like means means like the duck egg right now. We have the same the same way we open it up and then you put you put salt and pepper and then yeah i know he is saying how did that happen because like us not that close and that it didn't go through china or career like cream. People don't need it chinese people. Don't eat it to cambodia. If you don't know of cambone maybe it. Maybe we identify with it. Some howard's are people just say yes. It probably like probably did pass created. They're like me ask. I'm just imagining filipino like merchant. Yeah sneeze like oh. I've got a duck egg cream cheese. How we got we got. We got chicken feet. Ah seafood. I ha- i'll take it yeah. The vietnamese meet people from what i know vietnamese people and filipinos who'll be long really. Do you really do so. That's why i'm like. We were like the same food that hits our our sold. Why do you think that is you guys think you guys are like more show. You think i don't know always filipino filipino friends always talk about how chill unhappy happy. Filipino people are after even everything they went through their like. If you go to the philippines so happy they are and that you think that's same with vietnamese people we are. We are more chill. We don't guy like the <hes>. We don't got the korean han yeah. We don't got the chip shoulder like chinese people. Are these people are like you know you've had so many bad things happen to us yeah and that we're but we're still here which i think it's very identifiable right about. Hey guess what america rolled up into our country right and <hes> you know and it's foreign powers and surely that and we just sort of like persisted and i think that's part of it. I don't know why i don't actually does connect with life interesting. You guys went to like the exact same same thing you'll man. If you get oppressed enough you're down with eating fertilized cac militia and we're back with everybody's favorite segment is dos race news ooh this week. We got something very interesting and you know what this. I think this is relevant to a lot of our listeners. It doesn't really have to do with race race but it kinda. Does he kind of does it does and i actually do think it has a lot to do with race because of the of the way this is sort of position. Okay okay the headline henry. They became millionaires and retired at thirty one. They think you can do the same so little cliques nasa christine shanen bryce long are part of a movement caught fire that encourages people to save dave intensively to retire early. They are part of the growth of growing fire community so the fire stands for financial financial dependent retire early that encourages it just workers to save intensively enable them to stop working for money for earlier and is commonly done so i'm talking like thirty to these higher before your yup forty yup and the entire article talked about how this couple did it and they come from different financial background. Christie actually grew up very poor in china they have the family emigrated to canada and she has pretty much made every decision in her life. Using i guess more or less like a financial formula. Ah what am i getting the most value out of so. She didn't go to harvard she didn't she just went to the best most valuable school in terms of like the price to play price value ratio yeah and she's made all this inter life that way. Her husband also works as a computer engineer yeah and it doesn't say how much they make. I mean i'm sure there are making because six figures. I don't i think there are both like making three hundred thousand eight but i think they're making pretty good money and when they were in twenty twelve they realized they had saved up seven hundred sixty thousand dollars and they re. They realized they could return entire early thirties right yeah so that's kind of like you know the whole thing. <hes> some people some people see what they're doing as invalidating because it challenges the status quo quo it really makes people question their lives and they don't like that because it's scary <hes> they're they're getting albert but hate for it. Yeah i read this article and i hated these people immediately. Yeah and you know it was weird. I had mixed feelings about it. I think well first of all the whole racing. I'm definitely plays into it because they talk about how report china yeah and she she knows the value of money blah blah blah blah blah first of all vietnamese people we also report and we are terrible with money. Let's the assad right now. We can't join the we you know. My family grew up. Didn't we didn't have shit and we still waste money like a mother love gambling. We do show chazz. How's the world world poker tour world poker tour okay. We got to meet people. There didn't know that johnny tran or joining new in he if you look at him back. Do you look so vietnamese if you if you look at long enough you become beating me. Sir medusa you look at medusa turned us down ah long enough. You're swatting squad so yeah so i think there is this whole angle about them like being oh we're going to you know be real chinese and real like you know what is it called rational and stuff like that whole like so like when we first started this podcast we we would constantly lose if you type in asian podcast into itunes who constantly lose to a podcast called agent efficiency. That's right that's right. That's still up there still is up there and and we're like always like right next to them to and even though we're the opposite of efficient asian inefficiency. This is how we do it but i think there's a whole thing about like h._p. More efficient and like there's there's a there's a way to do things as chinese japanese way to do things and so i think you know they're difficult leaning into that yeah and it's funny to me just because i i i i'm not a i i like actually the idea that you should spend and save and do stuff you want to do and what they did was they were originally saving to buy house right and a lot of people have have done this. You know you have to buy a house. You got to put down twenty percent. That's like in a lot of places that's like three hundred thousand thousand dollars in cash you have to have cash and so but it is instead of buying a house just like kind of saved up the more money and then they kind of quote unquote retired and like you know they still spend and a lot of money not a lot of money. They travel just kinda do it did their way so instead of buying a house. They don't have kids. That's a big one. Kids are money pits yeah yeah they don't. They don't got a house this investment thing and they recognize that like at any second look. If if the economy goes badly they gotta go back to work because that will disappear so so on the one hand what they're doing isn't that insane because you just save money and then whatever but then they they save money and they didn't buy a house could never do do this if you lived in new york city you don't think so because i read articles about people in the fire community usually some suburb in denver colorado more affordable place unlike the documentary watching. They're saying how the only shop at secondhand clothing markets yeah yeah yeah. There's certain sacrifices you have to make these people have children in this particular documentary but i i just don't know if i believe in this kind of way of living. You know what i see what you're saying because it's like you work really hard for like ohio along. They did like ten years or fifteen years and then and then you go and do thirty two and it's yeah well you know. I mean if that's worth it. If your youth is worth that's cool but like there are a lot of you know you can only go do a euro trip with your buddies. When you're twenty one once yeah once in your life there is a lot of value in youth and just where you are in your life as you get older like money with money without money you just changes the the person just something really fun invulnerable and when you're real young yeah possibilities and that to me is priceless so like i'm glad i did a lot of the things that i did when i was younger you know even even if it costs me money you you know you're an artist. You know. I'm sure you always gotta think about funds and stuff like that. What what do you think about like this. Whole idea like you know you work real hard and then later on you can pursue dreams. I think it depends on the person after being sold like hands on just with my brand. I do think about dang like maybe i should have invested my time and just like working really hard day job and just like doing this in my thirties. Would that make a difference. I don't know i'm kind of i'm kind of for it but they don't have kids right. They're married for thirty yeah. I'm looking at it more like like who are these people. Since i didn't article i mean they're just regularize. Nope not just a little bit. Ill informed on the whole spectrum of this this conversation besides the money aspect but i think there's thirty two or something like that they were. They were thirty two. I think now they're now. They're all they're like in their mid thirties. Okay so then that's good for them. I guess but i agree with you about the youth thing and i also agree with yeah like could you could that even happen in new york i do not. I just don't think that's how life works for me. I can't like say like like life. Everything in life happens simultaneously. I can't just be like let me put this off completely and welcomes other things completely then i will work like it's kinda like life is not like a bento box or whatever right. You can't eat one thing at a time. That's why life is not a bento box and this is why right japanese failing right now because japanese think and i'm like i'm guilty of this. We compartmentalize everything we don't. We don't like it when the two touch even though it's fucking delicious way we like right. Life is not a bento box. Is you go. It's like when you go over a fucking barbecue. You make plate a plate. There's no or no partitions and it's all it's all slept and that's when you eat something you maybe you're eating the barbecue but you're getting a little bit of that costlo. You're getting a little bit of that sauce from the other thing roll. That's life life dude and i love that i love that saying that's my cannot live like this this. I don't know i mean you can but for me i look at that. I'm like what a way to live. Your life man like yeah you know. I always think about that too. I can never i. I've always know that you should live. You know when people say live every day like easter last day. I people always say oh that means actually like do heroin jump out of an airplane. I like what i mean. Is what that means is. You should treat everyday and enjoy every day so you should be doing all the things you want to do incorporating reading that into your life in some way whether that's like i like biking to work cool. I also enjoy watching anime. You should watch anime. Yes do your point. It's like a little bit of everything yeah because like every day should be an awesome day. Try to make it like that because like i i see a lot of people you know where it's like. I'm going to slog walk through my horrible job. I hate so i can take two weeks off. People people in finance say that i'm making for three years bro ears so much time. You're going to hate yourself for three or me because like the thing is that you think like that. It's always going to be you're going to always keep doing that until a one thing. That's nice with these guys. At least they did retire yeah because you could see where people are. I'm just gonna keep saving forever and ever and ever and just too afraid to jump out of that routine yeah and <hes> so everyday should be like that little barbecue q plate. Salivating insurance should be all yeah she'd be like and you should always have you should try to make your life like almost like a little little mini vacation every single day the saying 'cause i always think of like what if they were doing this and then on the day they retired. I got hit by. That's what i was thinking attack or something right i mean and anytime i think i i think about this more as i got older. I could die tomorrow and that's always true for for everybody. Oh i didn't tell you guys this. I did a show and then i had a drink after the show with my friend and i went out and i was like i was texting and and i was like you know and i was texting. I was looking down my phone and i fell you know in the new york new york. There's the sidewalk great that opens up to go into the basement of a restaurant or yeah. I fell into one fill into it and fortunately one door was opened. Yeah and i hit the thing and hurt like hell and i was i was i was going over and i was like i know what was happening and so i could catch myself and stuff. He asked jitsu myself. I was like i was like falling all all the way in and like fortunately the door was closed. You held onto this so i put my hands up and i went all the way over in the stairwell case. My legs went into the staircase case and i had to like get myself out. You know fortunately people are nice. They are really nice talked up your shinzo. Oh yeah i can show you later my pants and shit brown brands literally bros oh so i had fallen in and i thought about and i told i told c._n._n. She police book and that's some serious shit. Go straight down until hell yeah. People helped me on the like they it was. It was fine him but died. I really think like that was okay and those people have died from falling into those things and i just i think all the time. All it takes is like you not paying attention for one second you fall into the train tracks and happens to be the trains right there. Yeah you know all takes is just one second. You're not paying attention and you're you're dead. That's it and then all of a sudden all you're saving up money and shows like that. It's called on yeah so i always think like try to live like right now now and try it doesn't mean you gotta be frivolous doing anything. I think you're doing that with you like sleigh. You're doing that with your art everyday. You make art right yeah everyday. You're performing moment. You're watching anime. You're you're making cat sounds z. Every day more than what these china's people did so. That's the that's the lesson folks may look those fucking great great in the sidewalk. Louis era back with her guests slay rhys by the way. Can i ask you real quick. You yourself slavin. What does that mean it. Was this lesion. Oh oh my goodness. I i am this lesion. You use only one. I i was the first legion what does it what does this though slave well. When i i identified find myself as slaves in it was really a way for me to to kind of brand asian like cool or like the predecessor of slave is asian. Oh shit yeah okay. Dow was like a west coast west coast and i loved it. I mean if you don't see the vibes. Look at me and you don't think s._e._m. You don't know what you're talking about but i'm like okay a._z._n. That was like to thousands what the elevate what is the elevated version of a fan and this is already when i was slavery is and i was like i love when asians be slaying. I see asian slaying the game. Dominating representing compassionate like i think is more of an expression how i describe it but then it became my brand and it was like oh my god that asian girls slaying <hes> yes. She's asleep in. Oh oh my god that sounds so good. We should trademark that. Oh let's trademark that and dude i i did whoa i'm this lesion made that word up. I came out of my mouth. Was this is the mom i'm this lesion. Mall yeah yeah yeah. It was kind of like i'm tired of this. It's typical talk about this but at least we got to this point back then it was hard in the arts especially underground like there was no pop in like super confident sexy asian woman cui ear that was making a statement and i feel like an filipino like i just felt like that was very important to this very important to be that person and be multi z. faceted sol's like that's what's lesion is to me like the new generation of the super a._z._n. Supervision's report the super super. Yes lesion is an expression <hes> but now lesion would be more identified as someone who's queer. That's probably in the arts competence laying you know how sleigh has <hes> is now like a term like soleil which also also originates in ballroom culture that it's all it's all it seems zoo now that i lived my life enough and the authenticity of like brand and everything like damn. I'm that bitch <hes> worldwide now speaking of slaying yes get toward game the simple simple game this is this is fuck. Mary kissel with anime characters ready. We should play this game. Let's all play. You're gonna oh i see okay. I okay this is so perfect. Okay crillon from drug involves the ads from pokemon or al from full metal alchemist not non human version not the armor armor fuck you fuck armor. He's got no biological parts. Let's see what happens lesion move. I love my mind it. We're gonna fuck out then <hes> you said ash and crillon right. I'm gonna marry ass you. You know he's determined piquiachu so he'll be there. I know you'll be those family then. I don't wanna kill crillon but you gotta go you gotta do is that his hair probably not even that okay. Here's another version okay use up from one piece. Okay we use up. Piccolo pickled dragon ball z okay and then more sound from san right shampoo. If you don't use the pet squirrel hill shit. We're gonna fuck. That's what ask all. I'm fucking piccolo the piccolo it's so sexy. Is this something about that. No making skin piccolo so there's any area fifty one was good about fifty one first of all. He's guarding of the earth. That's you kidding me. He got a big. I know without a big oh man but you know what i think. I must marry. I wanna marry him because i would marry. There does stylist so we got. We wanna fuck a squirrel so we just gonna have to fuck up one time goose up with that big ass no no. I don't know a lot of these reference. You look look. We're gonna laugh couldn't spell his name. We saw one piece. That was hard hard. There's not there's not other. Oh god fucking you. Fucking knows knows you. You make one up and make one up. Make one up for you yeah for me. I don't know that much stuff. I want to have to go old school here. Okay yes go old school anything. Okay okay fuck hail mary. We'll naruto okay. We'll start with that which which version off season bro person seventh first season when he's a boy yes <music>. He doesn't even know roseanne gone and shit. I don't know what the fuck your. He only knows shadow clone like a little bitch. Is that the one where you can make another one of them yeah. That's like the only thing he's got for like ten seasons at the end. He's like super fucking strong or some reason. He doesn't even know where the summing zoot suit. No frogs okay these jokes or the animators. Uh got so much homework to do. Okay <hes> okay so naruto the robot from evangelium hold on oh. You haven't gone to the point where the there's a pilot but i'm talking about the actual robot. Yes he goes into <hes>. You don't get you okay. There's a little bit of a robot. Robot is actually really the sentient so this is going to like rage mode. Okay yes <hes> robot robot from jillian okay or <hes>. Let's go roles school rodman which one girl version or guy version same thing one <hes>. I would fuck rama nice just to know what that feels like yeah yeah so hot in the grover. The girl version is hot the divergence because she's got red hair and shit like that i would. I would kill kill naruto boy. He will boys a little boy back in my brand yeah right. I'm twenty nine cahan with little boys so you're marrying the robots yes. Can you imagine me on a date with a giant robot very slave labor the twenty twenty by the way i would go for a date. I don't know like fucking auto mar or i don't know. I don't know what he wants greece. I don't know what here's how you wanted to meet in my life partner unit zero zero shit. That's so romantic for some. Nobody would fuck me. They go inside of it in the game the game okay <hes>. We're going to wrap this episode up. Slay risk. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Is there anything you like the plug anything coming up <hes> singles coming out anything like the handle plug it all hit. What's up guys. It's a bill cavers. Aka slavers flavors aka the filipino puerto rican says aka persuasion mother. I wanna give a shout out to my sis- all the way from l._a. Academy look if you're listening to this. I love love you in media coming soon baby. Let's fucking get this bag. Protect the budget throw to budget eleanor shout out to all mice lesions world wide love. Y'all paul coming out. I'm coming out with an album alien twenty twenty my first full length album okay so siemian tokyo guys it is and if you guys would love to hear more about me and you just wanna find someone on instagram. That's like lit authentic sexy and knows how it's work a whatever i'm always do yeah like follow me on instagram at slavery's s. l. a. y. R. i. z. and shows are coming guys need to come or go to. I'm working on a new website but my instagram is very very. I'm very active on it. So oh yeah go watch my dog's on youtube. I'm super consistent and join this lesion dynasty with me all right and you can also find us on instagram asia asia pod and you can also find me on there at the fumiaki betas t._h._e. F._e._m._a. and you can find me on instagram at nice pants berkeley's. Please please check out our patriarch page for bonus content. You can find us at patriotair dot com slash asian not asian pod and if you leave a review i'm not i think this is coming out with a couple of weeks so let's play a couple of cities hack city the lives that have comedy show the mike host together so if your new yorker visiting please come hang out. I think let's see the next one's going to be september timber eighteenth eight o'clock here at cal markets to sixty five canal street and if it comes out after the september eighteenth. That's gotta be october sixteen eight o'clock to sixty five canal street so if you can't make it definitely come out tomorrow on. I think that wraps up rachelle sleeping so much for stopping by there was so much fun. This is amazing. They've is so much we'll see. Are you angels next week. This episode of asian not asian is presented in partnership listening party follow the crew on instagram at listening party presents and at canal street market.

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Mini Meditation: Navigating Tricky Times

The Mindful Minute

17:29 min | 1 year ago

Mini Meditation: Navigating Tricky Times

"Thanks for listening to the mindful minute I'm your host. Mural, Arnett. These ten to fifteen minute meditations have been created for your use as part of a daily home practice for inspiration insight, and a better understanding of what it actually means to meditate for sure to tune in to our Thursday full length episodes. It's and now let's begin. Welcome to the mindful minute podcast before we get started with today's class, a quick moment to thank our incredible sponsor goes after. GOES OFF OU CREATED A in my opinion brilliant product it is a small, lightweight portable meditation cushion that is meant for outdoor use. If you are a hiker, camper, a nature lover, and are looking to find a comfortable way to meditate on the go this easy little box. It looks almost like a lunchbox, really lightweight durable fabric. Nice loops. You Clip it right on your pack. Pack, you can go and stop anywhere. You WanNa stop in practice. I use it in my personal practice quite a bit I hope you start using it. You can save ten percent by using code mindful ten M. I N. D. S.. U. L. One zero by visiting. Go ZATHU DOT COM. G., O. Z. A. FEW DOT COM use code mindful ten to save ten percent. Mindfulness practice you know the very first tenant is presence. Be here. And so we'll practice. This tonight will practice being here the easiest way to do this. You guys is to connect with your senses. Sight Smell taste touch. Feel all of this right when we're here. When our senses are working were present. The minute we start going back through memories or freaking out about the future. We stopped smelling. We stopped tasting. We stop feeling. We are gone from the present moment. This is how when you're freaking out about something you can put away a chocolate cake and ninety tasted. Right you look down the player. Like where did that go? Will we missed it because we weren't here. Are Practiced this I. IF YOU'RE GONNA. Do the whole series. It's this whole first week every day. You're going to practice on coming back into the present moment. Right one time two times as many times as you can during the day. Let's meditate together, yeah! If. You've already been seated. Just take a minute to shift around arm chair. Some skin move around for second. You might do the same. If you're seated on the ground, you can uncrossed your legs crossing the other way. Let your hands. Rest down onto. Your lap calms down. And perform you. Closure is I want you to take a minute to just look around the room mature. And I know, most of us are at our homes. Even so take a minute. Look to one side all the way to Woodside. And then turn your head all the way, the other way and taken the full. Circumference of the room that you're in. Really A -nology moment the location that you're in. and. We need taken it in fully. Then you can let your eyes close. The she feel a little, uncomfortable today or little unsafe today than always you can keep your eyes open, and just take a soft gaze down towards the ground. Together as a group here deep in Helen. NEXT OUT CY. We'll do that again. Just inhaling gathering up your day thus far. An acts healing out that Cy. Allowing your breath just to fall to its own natural pace here. A Easy inhales exhales. You're just taking this moment to land right here. If you lie. Before we even begin. Might. Just imagine yourself trying a circle around your body this with your mind's eye. A! Feeling Circle of safety of protection just for this moment. And it's within the circle that we silently say to ourselves. Now is my time to meditate. Now is my time to meditate. And perhaps now you can feel yourself really sick. Might go through the FIS. The hipster the gluts. Feel subtle since of length reaching our your sparring. Drying, the crown of the head, been back, just touch. no-show before had smooth and broaden. Skin around the eye softens. Maybe you can relax the lips through the jaw. Even through the inside of the cheeks. The next couple breaths breathe out across your shoulder. Might be able to feel your shoulders. Drop back then. You could notice the way your chest rises and falls that she bring. Gradually relaxing the muscles of the belly. Just as best you can this evening. Noticing how it feels to bring you with a relaxed valley. HAP-. She'll even notice here that as you breathe in. The belly expands a little. As you breathe out, your belly contracts just lightly. Just noticing subtle expansion and contraction. Letting your mind, your awareness melt in to this rhythm of breath. As you continue to experience that touch of breath. You might also just feel your years opening up. Even to you have headphones on. Taking an emmy and all noises. As they rise up and awareness and follow away anywhere. Yourself here this mom! Continuing to feel the breath isn't moves in and now. And leading a bit your awareness move right behind those closed islands. Taking time to see the colors or shapes that move behind drylands eyelids. You don't need to describe the shades. You don't need to narrate to yourself. Just seen. This particular moment in time. Continue to feel breath movie. If. You're not congested today. You might notice as you breathe the scent. Of the moment. You even if you can't identify. Them. Even if you smell nothing. Notice sense of this moment. Maybe, gently swallow. Noticing if there's a taste crescent right now. And then what's your full awareness? Come back to that bre. Yourself, feel this inhale moves in through both nostrils all the way down into the belly. And then feel as the graph moves from the valley, an out both nostrils. Take your time. Tree seen this pathway of graph. Laddy must breath be the anchor. To the present moment. We move into a few minutes of silence together. To see how often you can come back and feel this breath. So worry about Ba-, thoughts that Karma. Don't worry if you get distracted. Just see if you can come back. SEAL, this next Lack seen any tension that might have crept into your body this next breath a little bit deeper. Remembering circles sit in. The room that you're in. The moment letcher. Literally fingers and toes starting to let go of that still. Together here let's take one last deep breath it. An Ex Hill Outta cy. Your Palms together in front of your heart like a prayer volume chin now. Taking a moment to simply thank yourself. For carving out the time to sit still. To connect aim to me, you're. Not must stay. Thanks for listening to the mindful minute. If you're enjoying these episodes, consider joining me for the recording of this podcast every Monday night during my live virtual meditation class. If you tune in for the live class, you get the bonus content that isn't included in the podcast episodes. There's always time for Q. and A., and there's always the chance to connect with me. Personally I would love to see your faces and better yet. If you leave me a review of this podcast screen shot it. Email it to Merrill at Merrill are net dot com. You'll get your first class with me for free. Email your review to Merrill, M. E. R. Y. L. at Merrill are net M.. E. R. Y. L. A. R. N. E. T. T. dot com get your first class for free. You can find out the schedule how to register all of that good stuff by going to my website. Merrill are net dot com. Thanks again for listening. I'll see next week.

Merrill M. E. R. Y. L. Arnett Woodside E. R. Y. L. A. R. N. E. T. letcher Laddy Ba ten percent fifteen minute ten M
Is Facundo Pellistri The Answer To Man United's Right Wing Problems?

First Past The Post

06:05 min | 6 months ago

Is Facundo Pellistri The Answer To Man United's Right Wing Problems?

"While manchester in that it has shown signs of inconsistency this season at least summer. Sundays are making good progress. While danny cavani have played with the i team publicity has featured the reserves so he could adapt to his new venture his turning out to be a great help for the under twenty. Three's and is also making good impression. Two coaches today we have ryan holland's a new contributed to past opposed. Looks at why police street will be the answer to his right wing problems. The eighteen year old uruguayan assigned from penn role in the summer and we expected a few minutes for him with the i team. But ole is trying to deal with his development in a slow but yet safeway what he can possibly offer to our first team and how has he been playing recently. United u twenty. Three's have been a delight to watch this season. As they marked their return in the premier league to division one in terms of results. Neil woodside have had their ups and downs. But the level of performance is satisfying. The i team manager has some prospects he is probably keeping an eye on and poetry despite only signing this summer for united has given the gaffer a lot to think about poetry made his united u. Twenty three's debut against everton you twenty. Three in a thrilling two one win showing glimpses of his talent. I scene featured chat outside. Yeah you know. He's obviously come all the way from your guy and he's wearing a number. I listened to an interview that he's spoke about. He wants to. Lincoln plays classes himself as fast. And i'm sure you know he'll himself in pockets and longer possible spoke the uruguay and made some great moves around the box but certainly his effective crossing was a major highlight in the game as his crossing. The twenty fifth minute found chillers tire. Who had his shop save the following. Show that for condo moving around to find the right space is giving united fans hope that finally decent right winger is at the door. Despite not scoring the impression he left was a great one leaving the attacking midfielder hungry for more wild being a bit shine. The first half football he played with united poetry was more likely in the second half being more direct certainly his presence in the helped winning united a couple of battles and few free kicks he featured for the twenty one. In the efl. Trophy having secured qualification for the next round. There wasn't much to play for and united you. Twenty one ended the group phase in a defeat four zero by more messy. Police three played the entire match with not much to do. And i should note that he received a lesson on tracking down the opponent. A lesson which will serve him with the i team as well his return with the u twenty. Three's was marked. In the four two victory against tottenham in a brilliant way the reserves had been creating various chances since the start of the game but unable to break deadlock with both longer and shorter trying earlier however as much pre recovered the ball a pasta. Fernandez who found unknown are pooch mel in the middle. The spaniards voted Down the right wing and the moment. He got the ball police street. I made a little run while taking on circuit. Who couldn't prevent police. She's brilliant cross. Which found shaw tire who scored with his head triggers. The let's start shorts. Was i love. Absolute poetry also started against west ham. You twenty three's problematic game for the reserves as they just didn't seem to find a way to scored and a few mistakes costed the game. Poetry had a good game overall but unable to provide for a longer and the united attacking. The referee was out of the line with several decisions and it was a game to forget overall it was only in the game against southampton that palestra finally expressed himself fully. After a brilliant first half it was short is time to return the favor in an excellent play in the middle. Short is pass found publicity. Who made no mistake. In front of the keeper the uruguayan also impressive in the rest of the half unlucky to score another on tuesday night poultry was named in the u. Twenty one starting. Eleven that took on accrington stanley the u. twenty one conceded early in the game as united. Were looking for an equaliser walston ball in the attempt to clear the area found the opposition. Unprepared langa was brought down while trying to control the ball. Then poetry beautifully took the keeper and defender out of play and scored going one one at halftime however united couldn't keep a two one advantage goal scored via langa and are out of the papa. John's trophy formerly known as efl trophy. Well despite only being a few games there are several things. I have noted in the player. He is versatile playing from both wings his explosion from the right truly can make you wonder whether he is the answer to the right wing problems and creativity dependent on bruno fernandez. While the i team may have been requiring such qualities it is important player is not rushed into the first team for the sake of justifying the united. Pay to sign him. This would hurt both the club and player as well. There is no coincidence in all these decision to united are making about his development and on the other hand the player has come around as a humble person willing to work hard and patient on waiting for his chance to shine his work ethic and talent will help him go find football no doubt as for his united career the signs of promising and united fans should look forward to watching him play for the i team is led led lovely trickery across go by streak ed three three year acquired and manchester united turban. Right here they lead to really.

danny cavani ryan holland United u Neil woodside united u safeway shaw tire ole everton premier league manchester palestra Lincoln tottenham walston Fernandez football mel united accrington stanley
Episode 3 | University Entry Requirements [Part 1]

Escopia Radio Talks

29:16 min | 8 months ago

Episode 3 | University Entry Requirements [Part 1]

"And that. I like to get into is requirements of win. Clinton was by via. They'd we all have vigils right wing going to university and we need to prepare ourselves. You know 'cause we think that universities what we see on television but it something else you know and you find us high school students we trying to figure it out. I mean some might be going to see next year and we know that reality is not everyone is going to go into varsity right so the main thing that i'm just trying to discuss with you as like what are the requirements going was like. What does a person you as an individual. Actually what do you feel is the requirement for every single student that is to go into university. That's actually a very interesting question. So i would say i mean we've done alot before lesser tation. So they told us that going into varsity. You need to consider your aps score. You need to know what you want to study. E e you know stuff like that and also mentioned working financial aid so i feel like those are somewhat some of the most important things to consider when you want to steady in the higher education institution doesn't really have a university. We have colleges as well that actually do excellent work over so the first thing that you a person has to consider when they want to go to a or any higher education institution in the morning. You know what they want to do. We'll have a deer so the thing is you know when you go straight out of high school. You don't really have some people do some people don't we are different than gets. Some people are like okay. I wanted to study engineering. And do you know what they don't really understand holidays or they might not be a way that these different of engine indian engineering. Our we have mechanical we have Electrical came co and yeah they civil is so when they get them might not know which one to actually eat pig. They know what. I need to be in the engineering space. Wherever i'm making an example engine you have no idea so. Some people are fortunate to career. Guidance advises you know like whenever you want to choose the people who advise you. I didn't have bed. I don't think our the tuition has it but someone did mention their other institutions that do have such an sit out when he went to study further. Is we need to have the least at tier vigil. Know what they want to study or something related to that so once they do. Do you understand you understand what they do have so you cut off a bit once. They do have yeah. I'm saying once they have like a vision of what they wanted to do like what career choice to pursue than they need to start doing thorough research. So i'll hang bit right in that also house the environment in university. I mean it's one thing looking at it and saying okay. My uncle has been to university. Mount remember we're going to have different experiences because the oakland to divan university facilities. You know as utions. If that's i would use so the thing that i'm trying to figure out as the house the experience or the environment you know because as an individual also needs to these were from my bates those just paean. You need to kind of put a personally. Have some sort of put. It is something that bill an individual that prepares you for the real world are out the confidence and not fearing there will dry but would like to hear from you now. How's the environment in university. How can quickly adapt. Yeah okay So i was one of the people who had this vision at varsity is like you know what the what would be see in these. Tv shows more more. What american american institutions are one. We have but again these don't these dome parties I'm not sure it's like we also run. Oh at least. I thought what gogo varsity you know. You have all the freedom. You have never had a high school and at home so you get to be in a free environment. It's very very true. But then there's a lot of discipline that one has to have gogo or will go into Especially when it comes to dimick's like they don't check up on you guys like high school is. Nobody's glue lag. You guys are four terms and get teams we only have two semesters and yes but didn't those two semesters they divided in two two two four quarters soy quote to the almost like you guys but they only right like twice in a year. Oh you guys you exempts Tastes like yeah true so now with that kind of too fast. In a way he's repeat 'cause i never. I talked this long. Silence of your side is like only at the end is slow taking it off. Yeah i know yeah exactly. Yes my incident that was before its connection his bed upgrade but put the whole up like okay so puts in of was in say. Is that the importance of is kind of have disciplined ripe. Because they don't up like they do they don't do their own ryden. You know the the facilities like a nice school right now. What opportunities can look up to win going into university. I mean we all fear you know that we get dispensed from our friends in high school family and removing different provinces or whatever whatever the case may be so one thing i'd like to know what opportunities does university have for individual aside of and educational qualities of qualifications. Okay so varsity. Now since. It's like i feel like it's a bridge between adulthood and just finishing off yoyo teenage years like now you are moving into the workspace but then you just need this loss phase of your life so that you can fully prepare yourself. So that's what velocity is all about. That's my own definition. Am i understanding so in order for you to explore. The workspace doesn't matter if you want to pursue in english or just work in an industry an so you need a lot of skills that you have to have need either leadership skills you need into personality skills like being able to talk to connect with different people because that's what you're going to be exposed to once you start breaking. So what varsity does what it has done for me is that there were a lot of programs. We have sports. we have debates. Have we think that a lot of high school does have that the with universities that you even have an opportunity gesture in actives students. From other countries. Some people fortunate to go to other countries while in the second or first years or even thirty during the undergrads. That's what i'm saying. Clo- varsity exposes you to a lot of programs. So i've i've been part of sports since primary schools even continued until now. I'm still doing sports. And then of being part of mentoring camps of being part all various kim's seminars you know of you know these celebrities that we see on tv people who make an example. dj's move. He's one of the people that working our institution approach or approaches decorative. These do but yeah. He used to be part of this boys or may men's thingy like mentoring the going on so that's another program that institutions actually have aside from academics. So there's a lot of you just need to. I think it differs from boston. Chichewa ciccio institution to institution. There's a lot of exposure seen with you guys way we one more. Can i just say one would be conc- i've seen with you. You are in high school but they you have your own business going on. What varsity does is that. It exposes you to a much larger audience in much more versatile audience. So if you have like a brand going on in high school you only have like a limited audience or maybe you might be fortunate to you know. Working get get other people as well like have a different target audience as well but in boston bra you have a lot of a lot of people go to compete to high school. True faces devante from parts of the country. That's true exactly so you even generate more ideas. You know very versatile ideas especially if you into the art show. That's that's that's a beautiful space to pursue also science. Fancy not to get into that okay so would like the different faculties. Like science business vocal. Tea's like odd faculties and you mentioned that the opportunities more exposure in notes innovates of how in duck innovative and was atoll Audience you get you get the opportunity to kind of think of innovative ideas. That's amazing and one thing that the last thing you know 'cause next week To talk or break down into perfectibility especially oh that's awesome especially start with yours because you did with us signs right. Yes so start with that so to those. That are interested in woodside. Nick saban wouldn't be a blow this. You'd better look out for because we're going to discuss a specific host to its coal and we're going to kind kinda learn what is required when four in order to study that specific caused. You know i'd like to ask the last question before we wrap it. Up is joe. Are those arrests parties real. Yeah they are. I want some of them are the ones that i've i've known of the totally real and she'll things go happened in in the in those parties. Say they are definitely real. This happen the way cheesy depicts. You know exactly so they definitely happen. Thank you say. I won't tell you what exactly happens but interesting. Each is lit. I know. I know people who've been indefinitely with a one business again because nurses popped up right Christians getting these christians not reading any of them like literally across from the his. Oh how the up rather have a new guinea composition than her and organize conversation. Most of the time. I would organize questions that. I know kim for this specific. But it's not an interview. It's a it's like malva conversation dmz. Tony i understand. So what i just like to know right for those because as i'm botany vice school and venturing into varsity in the next year after next sure i'll just to know like what can i do to kill stress because we all know that as much as was t can be very open to you opportunities people. It can be stressful so due to study efficiently and to make sure that list as possible. Okay well when it comes to stress me states is you forgive my friends. I don't even know if i should say this but then you just you just do. The things. beach per stress is a page and it comes even when you don't want it to come so remember that when we talked about stress we explained different. Yeah and we explain different types of states so you are definitely going to come across some of those The types and a lot of things you people can do to manage stress so you may to across working intensive workload not going to experience assignments where you yes like you wanted to you. Hey if you have what you got to. You are going to want to cry. But then the nice thing is that old that hectic work and i'm sure limit cheek. Meticulous can also see that tori the workload genome industry. It's a lot but then once someone puts their mind to it and says you know what i am going gonna deal on going to try and deal with all the streets because the pig the bigger picture is way more important just in just my situation right now. My stress right now are so once you see what new i want to do. Something big in the future. And i know what it is or has a vision of what it is then. The streets won't even you know. Be huge of a barrier of you going to your next step old actually fulfilling your vision so the nice thing about a boss. T is that that like. I said the different programs and they want to make sure you do graduate. 'cause a side note bosque's that don't produce. There's this thing called through. Portrayed net means or renew started gusty if your program or study program whatever you studying is meant for three years if you start ska like this year you have we done within the next three years but if you maybe unfortunately fail a few modules along the way obviously extent continue years or just an extent by a year also. Yeah with that sad news. Hori you no longer part of the throughput rate people so throughput means or if you started guy your first year and you have to finish within their motto of time. Just that he would. You d was supposed to be your understand so the varsity not not i. The higher education department says horry boston or institutions of higher learning should account to that as to. Why is the a different number. If there were ten people who started right at the end. Was it only fight. People who finished one all confident the sometimes they don't even get funding. Just because of. Yeah it's it's every institution's mandate to make sure they do everything they can to make sure the students pass because otherwise they have to answer to the posts which is the department of higher education. What they do is that they have Breaking these programs. We first years of a lot of advantages like there's a lot of things first years they help you with lino giving you mentos if you need. How like personal mentors. A few want or you ask for them. And then we have academic minto's israel and then help you with steady methods They profile you. According to the type of learner that you are so that when you going to receive help they're going to be based on the type of learning. But i know that in high school who everyone could letting is treated the same even though you assistant but then you're treated like a normal science student so nice and that's again our wanting to know what people were opposed behind applying to a vase institution was the process like and what is required for a high school student when apply to call into a certain high educational tertiary institution. Okay most of them want which is the most important. That's the reason why you play in the first first place key. Your mocks gotta. That's i knew that the first one the main one in bubble might not go. You know what he. Id's it documents and all of that Yet but then it's it's different from institutions. But i know the the most important one is your marks coming by in the first place even if you are the guy like a sport scholarship or whatever you need to steady something so they need your marks you performance from high school and the rest you just find them on their websites and now when you apply most of them don't do paper based like you don't need to do to to go to them in order for you to up to apply so now you just just apply online but then one thing i can advise you on that 'cause i know online as a bit sometimes today works tomorrow. It doesn't work so when someone applies and this is very important. Some people are fortunate fortunate enough to be delayed applicants. Because i know sometimes. People don't know dinghy debate today. You better king new study programs when they close you know so some people can apply that same year that they have to register in the understand one thing. I would advise a lot of people on who are pursuing going into team. Is that off. Tell you apply online. Give it like a week or two. Then make follow ups if you haven't received emails or if you haven't received calls or if 'cause i know most institutions have studied not studied but student portals where you can take your progress of the application so if you haven't received any feedback then just sent them emails. Just get on their nerves until the owner who you're no 'cause like thousands of you who are doing the same thing who who are having internet problems. Maybe that administration application aside. I'm just making examples. I'm not saying that's what happens. Maybe you have been with the paper based but online is a different store so everyone needs to make sure that they follow people. Don't follow up. And then they end up your i was working in the. I'm sorry i'm adding more information from our student. Admin now thinking was did last year this year because of working student at mit like different departments raise department full for time so a lot of people but feta guy like january. Any campaign would no i. I applied but then i don't know what my status saves and we ask them nicely. 'cause i'm not the students. We can relate to not the the people who work in the game they employees. No we're not there. We just helping out so we also have nicely when your plate. Did you ever follow up. And as president applicable like march april. But all the time you haven't kicked your application state to take the progress of application now because you're desperately need your parents are sitting on like your your parents anew case now going to you know so we come across different things like that and let's hoppy eeking. We have people came all the way from. Td has like one of the best. If not the based programs you know in the country a lot of people who are who are now tv in all of that's artists musicians. An especially active become from the arts bringing faculty so a lot of them go from or come from like different provinces. There was another one this year. Who came who wanted to do. I think musical theaters will who came from cape town. And that's a journey journey alone and you know what's happening in our country to go. It is so sad. People really need to do their the thing. You need to do your homework. You can't just go with the flow like you. Your classmates are doing like. I know. When i was in high school i wanted to go to. Up up is the one. Like duckie's i am. They like no one can tell me anything until i discovered or you can just apply one pace. You have to apply to many places and make sure you do options exactly and make sure your apply to different choices. I'm not saying. I'm not saying institutions talking about difference that he programs if you want to pursue music but then you appearance or seeing otherwise make sure number one. I'm not. I'm not saying go with what appearances. But i'm just saying what if you don't you to pursue engineering and you don't really love engineering. Put it put it as number while put musical number two puts another thing is a backup or will so that if you do get accepted guy. Engineering. 'cause they also tell you what the what your status for your second choice is and your third so if you do get selected for engineering and music then you know or you tell your parents now. Mara engineering kate. Orange engineering barucha qualify. Then you know who you would be called gum or visit you. You tell them about into music. Instead i know would next with this because you have so much more information to offer. So who believe with this as part wine right next to one or a conway were going to discuss. What science so those. That are interested in water a so much but they put tonight. I mean the information is going to be vice students. You know So all i can say is guys who follow up sto inches sits you follow ups you know and be open to a lot of options. Don't just hug onto one type of career choice. You know shirley in their career fueled these different types of the inches that you can really really really really executional like right marketing and all those things so surely these give options. Look at what you're good at and look at your capabilities at the same time right. Your like i'm talking about educationwise and look at what exactly you be able to do. What will make you happy at the same time. Because you don't want to do something that's gonna lead to happiness and you're gonna lead to depression. Soap follow up. Follow up if it means you have to be blowing up the mail for the next two months or so or three weeks dussault because at the end of the day your future. It's your jacket but thank you so much for tonight's episode. Like wow how how to apply in tokyo is the is the formation but limited in time so i does look for the next episode with this episode. We learnt so hope that tibbs that she's given out in terms of applied to varsity getting to a high institution. Or maybe it's a college whatever. Apply news these tips from somebody that is done with varsity and the extending the current qualification. You know matters of that is quite. They've graduated but they decided to extend that they love. Education should be committed study. Study study inevitable. deacon never be. it's never too late that he so yeah guys so look out for the next episode much though guys much love i your mr fox. Zeal and i was sitting down with the one and only because our going. I am a really nice sitting down with arado. We're looking for the next episode. This is only part one or conway lie in university institutions.

divan university dimick Chichewa ciccio kim varsity boston higher education department horry boston Clinton Nick saban oakland woodside Hori department of higher education bosque guinea tori minto lino
Episode 2: The art of positive thinking

First Podcast

58:45 min | 1 year ago

Episode 2: The art of positive thinking

"Welcome to leadership on the Front Foot with your host David Andrew CEO and founder of capital partners private, both advised and author of wealth repurpose h week, leadership on the front foot will explore range of leadership topics and interview some of our communities best and brightest latest. Leadership on the front foot was established to provide different ideas and thinking for our community. The views in this podcast, a general in nature, and should not be construed as advice. Today David Interviews Clinical Psychologist Alex halt on the art of staying positive in these trying times. Alex is a practicing clinical psychologist with over thirty five years in government and private enterprise. Immediately episode we're discussing all things, psychology and immaterial the art of positive thinking. This covid nineteen pandemic has had many papal on a roller coaster of admissions some through the loss of employment others because of isolation for others. The experiences enjoyable almost CATHODIC. We appear to be on the eve of an easing of restrictions where family and community life can get back to some sort of normality, but undoubtedly there will still be challenges ahead for all of us. So to help me unpack this topic I'm joined today by my friend Alex Alex is a practicing clinical psychologists with over thirty five years. Experience government in providence across. The fifteen years, Alex Hid the employee assistance program at Woodside Road. Wishing name dealt with the food catastrophe of issues for employees and families, and as a result, she's a real expert. in the psychological impact of accidents. Emergencies change fatigue stress in the workplace. Today. Alex's product practice is in the area of anxiety, depression, trauma, bereavement and workplace stress. Alex welcome and thank you so much for joining David I was just mucking around with my mute button salary. Everyone gets pleasure to be here and hello, everyone. Let's just both of us. Apologizing environments forward should win for our technical deficiencies, but also I was laughing with Alex before we came online, but I've been stoked by man with a leaf blower everywhere. Guy Scott turns up so if he turns out apologies in advance. Alex some lit stuck with you. What drew you to psychology in the first place? That's a very good question. And you put me on just to set you to ask me that, and it's really Tony had me thinking I. Guess that to me. I've always been interested in ideas. Always enjoyed talking about ideas talking about things and initially philosophy. And I agree was actually manager and then I discovered. There's not lots of jobs. So I ended up joining the government and Over the next. Five to ten years kind of wandered around exploring things. Started to. Do sock units part time I did fourth year organizational victim. That's what I like, and I found it as George Dry and boring as provoked so i. Started I was working retail. medic happened accidentally, and then I suddenly realized I should be doing technical. That's what I really wanted to. And I was very fortunate. That I had a boss. WHO's incredibly supportive? Encouraging, so I actually did mind. Adenoma psychology Pat Tom word. But he was very supportive of managed to get the time off I had a lot of price, too, so that's how it was one of those things I didn't five years of age. Wake up, go one going to be clinical psychologist, but I'm very lucky that I wanted something that i. really really really like. and I think it's a privilege to have a job that you. You really feel that. It's just figured the. Better. That's a really nice place to stop on on fascinated by psychology and the why our world is evolving. And we as human rights or evolving. It strikes me that one hundred years ago. They probably wouldn't many psychologists tonight. There's a law what what's changing in society that that means the this such a great need for people like you and the services, and the and the the help that you. I will give people. I think there's a number of factors I. think that it's a question. I actually get. Asked a lot by my climbs. Why do so many psychologists? And, it just seems confusing the first thing on size that. It's. Gone what to do with the Industrial Revolution Post, the industrial revolution, the pace of life just ramped up room. And I was used my grandmother's an example. My grandmother grew up. She walked everywhere. she was part of a close knit family lived in a village. She knew everybody in the village. And by the time she died. People were living in nuclear families. Pace was just incredible and we becoming globalised. So you got to know all the news from all over the world, which itself can be quite confronting and what I find with so many of my clients, and for myself is that theoretically will Morton Gadgetry? All the things that the industrial revolution is GonNa do I was GonNa make our life easier. All it does is make make you feel like you should be doing more. Most of my clients have a lot of difficulty literally is slowing down to the pace of life I see. A lot of high achievers and high treason visited Tori. Sleep bad just. CanNot I feel I should be doing something, so I think that that hangs. We shouldn't underestimate I. think too that we get on bad by so much information, but we talk a lot at a bit of a joke. The tyranny of choice you to the supermarket it used to be a choice of trae olive oils now sixty voyles, and there's all different kinds of autumn oils. Which one should I choose and that's all around you, and then, of course we throw in social media and social media is. A very mixed releasing. It's great for this. It's been great in the Coleman. But I think that it can be incredibly destructive because what it leads to his you. You see people telling you how wonderful their lives are. Know the real story. It's not the real story, but when young you start comparing your sexual all the other kids and you start to feel that your life isn't as good that it must be something wrong until you can really start doubting. Don't self and I think that it's it's what's even Saturn terms psychologists. The May my partner in practice, six children, and we could clone who ten times marking the growth in anxious children is just huge. And depressed, but in anxious children are young. Age is just unbelievable and I think it's because there's so much expectation this. What for number organization than a whole notion of continuous improvement? So you have a really good year in your Chiro cable he calls, and then you told next year. We're ramping it up. Keeps getting back to. That when I went to school. I knew I was probably going to go to university. There wasn't the pressure made in terms of exactly what Michael to get. school was pretty easy going. And that was in the denied where you could knock around on the weekend in thing. And you could go out and you. Mom didn't know where you world. You would just out with your friends. Dot Down the river riding your bikes so I think there's a lot of pressure. And The globalization stuff, too. I think impacted because you bombarded. We've signed much information in a lot of. It's not very pleasant, so people can get vicariously traumatized just by watching the news, so I think there's a lot of factors, but I do think that we underestimate. that. People from decided me. Why are you telling me I have to exercise? And why are you telling me to take meditation I said because. Our pay after segment, my grandmother used to walk everywhere. How often do you talk for war? My grandmother used to sit quietly and do nails needles cross-stitching savings. What do you do that settles down? We have to ask officially. Food in those things that hundred years ago, people just deed, and we now have to. Kind of take retakes people that you can't. Society might have changed, but we haven't changed that much. What we need is still there. I think psychologists have to become the the add official fixes of of society really. It reminds me of lovely story. You talk about your grandma. My Dad tells the story when he was when he was courting mom. Courting was the word back then. Of course, it wasn't dieting coating. To help on his Bach and ride across the Soviet way. Mom lived in him. A Gloucester Straight and Go out on their diet together. That's bought. Just a different world isn't A. Tightly and I think that you know we think that often cite paypal. Long meaning many millions of years of evolution to get like these France two hundred GS. society in the world has changed. We creatures soon have some had wide mates, and that's what we have to kind of what we're talking about this Laura receiving. That's what we mustn't neglect. Before we move onto of this is this is a bit of a lift period? But you've printed. I talked a lot about. Financial Planning where I. You know the whole concept of keeping up with the giants this. I. Have Come to the conclusion that comparison. Is Heart discontent. When it comes to money and materialism. You know the fact that we. If this way incline, you drone to compare yourself to what other people do and have set forth. It appears to me that that can be distracted from money point of view. What what would you side just from general well-being respectable? I think it's it's absolutely critical I'm sure everybody in the audience sort of say, take cognitive behavior. Therapy is what we call third hat so sewed way, behaviors and very trendy. A new kind of psychology cold act is acceptance and commitment therapy, and it's really a stock, an Extension Sabre Tail, the Act I think it's a bit more than that, but one of the K factors of modern psychology is compassionate, focused therapy, acceptance and commitment. Therapy is exactly that one of the dilemmas is that a modern Brian lobster might comparisons. Now it's actually from an evolutionary point of very important, because if you garden fruit tray, you're out on the African Savannah and you look at this particular piece of fruit and you think Oh last year when we add something very similar. We will not seek so it's important. You have to make a comparison go. This looks too much like that one win better not touch him. So comparisons helped us, but what happens now as you said if you start comparing yourself to your next door, neighbor and I've got a new car or The! Kids will go to private schools. All. She's got one hundred friends on facebook when you start doing that, that's not helpful at all so I think you're absolutely right, and so in modern psychology will certainly the psychology our practice. We talk a lot about values and don't compare yourself to others. What's important to you? What resonates few? And getting values right and it's very difficult. Society wouldn't even very strange society. On every billboard that you drive pass on stirling highway is telling you to be dissatisfied. About this Kinda, you haven't got this handbag. You haven't been here for holiday it. So you constantly being told knowing what you've currently goes no off. You must spend more money because that's how our economic system works. So you actually constantly being told? Life is not good enough. Lot is not good enough and no matter and so Lord. My client come in. You can see that puzzle really complex. I've. Paid had all the trappings and yet I still discontented inside. What's going on? And so that's what the League philosophy, because these as the questions about what makes good lash, what as make a good life and I think that phase of the things that not enough of his address and really talk about and reflect a good life isn't having a fancy car if if being. Apparently rich and successful in the eyes of. Society might say I wouldn't have hotlines. That's the reality and so I think that you've really now that the notion of comparison, we says a very. Useful in one sense obviously when you. A lot of time, the comparison somewhat helpful. Digest. Begged. What you focus on is not what you have. You focus on what we haven't all. Won't you have got often sometimes why native and I think you also alluded to the fact that the summit was in the college shutdown. Spending kind of interesting experience hasn't been all bad and of course had a long feedback from clients and frames of Oh. Actually. Don't need to go to the shops every week and just by donate and. Actually it's been quite nice just staying at home, not going out all the time. and. We've kind of got to know each other. It'd be BETTA. It's kind of Nice, so it's kind of that slowing down to the pace of life. If there is a silver lining, and I'm very Catholic this because I think for a lot of patients very tough time, but I think one of the silver linings. Is that slowing down starting to think what is it actually that makes my life food. What is it about life? And maybe we've been so busy. We've missed some of the stuff. We've not through any intent picking. Don't intend to do this, but you just get caught up, don't you? The it just carried along. I've often think this whole shutdowns been lacking enforced sabbatical. Will. Really Nice spot to shift gears and talk a little bit more about the the non because you've raised two three really interesting points day. What! The. Key things your same with your clients coming out of this. Good. You started to touch on lab. Well, let's talk about. The good I think he's the this quickly. Run through that we know that the silver linings lots of people talking about it and in the in the media. It is the fact that pick them slowing down. Even mark McGowan on television got last night, said. This is the first time in a long time that being to have an evening mail with my family, because normally I have to go to banks and Fahim, that's a silver lining and I thought. Gee, that must be the case for loss of people in public life. You actually get to stay home in the evening. An around shaking hands with by so that that's that's that's it's that connection with family. Each stat. Thanh reflect, it's getting back in touch with the joys of simple cooking. Will that kind of stuff so I think that studies a bit of a so blinding, but I think bad. Stuff is is has been very Very scary for many people scary in the sense first of all MRS, obviously very nasty disease, and so people are frightened for themselves in front today, families than Frank's. The pig will allow. They're trying and that, of course that makes sense, but also for many people the. The financial slash economic implications are huge I have clients who have lost their job and have nar prospects of anything in the in. The coming months. Actually Years I've had people whose businesses completely economists. That got people looking after it got people responsible, so they're feeling really. Bad for themselves. Feeling really bad about this stuff, so I think that that saints we've lost that security that certainty about future and human beings. This one thing we like to feel we're not too concise. Is, kind of basic made is to feel safe to have a sense all deductability in your life and the look. There's a lot unpredictable and the other thing of course. Is that not only? Is there lot some predictable? A lot of control has been taken why we haven't charged Charleston a lot of the restrictions that have been putting that being put upon us. We understand for for common good, but still remains. Remains like to make their own decisions like to do stuff. When you're told, you can't do something that's when you sit. People's back gets so I. Think it's it's been quite challenging in those wise, the other thing too is for lot of people. The trying to whip from Hong homeschooling I can't get GRANDPA to come round and help out because it's supposed to be social distancing some, they are at risk. So overwhelmed that I was reading an article in the baby. Say about the fact that people actually. Burnt out because saw me goals to juggle. The trying to do everything Cape Life going moment for the children, but meanwhile back at the ranch, trying to hold down their. That's been burying really giant challenging time. And then I've had other people who have saved. Not much difference to my life. I've got a copy deploys springs very introverted and I love I love the fact that they don't have to go to the office. I love the fact that. Yes, they can. Just. Do what they want, so I think it's it's. It's important to recognize. It's going to be different for different people and I know that in your plight route to retirement or I retired, and although you might be worried about our financials situation, it's kind of. It's not made as big a difference to our lives. Young people who've got children in school try to pay off the mortgage. Got Full catastrophe and my heart goes out to them, and I've had had to seat with clients. Really work through how they're going to manage this. As I'm sure you have. It's so interesting in. You're absolutely right way on having some very granular. Conversations and that such a great privilege to be typing into that place where you. Have, those conversations and fear is on the table and. What one one of the things that I found fascinating last week Alex. Say is coming. Was We're having a bit of a round table? With some of our senior leaders inhabits US and dumb. One of the things was what what what's what's a gift? Pat Out of this and a couple of people. It's just time to spend with my kids. and. Amend the next question was what what are you finding challenging and was will this just nothing does not give because. Your office is took pices away from the leaving Roydon. So. There's just no room at all anymore. It's just full on. So, I must say I feel for those people with young children at it's time. I thought you were going to sending the gift that I get to spend more time with my children. The his spend more time with my young. It's essentially. That was signed yes! Exactly Yeah I, do want to do want to ask you a question about the place of work in now lives. In that you know, it appears to me that we've got. Broadly, two groups those who, for whom life is largely business as usual this getting paid and they going to work, and they're doing their thing particularized. Who have the privilege of Bangla would from? In daughters in transport. Tourism and travel and. Hospitality where it's just been shot. Must Be. I wouldn't mind just you just tell us a little bit about the role plays allies, and an a. why we're feeling some things that we're feeling. I think works important because. It. Pays the bills etcetera, but again from an evolutionary perspective. We need to get pleasure out of achievement of. We wouldn't go to the effort to go and find the food. Go hunting bill the shelves as so militia, point of view out the positive emotion is attached to achieving things getting things done that sense of padding yourself on the back nine. Yea, I got that done, and it looks pretty good so when that's taken. Taken away from your its its quite daunting, you know people often say open on really looking forward to retirement my side. How many people have you seen to slide into your timing quickly and comfortably? It's actually we nine from a psychologist. That's quite a challenging time. Those first couple of years techniques being a working pretty hard can be quite a challenging time to adjust. and. I think that the loss of work is is enormous, but also it's not just the shaven. It's the fact that you socialize it work. And so. For many people, the Camaraderie, the ban with the Clients Grant Bantu with your colleagues. You spend more time with your with your work. Colleagues and you do get people at home. You know in terms of waking time, so that's a huge loss at subway. You are very oscillated I. Think it's different if you're working from harm, because you still get to maybe talk to pay on the phone and have these kind of meetings, but even some of my clients should working from home have struggled in missing. Having opposed the next day. They missing that ability to and have a quick check so I think there's the spin social stuff and we're also from evolutionary point of view todd wide. To want to be socially connected, because that's that improves, safety is a species, if you. Live. In tribal groups in small groups. You can keep each other Sipho. You've got a greater chance of your offspring surviving because if you might social connection, if something happens to you, they'll type neutral the Lucar afterwards and see you can actually get big things done you can. If this six blogs that can build something but one blood Khan and that can do a hell of a lot faster so as a spacey's that notion of social connection and achievement actually has really been a benefit to us, and what's happened in the carbon is both of those things have being attacked? which then in turn makes is Phil I'm not saying not safe. Thousand anyone wonder that many overs we wake got middle of the night. When quite sure why? We're just not sleeping as well. We just find out so mulling over stuff. We. We just feel A. And and then we go all this is ridiculous, and I think this is important a lot of people are we just thought first world problems, so haven't Wayne. It's like. It's too. It's true that there may be people worse off the now's, but at the same time acknowledged the reason you feel anxious is that's the kind of creatures we are? It's okay, and then we can. Do things that US manage it, but don't try rationalize away. Those things very very bad. Just acknowledge it. It's Kinda have those feelings that just made your normal human being. Something minutes just struck me as you're. Talking is in the woods. You used the first world problem which which rolls off at all of our tongues. John Gen- generally with a smirk if there's. But listening to you just strikes me that as sophisticated as we are as I world as we are. So many about the hobbies are driven by things that have been evolving over millions of years absolutely. Crazy in some of that that fear response in the socialization response and the evening reverts like to like to socialize socialize on their term. Know I'm fascinated by that. No wonder if you could come in just on. How powerful loose those. Being Behavioral traits are for us. And and how? It feels to me, so we fight against them too much. Is We. Do we do and I think that that goes to the heart again of some of the new, the new kinds of psychologists talk a lot about the fact that you can't deny. You can't deny the night. Troops based and the what a lot of lot of what we've often tried to do. Is We try to control our emotions? Try to push them away without. Don't want that. Emotions don't want that kind of emotional. Don't want that kind of behavior. We try to control the uncontrollable, and it's just counterproductive and the realities that it's appropriate to feel anxious sometimes, but because beginnings idea bad nine resigned Saudis a bad Martian. We shouldn't have. What happens is people get anxious about being anxious, so then what happens a book triple? The amount of anxiety because was going to be this much anxiety, not only in that being anxious, and what about learning to have it for what it is, it's it's kind of response from your body. Your system single or we don't let this. WE'RE GONNA attack up signs, and he's actually really useful emotional visit motorbike copter safety. The other thing, too. Is that with depression? Depression really gets bad. Raw shouldn't feel fulfils sad. And it's like actually. Is, we should. Because things always evolving and changing, and we know that all of his will die eventually, and if you don't feel sad when somebody loved is if you don't feel sad, when somebody you values lost, what Kinda personal you so sadnesses also important. Only the emotions have been place angers number one that can get a really bad rap and you anger is very closely silent with justice win. You feel you've had an injustice. Put upon your. You can get very angry. And that's how we improve the world, so anger is also one of the primary emotion which helps us defend ourselves against opposite makes. makes her come up and fought the body, but in modern in modern person. If we get angry about something like third, world did in the Bob Geldof since this guy, let's do something about it. Let's make up money, so you see groups in Australia's. So for example, the moment, a lot of people in Australia angry about domestic violence, as that should be that sexually motivating people to do something about it, so it's kind of interesting that we we need to be more comfortable with our emotions bed at bay round for a long time. We share a lot of our emotions with other animals. Anybody who owns a dog, not exactly A. AF- rotten dog can become an angry dog very quickly because it gets angry because he thinks it's going to have to defend. It needs to get ready to smile and by so we shouldn't be shined those feelings we should. We should have them for what they are. Recognizing that I will pass, but listening to what they're trying to tell us sometimes. The very very helpful, but of course sometimes. and. She had to come up soon related, didn't she? Sometimes? Sometimes they come from the injury. Diagnose what I'm talking about because he's one of my workshops on have an internal chatter in our heads and mine's coke daydream for it's a long story, but sometimes we will make up bad stock, which gets his anxious or depressed for example on the face, or can say that my friends got one hundred more friends and I have to go see a token. Nobody likes you. I don't know. Know, why even bother to think you're either GONNA? Make any friends or in mice, but of my examples is that if I have show my practice, dude remade pops out and guys say is stuffed last week. That light. He's going back to the Jay pay, and you'll never get another referral. ooh You. Start to feel bad and what? We invited psychology what we're trying to say, people started. Take Take Deidre so seriously she. She's a possibility theorist. She likes to compare things. She rabbit sewn at about five percent of the time. She's really good. But she's not you. There's an issue and you have an intellectual mind. And you need to learn to use it, not her run the shore. In the sunlight is an emotional spektr ourselves, but not larum mushrooms acclaimed, because they'd been created by dadri partly so that ability to be a bit more grounded to to guy to to Crown, the best of listened to your Martians listened to dri and make that discernment. What's actually? Helpful? Gear is just a bit old staff. Or is this actually useful? And I think that that means that that's where the going right back to that stuff about the slowness. Poses the quickness of live. Slightly slower pace can be very helpful. It gives you time to reflect. To ground yourself and. See what's going on to not just be running on automatic, but I say to. My clients is pulling that manual for why would we like to phone manual? And let's see if this manual is what we want. Maybe we need to kind of shift. Things be saw that you're not just being hijacked by jury. You're running short. A good a couple of questions here. That were like really closely to those and thank you to audience members who are posting questions. I will try to get to the mother. Try To slop into the rot spot. One from GIN and they similar rate by that you can result into them to get. Some of experiencing enjoying SUV aligning how how do we hang onto the positive aspects? When everything goes back to normal, that's a and then this one from Geneva. I say we know about, but you need to. Redefine what we want! The work and community spice to base in the twenty-first century had. Can we tap into that name for shaved? Alex Mansions to redirect the focus of young potential community leaders who we really need them to take up the challenge of rebuilding the future, so there's one near about the silver lining one about. How do we? You know we're all feeling with so many of feeling that this in good things coming out of this period. How do we? How do we? Grab hold of that. Very very very good question if I knew the answer to that I, probably won't be running the world. I think that unraveling you having I'd rather heavy running the world, but. I think that. I think the the thing is that we need to be prepared to localize it. We need to I'M GONNA? Say something I never thought. I'd sign public. We need to have more conversations about it. Oh, my God we have another conversation about anything in this country, but what I think we need to think about is. What is it that way starting to realize so for example one of? Of, the things I've noticed is I. Don't drive as much anymore because I don't have. I'm not going as much in the whole world. Suddenly, the pollution's gone down so you start to think? Why aren't we doing more of these in work? Why don't we start to think about? Maybe some stuff could could kind of have a fifty fifty arrangement that you come into work. Does that can cause? Those that you can work from home will why don't we? We could reduce our impact on the environment straight away? we could probably improve mental health of the country enormously because people had that little bit more time to go for the war to not be so rushed to take a bit of time to meditate from some must people. They are so busy all the time that means I think that every individual has to be prepared to maybe hold their ground to be when they go back to work side of the ball side of their colleagues. I've actually found it quite good and I'm wondering if we can. Go Shiite that maybe I could work from home. uncovered is awake, do not I mean I have clients. I've worked for organizations way. They do that sort of a little bit anyway, but it's horses for courses some people. It's much harder to work from home than others but I do think that we could be doing a lot more of this that why do we fiery? Why can't we just have zoom aging? I've been doing telly. Health and some of my clients have said I can't believe this is real. This is Alex. This is I mean a lot to see you in the fish Alex, but this is actually fun, and particularly for some of my busy comments as not rushing around they ahead that little bit of extra time to spend with their children, so I think it's about every individual. Sighing. What can I stop to do? That might be a little bit different. What can I kind of shift at an? Often expect others too late for us, but maybe we have decide I can make changes in my life and if I stopped doing that, everybody else do that's how you momentum. It's about being accountable for what you think. This is being Beijing figured. Why don't you just keep doing what he lobby for that one? We will do that. That's how you get momentum going I. Don't think it's about one person being brilliant Lleida. This is what we're all leaders. That's quite important. What have I found is working better than the all old stuff in. Why don't I stop? Pushing for that. What am I stick with? That, answers the question that von. That's what I call a leadership on the front foot moment where where where you know, we do have latest all levels, and we need to make sure those people have a have a voice. Of his age of his is in one sense the later for ourselves. I have no doubt that if you did not the question, accurate I. Placed will let us know. On this RIPA. This is a report so my. Dri I call fat Boston. Now, I. I've got fat bastard under pretty. Good control. But he's there and tells me I'm reasonably regular. Occasional I'm not good enough, or whatever as if or you know whatever way went to some of the? Gory details, but this one here you know what are some practices that can be used to choose your inner voice by the way months code imaging are not. On. This is workout bony gymnastic my practice. But. There are a number of practices and first of all is be framed image in. Your Voice. deidra thinks Dadri is my intellect because I've had a university education. And I worked in places where I'm constantly getting evaluated. She's been Fed Phillips died. You know. She thinks she's the base nays, but she's actually she's just a part of me. She's not may so don't few we. not fusing with her so. That's where we side very simple strategies festival. The first thing is. I mean just to see what the audience wants to. Regular exercise helps you manage to injury because I. Don't know how many picnic pig, but she's she's. And then I go for a walk. I'm not a runner of got bad news for really brisk walk. And after about twenty minutes. She's kind of just gone out there. She's she's. She's dead, but she's not do when she's there. She's got me when she's out there. I get my perspective back and the analogy of us. It's like holding a bit of written paper as you hold it. You can't say the words, but when you get it out there now you carita. And then you can guide Yay DJ. I've heard that one before now. Knots never happened, but this one next interesting. Jj. You can start to get your perspective and use bits of Jj that a helpful, so you don't get rid of the to Cape her in in a sense of perspective. You've also want to not be angry with her frightened or who you need to be. I'm fascinated and on bemused by I. Think some stuff. She comes up with a Kennel I. Just thought about laughing at my dude response. We've gotTA. Have that a relationship which not one of fear? It's one of understanding. She's just a part of you. And that's okay and she's a useful tool. So, we know that regular exercise helps giving her a nine or him. Nine helps because it diffuses. It makes you can helps you separator. She's but some of my clients just go. Oh, there goes my mind again, but I think giving nine is actually quite found. It helps you, you know. Another strategy believe it or not. Is that we actually use an ex therapy. Is you get people to what Dude resigned? But you use a cartoon characters voice so only one I know what to do, Sufferin succotash Felix. The cat. The cat, but you you get used to stop sign. Stop to you in just city voices, and after a while you realize it just thoughts in trees. Just because you've thought it doesn't make a universal truth, so you start to play with the debate. you start to defuse you. Start to sit at being though crying today Deidre. A tissue paper joy, so you can play games for putting one of the most helpful things do is to start to practice. Mindfulness and mindfulness is very much. You know the flavor of the month, but it is an important strategy and mindfulness is this notion of being willing to have whatever you're having wanted is willing to sit with your margins. Be frightened of them. Be Willing to seat daydream. Just notice what she signed. Had had thought, but you don't have to buy them. Learning to seek with staff to observe. To develop that ability to have an observing part of you that can conju on the best of the emotions and the best thinking. Now some people if that got a very very busy deirdre sitting down, imitating is quite daunting because she saw powerful. So that's what we say. What about doing something like Yoga? polarities what about taking hobby and one of the questions I usually ask my clients is. What is it that you do in your weight that Wayne you do it? You kind of feel recharged. Dietrich kind of goes out of it, she she gets of you. Kinda just feel. Better. One of those things and people will say. A aquatic gardening. Episode of God and all applied the piano. I remember I've never forgotten I had a guy. WHO said chase don't tell the family, but I spent three hours every Saturday claiming pool. On planning the pool? I'm just cleaning cold. And I just everything in my head to seems to go away again every late. The notion of a mindfulness practice to help you get away from Dadri. Do something involves you've senses? Not you're thinking. A! Gardening cooking, playing an instrument seeming. To give. But sensory is well since we cooking is an object. Is something. It's involving your Simpson's and only do it what we size involving your senses do it slowly. Do it deliberately slowly and no multi. One thing at a time, so you're looney to slow things down to sit with stuff, daydream white like this. Should we tell him you hurry up? We got a lot of things on the list that we should be doing. She doesn't like it when you start to risk controlled from her, just noticed that. So I, want to spend time on on the idea of. The Art of positive thinking because it strikes me that this. is a really genuine scientific basis to. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY MA MA MON Seligman. has done some incredible around. The important of having a positive outlook on life, the importance of having strong engagement in community of of having relationships that nurture you of of finding a sense of meaning in life, an accomplishment will really important, but. You know some of the stuff I've seen in social media fades and so forth during Kevin. It's just simplistic until you just gotTa think more positive, you know it just doesn't work like that does. This whole notion of the art of positive thinking it's a powerful thing in science. We know that but had. Can we move in that direction during during? Difficult talks because some people find that will difficult. CANOVA's absolutely what I think. I would go back to the notion of first of all. have. Sufficient abusive scored term potent have some compassion for yourself. You didn't choose your Brian. You didn't choose funny thing. You've got on top of your your body. So have some compassion for the fact that at times you will feel anxious tangible. Fill down at times. We'll say more German going. That's just have some compassion for that that the night showed the based. Is that pot about? Brian is always looking for tromble. It's always looking for. The dockside was the first day that a developed was. We have to keep us so safe, so we're kind of skewed. Be Little bit anxious so i. always excitement of feeling anxious psyche Alex obviously something magical a little bit uncomfortable. It's alright breed. We'll get through this to have some compassion that don't just push it away, not a good strategy, and then as you know my. I call instead of I. Talk About Rational to. Infamy rational optimism is the fact that I can think positively as much as my life, but sometimes. Happens just happens on and some not. Just my God so to me. It's about. Having passionate. I'm showing pretty bad. I'm chilling front. This is not what I wanted. This is not how it should be. This is not even how could be, but if this is how it is. Stop, thinking about one of the things that maybe I have to accept about the situation. I'm one of those things that I can actually influence or change that serenity prayer stuff. And then the research on this is quite clear. The entitled Action Mike at Least Start through some planning, thinking about to line philosophy boys obeying. as good as a candidate given this situation hanging on make this work for May. How can I make my business? How can I make this work as best as it can ignite? This is not what I wanted. The, how can I optimize the situation cannot optimize it, but it's important that when you're doing that. You don't just try and rationalize away. Bad feelings use those recognizing knowledge them because. Those feelings are actually trying to drive issue action. The emotions are the motivations. So, it is important now of course as you as you say something or just what we call ruminating glove. That were we just ruined the night. Go over the doc stuff and so I. Think it's important. If you're doing that, it's got whoa dude got to. This is the point. If you've if you've got to know, deirdre will, you can catch that. She's trying to bring you down and I think Ben's Danes the time to. To take yourself up for will do something positive for a little while, and then revisit wrought. Get things down on paper. Get it out of your head. Go through the process Bortles I'm going to have to accept. We'll stop type some actional. Do some planning. I think that's so important that if you're worried about paying mortgage mounted USTA guided the bank, all practical things start doing stuff, and that's what will start to make feeling better. On Seligman, told slaughtered that learned helplessness and for some of us. you. Photo might have grown up in a very different environment. Where we felt very proud, as his children had parents abusive parents, we felt very powerless to do anything to change it because children don't have any power and that when something like the color and comes up that can trigger that old helplessness that so most likely to default baton. And that can be quite challenging I. Think if you recognize that's a beautiful. You're gone. That's the time that she quickly dispatched. Get professional help, so you can learn to manage that that helped us to kind of move vessel very hopeful way of managing things and be more proactive. Love that idea rational optimism. I think it's important that we have to recognize that sometimes people. An we sometimes have really tough things happen any conscious rash. Laws away affected the taps, but you can't try and optimize. So, How you manage, the situation is the critical thing is in die, but how you manage a setback. Yet and that look that certainly the they certainly the conversations were having that clients around money at the moment and what I'm finding fascinating. And I'm researching is the MOM is just differently? People who have bribe's plan respond to across the stimulus versus those who are genuinely let's say. That not only did not die. Not say coming, none of us did. Not, Have a plan in that I not had A. Calibrate. Their response which I found fascinating. Is a really good moving to the to the back end of our conversation and an auditor want to spend time on. Tips. And I'm, GonNa Frame this in the context of. You know I feel quite robust. But. I know there are people around me who are not quite side right Boston there. There are people who really bust for whom really bad things are happening. Most jobs forth so question let's come up in the faith that I really liked, and it was the first question upside at till almost the end. Is What's a good way. To help someone out a friend who might be struggling during the situation of a shop down or oscillation? What what practically? That's a great question. Thank you on what what what practically can be done in that situation. I think The obvious and that is reach out to them. Checking them the old. Are you okay question? Maintain contact because at social that that social connections is hard wiring towards. I think don't tell them what they should do. About be respectful. Do a lot of listening. To a lot of reflective listening. If they trying to tough it out. Just allow that. But I. Think it's about staying connected doing things like. I mean I've got I've got one friend who is on her own and works were situations pretty grim, said just checking in. We gone for social distance walks. We've tried to have a few laughs on trying to open up the conversation and talk to her a little bit about it, but I'm doing just a lot of just just making sure. She's feeling connected, and I think that's quite important I. think that you're very worried about somebody. One of the useful things that you can do if a person you think on wardrobe it causing often. They're not letting me and. Often plan at a psychologist, but being mirror just you might. The person's unfond I don't know what we worried about, but you can see. That is shaking or they'd be very irritable. I, was side. Comment on what you can see. The time we. Are K.. But you've been very snappy, and that's not like you. Know. What's the discrepancy that you're observing? You know there's been a shift in your behavior. That's worrying me, and I want you to know I'm here for you. Let's say that you're not going to be snot pushed away. Let them know. I can say that be the mirror. That's very important, but I actually do think being in contact. Checking in and I I've destroyed with paper on just on welfare. Check I laugh. Because I think that easing. And just having a trach and I think that if you the person does not starts talking about their views than I actually say well. Let's sit down and maybe let me help you make a plan. Let's let's see what you are worried about now that sounds. Will you do that for leaving but I think about friends who've done that for me in the past. I've seen I've been struggling and. And deceit down. That's I. Come on, let's just talk about it. Let's may be making the plan. Do you must be very careful? Not Tell people what they should do it already feeling helpless I already done have a lot of control so you what you WanNa do is try and help. People get a sense of control at that. They do have some influence in their lives. I think that's very. Slowly I'll go last. Christian here. Have you noticed any changes? During this time in the UAE leaders might decisions. The impact Obiang's is business and personal choices, I'd considering relate to that Kim as Aleida of a business. This being a couple of occasions this week. We're probably should have gotta find co from someone saying yeah you. Know, you'll know reaction things. What about you Alex? What are you seeing in times? What happened? What what I guess. What I've seen is that. In terms of the the people who are PEPs in leadership roles in organizations, and is Barth in my client were N and my extended family and friendship circle. Is that. I've seen a lot of what I call. Sworn Hyphen that underneath the water. Annoy the mullen tonight the gone. That trying to be all things to all people and taking enormous amount of responsibility on and think at. What I think that's if know somebody like that or you are that person? It's really important that you have somebody you control talk to. It's really important that you've gone. Oh, because it's kind of normal. The other thing that I would say she'd is also quite important that you. Too tough. This fine line between if you have. In the fatal position in the cone of the Staff GonNa Panic, but if you're totally in control and look fantastic Dagan field. Very uncomfortable with that opening up to you that I'm struggling. If you actually opened up liberal view, actually say. This is tough time, isn't it? You know I like I woke up slowly at three o'clock I. Do we that even? I Miss Mrs. Cold here wow. I think it's important to kind of shy that human side and I think ladies will do that. I think that's very important that you. You allow the Yoann Maury. And this is a tough time, but the and try and lead by example. This is what I'm trying to do to make this as good as a coup bay. And into the organization, still I'm trying to do to make it as good as it could bay and I think that's certainly what would often trying to do in my own office, yeah. Alex some as we wrap up our time together, and you've just been so generous I wonderful just a pleasure to listen to you I. Enjoy it so much whereabout leadership on the front foot. That's what that's why I've cited these conversations and I'd love for you to share with is a couple of thoughts. you mentioned earlier? We're all ladies. Come thoughts that help everyone bail later on the front foot during these time. Well. For me it's. Obvious thing to say I think it's very important to recognize it actions speak now to me, words woods, sometimes important actions but I. do think it's what you do not want you say so I, think it is quite important to think about what are the behaviors that I'm using that actually? Letting my staff Nar on the people around. You know that's what I expect from then. I think that's important. I think the other thing that I've. talking to a lot of employees as over the years and being you know having manages myself is at. Darbar so much about being liked to do what worry about being respected what we need. Is it people are? People I've had bosses allows Simpson's don't unkind. Not Really my cup of tea, but I've I've grown to respect them I've grown to respect them in the workplace, and I've been very loyal to them. Because I've thought why I, you are very up front, you can rely on you. what I see is what I get. That sort of stuff is so important. I think the other thing I wanted. I thought of only just just before we started. This session is I think too. Because I'm a psychologist and I say the people that come in in a bit. Damaged I work is that it's important elated to match. Almost feel safe emotionally. People don't feel safe emotionally at work. You are not going to get productivity out of them. It's it's like a contagion in the workplace, so it's really important to think Ahmad behaviors making my staff to size to that feel respected. To the ideal value and That's very important. You don't have to be locked by stock, but I think if you stop feeling. That can rely on you that you've got the. You've got A. Lot of people south expect my staff to be loyal to man. I got loyal to your style. You Loyalty, or staff, and grow and experience the people that I really have given absolutely everything I could for people that don't have my back would something. That's what I'd be saying and it would be. It would be remiss of us to miss the opportunity to point at just. How valuable that Simon Vases within a family is is absolutely. A lot of a lot of us even at my age with adult children. Adult children. How does that work? You know what I mean. Somebody going through tough times, and it's important for parents to be loyal consistent. That's really beautiful. Boss I really appreciate Alyx some that has been a wonderful perspective. Thank you so much for joining us today and being my guest. It does fly NAS. Sleep that if if anyone in your family your network. Has Gone issues and needs help. You can find Alex simply by googling Alex Hof, psychologist and reaching out to her practice I'm show should be more than happy to help and can I just quickly throwing Underestimate particularly east also. Sometimes if you feeling just ring ring lifeline, it's amazing hunters talking to one of these beyond blue lifeline having a chat. Just if you feel a need, that anonymity is good and I think that also said children. The kid's helpline gets used a lot. Because kids can, I can do it quickly and on that. They've actually quite useful. Fantastic thanks Alex. and thank you also to our audience joining the Vanden, asking questions I hope you've enjoyed disaster all leadership on the front foot as I said earlier place Ville free to subscribe the future episodes in a few lockwood shared a link. Send me a comment and tell me what you think. You'd find us on Youtube where you find your favorite podcast, so thank you very much for Jones. Thank you for joining us for later ship on the front foot. All episodes in this series are available on the capital partners, private wealth advisors website capsule hyphen partners dot com dot a year as well as our youtube channel and your favorite podcast APP and we invite you to subscribe and share with your friends and colleagues. Take care and we look forward to many inspiring conversations in the coming weeks.

Alex Alex depression US Dadri Guy Scott Brian lobster David I Deidre Alex Hid Simpson Woodside Road deirdre Seligman. Pace David Pat Tom Tony George Dry
Podcast Ep86: July 3 2020

Trainer Talk - The Podcast

1:10:33 hr | 1 year ago

Podcast Ep86: July 3 2020

"This is the podcast brought to you by showing gaskin of the Trainers Training Company, major task of the get that gang over the next hour, and a bit will discuss what we've been up to businesses and a top of wine topic relevant to trainers. We also talk about events to consider books to read a weekly top tip for online course creation, and of course it wouldn't be trying to talk cast without the Dope Walking Digest every now and again we invite a guest long to share their experience and expertise. You can contact us through facebook group. Just search for trying to talk the full cost. Feel free to email either Sharon. All me so one. Sit back with a Copper Might Not Journey Chore. Go a little bit quicker with all weekly inspiration for developing your training business. Welcome welcome, welcome. This is trying to talk the podcast. We're at number eighty, six and eighty six Sharon I'm happy to report is a happy number Yay. Number. Which is the facts I? Think one of the few things that frankly that I can tell you about the number eighty six apparently, there are eighty six metals on the modern periodic table. K.. I want the old periodic table walls, but apparently it's on the. Periodic table and eighty-six is also the code for the international direct dial number, but for calls to China which is you know obviously relevant because China is purported to be where this whole thing started, but then we got that's. Wise noticed the. Virus, apparently, so apparently see. Exactly Oh God. Let's not. Let's not even go there i. just there's going to be more and more rubbish, either. FACEBOOK isn't there in the coming months in the lead the election. Yes, okay, let's not get annoyed about that now. Tell me how you weeks been Sharon. How's it going well, God? You know the bill is still here as they will be the first few weeks yet. It was one of these in one of those weeks. and I used to do the same with my kids when they were on school holidays, I'd completely. Underestimated overestimated while I could actually get done while we had thanking crashing in dismantling around the house. Because I be fine. I'll just carry on. The I'll be at the center. The House that we will be fine slow. Loss demonstrates. The of the day are the future kin- books. I should. Cool yet at that, I was completely a mistake. I'm just the same though it's one of those things where you just go. Yeah, it'll be fine. They'll be there. I'll close. The door won't be a problem blood. Oh God. This is knowing. I know it wasn't just the. Law as I said you know, don't going to play the backs it. It is what it is that he is. We want him to not do this job, but he's just trying to work around it as a sad just a bit to a mystic so So ginette and I decided to the people on the teacher program Graham that we enough in extra support. The program officially finished of weeks ago, until began to and July. We have been offering additional coalition of the little facebook group when we decided he three, but do like A. Coal than to and quotes at kick them the boom because. It's the saying that you know. Typical thing won't SOCO's finishes. They know the medicine that in Boston they want to. Some helping conduct So. We decided to go on that range. They're putting. You know, did the? Settled the Lindsay at such a sector I'm literally the day before they were like holy, no concrete tiles and overestimate. That was so dosed. Just really in the backyard nuts and could not stop coughing Ono. This is just really annoying. kind of black coal companies able yes. And this continued until the next morning Cosa back again and I will. Take more als with dust everywhere, so one I. Couldn't himself thank to? And be two seconds, and I just thought Gosh about ten o'clock and I just. So going to be out to do they serve. No. happening. Fortunately because we have offered to testing than that. You were able to add report on. How? All was well in the end. It was organised one in the end. That was great, but The other thing that happened on Friday litsch was fried. I was just a complete. That was just all sorts of stuff on on Friday. We have We have the clusters saying we had. Know The don't groom itunes which come onto the digests on that we have these other guys. Turn up to basic kid level the floor because the whole floor issue has been. It's been an issue which won't go into. It turns out. They have to stop doing extra work in luckily the floor before they. They didn't tell the MITES mentioned this in housing. Well what became clear to us on net brought on fighting morning that Woodside actually? Ally of concrete down for the whole way we would be able to walk in it for research. A Gym Was it was A. Look it up in his bedroom. On I around evil. Big Staff they said you do realize that you're not going to be able to conduct as a full o'clock. And he was like Okay Wadi went, will at least a toil here at which point I thought. Wow God. Because, the toilet is no way. CARE SO I can't go to the new and then I saw. My gym session either because I. You know my clothes, says coast of the Boyd of. COMES JIM session. And then I realized that so wrong. Status Again said I think not come Jim Session enclosed with that. You always arise. Try Window. Stood if that God is in the back, God is the Back Garden Valley. Thanks of a train is not with. At which point I was thinking to Scotland shown I just. Dined. Isn't it just? Don't want to deal account last two full walk backwards toilet. So, a certain. What WanNa go to the garden because. Now, the builders and he's not really Kinda. Thing you won't be doing in your garden when you went display I'm EC when you learn. It's not easy if We could just exactly what we have to. You know it's taken off with, and we have other considerations. So, it's really hard. Okay well. That's going to be an option then I felt. Used Bulletin Loo. 'cause you know best for that reason they go links. Cassini builders. Virus number. So I just looked to my man. I just thought. Well now obviously. Off My face savage what we've been using. Excuse me one second, hello. Hold on. Sorry. Build his clearly have now understanding of the you know the importance of recording ah pocos. So, so what I was saying was so to buy me. I'm realized I said waking in your this. Which aside the office increasing mate seats starting to resemble some bed sit. com. Laura Mostofi. into this one space onto because the remove it, which is going to be youtube was being used as to shut us a charlotte. The tech toil acts of that on the tightness chart of the left to sing that because we say that's why we do know or she thinks that. I just. Tune it here. But I'm going to have to. To the coffee. And basically we say. By absolutely! Absolutely, you know on himself because when I go in back as I say I to climb on top of the coffee table snacks to it with all. The used as a kind of Ouachita Barry. Let's say gem exited WANNA. Tell you know keeping them in here cassette. Maybe my she to have the Dog Reema, which a little not traumatic when she was glad. Winnings over you know places August of guy now and. Talks told. Onto the coffee table and level myself. What. She. told me thinking wait he just well. I thought I couldn't get anywhere. My face. I am. I'm going to read for you, but I'm laughing. Insofar as I think there is any woman that doesn't know. This kind of dilemma. Haven't lived frank. You know we've all had to do it at point and if you haven't had to do it yet, your time is coming. Trust me on this for me. It was way back when when I was in bed. Sit, UM, when I was a student and there was just a there was It was a shared sort of house with bed, sits and shed both type situation, and it was it was a separate new and bath. So somebody had oversee you settled in for the afternoon to to have a bowl of what have you is so desperate? Guys the sink to the rescue it's. GonNa be doing. It has got to be doing so thank goodness. Why would it vandalized for? This was this story was retold at wind o'clock tonight and calls much. Wasn't it the week before we were talking about she we's. Lovey! Kind of. Weak create were highlight. Fantastic. Week instead also said in between. The the builders have much to to do so wet, but not as much as I would lives. Couple of yet shake clients this week. punking took enough. You know because they do seem seditious leopold. Every Bridge! Yes, it's not exactly a full day, is it? That they asked my clients like my pollutants where it. was parked right full out in the end I've been having chops with that attentional trainer to speak. His just likes the so. Doing that, and in fact I said you had video this morning of what are the speak saga books. Which is good Our team man the weeks though. I was captured. Remind it wants to. Talk about it. Oh, ongoing projects dot com silks I was doing that out then. Is it a been also a little bit of a another woo type week, so my no, said lots of the. Loss of inch wishing type things of big popping up this week. All full and into place and. Now enabled makes decide what's. The next next villa developments Get Big Sur. I know it's helped me this. How do you back after this Oscar? OFF CAN'T, wait Outlets. Kill them with it then. Get goes. It. It was great. It was really good. It started off really well actually. Insofar as I had an inquiry through facebook the week before through facebook page, forget that also mind the week before and arranged to have a just a chats as a deal with anybody forget that Colson line. Get that website online very happy. Top fifteen twenty minute chat with somebody to see whether it and see how I might be up to help if they then decide to go on and pay for something then great, if not no harm done. And, so this lady got in touch with me through the facebook page. We raise the chats on the Monday afternoon. So we chatted started the chatter two o'clock we finished at two forty, and by two fifty she'd bought and paid for my foundation package. Website, which is fantastic, and also it includes an. Here's a top tip for you. Anybody offering anything online includes an upsell in the payments sequence, so they booked to say yes. I want to buy this thing. And then it goes onto page that says before we take you to check out He's a special offer. Just for now. The author is a half price is excuse me mentoring session with me? And it's it makes it very clear on that page. You don't get this offer at any other point. It is only offered as part of of this, so take it now or or date entirely up to. And it absolutely works when people decided that. Yeah, yeah, you know they've. They've decided to take on the extra. The extra cost. L. That as well so that was a that was fantastic and completely unexpected, because normally what happens with these chances that you know you have a little chat somebody they take few days to decide, and they are the decide. Yes, I'M GONNA know head or they they sale. It's not for me at the moment, which again is absolutely fine so to have some turn around that quickly and Nicole cycle the notification through. Blame me. Okay, that's fantastic, really good start to the week very happy, not one and then the rest of the week kind of whizzed by oversee those the kick up the bump session which. was. Kinda quick arranges meeting, and then have people message you can in the group saying it starts at twelve. Ginette start at twelve hundred. No, it starts. Now I just want to do it. Really quick shirts go for walks builders. So it was fun, and we had six six or seven people on the call which was great, and I've seen subsequently that a few of the the people in our pop group. Have said they've watched three plan. Founded peaceful, which is gray and I think. That's SORTA thing that. Can provide some real extra value for not that much additional outlay from us, and the reason I'm pointing this out is simply thinking of doing the same sort of thing. It's a really common thing that happens. If you run a program with people, they get caught up in the momentum, and then if they just haven't quite finished as soon as the program stops them, continuing momentum on their own is really quantifiable thing so that's why we started this pop-up Group for for members of China Talk. And also people who fit program just for another period of time on the understanding that we weren't doing any more training. It was just you know theft them to ask questions with the within the same sort of safe environment. They've been before and so yes, so being able to sort of pick up on. Some of the messages that were in there. Some of the comments, the people who were making sanger. Would you appreciate this? Session and they did so really really happy. And that's the sort of thing but I know. fulfills you and me because we we can be helpful. and being helpful is is just something. That's that's what we're here for. You know being helpful and being paid for being helpful. That's what makes it a business there. We go, so yes, that was really good to do that. I had my first proper day of concentrating on writing the book, which went really well. Site very happy about that. That's another chunk written not quite as much as I wanted to do. But of course if we remember back to last week, not leave note today. Wednesday and Thursday were ridiculously hot days for most people in the in the UK. We had this many heat wave going on and this office when it is hot hot like fat when it heats up in the afternoon. You just can't sit here and feel like you're cooking. So I can go out of this room into the rest of the flat and be warm, but then walked back into here and go. Oh, no, it's really hard. And I had the window open and everything and next tools doing some renovations, so I kind of you know I'm kind of with you with the sounds of building book and all that kind of stuff going on, so it wasn't as much as wanted to get done, but it was cracking. Start for setting aside that day of the week. Some very happy about that. And then on Thursday. It was my suited normal day, but managed to finally see a live version of if the monthly calls with Denise Defoe Thomas in the in the money boot camp group that we by saying so that was quite nice to catch one live as opposed to on replay A. which was really good? Excuse me. And then Friday was. A bit of an old one. Just purely because I think. I mentioned before mom had an operation on Friday on her. to sort of repair attendant that according to the surgeon was in shreds much worse than he thought it was going to be issues in scope just for the day on Friday, so I went over to to her and Jones in the afternoon. This is the first time. During lockdown because I'm able to form a bubble with them, according to the England rules. and. We'll come onto. The difference in all the rules. So I went over there all seater to help out work. Could what happy and ended up staying there until Sunday lunchtime and Jessica doing various bits and pieces and helping. Her out and it's right hand, and it's heavily strapped, and all the rest of it and you just you don't realize how difficult it must be for for people who have. You permanent loss of use of one or other of that limbs. Just how much she rely on something like that, so it's just you know trying to think ahead of things that need doing including i. mean silly things like cutting up her dinner for her. She she couldn't. We had bowl potatoes with with Roy and all this stuff is considerably. Cut My potatoes up for playing. Yeah. Okay, no problem because you know, she can do that so yes, I am getting the medicine bottle open you know, because. Of course, he's GonNa. childproof captured an arrest. What you can't do that without two nouns so Let alone pouring out there the right quantity in taking. I see yeah, so that was also needed sorting out. And what have you so by the time I got? Yesterday lunchtime I had intended to to do very loud much black in the background we had intended to do. We I had intended stood. It'll be working in the afternoon. Excuse me, I just ended up sort of a flitting between different sort of little projects. Come thing I was thinking about going to. The supermarket didn't end up doing that. because I just couldn't get my head around the list of what I wanted to do. NEW IF I walked up to the supermarket without to clearly supervisor wanted to buy I would just end up buying rubbish because. Because I hadn't. Considered right on this style have this May on that. Don't have that meal, etcetera, etcetera and I. Just I was so tired. I just couldn't think clearly you know right? This I feel like eating and we talked last week about my own relationship with food. I need to be really clear. If I'm going to do this once a week. Shopping I have to be really clear on. On Ryan I'm going to have this. I'm going to have this going to have this so let's see so. I knew that would make it. So ended up having sneeze on the cipher, fiddling around the few bits and pieces scam was quite happy just up, and then we went out for national walk in the evening, but it was ever so windy. I mean is again today. Not Phrasing. Race Yeah. I mean when you reminded me of how hot it been last week. Like. His agents go completely forgotten about that. That doesn't stay Wednesday of visiting Tuesday night. was went down to the beach. Plus wine and disabled gorgeous. Go just! You know and yeah, and unlike the. Week of it was a warm look. We'll both back in jump is. Literally is GONNA weaker. Because is really excited savings, Thursday. He's tomorrow. And every year is always one of the hottest days of the year on Thursday. I mean this time last year I. Remember going to see her in cody from relent show in the dying. We sat outside. The cafe. The shade of massive Chestnut Chaves so hot was like exciting easily. To that put your best is always really hard. She said I never know this year. While a the weather is very very order the moment. Isn't it and I wonder how much of it is to do with his the changing pollution levels. Say the. Reason that my my head is going in this direction is years and years ago I read or saw or heard something that said there is a reason why way seems to rain over a bank holiday weekend. Even though we know, it does have been plenty of Nice days, and all the rest of Eight, and even you know the weather turns, it can be nice during the week, and then it turns over the weekend, and it's something to do with the pollution. That's around during the week. Because everybody's in vehicles, moving around then goes up the atmosphere which they need. Changes. What's happening and that's why the weather changes over the weekend now. Obviously I have no sources. No science nothing to back that up other than I know. I heard it years ago so I'm wondering if the weather at the moment is something to do with the fact that so many people in lockdown for three months and way less vehicles on the road. That's just somehow upset the ecosystem of the weather system. In some way, and this is just the result of it. We are going to have. A period I mean certainly this week is supposed to be quiet on settles. With three years, sunshine showers, strong wind, and all the rest of it and the thing. I was thinking about the dog. Will this movement hang? The thing that really gets me is when you out to the wind, and the sun comes out. It's really holds. Even though the air temperature isn't supposed to be that much is really whole, and you say okay. I'm out boiling. And then he started the wind is. Cold. Now I would put my. Socks. Hence the Japan the he was on the. You know the Thermostat so get into. The offices wound the heat was little Nice, toasty woman here love thanks very much. Well, it's. Such. A nightmare, this outdo cushions on my God. You know you'd like with you. You take Chad's yards. So we have a very cushions that all meant to be the tools said there's no bringing in because they all yell. Awards. Well my goodness. They literally is up. Against the door to dry them out, you know the media and then put them back and then the half the other in the next day. Maine's again. Why these shootings at all what we have really bad and I was literally. Rigging the now. I think. Get the cushion outside Coburn. Yeah, we'll see. This is ridiculous else crazy and. As say Saturday Saturday morning. We will finance. chat rooms in. That said that he will slow down. Measuring. SNOOZEFEST, Iraq who fighting athletes happy did now. Oh I spent all day. Initially I spent the previous week. Did look into? Yes, yes, at that Oh got the stage one. You measurements online. I was too much choice. Yeah, too much toys. We've probably comes onto. It'll be good to talk about something nine. Chambers choice I was totally. Like. He's taking some because table is not capable waving the other Ukhta. Anyway Barlett demoted. Final will check. Followed by okay. Press it Presi Presi. Presser. If he. Now excellent. You know we tweet full six weeks takes a long. They're. All sit six weeks eight weeks. Who knows? I think the the thing to be grateful for is that you know well? Theoretically, the building work will be over by then so. That's it. That's what we're all about so divvied like China tonight. Now because they'll look at me to they. The numbers chance I. Could be all by the time they. Which is an actually that far away in considering July stocks this week. Date so yes. Exciting. What at one stage we? Probably should leave this. The double digest that's. One! St Jab so basic removed the. So we have a sophie in the kitchen and we that we will always had a certain kitchen gnarled house. And so basically we ended to leaving that Sofa into full said we could see what it looked like Saiga yet. With bits of paper from the floor yeah yeah. It. Was So excited. She took Christianity said she was getting so excited bias, moving sobers lamb, and she kept like jokey go and sit in on the system and everything, and then the end once we ended up carrying be. She's trying to tell you something. By. Queen, Sheba Yeah. Yes millions trump sports me over the athletes. Do It really funny, because I looked to all these different surface. Will these different companies evident? We ended up. Buying the same though? That is in the kitchen. Yet No, the second cook different color. Yeah, he's not. It was what we put it against the window. It's the right size this. Out. That while. We know it works because he sweetie come. We love it and so one or two soldiers. I definitely. Definitely absolutely, if you if you like it. Know and then it works. It's what you want. Otherwise you spend ages looking for something. That's just like that one. You'll never find anything because it's one thing I've been doing a little bit of finisher sort of not shopping impressed by yet, but unfair close Vervoordt class. Just because one of the things I want to do in August are as I've spoken about is lots of decluttering including my office? And moving moving things around the restaurant, and I'm thinking will. Once this desk was a put this together. I made it myself out of out of other bits of furniture. The we're in here. And it, it served a turn. It served a purpose for this position in the room. It was what I needed, but it's never been quite right because overseas. You know high made from the. Bits of furniture. Rest of it was never a desk in the first place. So what I'm looking at is is sort of in various desks and. Shelving and that thing that she moving back into the corner. Excuse me of. The office. And what work and all the rest of it so am I found some really nice stuff up see I've set up. A business account on Amazon. So you know you, take the into a camel dot com stuff. Which I didn't read as I do. Until I saw a thing gang. Type long at all I just had to fill in the details I had to remember. Which address had the number registered against it? Because I, couldn't because my my company official registered addresses, actually my accountants. An, obviously, up my home addresses for other things. So I had to sort of you take a bit of a flyer. It's one of those kind of GonNa Press. Send and kind of squint. totten hope that that's the right one. They come back and go. No, that's not quite right. So I'm sure. And they said it could take up seventy two hours, but actually within about four hours it was confirmed. And, of course, then you get access to what they call the business prices for stuff on Amazon. And yet to do my comparison back again to go. Is it really or is it just a? Very, digital between it, because one of the things I do on Amazon for personal shopping is a US smile, which is small door, Amazon dot. How do which means I can pick a charity so every time I make purchase your donations. To charity so so I was on short personally through Amazon through that and if there's not much difference with the business. Right you get four things like furniture. They'll do it through. My personal account gets the money to charting claimed it back from the business it's. It's no biggie. Sam Checked that bit yet, but BS The sort of going back to the days of measuring and thinking and I actually physically get into that corner at the moment except getting the tape measure out and trying to imagine what things look at the right place. Having the ability to move the exact thing you want into the place that you want it going. Yeah, actually that works is fantastic, so it's very. You See. Around the really nice, actually because he cannot Slough, thing is we left the south of that on the mother child that live watch. You just. Put it that. We left it. Overnight on Saturday. It was actually really nice that every time we walk through that keep cooling but it's that's GonNa be one big way. Yeah, we walk through Diet was upset. Hopefully, it's starting to get the appropriate. is. Just just briefly concisely what it could don't look like well I. Tell you what by by the time we come back after after the summer. Break I think that it's going to be a like a distant memory almost four. You I know. You're right in the middle of it now and IT'S A. Really stressful at times, and all the rest of it, however once you get the point where it starts to feel more like you've put your own stamp and equal things where you want them and all that kind of stuff asking me fantastic, it is a little bit now. All the monstrosities have gone. in. The stage now everything's the whips out now is being conical. That's. In the to the bathrooms that she's addicted or check. Kobina the after the kitchen. And get reason by public opinions tile on my shower. I'll be very happy well seriously. If you talking about waiting in the sink, then the oils that you deserve. Yes. Pitches this week from with exclusive. Of They? Stay be most spoke. If, you're interested. Oh. Yeah, definitely, it's lovely. I love to unfunny enough facebook keeps throwing up. You know they do these on this day. How many? This is what you posted. It was eight years ago. That I was doing my bedroom so I I've been getting. The flashback reminded of the pictures I was posting about wall. Star is ripping everything out, and then guy back to basics, and all the rest of it, and then as I slowly built up again as looking at again. It was lovely. Is Guy, while that needs doing, but you do magma lactose. Quite often that you know. There's the gave my at ten eleven twelve years ago. This is led to pay. These seem to be just ten my head. But. Do you remember the thing that you would tearing Harrow ballots? What was? Different. Is Funny. Oh, I mean I. It's just what these sorts of things are ready for the majority of the time. They are really good reminders. That you know there's a there's a not so nice sight of these things as well when people get reminded of something, that's still quite rural full them Cypher. EXAMP- family members of Pasta way that kind of thing and you get sort of suddenly reminded, perhaps before your emotionally ready to to see sort of thing, but as a general rule having these sorts of reminders is quite good for for remembering. HOW DIFFERENT YOU'LL! Be you know and the decisions. You've taken to to move in that direction. Yeah how any way anyway should we go onto a top of mind for this week? They did because when we. Talk. About, clarity with yes. And this is about. By yet also Confusion regarding you know lockdown rules or using of lockdown. That leads us to consider what the The implications of the business. Indeed our lessons learnt that confusion on my cloud. Is a good thing. Definitely definitely. I think it's just. It's really interesting analogy, isn't it? Because we were chatting us, we always do pre prerecording podcast and just trying to sort of understand the difference in in the rules Noviny between England and Wales, but also within England. You know exactly what you can and can't do Because with the easing restrictions there is much more possibility for people to be confused now this is not this is not trying to provide any kind of excuse for the covets that you know came on mass down to Palm Beach and wrecked it. It basically the there W- There was no change in the rules, so that and I don't think there's any excuse for that kind of behavior, however, just in in discussion I was talking about forming a bubble with moment John, and and what that means, and an even mom said yesterday when I'm able to drive Chris. Lake Land near here and she loves LAKELAND. So he said Oh well. If we're in a bubble, allowed to come and visit you support. Should I don't know I know I know that I can go to your house. Because I'm a single person households so I can go to you. Inform Bob so I presume you can come visit my house. I don't know actually specifically whether or not that starts okay. I can't imagine it wouldn't be but. At the same time, and this is of relaxation from. Stay indoors to stay alert hidden on. Earth thought means. To. What the fact that people recovering the rules all around me? Well well if you watch GOCO box. Occupy. She's celebrity. Moment! But they were. One of the things that are watching was one of Boris is latest announcements which is about the change from the to me to to the one research. In England Plus. That was the thing that was the thing that they. Won't be to close Alabama. Teenagers always want me then you can do. While Mesa plus away do were supposed to more. To me, is that emission a half? Is it may? So much confusion. And I mean this whole thing is just stayed at an exercise in. You know. Communication lack of Lack of well I. Don't think he's lack of communication. Sense that Baz. They'd plenty of announcement. For this is row it, but it's what's actually. Delivered within my communication piece. Goes incredibly. Confusing I. Guess Not Rick, latently full absolutely and you know. Go No. So yes, we kind blinking that back to a business, which is the point Moore China make today is that we got something? In Business China went is quite possible. Look, somebody's at league. Tim Profile. All websites Oh to have a chat with the day to be none. The wiser of of what is it about who's not she does. It's so true. It's so true and I mean we unsure lovely listeners. You see that all the time you know as much as we do. You look at somebody's linked in headline or their profile or the way in which they describe what they do and it's like. Yeah, those are just filler words you know. The example I use all the time is empower people to be the best they can be really I won't aspect of their life, and which people and how you empower them now. I'm not saying that you have to talk about the tools that you use to get the response that you get to get the outcomes that you get necessarily I think a lot of people actually get confused about feeling like they have to explain the tools. They use to deliver an outcome. That's not what I'm saying that. In fact when people are looking to buy something, they don't care what tools you use. The care about is whether or not you can get the results so yeah. You could say that empowering people is a result, but it's just not specific enough, and because it's not specific enough. That has the potential for confusion over what it is, you actually do and how you actually help people because when people are looking for help, what they daily one is for somebody to kind of. To feel like in the nicest possible way, somebody's got inside their head and gone yet. This is the thing you need Janette. And this is specifically what you need. And it takes account of all the different concerns and thoughts and worries that you have, but I can get you to where you need to get to. It's the sort of thing I talked to people about when I'm talking about selling online courses, and particularly actually in the creation of selling online courses, which way your sales bit starts is with your creation. You need to create the solution to a problem that exists not create a solution and then go out and try and find the problem because you your crop about way so when we talk about clarity has so many different revocations doesn't in all aspects of our business and. And it has to start with if somebody says so, what do you do if you are still feeling the cold theory of dread tingling down your spine, the thought is somebody going some. What do you do because you haven't got clarity over that sentence? That says this is who I am. This is what I do then. How can you expect potential clients? Too To know what you do and to understand what do enough to pay you money for doing nothing I don't know you know. Thought that was where we were going with The analogy with lockdown up. Just made the point. He just make the point so beautifully. We'll talk about her. And it's you know it's not search that the resources say that there's a shortage of communication in the communication staff with it's what is being communicated. Yes, out, if you listeners I guess the most people, there is no shortage of communication you know. Most People Bullington profile most. From Sexually Jim Nicely have a website most people. Are used to talking to people about what it is a do. about. How the messages is delivered as the intimates, the difference because everything you need to put on your side what you say, your social media should all be saying the same thing. Just yeah what I do. This is how I help able. This is what to do. Do it full. Completely and I think as well it helps to think in terms of layers, and this is something that I really struggled with when when I first set up my business because my my natural preference in an personality type I want to a better way of putting. It was that. Right I felt I had to explain everything to everybody in one go so I had to give kind of the the detail so that nobody could come back at some point and accused me of lying. That's kind of what it boiled down to so let me explain what what I mean by that. If I called myself, a consultant that it was a consultant, full third-set set to which is. is where I'd come from and specifically a consultant in terms of in certain forms, and specifically within that I can help you with Xyz Blah Blah Blah, which is faulty, much information for somebody to take on in the first instance because I was struggling with what specifically am I doing in whom I doing it for and regular listeners will know my businesses a world away from that now you know. It can become quite sort of a cantata hands together to try and explain everything that you do in one go, so it's about having the right messaging for the right moment and thinking about the layer of messaging for people to to build up a profile of who you are, and also to find the right box to put you in I. Talk About this a lot, and did the future fit people, and and I still think that people kind of don't necessarily get it we we don't. As human rights, we don't necessarily want to think for sales sheep. We don't want to think while sales as being the same as everybody else, but the reality is, we can only express our individuality and uniqueness. Once we have given people a box to put us in because they need an easy routine to go yet. Ginette online courses and websites I. Yes, Sharon building training business. That's the books that people need before they then go right okay now I know I need something from that books. Tell me more about what issue do, and then you have the opportunity to layer the information and the complexity of what you do that. If I started from the point of view, saying well, you know, I can help you get your business online, but only online courses and websites and a little bit of social media, little bit of search, engine optimization, but really the. Of lost, you of already loss g with that stuff because I'm trying to explain too much in one go, whereas if I'd say people yeah I can help you courses. I can help you. Websites Britain that start conversation. Absolutely absolutely. We do this all the time. I mean you know when you're looking? To get somebody to come in the building on your house. You know you just you go full. You know a plumber or an electrician or you don't get. You don't necessarily what somebody you can do. All of those things because you know. How could they Dave Jecklin? Oh, while I can. Console giants are. We just see. You know all go to see you know doc, sir, you know you got a problem. Let's say with the Doxa your niece s listening because I want. You all be so as I say. Yeah. Thais -ly tight any. It's just so Putin is all about you know it's building Thatt's that credibility and actual switch as we know is so important in business. I don't really think you can be credible. If you are just offering also significant things have good cam. You Really Bay. At any one of those things at school about so about going deep, not why is? Yeah, and it kind of I. Mean it worries me and I'm I'm sure it's the same for you and you have to kind of Bite your tongue at the point where you meet somebody new particularly. If they are trying on this l., we know I can go anywhere and do anything. I can tell my hand to anything. you know whatever anybody needs? Trading on can go and train it. I K- but you home. You cannot train management and leadership and A negotiation skills to the same degree of expertise. You just can't do it. You know and even within management leadership. We know that management leadership trainers are ten a penny That's not being derogatory about management. Leashes tried as it just means that there is. There is a huge range of expertise in there and levels of. Or degrees of specialisms in there, which is why we ended up talking to people about K which industries do you work in because management and leadership within a tech or engineering firm is actually quite different to management leadership inside a charity for example even though the principal start off site, the application, which is where I think trainers, really can own their money is in the application the practical application of the theory. Anybody can learn the theory Book! The theory, the beauty of the trading is in the practical application, and if you are trying to be a Jack of all trades trainer then the problem is you're not. There's no way you can have enough experience to be able to bring those practical applications to life for for people in training, room I see all the time as well in the the company's comes nee, looking for China's, so we want to make the. Up, requirements to the Associated List Service. The number time along those requests are very very specific so early. They looking to somebody who can train in a specific area thoughts that looking for somebody with specific. Qualifications though he was wetting specific industries. I'm the number of times that people just completely new that they dishonesty in any way on the company comes to naming us. As response shown, but not single one of them. has as a Scott what looking for we chase? You know I'm looking for a specialist in this. Area. So it's it it, it's a big issue and it all were. Started many many times we will continue to talk about. The penny finally draw. As them, a lot of people out left and responding as not all. Penny how strokes? They're just not bright enough to take no steps yet, and it is absolutely it requires a degree of bravery and courage to to be in a position where you have been used to accepting any old thing that came along 'cause. You worried that you don't know where the next thing is going to be to actually getting off something that you know is not your nation there. It is Ding Ding Ding anybody full for voicing for that word there. It is the niche word. At that point where you've decided what you're leashes, and then you get offered a piece of work that is no longer within your niche, having the courage to go. Actually that's not me it does type a degree of courage, but I can absolutely promise you. Sharon can promise you anybody that has taken that step comprom- issue. Life gets better on the other side. So does the son move leads? Yes, Y. Tim and completely. And you get of this, is you? Know brings us back to the points. We make initially that you just get summit clarity. Won't sheep do that? Everything becomes so much easier. Boxing becomes easier you know. The the the business direction becomes much easier what we charge because mccheese everything becomes not excite us is easier for the people He will look into people like you. Yeah. Completing an I I've had experience of this happening twice in my business, I'm and I feel very fortunate actually to had that experience and to be up to speak from that experience, so the first round with setting out, gather course online. And that was the conversation with you where I was kind of Yeah I. Think I probably need to do this For anybody. That doesn't know Sharon's reputation as a flaw startup just have. We basically went along the lines of I'm thinking of doing this. Yes, you should do any need to change the business that I like what you've got okay or. I within the space of I, think it was probably only about half an hour. We'd got entirely new business name. not my my actual company name has stayed the same. My trading name is is the say you know these different brands now which will some point. Again into formerly the get that gang because I now have called on and get that website online, and there are other things that people can get online I can help with but having that sort of moment of clarity of guy. Yes, opposes is by call some line right boom. The website was built. You know super-quick. I knew exactly who I was trying to target. I knew exactly how to talk to them. I knew what my marching needed to be a new I needed to do and how to present Mont offerings. It was fantastic, and then the same thing happened again when it got to. To the point of setting out, get that website online. Even though you know as I've said previously, the universe was kind of bashing my head against for some time going really. Have you not got it yet, Jenner? You should be doing this as well. That came together within the space of a week I'd written five blog posts in a single day because it was so clear what what questions I needed to answer and how I needed to to do it, it was just like boom boom boom boom boom. It happened super-quick and in that clarity is the thing that did it having. Clearness of vision as to who I was trying to help with what and that cannot be underestimated. An and my business has grown exponentially or as since I point you know. Yes, there were other things and still are other things that have gone into helping that happen not least having. Supported a regret, accountability group such as the ambassadors. It doesn't have to be ambassadors. Oversee can be any conduct act cheap, but having people who are on your side or on your chair team. sort of yes brilliant doing that. Will you do that full high? No, not really back in this is the direction and having that opportunity. Yes, absolutely, but it started all started from that moment of having clarity over who I'm trying to serve and how to serve them. And you know it's the future people tell you. A W like Boris. Not Confused your potential clients if you'll messages. The clay get brave. On you'll find. The magic will stop to houses. It really well, absolutely absolutely all right exit. One I feel tingling buzzed. Age is now on yeah definitely. Listen to that I think we've mentioned this I. Just wake up so tired this morning. I think he's. Having to be made over the weekend, but I'm site time this morning, but now it's kind of note. That's it done it brings. Up Real, we offer the rice. The, post always has the power to reenergize. Does it's obsolete? I I would say, and it's the power of having a conversation with somebody you can bounce ideas that I think is is something that definitely won't be on the Restaurant Anyway Doku King Digest so often carting gem around on the safer light. The Queen of Sheba will else is happens. Uses touchy. Cook Remember this Sunday to have ads that had quotes. I wanted to win. That was going to come up, yeah. So all my goodness, they said so. We were so lucky system. Really strange find sympathy she. Wasn't not that many dogwoods an tables once all right hooks up the young Muslims ahead and just lucky because. Rebecca had corral. And she? She said Oh. Jim Pope wait hog. She's many big and I said no, she just all had you know? Find a Duckman. She said Oh. A friend of mine has daughter is said has to start a degree me. Business I was a great, so we've been off an our thoughts. I booked to the point at contacted today on Instagram and book appointments. And, she came out on Friday a absolutely really really jots. Who Can the garden you know? Did all that stuff was good as gold as usual, shall we say? We're really fully that because I was saying here. Working. And that. Could hit you. She's scratching frantically widow, and that I george mystery running to talk to her chair I was like Oh have got back, Saturday. Tell. He was just dying to get back. On a chat and even books. Honestly the usual thing she is half the size as she was because she hasn't put any way too little. I just always had. A. Dog 'cause amazing. He's like not only. The way. She looks a way she is. She she's been reenergized and I could not see because all be wet. Extra weights with a hat was just slow it down. Yeah, yeah, absolutely well I think it's a sign for for MOMS. DOC COPA as well I, mean he? He was practically Sean The dog rumored apparently said you know had to cut him that Short, because yes, his haircut so matted must. Yeah Yeah, so it really is. It's like Oh, she's she's to a beat. She's founding rock. Is like you know like the bill. which must be so much recruiter? Oh. 'cause. Yeah, because I sleep with all this happened. She's black while and repeatedly harmful. Yes St Louis Geology. Mak- chief. Cute. Even everything. No. Kid. Was Big news for us of double. Digest this leaked. Exciting well. We did have anything major to report. Don't think of the the the usual trying to get scam to come out in the rain I mean he's has been out in the rain, but you know he sort of? He's just really not that I about anymore and must be just a sign of him getting older I. Think Eighty Ish now so. Perhaps, that's what it is I know he doesn't like generally doesn't like being anyway. But on the really hot days we managed to do a socially distance doc walk with. Freddie? My friend Remmy. Answer went down to the potent, and normally Scott won't go into the point and the only time ready he gets enticed to do it is if we Freddie loves thomas all kicked into the Poland and swim to get it. Scam White Swim Ball is close enough for him to think he can get. He'll go up sort of to his chest. Thing so that was nice, because it hasn't rained at all the point, the point was pretty skanky. so was You're GONNA have a both when we get home. Then because otherwise yeah, stinky dog is not nice at the best of times. Stinky dog in Skanky Bond so so that was. Something? That needed doing but other than that because we'd been away, forbid at bums. He did his usual thing. Yesterday afternoon and morning where he so happy to be back in the park. He absolutely adores over that part, so whenever were away even for one walk? Away when we get back, lucky hasn't seen it for years and everything has to be sniffed and investigated, and and all this kind of stuff which you know yesterday in that wind was Kinda. Can we get to the bottom of this bit and go down the hill so we can get out of this wind plays. If all of these bushes, every single leaf on this Bush needs sniffing. Please, come on, put you on the lead in a minute dragging. Because I am freezing. But. It's fine. It's fine, but not nothing much to report from from the Dog Walking Digest that was somebody actually saying you say do this every time. Nothing triple Oh. Yeah, this is Kelly out well. Somebody said to me that apparently they. This is the mythical. They you know that they always comes up in conversation. They was saying that during lockdown. See Those No. Gulf over Queens Park. Because it wasn't allowed and apparently they were saying it was. It was great. How so many people? Members of the general public were using the park united for their daily exercise in that kind of stuff way more people than normal. And present way more people than the normally would use it because the Gulf wasn't there. I think that was where the thing he was going, so they apparently in inverted commas were considering whether or not to stop gopher, Queens Park, because there are in fact, plenty of golf courses around here which there are. I mean this this one. Just just down the way over the other side of the Wessex Way, which is made wrote in answerable Murtha driving range there, and there's all sorts of places the golf clubs will the shop around here. And I was talking to this person that had said they had said that and I said yet, but the the problem with that is it at the moment we can actually have dogs off leads a providing their under control. Of course we can have them off the lead quite a lot of the time because there aren't loads amends the public over there because there's going on, there's very few places actually where. SHOULD NOT BE DISTURBED GOPHERS for any period of time if they stopped Gulf that that means, says going to be tons of families and people going over there and sixty down, and having picnics, and all we have to keep dogs on the dates for want much much longer than we do at the moment because there, there's so much more to investigate and scam you know. I mean. He can smell one hundred paces. and Freddie Freddie absolute nightmare with people with picnics or even just people with bags i. mean he will, he will go up. He will drop his ball into the bag, so he's going excuse to rummage rammed to sell any food in that he's full for it. So. Having more people live there because there, no gophers and no fear of being hit by one hundred fifty miles Alco photo. Actually it would be great to not have to deal with the trauma of the gophers getting grumpy, because other people dead to us The the PUCK is probably a good thing that they are there and I. It sounded to me. Golf has been that the park was first opened. I think it was nineteen, hundred, thousand, nine hundred, and then golf was introduced like two years later or something like that, so it was always a public off park before it was a golf course. I cannot see them stopping Gulf of from part from anything else I think. He joined for some four hundred quit a year or something to to join the club there and that pace towards the upkeep of the park, not just the teas and the Greens, and all that kind of stuff. So I can't imagine the counselor going to be happy to do without that money You know just because it. Wasn't it Nice that seventy people will use using the park during lockdown Let's say it doesn't sound like something that is going to come true to me. However I'm actually not sure I would want it to anyway. Again I! Just something! Housing today. We are yes nothing to report apart from something to report. So So this time when people are listening to the podcast some day, you will be willing you're looking. Bonus is certainly well. Mind will be going on and nationalist will be going on in late scientists, I will be and then following bleak. We have littler who along the dyestuffs weeks today to six. July We also a half of go coming up with a Brighton on the ten. Manchester on the towns we thought. Newcastle on the town Telford on sixty. I'm at Bristol. I'm limited on the twenty four seven. It's. Going on July, so if you found the coming along the two hours of Lincoln on Your Business I'm the meeting lots of the lovely trainers. We did I say within you'll have cloudy because they all virtual of my when they don't necessarily have to be, you'll love Klaudia Have you slow coming on Friday nights? I. Might Have I. Say the gorgeous Emma Williams who is trenchcoat locally Diffa Cambridge of course. She was Paul of supposed to be on holiday this week. she and family was supposed to be on holiday, and of course that inevitably got canceled for them so she decided the next best thing was to come to translate likely bombers which I heartily agree with but you know, bring bring cake bill. B. Y. O. C. obviously. Emma does great cake from the pictures. That we've seen social should fine to to bring her out to that once a year and we've got. A couple of other people that are under the normal scheme of things would have to have a little think about traveling the distance that is all them to to get to bowl is not insurmountable but it would still be. You know have to think about that and take the travel time into account so we've got a couple of people that are coming that perhaps might not normally do size I'm very happy about that stuff so ahead of the two the train at heightened talk dot. Kate websites where you can find out what about trains with locals on book, you'll space because they are visual at the moment says. Up to to states to attend indies. Cool creations the. Yes so this week we are looking at number twenty six, which is all about providing sources of credibility for people otherwise known as social proof. So, I think this is one of those things where testimonials can sometimes be a bit of a sticking point, people, because then you know they they either forget to ask for them all. They're not quite sure if they can use them. And if they ask for many people, mind and that kind of thing, and the reality is, it doesn't have to be that difficult to get hold of these sorts of things but you do have to ask, and you have to ask at the appropriate moment. Any have to make it as easy as possible for people to be out to give them because I think a lot of people especially if they've had. A good time on your on your training session orange your online, course whatever it might be, you say. Oh, would you mind providing testimony? Yes, of course I would love to do that. And then that day turns into another day into another day to another die, and what tends to happen is in less people. Do it there, and in the moment, the kind of it gets put off because you're faced with blank sheet of Paper Syndrome and people aren't quite sure. What what? What to write. It does take quite a bit of creative energy, actually to to think about writing a testimony so I think one of the things that you can do when people have taken your calls, a have a video at the end, the warms them up to the prospect that you're going to ask for a testimonial and then don't be shy about going back and nudging people about it, but the way you can nudge them. Battle is to make it. Really easy for them whether you do that, is you give them some some kind of either question to answer all sentenced to complete so? Good questions to answer you know. What do you want to get out of this and you know? How did it meet? Or exceed your expectations. Don't forget a testimony. L. Is what you want. People to be nice okay to have leading questions in that. If you're asking for feedback, then you don't need in questions, but if you're asking for testimonial, you do want leading questions. So, what was it brilliant or just amazing? You Know Zach. Incentive thing is. Defined for testimonial, the other thing you can do is give them as a say a sentence to complete my favorite one. Is. You should take this course if and you know, imagine they are answering question for somebody who's looking China course in the. You should take this course if and you can get some really amazing testimonies from that, because people are then putting themselves in the position of of somebody who like them, but hasn't yet taken the course, and they provide the woods for you, and those words will speak to other people who are also in that position looking for your courses their solution so absolutely. Make sure that you've got. got some sources of credibility. One question the I get quite a bit is from people who say well. It's my first online course, and I've never run it before. So how do I get testimonials from people if I haven't had anybody takes the course yet, and it's a great question. There are two ways to to counter that one is. She used testimonials from people who have taken your trading. Trading in other forms, and you can be very clear and say his his some here some testimonials from from people who have taken my training, or whatever is not trying to form anybody with that the other option east to offer your course, either at a discount or even free. If you're comfortable to do that, to people in exchange for testimony, and normally I would advocate doing that. That in exchange for feedback and a testimonial, so they won't tell you privately. The bits that need improving and the bits that work really well in your online course and then publicly they will provide you with some words that you can then use in publicity about your course so that that's kind of the way to do it naturally. I have several on courses that can help you with this. But then we all so that's number twenty six provides sources of credibility or social proof for people to go a high okay somebody. Just let me has taken this, and therefore this is going to be good for me to. Really head wound funky Sandwich. I know armies. I think we are four and we. Think we also? We've recorded our last one for for June of this year. By the time you're listening to this of course misters, it will already be July. Where is this year going It's a bit crazy, isn't it? But anyway, thank you for your time and patience as always you can get hold of us through the usual methods another loud much like in the background. Around a lot today joy! You can get hold of us in in any of the usual methods but particularly. We'd love to hear from you if you also offering from a lack of clarity, actually in your business new feel that you do the help. in and around that then by all means, get in touch with us by email Sharon at the trainer's training company DOT Co. Dot UK or Ginette which is may which is gt at get that course online dot com. We would love to hear from you all right. All right take care and have everybody.

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Why you should define your fears instead of your goals | Tim Ferriss

TED Talks Daily

14:09 min | 2 years ago

Why you should define your fears instead of your goals | Tim Ferriss

"For over twenty years Virgo has been helping homeowners. Connect with travelers from around the world by renting their homes while staying compliant with local regulations. Homeowners earn extra money and contribute to the character of their communities and local economies. Learn more about vacation rentals and see how much you could earn renting your home at VR B, O dot com slash Ted. Don't let your house sit empty when you're out of town, visit Virgo dot com slash Ted to find out how much you could make into support this podcast. That's VR B, O dot com slash Ted. This Ted talk features investor human Guinea, pig, and author, Tim Ferriss recorded live at Ted twenty seventeen. So this happy pick of me was taken in nineteen ninety nine a senior in college and his red effort dance practice. I was really, really happy. And I remember exactly where I was about a week and a half later. I'm sitting in the back of my used minivan in a campus parking lot. When I decided that I was going to commit suicide. And I went from deciding to full-blown planning very quickly. And I came this close to the edge of the precipice, it's the closest I've ever come and the only reason I took my finger off. The trigger was thanks to a few lucky coincidences. And after the fact, that's what scared me, the most the element of chance. So became very methodical about testing different ways that I could manage my ups and downs, which has proven to be a good investment. Many normal people might have say six to ten major depressive episodes in their lives. I have bipolar depression runs in my family. I've had fifty plus at this point, and I've learned a lot. I've had a lot of at bats, many rounds in the ring with darkness taking good notes. So I thought rather than get up and give any type of recipe for success or highlight reel. I would share my recipe for avoiding self destruction and certainly self paralysis. And the tool, I found which has proven to be the most reliable safety net for emotional free. Fall is actually the same tool that has helped me to make my best business decisions. But that is secondary, and it is still schism. That sounds boring. Might think of Spock might conjure an image like this a cow standing in the rain. It's not sad. It's not particularly happy system passive creature, taking whatever life sends its way you might not think of the ultimate competitor say, Bill Belichick head coach and the New England Patriots is the all time NFL record for Super Bowl titles, and stoicism has spread like wildfire in the top of the NFL ranks as a means of mental toughness training in the last few years, you might not think of the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, George Washington to name, but three students of stoicism George Washington, actually had a play about a stoic. This was Cato, a tragedy performed for his troops Valley, Forge to keep the motivated. So why would people have action focused so much on an ancient philosophy? This seems very. Academic? And I would encourage you to think about stoicism a little bit differently as an operating system for thriving in high stress environments for making better decisions and it all started here, kind of on a porch around three hundred BC in Athens, someone named Zeno of city him taught many lectures walking around a painted porch a Stoa that later became stoicism and in the Greco Roman world's people use stoicism as a comprehensive system for doing many, many things. But for our purposes chief among them was training yourself to separate what you can control from what you cannot control and then doing exercises to focus exclusively on the former this decreases, emotional reactivity, which can be a superpower. Conversely, let's say you're quarterback you miss a pass. You get furious with yourself that could cost you a game if you're CEO and you fly off the handle. At a very valued employees because of a minor infraction that could cost you the employee. If you're a college student who say is in a downward spiral, and you feel helpless and hopeless unabated that could cost you your life. So the stakes are very, very high. And there are many tools in the tool kit to get you there. I'm going to focus on one that completely changed my life in two thousand four. And if found me then because of two things a very close friend, young guy, my age died of pancreatic cancer unexpectedly. And then my girlfriend who I thought I was going to marry walked out. She'd had enough, and she didn't give me a dear John letter, but she did give me this. Dear John, plaque not making this up. I've kept it business hours are over at five o'clock. She gave this to me to put on my desk for personal health because of the time I was working on my first real business had no idea what I was doing. I was working fourteen plus our days, seven days a week, I was using stimulants to get going. I was using depressants to wind down and go to sleep. It was a disaster felt completely trapped and I bought a book on simplicity to try to find answers, and I did find a quote that made made a big difference in my life which was we suffer more often imagination than in reality by Seneca. The younger is a famous stoic writer that took me to his letters, which took me to the exercise, premeditate, Yoma, Laura, which means the premeditation of evils and in simple terms. This is visualizing the worst case scenarios and detail that you fear, preventing you from taking actions that you can take action to overcome that paralysis. My problem was monkey mind. Super loud Varian sent just thinking my way through problems doesn't work I needed to capture my thoughts on paper. So I created a written exercise that I called fear setting like goal setting for myself, and it consists of three pages super. Title first page is right here. What if I thought dot dot question Mark, this is whatever you fear, whatever is causing you anxiety, whatever you're putting off could be asking someone out ending a relationship asking for promotion quitting job, starting company could be anything for me. It was taking my first vacation in four years, and stepping away from my business for a month to go to London where I could stay in a French room for free to either remove myself as a bottleneck in the business or shut it down. In the first column define you're writing down all of the worst things you can imagine happening if you take that step and you want tend to twenty I'm not going to go through all of them. But I'll give you two examples. One was, I'll go to London. You'll be rainy, I'll get depressed. The whole thing will be a huge waste of time. Number two, I'll miss a letter from the IRS, I'll get audited are rated or shutdown or some such, then you go to the prevent column and that call them you write down the answer to what could I do to prevent each of these bolts from happening, or at the very least decreased the likelihood even a little bit. So for getting depressed in London, like take a portable blue light with me. Use it for fifteen minutes in the morning. I knew that help to stave off depressive episodes. So the IRS bit, I could change the mailing address on file with the IRS. So the paperwork, would go to my accountant instead of somebody UPS address, easy peasy. Then we go to repair. So if. The worst case scenario happened. What could you do to repair the damage even a little bit? Or who could you ask for help? Some the first case London, well, I could fork over some money fly to Spain get some sun undo the damage, if I got into a funk in the case of missing letter from the IRS I could call a friend who is a lawyer or ask say, professor of law, what they would recommend who I should talk to you. How people handled this in the past. So one question to keep in mind as you're doing this first page is has anyone else in the history of time, less intelligent or less driven figured this out chances are the answer is, yes, the second page is simple. What might be the benefits of an attempt or a partial success? You can see, we're playing up the fears in really taking conservative, look at the upside. So if you attempted whatever you're considering might you build confidence develop skills emotionally financially. Otherwise, what might be the benefits of say base hit spend ten to fifteen minutes on this page. Three. This might be the most important. So don't skip the cost of inaction. Humans are very good at considering what might go wrong. If we try something new say ask for a raise, we don't often consider is the atrocious, cost of the status quo. Not changing anything, so you should ask yourself if I avoid this action or decision, and actions and decisions like it. What might my life look like in say? Six months, twelve months, three years any further out starts to see him intangible, and really get detailed, again, emotionally financially physically, whatever. And when I did this painted a terrifying picture. I was self medicating. My business was going to implode at any moment at all times, but in step away, my relationships reframing or failing and I realized that inaction was no longer an option for me. Those are the three pages, that's it. That's pure settle. And after this, I realized that on a scale of one to ten one being minimal impact ten being maximum impact if I took the trip as risking a one two three of temporary and reversible pain for an eight to ten of positive life changing impact that could be semi permanent. So I took the trip none of the disastrous came to pass. There were some hiccups. Sure, I was able to extricate myself from the business, I ended up extending that trip for year and a half around the world. And that became the basis for my first book that leads me here today, and I can trace all of my biggest wins and all of my biggest disasters of Vert back to doing fear setting. At least once a quarter. It's not a panacea. You'll find that some of your fears are very well founded, but you shouldn't conclude that without first putting them under a microscope and it doesn't make all the hard times, the hard choices easy, but it can make a lot of them easier. So like to close with a profile of one of my favorite modern day, stoic. This is jersey. Greg wreck. He is a four time world champion and Olympic weightlifting political refugee published poet, sixty two years old. He can still kick my ass and probably most asked us in this room. He's an impressive guy. I spent a lot of time on his Stoa his porch asking life and training, vice. He was part of the solidarity in Poland which was a violent movement for social change. That was violently suppressed by the government, he lost his career as a firefighter than his mentor priest was kidnapped tortured killed and thrown into a river. He was then threatened. He and his wife flee Poland bounce from country to country until they landed in the US with next to nothing sleeping on floors. He now lives in Woodside, California a very nice place. And of the ten thousand plus people, I've met in my life. I would put him in the top ten in terms of success and happiness. And there's a punchline coming, so pay attention, I sent him a text few weeks ago, asking him had you ever read any stock philosophy and you replied with two pages of text. This is very unlike him. He is a terse, dude. And not only was he familiar with stoicism, but he pointed out for all of his most important decisions his inflection points when he stood up for his principles, and ethics how he had used stoicism and something akin to fear setting which blew my mind and he closed with two things. Number one. He couldn't imagine any life. More beautiful than that of a stoic. And the last was his mantra, which she applies to everything, and you can apply to everything. Easy choices hard life, hard, choices, easy life. The hard choices. What we most feared doing asking saying, these are very often exactly what we most need to do. And the biggest challenges and problems, we face will never be solved with comfortable conversations, whether it's in your own head or with other people. So encourage you to ask yourselves where in your lives right now, might defining your fears, the more important than defining your goals. Keeping in mind all the while the words of Seneca, we suffer more often in imagination than in reality. Thank you very much. For more TED talks good at Ted dot com. Or. Ex-.

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Barrier Grief

The Sustainable Futures Report

21:02 min | 1 year ago

Barrier Grief

"Hello and welcome once again to the sustainable futures revolt this time full Friday, the twelfth of June. I'm Anthony Day. There's a lot of news coming out of Australia, thanks to all my listeners, patrons and correspondence over that. This news as well from Brazil and news from the energy industry. More ideas so building back better as we get the covid nineteen pandemic under control. And given that governments a crucial to successfully challenging the climate emergency I. Ask whether we can trust the government which rejects its own manifesto commitments. Amid all this I. Haven't that Black Lives matter? We are it seems at turning point, and we must hope that this time it will be a turning point for real change. The aim of the sustainable futures report is to preserve our planet for all for everyone. A Saif home for universal human rights to be preserved as well. Calling Cock. Patron in Australia directs me to a podcast about the great barrier. Don't find the link on the blog. Which if coast is www dot? Sustainable futures don't report. Graham redfern activists and freelance journalist explains how the coral has just gone through the worst bleaching ever with reefs previously unaffected breaching for the first time. What is basically means, is it when the world has to wall, the coral dies? The animals and fish on on the reef disappear, either because that food sources go all because they can no longer hide from prejudice. The whole place begins to smell. Of hoegh-guldberg is a biologist and climate scientists specializing in coral reefs in particular bleaching, due to global warming and climate change. He is the inaugural direct to offer. Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland. His paper publish some ten years ago, warning the reefs faced total destruction by twenty fifty was denounced as alarmist, but subsequent events have followed his predictions. Anymore more rapidly. This latest bleaching is the third such event in five years. Reefs need ten to fifteen years to recover. It is estimated that if we can limit warming across the globe to one and a half degree centigrade. Then seventy percent to ninety percent of reefs will be lost. If, we hold it only to two degrees centigrade, then just one percent will remain. Go Bag is one of the founders of the fifty reefs initiative to identify a number of reefs globally that have the best chance to survive the impacts of climate change, and to subsequently use them to repopulate nurturing reefs once ocean temperatures stabilize. Committee some time. As the ocean stores vast amounts of heat. There all some three hundred seventy five thousand square kilometers of coral reefs across the world, supporting the livelihoods of five hundred million people, engaging fishing, tourism and leisure. The commitment of governments to the Paris Agreement will keep the increase global heating. To three to four degrees centigrade far in excess of the cycle, fatty safe target level one point five degrees centigrade. Three to four degrees, centigrade is too much for reefs too much water supplies for protecting forests, and for avoiding von whether. It is global emissions which affect the Great Barrier Reef on the ecology of the whole world. The podcast ends with a message that the world needs to act. When was that not ever true? And that brings us to Adani. Carol dunce drew my attention a while ago to the Adani Group's proposed Carmichael Mine, which some estimate will lead to the emission of four point, seven billion tons of carbon pollution over its lifetime. The project requires the ability of new railway and the expansion of port facilities which will be approached by ships passing through the Great Barrier Reef. The Marine Conservation Organization of Australia says. The mine would drive massive industrial port bench, and along the coastline at Abbot Point. Over million cubic meters of the sea floor would be dredged for a new coal channel fattening, the habitat of Vulnerable Doug owns and turtles and dolphins. That'd be hundreds more. Coal ships plowing through the reefs waters every year, increasing the risk of accidents. Just one collision one mistake one spill could result in an environmental catastrophe in the Great Barrier Reef. Despite protests. Joan Engineering John's Zeman's will go ahead and build a rail signalling system while marsh insurance. BRECKIS are under oppression not to arrange insurance for the project. Donnie itself is under financial pressure as raised about the financial viability of its abbots point. Co Export Terminal. Writing in the print David fickling says that the comical line could be a white elephant. He suggests that the cold produced will be relatively low grade unlikely to command a high enough price to serve as the investment. Fluctuations in coal prices, only commodities markets could make things even worse. An article in the conversation points out that Australia and listen to the science on Corona virus. Imagine if we did the same for coal mining. Apparently, the project still has government support so the saga continues. Elsewhere in Australia youth verdict is an organization of young people across Queensland using the legal rights to fight for youth justice. They say our first case is taking five Palmas whereas a coal to court to stop his proposed climate wrecking coalmine from destroying our human rights. It will be the first legal case ever launching Australia by young people to fight Cole on climate change on human rights grounds, and we must win. I'll future depends upon his. Club is an Australian billion high profile character and one time member of Australian parliament. I've contacted youth and hope to bring you an interview. is on the north coast of Western Australia Woodside Energy is fine to build an engine hop liquid natural gas on the burrup peninsula. Gas will be landed from a number of production platforms. The company is actively recruiting experts from the oil and Gas Industry Aberdeen Scotland. Gas Is of course, a cleaner fuel than coal, but the estimated lifetime emissions of six billion tonnes from the project DWARF, even the pollution from a his comical mine. The Sydney Morning Herald described it as Australia's most polluting project and complained that approval was being sought by stealth. Clean Slates Dot Org dot a u out ten reasons why the hub should not go ahead. Find the link to that article on the blog. Positive news comes from Western Australia where there is a proposal to generate Jn using set of power. This has been county detail by patron Dave Bolles in his video blog which I mentioned to you recently. Funded on Patriot or on Youtube at just have a think. There is a specific link the block. Nothing is simple of course. The Sunshine in Australia's Desert's is clearly ideal for generating soda power. The problem is that if you intend to do this by electrophoresis, you need substantial quantities of clean water. There's not allow this in the desert. The good news is that research is progressing towards using seawater for an analysis hydrogen produced from clean water releases oxygen as a byproduct. Seawater presume release other residues. The alternative is to strict hydrogen out of natural gas. But this is the CEO to. The industry claims that carbon capture storage will solve this problem, but CCS, com capture and storage is not operated successfully at scale anywhere in the world. This is demonstrated by recent case where oil and Gas Company Chevron faced the possibility of having to pay offsets with more than one hundred million dollars for carbon dioxide emissions released at a delayed carbon, capture and storage project in northern Western Australia. The state government ruled against. Over an emissions condition. Applies to the company's Lodge Gorgan. Liquefied Natural Gas Development on Barrow Island in the Pilbara region. While Zeman's gets criticized for supplying part of the Infrastructure Adani's Carmichael mine on the other side of the world, it has signed up to a project to produce green hydrogen working with Union Pat Energy an energy company based in. Germany. Green hydrogen is defined by the partners as hydrogen from renewable resources. A graphic with the climate action article seems to indicate electrolysis will be used north natural gas reprocessing, but details are sketchy the violent. The big success story in renewables has across southern power with the of subtle panels, dropping by eighty six percent between two, thousand, nine and twenty seventeen. The hunt is on for new materials to improve the efficiency of panels even further. Peres skype is the current front runner. It's named after a Russian count to discover it it. It's a calcium to take him outside compound. Pair of skied captures energy from different parts of the wavelengths of sunlight silicon. And company Oxford PV plans to layer it on top of silicon to maximize electricity generation. That F enhancing the established silicon. PV's rather than competing with them. Parasites can't be printed onto a service with an inkjet printer and Swedish construction firm. Skanska is working to apply skied. Lay as in building Powell's. The theoretical maximum efficiency of silicon peavy is around thirty percent, but using a combination of materials, including parents guide could raise this to forty seven percent. Insulate. A Swiss startup has taken a different tack embedding a grid of Hexagonal Lenses in a soda Powell's Protective Glass, thus concentrating the light two hundred times. The key question. is whether these new technologies will be cost effective, and whether they will loss as long as they expected twenty five year life silicon panels. There's a new report from common tracker. KINGSMILL bummed Kaban truck at Energy Strategist report office said we are witnessing the decline on full of the fossil fuel economy. Technological Innovation and policy support is driving peak fossil fuel demand in sector of the sector and country after country and the covid nineteen pandemic has celebrated this. We may now have seen peak fossil fuel demand as a whole. This is a huge opportunity for countries that import fossil fuels which can save trillions of dollars by switching to a clean energy economy in line with the Paris Agreement. Now is the time to plan an orderly wind down a fossil fuel assets manage the impact on the global economy rather than try to sustain the unsustainable. Goldman's listening. Please, Sean. Clues said businesses usual. The Center for Research on energy and Clean Air. CRA CRA reports that levels of health humming air pollutants in China. How exceeded concentrations at the same time last year in the pasta days for the first time since the start of the COVID nineteen crisis. This includes PM, two point, five and two two and ozone. Appalachian levels plummeted during the national lockdown in February bottomed out nearly much have now of assault that pre-crisis levels Europe is fit. To follow suit. Craze rebound tracker is a link to the blog monitors equality in principle Chinese cities in real time. Whether these pollution levels are permanent. It points out depends on whether we have a green recovery. Meanwhile us from Russia seems particularly muted. There's not a lot in the press about the oil spill in the optic region, but twenty thousand tons of diesel have leaked out of a pass station that. The BBC reports. It has polluted a large freshwater lake, and there is a risky could spread into the ocean. Emergency teams are trying to contain the oil which is now traveled about twenty kilometers north of Norilsk from a collapsed fuel tank. It is worst accident of its kind in Multan Times in Russia's optic region. Environmentalists officials say. Is unrolling that global warming is partly caused by burning fossil fuels such as diesel. Global warming as led to the melting of permafrost, which, until recently was seen as a rock solid foundation. In this case as the poem frost melted in unseasonably warm weather, the storage tank. On, the oil escaped. Once in the Arctic, Ocean knows worth will. I'm really surprised has not been more concerned about this hour. Just becoming inured to such disasters. Role President. Putin has declared a state of emergency. News from South America. Accelerating deforestation places Brazil which has sixty percent of the Amazon rainforest within his boulders at the heart of the struggle to prevent runaway global heating. This is because the Amundsen is the planet's biggest terrestrial carbon sink on plays a crucial role in the water cycle as well as providing a home to most species anywhere else on land. The Guardian reports a twenty eight years ago in June nineteen ninety-two. The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change was opened for signature in Rio de Janeiro. But since Brazil's far-right President Chhaya Bolsonaro took office eighteen months ago. His government is sabotage. Years of work by environmentalists and indigenous activists aimed at protecting the rainforest. And instead found the flames of its destruction by illegal loggers, minds and cattle ranches. In the year to July twenty, nineteen losses rocketed to nine thousand, eight hundred square kilometers and research predicts the rainforest is on course for a tipping point that would see it become a carbon emitting. In the Mid Twenties Thirties. Now. There are fears that the coronavirus may speed this up. They say this week. The Guardian reported that you can't bank provided more than two billion dollars in backing to companies linked to deforestation. Those institutions must now come under pressure along with US investors, such as blackrock, so must politicians regulators. It'll take a huge international effort to preserve the Amazon. Rainforest agribusinesses responsible for the one fifth of Brazil's GDP. If the cattle, industry is to face cubs. That must also be incentives. International Trade and climate negotiators have their work time. There is a job to be done by public opinion to. Out of the pandemic Z. Recovery. Last week I commented that the large number of organizations seem to have adopted. Build back better as their slogan. I've since found that there is in fact, an organization on website without title build back, Better Steering Group consists of green new deal UK Mad Act Greenpeace green jobs aligns public and commercial says Union. UK school climate network. Joint Council for the welfare of Immigrants Workforce, new, Economics Foundation Friends of the earth and three fifty dot org. And is supported by a large number of other organizations from health poverty action. To the basic income conversation. They say the coronavirus pandemic has turned the world upside down, exposing major weaknesses in our economy, and the deep seated inequalities in society that mean the most vulnerable people have been hit the hardest. But what we do next could change everything. As the world recovers. We have a chance to reset the clock and build back better than before. We need something new. We need a new deal that prioritizes people invest in our national health service and creates a robust show proof economy that is capable of tackling the climate crisis. They go on to explain that five fundamental principles which you can find a bill back better. UK, Dot Org? You can also sign up to join that virtual rally. Just tell the Australian energy minister taxpayer money invested in stop guests projects to drive the post pandemic recovery. Someone called out building back bad, but don't worry that. Go to use common capture and storage. I seem to remember a quote from some new said that IT industry was carbon, capture and storage ready. But just waiting for the technology than his bedroom was time travel ready. Just waiting for the technology. And finally. Writing in the Guardian, George, Malia, explains how the British government as introduced legislation to relax food, safety and hygiene standards that we have been subject to as members of the EU. When transition ends at the end of the year, the UK will be free to import food from the US, including chlorine wash, chicken, homeowner, fed, beef and vegetables, which may have being treated with any of the seventy two pesticides currently abandoned the UK. And this is directly contrary to promises made in the conservative. Party's election manifesto notable than six months ago. Is Count be in the interests of the population at large. So. Can we rely on such a government to take robust and appropriate action to deal with the climate crisis? Or will it just wait and see until it's too late as it seems to have done with the coronavirus? Amoco's. We need the Albans the Bolsonaro the trumps, and all the rest to take robust and appropriate action as well. I, don't match you if elect I lead you for another. Thank you for listening. Thank you for being a patron if you are. Thank you to all who sent in ideas and information. I'm always open for a while and you can come type the mail at Antony. Dash, day DOT com. I'm the that was the sustainable futures revolt. Until Next Time

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Learning The Love Languages of Your Wife and Kids (with Dr. Gary Chapman)

Dad Tired

29:10 min | 1 year ago

Learning The Love Languages of Your Wife and Kids (with Dr. Gary Chapman)

"And after a while they descend. There's no love there. You know all the positive emotions are gone and I feel like is it. Neither one are meeting each other snake. Yeah and that's often they find somebody else at work or somewhere else and they get new emotions towards this other person and and then it begins to grow and they falling in love with the other person and then they go home and say I just don't love you anymore and out here. How's it going guys? Welcome back to the DAD tired podcast. I'm your host Jared Lopes. Join me every Monday as we dive into what. It looks like it'd be men who fall in love with Jesus and help our families do the same. He can learn more about our books resources conferences and even online community by going to dad tire dot com. Let's dive into today's episode. Dr Chapman so grateful that you took the time to Be On the dead tired tired podcast. Today for the audience members may not be familiar with your work could just give us an update on who you are and what. You're up to these days names. Gary Chapman and I've been a EH counselor for marriage and family or allow long time and Recession for the role of the day at in the hull it and of course written many books and do a lot of speaking around the country marriage. So that's gotTa my life. Yeah you said many years. How many years have you been counseling? Actually actually over forty. Wow are there some things that have shifted. You've seen shift. I'm obviously culture shifted Over over those forty years but in regards to family. Have there been some major shifts that you've seen over your time. Well I think one of the major ships of course has been technology elegy which can be good or can be negative in terms of marriage and family relationships. But I think that's one issue that we didn't base you know twenty years ago. Yeah I think fundamentally however problems are basically the same if you have to blow it down. Most of our conflicts and marriage and family grow out of our own selfish perspective on life. If the husband is is facing Mary's with the concept of you've you you've got to make me happy You're not making me happy and I found somebody else. Who Will? Then you know that that sets the prescription option for divorce but if we have an attitude of love or the other of how could I enrich your life. How can I help? You know. That's the opposite of of the real problem of selfishness so a lot of other issues obviously marriage and family but at the heart of it most of our problems come out of our own self centeredness and that hasn't changed in forty years or l. e.. Yeah Yeah I WanNa talk about your book. Five love languages languages which is obviously most people know about that but before we do one thing that struck me when we had a chance to meet a couple of months ago You we were attending a conference. The other as a small conference France and there were a variety of speakers who shared with us. But during that time you actually sat in the same row as me on one of the days and I looked over and I saw you taking notes and I. I was so impressed by that because I thought what in the world could you possibly have left to learn. I feel like you. You should be the one teaching us all things Can you just talk us through that. Like wh- after all your experience. What motivates you to still like WANNA learn and take notes jared thank where either learning are we are regressing aggressing? We don't standstill and a month. Las Is always been. Let me to conference. I don't care WHO's speaking. I want to take notes on what they're saying because 'cause I know I can't remember it if I don't take notes you'd never know where you're going to hear an idea or an illustration or something that you know you have acquaint- heard before I that that you can use in your own ministry in Your Life so gi knows just helps me gleaned the most out of sitting there you're listening to someone you're gonNA spend our listen to somebody giving a lecture or forty minutes or thirty minutes. Why would you WANNA walk out? Forget most of it it notes you can at least look at the notes again and bring back the memory so you know I just. It's just an attitude of always learning. I don't like ever get to old or two zero to keep learning while I appreciated that humility. It actually taught me a lot even in that moment. You know you were teaching me even though you weren't even on stage so I appreciate appreciate that Another thing at that conference that stuck out to me as you were sharing and you had mentioned that you ask your wife the same questions on a consistent basis. I think there were three questions that you said. You often share our ask your wife. Can you share those with our our audience. Yeah they really. These questions really grew round of experience in my own life. When I was just really struggling in my marriage does not knowing how do I get better and I just ask God to change change my heart and teach me to have the attitude of Christ whom as you remember washed? The feet of his followers and I knew that was not latitude. Marriage was look. I know how to have a good marriage. If you're listening to a woman we'll have one. She would listen and blamed her but but when I really has gone to change my art give me that kind of attitude. These three questions made it practical because God Komo art and gave me a desire to serve my life like he served others with the very questions are any. What can I do to help you? Simple question should what can I do. Hope you cycling. What can I do to make your life easier due to make your life easier and the third question question is how can I be a better husband? And when I was able to ask those questions I was willing to give me answers the guide my behavior and I began to onto. That won't happen. It didn't happen overnight but within about three months my wife started asking me those three questions and and that's when our marriage really began to turn around my heart had already been changed. I was already in a whole different atmosphere toward her but when she started asking me those three questions. Now we're doing what God intended marriage to to took -CCOMPLISH and that is there's two people who are reaching out to love and help each other becomes what God intended them to become. So yeah those three questions were really a turning point. Certainly I imagine that last question takes a lot of courage and to bring up because I I I can imagine that. There's some husbands at here. That last question which is you know. What can I do to be a better husband and it? It's just a risky invulnerable question because your wife may bring up things that you're not quite ready or prepared to deal with. They were were you scared at all. Bring up that last question. Well I think I think you're right. First of all I think it is a vulnerable question And less wives are willing to answer. Answer it but I think many of us feel like well. No she's going to say she's been Harkin on it for ten years or five years or three years But really if we want to build a positive relationship we need to. What's in her mind how we could be a better husband because most of us likely think think we are a good husband to shape up? We'd we'd have a good Mary Tyler. Good husband But the reality is we have different ideas a good husband and we desperately need to know what our wife feels like a good husband would be would be doing and saying and and yet you still have A. You're getting information. You still have the choice. You can choose to do what she says. And make changes or you can choose any no. I'll luckily do that. But if you really want to build a good marriage we we glean information. And then we ask God help me I'd like to. I'd like behold this woman needs in life to help her become a person that she's designed to be really Jared there's there's great satisfaction NC in your wise return potential for God and good world. You know everybody's gifted differently and her interest or probably different from his interest but when you're each helping the other move out toward the goal and the vision that you feel God won't accomplish in life I L. Lean. That's that's a super marriage when you're in each other you know. Reach your potential. Yeah how long have you been married. Fifty eight years Slough so so worked out. It's working out. I was dad. Jared That's amazing that's incredible. Well let's dive into the The love languages you obviously. It's been a majorly successful book. In and a tool to help you know. Thousands and thousands of people How did you come up with this? Like what what was the background of the five. Love languages and How did this whole thing? It started really grew out of my counseling. Couples would sit in my office and one of them would say I just feel like he doesn't let are she doesn't love me the other Woodside. I don't understand that and do this. And this and this and this why would you not feel up anew that people were missing each other emotionally. They were sincere they were they were loving in their own mind with. They weren't connecting with with the other person and I knew there had to be a pattern to what I was hearing because I heard it so many times so benchley. I took time to sit down and read several several years of notes that I made when I was counseling and ask myself the question when some lunch sat in my office and said I feel light. Must House doesn't love me. What did they want? What were they complaining about? And their answers fell into five categories and later called all the five love languages and already using that concept in my couch. Link that if you want her to fill up you've got to speak live in her language. If you on him to feel a you gotta speak his language and I would help them. Discover each other's love language. Challenge them to go home and try it. And sometimes they'd cut back jared in three weeks and say Gary this is changing everything. Oh climate's different now. And then I started using it in small groups and the same thing would happen probably five years later. I thought you know if I could put this concept in a book and write it in the language of the common person. Leave out the psychological jargon just L. People get the concept could help a lot of couples. I would never have time to save my office little or no. The book would sell out over. Thirteen million copies be translated in two languages elbow. Amazing it is. That's absolutely amazing. Why I remember? I told you at breakfast when we had a chance to sit down that when I first met my wife you know I I I was convinced you as my wife right away. She was in his convinced that I was her. Her husband took a little bit of time to convince her but We were so different Our personalities were so different that I remember thinking like I need some kind of tool to help us communicate and to kind of figure out how we can be on the same page here otherwise. I'M GONNA lose this girl who I really WanNa marry and we read your book very very very early on in our. We only dated for months and I think within the first four weeks of meeting we were reading that book together so I don't I don't have as many years under my belt as you do in marriage but we've got we're coming up on ten and I think a big part of that was You've given us some language to communicate to each other so I appreciate that one of the questions I had for you is. It seems like so. Many people often Mary. The opposite of them are people who have opposite love languages our personalities of them. I was just curious. Why do you see that in your office? That people are consistently marrying their opposite. And if so why do you think that is. I thank seldom does a husband and wife at the state level which it does happen but Not really very often. It's like in many other areas you know. We've always santer manner. We always heard you know opposites attract right. I don't know what all the dynamics are in that. It's just that I do know that when we're in love we tend to just if we're ever going to speak off IBE languages. We'll speak them. When we left goes which is going to do everything we've ever heard of detail this show is burst? I that I love them. And so sometimes we in the dating stage in the end allowed experience particularly when we're really in love we've got you for these euphoric feelings. We're we're about to best wherever a a wake-up down at high hi after two years and we go back to normal Illinois Belive. We don't have the same level. which so I think at that very likely when when we are in that euphoric stage? We are speaking each other's language that we don't have the concept but we are expressing love in ways that are meaningful to the other person and and And we just assumed that we just meant for each other we're just we're just so together But when we come out and high and then the love has is to become far more intentional. Because we're not doing all those things that we dad we're doing what we do about nature and that's why I think we start missing facing each other emotionally. Do you think there's an advantage to people who marry someone who has the same love languages them. I think it it does make it easier because it's kind of natural for both of them to speak that language but what I found is this dared and even if they have the same love language language they will likely have different dialects within that language with Discuss list that every language has dialects like aspect southern dialect McKay language. But that's true in love as well for example or information a person's lot language there are a lot of dialects in there's encouraging words. There's words of praise there's words encouragement in. And then there's methods are means Gorbachev incorporate you expressly sometimes it's horrible sometimes into written. Sometimes we sing it to them. You know. There's there's still differences even if they have the same sleep bribery lovely. Yeah that's interesting that you talk about that. Because I wouldn't Leyland I were dating. I remember I was the first one to tell her that I had. I loved her and she didn't say that she loves me back right away. which was really kind of surprising to me but she really needed to take the time to think about if she she did love me? And what what that all meant And then maybe two or three days past and I came home and She had come over and she made made me a cake. That said I love you on the kick she had written it with frosting. I love you and to me that was like you know it was nice but it wasn't it didn't and speak this deeply to me but to her I mean she had just poured her whole heart out on the line and And I just totally missed it. I was like well. That's nice. That's a nice gesture. I was still waiting for her to say along with the whole speech behind it. Yeah and But what's interesting. I guess to one thing I'm learning. You know ten years in marriages. This is still a daily thing. We have the language to kind of process this now and were were we can say. Oh I think missing your length. You're lovling which here I think I'm not speaking. And what you know the way that you receive love But it's still like you know even ten years then. It's a daily thing I we have to remind ourselves. Constantly constantly of how the other person receives love thank. That's right you know it's like I talk about keeping the love tankful just like with the car. We you have to put gasoline in rather regularly are. It's not gonNA run and we have to feel the love tank on a regular basis One of the things I sometimes suggest suggest couples do as about every week at least once a week or so. You decide to your spouse on a scale of zero to ten how Foley's your Luptak And if I say anything less than ten you say what can I do to help fill it. They have it says to tell you what would be most meaningful to them own that very day and typically it'll be in keeping with their love language and sometimes one or the other languages but at least you know now what would make them. They allowed today. Yeah that is so helpful and I really liked the filling up the tank with gas analogy because all my ladies love language is You know acts of service so if I unload the dishwasher I'm just you know the sexiest man alive to her. She's just but I'll what I'll do is I'll do that. You know two weeks ago and think. I think that should carry me for the month. We'll get frustrated like well. Why are you upset right now? I unload the dishwasher two weeks ago so I like the Every every week this constantly needs to be filled. That's really helpful. You ended up writing a book about love languages for your kids win. Does that like uh what age do you think you can start to identify the love languages of your children. Think Jared by the time they're four years old you can pretty much figure you're out there language if you just observe their behavior. How did they respond to you? For example my son's love languages. Physical touch is grown. Now that when he was that age I would come home in the afternoon. He would run to the door grandma leg climate. He's touching me because he wants to be. He touched our daughter. Never did that evaded he would say to Mitt. Daddy come into my room I will tell you something he will it quality time undivided attention. So yeah it's there. It's there by the age of four. At least sometimes maybe earlier but at least before you can tell they're lug look like which and in what you want to do then is apparent is give them heavy doses of the primary load language. Now that doesn't mean clean you don't speak the other languages you WanNa sprinkle in the other four languages because we were like that child to learn how to receive love and give love and all I five languages. That's the healthiest adult. Most of us did not receive all five so we came to shelter and some of these are just not natural for us us and but we have to learn them as an adult. But if you really want the child mostly healthy you give heavy doses of the primary love language you sprinkle in the the other four two inches. Are that child is going to grow up with a full tank. And that's the most fundamental emotional need. The child has is to feel secure here in the love of the parents. That's interesting that you talk about how it's Really healthy for somebody to really be able to give and receive love from all five because when I've met people who have met people who say well I'm just all five are when I've talked to as a pastor I've talked to wives who say you know he doesn't show me love and I said well what you love language to say. I'm all five of them. I've always kind of dismissed that like well. You can't be all five. You gotta be at least one now. I feel like I need to go back and apologise. Maybe more healthy than expected I think for some people they do have trouble seeing Number one albums being more important the people say that typically are people who grew up assailing loved is their parents may be spoke all five of these and they see all five of them and they've always been out loud and then they got got married and their spouse spoke of these that you say that you can't figure out your primary language. Don't worry about it. Uh but but from us us there is will explore important and the other in terms of emotionally speaking to us. Do you think it's important to try to grow in the other areas or I guess I guess I've kind of just dismiss some of them like well. That's just not who I am. Do you think that's true or should i. Is it important for us to try to see. Okay well I am not a physical touch person. I'm not a words of affirmation person but I should probably grow in this area to become more healthy. Well I think I think the good news is that we can learn on these five languages as an adult even if we did not receive that was a child And yes I think to to Throw in one of the the time can be meaningful. Now they're number five the one that is least important to them is really not going to do much at all. To communicate loved for example my wife lovling number number five is is gifts we first got married. I gave her all kinds of gifts. Toma omit the woman gear. She's clothing. I did everything and almost everything I went out and bought and gave her. She took it back in exchange for something she liked. They took that his rejection but one day I said to her you know. Why don't we just cut out the Middle Land L.? By what you want and what you like. Oh that's hilarious. I've met so many men who are buying gifts and they just can't get why Their wife's just not loving it or return. That's so relatable a well I guess what would be your your final piece of advice advice to a young husband and Dad. Maybe early on in marriage have been married ten years or less He's got some young kids and What would what would be kind of your parting words to that man is? He's trying to be the husband and father. God's call them to be well I think first of all obviously is our relationship with God because we are not lovers by Sundayhtor We talked about this earlier. We're selfish by nature. But I think asking God to give you the heart of Christ so that you approach your marriage and your parenting in writing with the attitude that God has toward us and that is an attitude of love reaching out to help us become the people that we want to become he he wants us to to become first secondly I would think would be to to learn. Learn your spouse is primary love language and your children's love language Wjr and give heavy doses of make. Sure you meet that need for love everything else in marriage and parenting is much easier if you feel loved take a family. That's a loving family where everybody feels loved. it's just easier to process the normal conflicts and other things that arise in every relationship. So I think that would be the second thing I would say and I would say this and I know a lot of guys don't read books okay but read one one book a year old marriage and one book a year old parenting any if you only learn one thing out the book The net one thing. It's GonNa make you a better parent or a better spouse so and make time to read or if you don't read by books that our own audio let somebody read them to you. I've said in my marriage seminars on challenge couples to the couples to share one book a year old marriage and when I say share. What I mean is husband's chapter? She reached the chapter at the end of the week. They share with each other one thing. They learn out that chapter and his work through book once a year. That alone will likely keep your marriage growing and the same thing is true if you've read a book parenting once a year are shared buckled parenting. It'd be my suggestion. We we don't we don't learn it all in one lecture or anyone book but we keep growing and life gets better ryder rather than ending up in divorce. We ended up closer and closer together because we're sharing with each other in a meaningful way. That's so help. I love of the practical advice you've given throughout this interview. I I know I was trying to wrap up there but one other question popped in my mind as you're sharing that I I we're in a season now. You kind of as young married people. We go through these different seasons where we get engaged and we get all of our friends are getting married at the same time we. We seemed all kind of be having children at the same time. Now it seems like I'm entering into a season. Where many of my friends are actually getting divorced? Now and I just I. It's weird to me. See that I'm in that season of life for our freezer have had children another Many are getting divorced are you have you seen kind of benchmarks marks or Like time stamps for lack of better words on on these years Like every two years you you talked about kind of the love that feeling lean of infatuation going down after two years. Are there other like yearly marks within marriage that typically you see high volumes of divorce happen. Yeah I think. Research indicates that there's a higher level that or around the seven year mark between the seventeen year. Mark this this means as I came down on the high after the two years they never learn how to really communicate love to each other their differences emerged. They ended up arguing doing about their differences. And then the arguments they said hateful things to each other in a very harsh way. And after a while they descends. Since there's no love there all the positive emotions are gone. And all the August meeting each other's needs and that's often They find somebody else at work or somewhere else and they get new emotions towards this other person and then it begins to grow grow and I quote falling in love with the other person and I go moments. I just don't love you anymore and out here. It's tragic it's really tragic It's been so encouraging to me. So many couples have said to me. You know Dr Jam we're GonNa be honest yearbook on the five love. Languages saved our marriage. They were on of divorce. We thought that we were not meant for each other. We were just too different and we read that book and we look back on our marriage and realized how we missed each other and we took the quiz and we discovered our love language. And let's try this and we start speaking the language and within a few weeks wchs our marriage began to turn in a positive way. It literally saved our marriage so you get people the right kind of help In those first ten years and they can learn how to keep love alive after you come down on the high It would save a lot of marriages. I'm convinced and the reason I wanted to bring that up because I know there are a lot of guys listening. Who are in Azure mark the seven to ten year mark? And there's a lot of guys who are probably feeling like Oh man I mean. I'm married the wrong person. I thought this was going to work. But we're just two separate people or whatever the thing is and I just want guys who are listening if you're in that mark whether you know it doesn't have to be the seven to ten but if you're somewhere in that area just know this is normal like this is statistically you're an enormous spot but that doesn't mean you have to divorce it doesn't mean that this is the option for you. There are couples. Who are recognizing this getting passed it fighting for selfless love instead of selfish love so get help get resources like the five live love languages go to counselling continue to learn your spouse but You're you're not alone. It's worth fighting for Dr Chapman thank you so much for being here today. It really means the world to me. I know you're a busy guy but I'm so grateful for you to come and share your wisdom with US Jerry keep up the good work of encouraging guys. You know we all all hail we all need. People do encourage. Thanks for what you're doing. Thank you

Jared Lopes Gary Chapman Mary Tyler France latitude Woodside wh IBE bribery Harkin Slough Mark Dr Jam Gorbachev McKay Jerry Leyland Illinois Foley Mitt
The Importance of Closing the Feedback Loop: A Discussion with Dropbox's CCO

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

48:30 min | 2 years ago

The Importance of Closing the Feedback Loop: A Discussion with Dropbox's CCO

"Everybody today on the podcast is Yami Rangan. She is the chief customer officer at dropbox many of, you know, dropbox in our customers of dropbox. So I think you'll be interested to learn about the role of the scaling across a company that's hyper growth as well as a C exceeding billion dollars in sales. So stay tuned to see how Yami got to her role and how she's doing the role today. Thanks, everybody. Hi, everybody. And welcome to the chief customer officer human duct tape show. Where we talk to leaders about how they unite their companies to achieve customer driven growth as the duct tape of their organization. I'm your host, gene bliss. So be sure to catch us an I tune Stitcher at customer, bliss dot com slash podcast. Hi, everybody. And welcome to the chief customer officer human duct tape show today. What a treat we have knee Rangan with us, who is the chief customer officer at dropbox, Hello, Yemeni. Hello, Jean pleasure to be here with you, sank you so much. It was we were actually together last week. So it was a pleasure to be with you now to hear the story of your life leading up to this work in how you're getting the work done. You've been dropbox about eight months, but it certainly isn't your first track into this works. So take us as far back as you'd like to show us, I like to call him the bread crumbs, the stages that got you to this role y'all. And actually, I've been a dropbox now for three and a half years. A hug. You're right. You're right. I'm sorry. Yes. You're right. Thank you for correcting. Me. No worries. No worries. Now I have been in my current role for eight. Eight months at, but I've been a dropbox, and I've had the pleasure of working with the number of teams year for the last three and a half years. And yeah I definitely like your breadcrumbs question. And you know, my Pat that to my current role as been through a lot of Munich twists and turns as most careers, develop right there is never a straightforward path. And there is never a standard. Pat, I started as an engineer. So I liked to think of myself as an engineer with a passion for customers and sales, and I started as an engineer because I was always, you know, tinkering with things even when I was growing up and became a computer engineer spent the first five years of my career in computer engineering, coding, as well as talking to people, and one of the first realizations, that I had in my first year, five years in technical roles as that I really liked technology. But I really like talk. About technology with people. And so you a bridge villas I am a bridge builder. And I really liked that aspect of my role from, you know, days way back then. And so I ended my career went to business school to really make a clean shift and post business school. I've spent the last two decades in sales marketing mostly field based roles. And so the first phase out of business cool was working in product marketing sales increase sales, and I will say, again, one of the things that I really enjoyed about my early roles was talking to customers, you know, there's the, you know, at SAP SAP's was one of my earlier, companies there. I got really into this customer center city and one of my roles at SAP was Baillieu management and not a lot of people know what that actually means. But it is. Actually talking to customers about their business strategies and pain points in really. You know helping them connect the technology investments, they are making to the big improvements that they can see from a strategy perspective. So that was my role was called value management. And I, you know, spend probably, you know. A better part of three to four years talking to ten to twenty customers each week. And that was, you know, pivotal that was found day tional, and I just enjoyed talking to customers, and what I found, there was that it was not just about the product, but it has never been about the product right? Why do customers actually by technology because they're trying to solve up particular problem for themselves for their companies for their customers? And when you got them to talk about those problems, those challenges those strategies, and then you're able to connect what technology can do for them, then you know it didn't even feel like a sale. It felt like you're helping them truly. And so that was my job for better far afford five years. And that was pivotal and foundational experience for me in talking to customers understanding their decision making patterns as villas buying patterns, and so that only face. Yeah. I know I love that. You know what's interesting is, as we the topic and definition of value, I think, is becoming more and more prominent in our work as well, because it's not about touch points about customers recognizing value that they're getting that they can articulate back in their own words. And so that the, the fact that that was foundational for you is, is intriguing and also, again, one of those important breadcrumbs. Exactly, exactly. And that's when you know that, that true, passion actually came in and that was really pivotal. And then the kind of the next phase of my journey was going to workday where it was all about scaling, and I joined workday, when they were about nine hundred person organization, and when I left workday, they'd grown to be five thousand five hundred person organization, so it was very fertile ground for me to take all of my early experiences in Baillieu managed. -ment in talking to customers. And then creating organizations that could scale a pretty big and one of the things that was really again foundational for me at work. They was that the organization was very, very customer Centric, one of the core values and a one of the top three annual goals for the company was all this customer satisfaction. And they took a lot of pride in that. So for me it was bringing that customer central city, but also really looking at how we scaled organization. So my job was really to, you know, start analytic functions. Starlets strategy function sales enablement functioning competitive functions, but all with an idea towards scaling, and quickly as they were going through hyper growth than that led me to come to dropbox nearly three and a half years ago when dropbox was against scaling and we were scaling into the business side scaling into teams with larger and larger companies in. So one of my early roles was to help think about, you know how we kill the company as we were going fairly upmarket, and then bringing my experiences from both SAP as Willis work into the company. And so the first three years, spent a lot of time on a strategy looking at our customer base looking at our customer journey, but really from strategy analytics and operations perspective. But man that, you know about eight months ago, I took on the chief customer officer role, which is the first time that company has actually created this role and focused on bringing a set off customer and partner facing functions into dropbox and then really driving the customer center city into the DNA of the company. Great. Well, thank you for that. So thank you for walking through. I think what's really fascinating is what we're finding is in the technology company says. Companies, you know that are B two B B to B to C. Is that often people in these roles do start as engineers? You know there's a passion, which brings you into tack. But then at some point in time, there's a pivot that says, look, I wanna be wanna be built bridge builder. I want to extend this and people start adding on operational, specificity around delivery service sales etcetera, which is fascinating in your path now. You sit in your right up here in your views toward operations. Are you running functions of the business as well as driving the transformation for a dropbox, Yemeni? Yeah. That's a good question in your observation for a ride on as always, gene, and in terms of my car roll it is a set of customer and parking are facing function. So it includes marketing, it includes direct sales and third channel sales, eight includes customer experience on, for us, customer experience is, you know. Customer support, but also customer advocacy customer community building, as well as the partnerships and the strategy and operations function. So it is true that in the current role that I'm in. It is a combination of operational teams with the joint purpose of actually amplifying, the voice of our customers. Okay. So thank you. Because I think that's the other thing we're seeing, especially in tech roles that our chief customer officer or chief experience officer said in many if not the majority of cases, there is the, the transformation, but also the leadership of parts of the operation. So, so let's dig deep into this chief customer officer role. You've had for eight months. How did that role come about? Did you bring put the the seed of interest in it or did it come from someplace else? Yeah. That's a great question. So I'd say that. Dropbox has always been a customer focused organization, and the last two or three years. We've had a number of initiatives within the company to really drive the customer central city further. And as we were actually transitioning, you know, between in a Dennis Woodside, who was actually leaving the company as COO into Mike Kearns role. And as we were going through the transition, we were looking at what is the biggest difference that I can make within the company and what would be the next three years, five years, ten years of that journey for the company and it was very clear that bringing together a set of teams that had already started. You know, on that path, when driving initiatives, but giving voice and giving amplification to that was really the big focus for me. And so these teams were working independently. It sounds like is that correct? That is. Exactly right. I think this happens in almost all organizations. You bet. Not not really. As part of, like, hey, this is how we wanna do business, but really as a company's, call really kale and new, hyper growth, period. You know, we started getting a little bit silo, and we start thinking about here is what I'm going to do as sales or here's what I'm going to do as marketing and that's not the intent with which teams operate, but it organically gets to a point where you are running fast. And, you know, you really don't think about in constantly breaking silos across the organization. So part of it was that realization that could be bringing together a set of customer facing teams with a common purpose. And that's how the role developed and once we started going down the path that the momentum was already there. So it just, you know, I started giving Boyce to all of the teams that are already ahead of us enormous journey because you started saying, oh, look, there's this work in. There's this work in their this work. And, and is that when did you propose title chief, customer officer? Where did that come from in the? Yeah. It was it was really, you know, a joint discussion with with, you know, our head of people as well as our CEO in terms of what this role should be what the focus should look like. And what the next few years of the journey, should look like. And the just, you know, immediate embracing all what this role would mean and what we can accomplish by bringing all of these teams together. So before we jump into the definition of the role in what success meant means for the role for people who may not know dropbox. Can you tell us just very briefly, what dropbox does and some context as to the size and scale of the customer base in the company? Yeah. Sure. Sure. A dropbox got started in two thousand seven and most of us would know us as. Consumer company that was focused on really providing a way for us to store files if you really needed to be on the go, which, I know you are, and so many of the folks are, you know, you needed a place to actually put your content that was dropbox. I'm back was kind of the early days of dropbox since then we have developed into a collaboration company where it's not just about storing the different files, but being able to collaborate to share to annotate to communicate and get work done. So today, we are a company that is global we have more than five hundred million users of our product in multiple countries in behalf nearly twelve point seven million paid users that use dropbox for collaboration. And from a scale perspective, you know, we went public last year, and we have nearly twenty five hundred employees within the company. And anything about growth numbers revenue that you can share for people. Yeah. I think last year we just completed our owning you know, for twenty eighteen we are growing at about twenty five percent to end you know, in the one point five billion rage. Okay. Very good. And anything around an N B two. B. N B to C, correct. Gammy. Absolutely. Yes. That's one of the things that is fairly unique about dropbox. We certainly started as a consumer oriented company, but we found that nearly eighty percent of our consumers where bringing us into work, and using us as part of their team collaboration. So we are we serve both individuals as well as teams within larger larger organizations. So we're both B to B as well as to see. Okay. So thank you. I think the context is important for those of you who are have the role of the c. Co especially in as you mentioned, a high growth environment and scaling, you now a multibillion dollar companies, you know, certainly over billion dollars. But I think it's important because this scaling piece of the work is a very very critical in in this role as we move forward. So let's talk about framing this role. You know what we find is what's on? What's most critical is how people define success, what will be different? And what are you looking at in terms of how the company behaves in acts differently as a result of this role and also does this role have an end in sight, not in a negative way? But actually, in a positive way that it moves you organism to a place where it self sustaining of these competencies yet, you know, very tactful questions I think I will say in terms of what difference does does role. Make it is really about embedding customer central city into the DNA of the company because most companies, you know, start out going through a hyper growth phase, and it's very hard for a product manager to know this is exactly what customers want for marketing campaign manager to know this exactly what we should be communicating or salesperson to know this is how I should be talking to my customer about the value and that happens when customers are in the customer sensuality in that approach is deeply embedded within the organization and ultimately, why, and I think you say there's a lot, which is alternately for the purpose of driving differentiation, and growth has that's the ultimate purpose. But we gotta do it, where it is deeply embedded. So success for me is Ben the organization has customer central city into Embiid. Headed into the DNA we really use differentiated customer experience. And we are able to drive a differentiated customer experience and begin earned the right to grow with our customers that is what success looks like now in terms of, you know, where would this joining look like we are in, you know, fairly early stages. We have always had initiatives programs, but bringing all of these teams together and my job, I see is really amplifying the voice of our customer. But also amplifying, the voice of all of the internal teams that are working day in and day out with customers muzo weekend get to that point of different nation in growth. And that's what I see as the journey going forward. Okay. So, so growth, really as the number. But so let's get into some tactics. I know you've given some thought to this in it, and people really do a benefit greatly from understanding the specifics of what you've done your in the role. How? How how especially when you first got the role, you know, maybe for your first ninety days. How did you assess the work to be done in what specifically did you do to frame up? What needed to be done. Yeah, yeah. So, you know, I will say I have to benefits right of and dude vantage as I would say the first thing is that a been in this company? So it's always an advantage when you are at the company and your deeply entrenched in working with a lot of teams. That's a huge advantage coming into a role like this. And the second, I'd say is my engineering roots never have left. And so I'm very process oriented and somewhat. You know, logic when it comes to approaching a new role in you function or anything new. And so I do have kind of a one year plan and a one year plan on him, walk through the different stages of the one year plan, and the first part of the one year plan is really the ninety day lamb that you just mentioned. So the way that I approached it having been. In customer, you know, type of roles before the first part of it is really listening. There's nothing that beats listening. And so my first ninety days I prioritize to specific things. One is employee listening, and then second is customer listening. So part of these two from a strategy perspective, converted itself into tactics. I just met, you know, literally started, you know, routing myself to different parts of the organization in different countries within dropbox where I could spend the time meeting with employees and from an employee perspective. It's really important, because, you know, there are a number of roles within our organization, whether it is in customer support, or sales or customer success, where they spend most of their day talking to customer, so many important to kind of, you know, listen from their perspective. What is working, what is not working so that you are actually? Taking those into account as you begin to planning. So the first step was really visiting a lot of the region's offices, and talking to employees. And then as part of that actually talking to customers, you know, we are in such a great position. I find you know, that talking to customers and asking them, what is good about dropbox, and what is not, you know, good about dropbox where we can continue to improve an asking those questions and getting the feedback really stepped one. And as you know, as going through that literally, I would send out thirty day Email to the team on this is what I've heard from employers. And this is what I've heard from customers and then doing the same thing at sixty days, this is exactly what I've heard and doing the same thing. So really pausing, not just like listening for the sake of listening, pausing, at the end of each of those listening hosts and kind of really formulating or are the teams and therefore, what are the set of actions that we need to be taking. So it's very you know. Thoughtful approach. But, you know, something super. Simple, right? Uniting, and you pause, you reflect on that. And then you create an action plan, and that is kind of the ninety day journey of both employees as well as customer listening. Okay. So let me ask a question. So you're, you're talking to customers and employees and asking them what you know what they need is customers with a news employs. Then you're pausing. Now. How are you packaging it or gauging with your fellow C, suite members, so that there, you know, taking it in, in a United way, right? Yep. Yep. Well, I think even even before the speed members, it is all of, you know, our leadership team. It is it's all about them as well. And I really believe in this enrollment process, because you could be seeing one thing and you could be listening to another band try, and you could have missed a whole bunch of things already. And so partly the question that you're asking about how do you package it? And how do you make this a common viewpoint rather than your singular viewpoint and Suma ball so that people can internalize it right? That's exactly correct. So a lot of this has to do with how you create an co create with your leadership team. So one of the first things that we did early on in this process was to actually bring together across functional group of leaders, and this was across all of the functions within our organization, and we said, hey, these are the kinds of things. Fair hearing and actually had them listen to customer calls on customer support interactions. And then you begin to co create so you start out with. Hey, here are the three themes does that resonate with you is there something else that you'd want to add. And so you begin the journey of coq creating so it doesn't feel like you're pulling organization. You're actually just walking along the journey in your empowering. Teens. To actually come up with the right teams and therefore the right action. So I really believe in that process of not just listening and reflecting, but bringing everybody along. So they see what you'll see victory the process that we did in the first few months. So an and I thank you for that. Because it's important to know that you have to groups that you're engaging with one are the leaders of your own team who are running many factions of the operations and the co creating makes a lot of sense. But there are functions of dropbox that you also need to unite that are led by other members of the C suite yet. How how're you then linking arms with them? So that your helping to create that comprehensive view of how defined how to define the current state in the future across the whole enterprise. Yeah. You know, here there is a fundamental truth. When we talk about customer experience. We're talking about people. You know, we're talking what people and how they experience a company in our case. How do they experienced dropbox? And so to me, it is more important to actually present an experience that are, you know, cease, we'd our executive team, they experienced what our customers experienced rather than providing analytic dashboards and metrics and, you know, a long list off initiatives. So for me, the focus is actually been how to get everybody within the company and certainly the cross functional leadership team as well as the executive staff to experience what our customers experienced and so there are a handful of strategies that we have gone through in the process, the first one again, a lot of companies do this, which is a customer advisory board. So getting a group of, you know, the top fifteen to twenty customers together and getting our. Executive team involved in the conversation talking to them about our customer journey but also a product strategy the company vision and hearing directly from the customers. What is resonating in what is not resonating that is powerful, and that actually unifies the executive team more than any, you know, like list off initiatives are, you know, lengthy PowerPoint that begin percent on what the customer experience needs to look like? So that was like number one. The second thing that the overall team also did was create customer connection days and these are in immersion experiences immersion experiences on what the customer journey looks like what they experienced been day are trying to, you know, onboard dropbox, or in installed dropbox on how are they actually experiencing us when be used for the common use cases? And what is their experience when they're calling? Support, what is their experience when they're calling into sales, and so literally, these are immersion experiences. And so we created in two or three immersion experiences are the executive team was able to spend a day, you know, literally walking the life of a customer, and you talk about this, right? You about how there is a customer room where you can experience, what the customer journey looks like. And we did that process now coming out of that we not only did that with our executive team. But we did that with all cross functional leaders across dropbox during offsides, and that builds common context. Yes. Yes. Many from it if I could interrupt when did you do that you're eight months in what's the order, you I went and talked to a lot of people and understood and did depositing. When did you start doing the immersion? Well, I would say that in the case of dropbox that process had already started. So I didn't have to come in, you know, do that. The teams had already thought about this. We had already gone through this process of creating these customer, immersion experiences and taken a lot of the leadership through that so that process happened and was just providing the momentum with additional, you know, strategies that were deploying, but the point being it's a lot about having the relevant teams of the relevant leaders experienced what our customers experience and you do that, with the customer visory board. You can do that with the customer connection days or those immersion experiences. We all actually drove a program for adopting customer. So every, you know, all. One of the top cross functional leaders we had them up the customer all the customer. Find out what's working, what's not working. So they can hear directly from the customer, and that puts them into their shoes in a much more experiential way. So I think the work that we have actually done in bringing everybody along is really about making sure that they experience what our customers experience. Okay. So let's talk some tactics. Tell us what worked in what didn't work in that process, you know, sometimes in these immersion, it's hard to get people really connected where there, some processes that work in some didn't to get people because one of the things that we know is everybody slides in, in a very well, intended way you mentioned it earlier, Yemeni from their corner of the world, right, there, silo, and good, or success, or how far we are along is defined based on what KPI's they're defining, and what how they perceive their doing versus how the customer saying kind of the company in the experiences that comes together. Did you have to do any work in level setting everyone on where you are today to understand the work ahead? Yeah. So one, I, I will say in terms of your what is working, what is not working. Being we. We look at every day as a day for improvement. Right. And you know, it's, it's a journey, and it is I always liked to look at this as a journey without a mountaintop. You know, you can't ever say I've reached this. I have gotten to the point of the best customer experience, and there's no more work to be done. Right. So I think every day is a percentage improvement over the previous day, and that's how we byu the journey. And in terms of, you know, how we approached it so far is that, but, you know, we talked about the employee listening posts and the customer listening post right after that is actually analyzing the customer journey and identifying what drives a differentiated experience from customers viewpoint. You know how did you do that? How did y'all doing that? So we literally put across functional team for a ten week period. And we said, okay, let's look at the customer journey. And let's look at all of the quantitative as well as qualitative infamous. That we have off the customer during that journey, and as they went about assembling, all of those pieces in, you know, a dropbox we do have information on, you know, each step of the journey and where our customers see friction versus there. They don't see friction and be also used a lot of data signs and data analytics to be able to identify from a propensity perspective, you know, which customer is leveraging our collaboration tools, a lot more and which customer has the propensity divine, which customer, you know, is has the propensity to turn. So there is a ton all data sign's behind. This will be put across functional team across our customer experience as Lazar data signs organization to look at the customer journey. And then we began identifying the points of differentiation in if we improved the on boarding experience for customers. That would lead them to be much more engaged, and therefore that would lead them to be much more retentive as a customer. So what are the things that we need to be doing from an on boarding, perspective? So really to be tactical, it is, you know, you listen to your customers, and employees. And then you really put yourself through the customer journey and big into look at patterns that drive and improve differentiation for the customers, and then begin putting very clear action plans on, what is going to improve that particular point of customer experience. And what is actually going to improve you know, the friction points that our customers are seeing within the journey. So that's kind of where we are in the process. It's a little too early to say what is working, what's not working? I think what I would say is that I have been super positively in a surprise with the momentum within the organization. There are already there. And you know, everybody is, like, okay, this is the right thing. To do. And there's just so much, you know, motivation within the teams to actually drive this type of difference Asian for our customer experience, both in product type product. Okay. So let me ask you question 'cause you're SAS company, and there's lots of questions about that, are there are there, any general or any of surveys, you've found that you, you. You're okay sharing for other companies that are the key for chin points. Or do you think they would be different by every business model? Well, it's, it's not as much to the business model or SAS. I think every company needs to actually look at, you know, the points of friction within the customer journey show and there's not like a generalized trend. But I will say looking at the data, you know, when you think about, you know, dropbox, you know, the number one reason that our customers by dropbox is because it just works the, the number of times, I actually have. Have a conversations with customers and say, okay, you already have, you know, other collaboration tools. What is actually driving your usage of dropbox? And they'll say it just works. And for us, we spend a lot of time in order to make it just work. And therefore it is super important for us to look at the points of friction and I mentioned, one example, right? When an individual or a team, you know, is on boarding into dropbox, you know, what can be do to make the process of setting up folders and make the process of setting up sharing make the process of getting information from wherever they had the information into dropbox. How do we make that the most, you know, friction free process possible in every clicked cloud counts in every part of education within the journey actually counts? And so that's one example. You know, same thing when you know, a user, maybe a, a free Muser is actu-. Wanting to upgrade. How do we make that process of figuring out? What does the right product for them to upgrade to, and how do we make that experience of them going into a paid product, much, more, easy, and simple? So those are the points from our perspective. So I don't know if there are a broad themes across asked that I can share. But I will say if you know, providing a fictional is journey is important, then you literally have to pay attention to every part of the customer journey where there are points of confusion where there are points, where we can provide proactive information as well as very clear reactive information, so that they can go through that process, and that's been the way we approached the journey. Sure. No fair. And, and again, I am destroying to get some luminated points from people because, you know, you're, you're Enin advantages, many companies are when the actual behavior of the customer, is, is, as powerful of listening, if you will as asking, how are we doing? Because it's their voting with their feet every time they click, or don't click, or move forward or don't you can see and watch that behavior? Absolutely. I want to ask you about your engaging clearly with people who report, you. You've got your management team, of course, tell us more about how you're working with the C suite of dropbox so that they recognize that your role with them is a partner not a service provider. Right. You're, you're one of the big things that the most successful CEO's recognized that a big part of their role is, is to unite the C suite. Yep. Yep. Now, you know, one of the things that are organization is really good at is actually listening from all points of view, and what I call this and certainly our customer experience team calls. This is the inner loop, you know as well as the outer loop. So this outer loop is like, how are you listening to customers and how do you bring their points of view and the inner loop is? How do you actually circle? That with all of the key stakeholders within the company, and how do you shape the initiatives? The good news from a dropbox perspective, is that we look at our winning aspiration are three or five year longer term journey and providing a friction list, product and customer experience is one of the companies longer term, meaning aspirations, and that's joining that everybody is committed to all the way from our chief executive officer to the head of products. Do everyone within the C suite. And so for me, having that is really, you know, powerful when everybody within the executive team is already bought into delivering for a very great product and customer experience. So about a one be some tactics because saying it, but then getting into the weeds of it are two different things right? Yeah, yeah. And, and really the tactics are, you know what I mentioned, which is? Having your executive team go and speak to customers as part of customer advisory boards, having them go through a customer, immersion day, having them actually adopt customers, and having them actually traveled with you to, you know, support centers so that they can experience what the first hand interactions are with verse line support each of those in combination with our combined, you know, initiatives are Brown improving the customer experience. That's what counts and to me. I find that because of that, I can have this conversation, whether it is with our head of products or anybody else within the executive team as this is what matters it matters. Because it impacts our longer term company vision and goal of driving friction lists experience for customers. And so I mean I potentially could be in a lucky compared to maybe a lot. I find that because our goals are aligned. And it is much more a conversation about prioritizing and sequencing their rights said, affections to take. So I I'm not spending my time convincing. If you're doing this, I'm actually spending a lot of time, helping a prioritize, what we need to be doing which ones are needle, moving initiatives verses in initiatives, that can have short term impact, so that's basically the conversations that I'm disciplining in right now. Sure. Well, that makes sense it's interesting because when there is that much enthusiasm another kind of opportunity, I guess you would call it arises, which is everybody in their brother starts either creating new projects in. There's a proliferation of well-intended projects that might actually be, again in advertently across purposes or duplicating. And so there, there's got to be a lens through, which you sort through all of that. And like you said prioritizing, I do want to ask about this notion of competency of. Redesigning, or designing experiences starting from the customer's life or point of view. Are you what kind of methodologies are you are? You using are you bringing in human center design? Did it already exists? Tell us about that process in how you're building that inside of dropbox. Yep. And I think the points that you're making are absolutely right. And it starts with, you know, like you have said many times in your podcasts and previous conversations really imagining the journey through the lens of a customer, right? And we do have a number of tools and teams that are focused on behalf of design focused team that is focused on exactly how, you know, our customers experience it we have a marketing customer insights team that survey our customers do a lot of experiential research with our customers to understand how they're leveraging it, but really it's. Starts with building, you know customer journey oriented, you know, roadmap rather than an internal team oriented roadmap, and for us in a stepping into that view and saying, how do our customers actually discovered dropbox on, how do they actually try dropbox on, how do they actually use dropbox? And then how do they change the usage of dropbox so mapping every one of those in the underlying ways in which we have invested is really a lot of teams that do surveys, incites work in small groups with our customers, look at how customers are never djing are solutions and then come back with insights on how that joining needs to be map? So those are the kinds of investments that are up, we are making, and then you know, as I mentioned just doing deep dive immersive exercises that can again, put us indisp- ace, all our customers are experiencing out of all of this. There is no dearth of, in things that we can do, right. Like in every. Any that goes through the straw says you will have more ideas than what you can execute. So, you know, the most important thing coming out of all of this process is really saying, what are the handful of things that can help you differentiate, the customer experience? And what are those, you know, handful of things that you can do in the next year in the next twenty four months in the next thirty six months, and what are the metrics, that it is actually going to improve. And therefore, how do you form cross functional teams that are prioritizing, those initiatives? So for us, it has been much more off, you know, looking at the sets of initiatives, and then really getting to, you know what are the three things that can do this quarter. What are the next six things that we can do in the next half year? That's been the process on it. Okay. So is there one thing in particular, that you'd like to share that you're working on that to improve the experience, different ploys customers before we go to our last question? Oh, yeah. I again. It all comes straight out of talking to hus- mors employees. I think from an, you know, organization and an employee perspective, providing them a common purpose which centered around in amplifying voice of the customer has really changed. How employees stink. I mean I do a number of roundtables every week. I talked to, you know, our employees in roundtables, and the number of ideas, that are employees have, hey, we should be thinking about this as the, you know, goal along this journey the number of ideas, they have has been very different. So I think from an employee experience perspective. They know that it is so critical for us to, you know, drive a differentiated journey for our customers and they are all in for that. So that has been a huge change something that, you know, super proud to be part of that journey. I think from a customer perspective as well. You know when we started. Doing these customer visory boards. I know everybody, you know, does that in a certain fashion. But, you know, in be started listening to it, and then be gone back to some of the customers with. Here's what you said, you know, you wanted these three things here we have now delivered two of those three things, and this is the last one and it's going to happen in the next six months. You know, there is so much power that we had customers in Australia. We've had customers in San Francisco that are part of this advisory board that provide us feedback. And you know what the number one thing they say they will eat important that you listen, but it's even more important that you're taking action on it. And you're coming back Alec Ellison. Yes. Yeah. There is nothing worse than listening to employees customers, but not actually closing the loop of what you have done based on what you've listened until the early experience has been you know they they just love it. And, you know, we are time and again when I talked to customers and. We go back. Six months later. They said, well, you've listen, you've come back with an action, not every time you're fixing everything to be you to. But at least you're, you're listening, any exactly you're communicating. And so those have been kind of their reinforcing in terms of the journey that they're taking. Yeah. Really, really critical. It's interesting. How many folks forget about the communication is a critical element of the work in, you know, I've, I've started to call it marketing hope. Yeah, it's critical circle back. Well Yama let's go to our last question. I know we could go on and on. Thank you for the specificity of some of the actions, you've given people our last question, we call the pay it forward question for those who are doing this work, or perhaps need a little bit of a boost in the work so based on your experience in what, you know, what do you know now that you wish you knew then? This is this is a good question. I would say that pay attention to the human experience. You know, one of the things that I've kind of interestingly known, but now, I really know is that it's not as much the largest initiatives that matter. It's also the small changes that improve the experience that matter so pay attention, not just to the really large, you know, needle moving once, but also the small human experiences a change the perception of customers. You know, an example, specifically that, you know, we, we have a lot of initiatives to improve the knowledge base to improve the support experiences, improve the technology, all of those are great, but then, you know, also pay attention to how you treat a customer, how you actually think the customer for the business how you listen to the customer, how you close the loop with the customer. And them feeling that you are listening and you are acting based on that is as important as the biggest initiatives that you can drive. And so that's been, you know, kind of a huge learning for me. And hopefully that helps others that are going through the same journey. And it is the other thing I will leave everybody with is this is super gratifying. I been you are on the right path, and you know that, you know, this is improving the lives of your customers, and also improving the lives of employees because they feel like they're having impact into super gratifying. And so there's nothing motivating more motivating ban. You know, having that type of impact. And if you're on the journey just stay on the journey in it is too exciting and it's a good time to be on, on that journey. We'll thank you for that. What a great. What a great summary of our work in and thank you. It's been a pleasure having you, as our guest today. And thanks everybody. For continuing to, to, to be a part of our show. Remember, please go to customer bliss dot com slash podcast. Please do sign up. So this comes automatically in your inbox. Connect with me. I'm at at gene bliss on Twitter. Also, if you feel like it in wanna go, let people know how we're doing. We're on all of the major places where you can give feedback on podcast shows so until everybody, please. Keep pushing that rock up the hill. Now you got a lot of great information from Yami today. Thanks how many for being with us. Thank you for listening to this episode of the human duct tape show. You can get our show. Notes are links and any tools. We talked about today at customer, bliss dot com slash podcast. And while you're there, let us know if there's a leader you want to hear from on this show. And finally, only if we earned it gander over to itunes or Stitcher and tell us how we did today.

dropbox chief customer officer customer advocacy Yami Rangan engineer executive SAP advisory board CEO SAP SAP Jean Munich Pat partner Dennis Woodside Twitter