28 Burst results for "Woods Hole"

Ice shelf collapses in previously stable East Antarctica

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Ice shelf collapses in previously stable East Antarctica

"And I shelf the size of New York City has collapsed in east Antarctica Catherine Walker is an ice scientists with woods hole oceanographic institute and she says the location of this ice shelf collapse is the big news this is not going to have much if any measurable effect on your C. level rise or anything that but the process is important because of where it is and we are you know we haven't seen in east Antarctic ice shelf collapse in our at least in our lifetimes possible reasons why we probably are seeing the result of a lot a long time of increased ocean warming there it just has been melting in melting then last week temperatures soared more than seventy degrees above normal in the area I wouldn't say that it's the entire story but it certainly added to pressure on to the those ice shelves that we haven't seen before I'm showing after

Catherine Walker Woods Hole Oceanographic Insti East Antarctica East Antarctic New York City
"woods hole" Discussed on HowSound

HowSound

08:12 min | 6 months ago

"woods hole" Discussed on HowSound

"After three years of being deep in this story, we have to tell the Johnson's for now, our work has come to a close. Things can pop up and if they pop up if more information comes to the surface, we'll be back to work there. We're not just like, it's not like, okay, the story's done we're out. But this is the wrap up of the major part of the investigation. Do you guys have any questions, anything you want to talk through? You know, whatever. We're here. I'm good right now. You okay? Yeah, I'm good. You all right? Yeah. I just felt like a family shouldn't go through so much when you have so much evidence. When you have so much, but it's just when you live with the people that don't want it to stand up for people it's real. It was right. This is not. Shouldn't go through it. Nobody really cares until you hit home. And so they had to face it and go through it. I don't understand. So there's going on 14 years and I'm tired. I'm tired. Justice is what we need. That's what we fighting for. She's right. And honestly, I don't know what else to say. Was there a risk that you were going to get the family's hopes up? Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, I think that it's wasn't just a risk. I think that's the yeah. From day one though, I just Jonathan and I just tried to be as honest as possible with them, even when it was hard. And you know, it's still. The thing that I think. I'm trying to not get emotional. The thing that is the hardest for me. Is. It's just hard because I wanted to know everything and I wanted to tell them everything. But there's only so much that I can know. And so hold on. Let me retake that because I feel like I am running from the emotional truth. I can feel myself going, we don't want to say that because that's going to hurt. And I should not do that. Let me say this thing that's going to hurt. The truth of the matter is I wanted to tell them what happened and try to give them. Try to give them what has eluded them for so long. And we didn't. And it's the thing that. It's the thing that I struggle with. Because I do think in some ways, I think that this series was so worth it. And another way is I don't know. You know, because I put them through a lot and we didn't get the thing that I wanted to give them. And the thing that they need, and I don't even know if I could ever give that to them. I got a lot of emails on this series and on a whole, I didn't respond to any of them. Mostly because, you know, I mean, just to be honest, I don't want to make this about me, but to be honest, like I was dealing with my own. My own hurt when it came to this story and reporting on this for three years and living in this world and looking at autopsy photos. All sorts of stuff is just hard. It was really hard and I just felt like I couldn't really communicate well with people about the series. But one person wrote me and he was basically like, how dare you do this series and bring all this stuff up to this family and bring it all and hurt them all over again and not give them an answer. And. I think about that email a lot because I don't know if he is wrong. And I think the family would say or at least. Tiffany, the sister who literally just talked to yesterday, she told me that we did exactly what we told her we were going to do. And that I didn't know her anything. So I don't think the family feels that way, or at least Tiffany doesn't feel that way. But you know it's hard. It's really hard. And I feel like I'm not giving you a good answer. I'm just kind of floating, but I'm still like trying to walk through all of it, you know? And I keep reminding myself that whatever it is that I'm carrying right now again is nothing comparison to what the johnsons have carried for decade, you know. But yeah, it's been hard. It's been hard because I think the first episode really talks about how you know when I was a kid. I saw this stuff and I grew up in a little southern town and I knew that things like this could happen and I think all of that is it's why this story reached out and grabbed me. And. I think that that pull is the thing that has made this really hard at times to wrap my head around and you know you and I had talked to like a couple weeks ago and I think I told you that I'd never do anything like this again. But I also think at the same time I was like, but I also have another idea. You know, so it's like I'm struggling with it now. And I will get through it and I will get back on the horse and do another story that feels just as important to me as that one did because that's how I'm programmed. While we were chatting, I asked Al what he thought the impact of traditional true crime storytelling might be on listener's perceptions of the criminal justice system. You can hear what he had to say had transom dot org. Also, Al is very much not alone in his concerns about true crime storytelling. Take, for instance, a recent headline from gawker. True crime is rotting our brains. There's also a thoughtful essay by campus songster it transom called move it forward. We can find a link to these articles in several others at the post for this house sound at transit. This is how sound the backstory to great audio storytelling from PRX and transom. Genovese sponsor, my editor at PRX, has the patience of a saint. Thank you, Jennifer. And thanks as always to the transom crew in Woods hole, Massachusetts. I'm rob Rosenthal. Thanks for listening..

Johnson Tiffany Jonathan Al gawker PRX Genovese Jennifer Woods hole rob Rosenthal Massachusetts
"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Maybe Shiver me timbers, Sea shanties that once was a ship that put to sea in the name of that ship was a billy A T. We'll land. Lubbers on TIC Tac and other social media are now appreciating that under year old art form. Sea shanties are a particular kind of song that accompanies work. That's Mary Molloy for 25 years, she taught a program out of Woods Hole. Massachusetts, called the See Education Association semester, she says sea shanties are influenced by the rhythms of African work songs with lyrics that are Anglo Irish. Marie Malloy is also a folk singer. How could she not be with so fight a name? And yes, she sing, See songs here be merry. Oh, and I wa Solider boy or so my mommy told me away. Holloway will haul away Joe. There's a singer who is that shanty man, The leader who sings a line and then everybody together, joins on that second one way haul away will haul away, Joe. And on certain words, you would actually haul on the line. Which brings us now to the social media phenomenon known as Shanti Talk. It took off after Nathan Evans posted his covers of sea songs People started to add to his version of Wheeler Man using the TIC tac toe. It features Another, Skelly wags began posting their own sea shanties. Oh, you hear a lot of stories about sailors and her sport about how every sailor has a girl in every port. What should we do with a drunken sailor Early in the morning? No Wheeler man is by far the most popular shed, he talked, but it's technically not a sea shanty. Blow me down it be a balance the songs that are now appearing on tick talk. A lot of them are acts. The songs that were sung on shipboard, but they weren't some for work so technically, they're not Shanti's but tick. Tucker's don't care for technicalities so soon. I still can't see what other people are seeing in the video like it's just another car, right hand. Franklin, who Zulu of Houston, Texas, talking about his viral tic tac that shows spread of Shatti love from him to his older brother. Promise I liked what I listened.

Wheeler Man TIC Tac Marie Malloy Mary Molloy Joe Lubbers See Education Association billy Shanti Nathan Evans Woods Hole Massachusetts Skelly Tucker Houston Holloway Franklin Texas
"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tricia Coburn. Tricia Coburn has worked as an artist in Boston in New York, and it's built an interior design practice. She's working on a collection of short stories based on her childhood experiences growing up in Alabama. See photos of Tricia crowned this Anniston, Alabama 1971 and with Giorgio Armani in his showroom in Milan in 1972. Visit the moth dot or by the way, Tricia story came to us to our story hotline where anyone can call on pitches a story that includes you radio listeners. You can leave a two minute pitch via our website, the moth dot org's Or call 877799 moth will be back in a moment with a story about a good faith effort at marriage. Support for the moth comes from duo lingo, a language learning at built around the idea that learning should be fun and accessible to all with more than 34 languages and interactive audio lessons. Information about the dueling go app. It's available the APP store or it dueling go dot com and by progressive insurance committed to offering a streamline shopping experience where home and auto can be bundled together. Now that's progressive. Learn more at progressive dot com or 1 800 progressive. The most radio hour is produced by Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and presented by P R X this weekend, this American life Single people in New York on dating APS. People don't normally play the field. People who normally want anything but a commitment since coveted are singing a very different tune. Lots of them, saying things.

Tricia Coburn Alabama New York Giorgio Armani Milan Atlantic Public Media Anniston Boston Woods Hole Massachusetts
"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

"Was Diane Castillo. They end as a writer and three time moth story, son. She's also the producer of First Person Live, a storytelling show in Chicago's Northwest suburbs. Diane told me that beyond the fear of health complications She worried that at 47 as a new mom, she wouldn't be able to handle the demands of a baby. She thought she'd be mistaken for the baby's grandmother that the physical toll would be too much on her body. And that she wouldn't have any mom friends because she was quote old. She says. None of this came to pass and it turned out to be the best time of her life. She said. Her daughter Catherine is very strong willed, very confident and self possessed, and they consider each other soulmates. After our break a story of channeling Bruce Lee on the elementary school playground and a story about avoiding the talk with your kids at all costs when the moth radio hour continues. The moth Radio hour is produced by Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and presented by P R X Support.

Diane Castillo producer Atlantic Public Media Bruce Lee writer Catherine Woods Hole Massachusetts Chicago
"woods hole" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I try to Do a conversation. Um, I can listen to you. If you want to do that, But I try to do a conversation and the one thing that I think ofthe often and particularly tonight we're beginning our 14th year on the show tonight. I just think of all the different people over the years who have come to know and some of whom had passed on. And for those of you with a long time listeners of this show I just want to mention in passing tonight, a couple of callers who were I thought, really interesting people. One was a felony Dan from Woods Hole. He played football at Syracuse and got to know him a little bit and then was bedeviled by a lot of serious Physical problems, which eventually took his life and one of the most unforgettable callers was Jim in the swamp. And again, I could probably read a list of 100 people who I have known and sometimes you don't hear from people and you think, would you? Maybe they've drifted away or But I want you to know that I do know you. Ah, I've gotten to know you. Ah, again, just talking about my friend Jenny from Weymouth. She and I have clashed many times. I just want to have a conversation. I want to hear what you have to say. I'm I'm interested in conversations back and forth and I want to be respectful. I hope you'll be respectful to me. And that's that's all I want to say again. I do want just mentioned Dan from Woods Hole, and there are so many of you. I'm not going to mention all of you who I know. Come and who were still with us. But those are two who have passed on and hopefully somewhere. Listening on the Internet and in a far better place Jim in the swamp, who was a great guy and Dan in Woods Hole, both of whom I visited before they passed. And made a point of doing that. Let's go to the call 617 to 5 for 10 30 Triple 89 to 1930. Who's up next and being involved in. Hey, Dan. Thank you for your patience, you and next on nights I go right ahead. I don't know why I was calling to keep here and I want you to I don't know if you could clear it up for me, Um But when Biden stated that And FIFA wasn't I hear organization. I didn't know if you have that clip. I We had that last night. I don't know if Mario was able to access that sound clip. But basically I can tell you that When he was asked about that, he said something well. Antifa is an idea, not an organization, and he's wrong on that. He's absolutely Well, is a very dangerous organization. Well, what? What? I'm trying to get out of the tub was talking over him in the beginning, but if you had, you could hear it. Um Over Trump. Restated that it was Trump FBI. What that stated.

Dan Woods Hole Antifa Jim FBI Mario Syracuse Jenny Biden Weymouth
Boston - Steamship Authority Employee Tests Positive For Coronavirus

WBZ Midday News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Boston - Steamship Authority Employee Tests Positive For Coronavirus

"Authority employees assigned a Wood's hole has tested positive for covert 19 Thie authority is not disclosing the employee's name or position within the company. Theo employees We are learning last worked on a boat. Which is currently serving the Nantucket route on the ship that began with a new departure of the vessel from hyenas on August 25th and then ended with it's 11. 30 AM arrival in hyenas on August, 26 Thie employee was unlikely to have had any prolonged exposure with any member of the public during their work hours.

Nantucket Theo
"woods hole" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on Short Wave

"Okay Nell. Greenfieldboyce last year, you visited the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole Massachusetts. Tell me about it. What was it like? So it's sort of beautiful location right there on the coast of Massachusetts and you go inside. In you know, they took me to this room full of kind of burgling aquariums everywhere and. All of our exotic animals, the guy giving me, the tour was Brett Grassy and his official title. There is manager of Cephalopod operations. It's amazing title. So we've got our beautiful <hes> flamboyant cuttlefish. We've got our straight PAJAMAS, squids. These ones are native to Australia. We've got our octopus church, which is the pygmy zebra octopus, their native to Nicaragua small octopus species that doesn't get much larger than table. A. Table Grape. Nice. Yes. So they're they're looking at all kinds of squid and octopus is to try to find ones that you are easy to take care of that reproduce. quickly, that are going to be good to be sort of like the next lab rat and their work involves everything from the very latest high tech kind of gene editing tools to just like a bucket of rocks sitting on the floor. Why rocks? Well, they use them to make like little habitats in the tanks <hes>, but they also use them to way down some of the lids. So octopuses are notorious for being able to kind of escape out of their enclosures. I've heard of this in aquariums. Octopus have been known to climb out and wonder around. Yeah, they're clever. You know. So when I visited Bret told me, there were roughly around three thousand cephalopods under their care there. But honestly walking around and looking in the tanks, you can hardly see any because they like to hide in those rocks and you know other little things, little containers. Keepers put in their tanks at one point read opened up this one plastic container and reached into the water and pulled out this little like like terra cotta pot and inside was this California two spot octopus. She's right down in there. Because see her eyeball, fairly see her. Yeah, and so basically, this is a kind of a common Dan either they're gonNA find rocks or. Some sort of basically dark enclosure sometimes. So this was a female octopus sitting on her eggs, and while we were looking at her, she's sort of shot out some water at us. She's of trying to skirt some water here. She thinks that I'm going to give some food <hes> or she's just trying to say you know I'm sitting in here taking care of my eggs and <hes>. You know come back another time so now. Now. If you had a podcast called nell spies and octopus I would listen to it will we would have a lot to talk about because <hes> cephalopods are pretty crazy i. mean they have these sophisticated brains, they can solve puzzles, they can change their skin color like an instant. They can re-grow arms, they travel using jet propulsion. I. Mean. Some people have said they are as close to aliens living on Earth as we've got. that. is so cool. Honestly, we do a whole episode just about cephalopods, but I WANNA go back to this research question about using them as model organisms. So why CEPHALOPODS in particular? Well. It's all those odd features that makes them interesting to biologists I. Mean, for example, I mentioned their brains, you know the they're clearly sophisticated problem solvers, but their brains just look completely different from our own like they showed me one in a glass vial that looked almost like a triangle shape and you know there's <hes> brains that look like doughnuts that wrap around the Esophagus, you know <hes> at the same time, we know that some of their brain chemistry. Chemistry has got to be somewhat similar to ours because there have been experiments at how octopuses react to the drug ecstasy. Right? It seems to make them like little more friendly and cuddly to. So you know it's it's just fascinating to look at these creatures that are on the one hand. So different and on the one hand similar and studying, them could help scientists see what's necessary and what's not for being able to perform you know amazing mental feats. Feats like the ones people can do, and apparently you know some cephalopods seem

Woods Hole Massachusetts Josh Emily Kwong Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR Marine Biological Laboratory Biological Laboratory reporter Woods Hole Rosenthal CEPHALOPODS.
Gene-Altered Squid Could Be The Next Lab Rats

Short Wave

04:08 min | 2 years ago

Gene-Altered Squid Could Be The Next Lab Rats

"Okay Nell. Greenfieldboyce last year, you visited the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole Massachusetts. Tell me about it. What was it like? So it's sort of beautiful location right there on the coast of Massachusetts and you go inside. In you know, they took me to this room full of kind of burgling aquariums everywhere and. All of our exotic animals, the guy giving me, the tour was Brett Grassy and his official title. There is manager of Cephalopod operations. It's amazing title. So we've got our beautiful flamboyant cuttlefish. We've got our straight PAJAMAS, squids. These ones are native to Australia. We've got our octopus church, which is the pygmy zebra octopus, their native to Nicaragua small octopus species that doesn't get much larger than table. A. Table Grape. Nice. Yes. So they're they're looking at all kinds of squid and octopus is to try to find ones that you are easy to take care of that reproduce. quickly, that are going to be good to be sort of like the next lab rat and their work involves everything from the very latest high tech kind of gene editing tools to just like a bucket of rocks sitting on the floor. Why rocks? Well, they use them to make like little habitats in the tanks but they also use them to way down some of the lids. So octopuses are notorious for being able to kind of escape out of their enclosures. I've heard of this in aquariums. Octopus have been known to climb out and wonder around. Yeah, they're clever. You know. So when I visited Bret told me, there were roughly around three thousand cephalopods under their care there. But honestly walking around and looking in the tanks, you can hardly see any because they like to hide in those rocks and you know other little things, little containers. Keepers put in their tanks at one point read opened up this one plastic container and reached into the water and pulled out this little like like terra cotta pot and inside was this California two spot octopus. She's right down in there. Because see her eyeball, fairly see her. Yeah, and so basically, this is a kind of a common Dan either they're gonNA find rocks or. Some sort of basically dark enclosure sometimes. So this was a female octopus sitting on her eggs, and while we were looking at her, she's sort of shot out some water at us. She's of trying to skirt some water here. She thinks that I'm going to give some food or she's just trying to say you know I'm sitting in here taking care of my eggs and You know come back another time so now. Now. If you had a podcast called nell spies and octopus I would listen to it will we would have a lot to talk about because cephalopods are pretty crazy i. mean they have these sophisticated brains, they can solve puzzles, they can change their skin color like an instant. They can re-grow arms, they travel using jet propulsion. I. Mean. Some people have said they are as close to aliens living on Earth as we've got. that. is so cool. Honestly, we do a whole episode just about cephalopods, but I WANNA go back to this research question about using them as model organisms. So why CEPHALOPODS in particular? Well. It's all those odd features that makes them interesting to biologists I. Mean, for example, I mentioned their brains, you know the they're clearly sophisticated problem solvers, but their brains just look completely different from our own like they showed me one in a glass vial that looked almost like a triangle shape and you know there's brains that look like doughnuts that wrap around the Esophagus, you know at the same time, we know that some of their brain chemistry. Chemistry has got to be somewhat similar to ours because there have been experiments at how octopuses react to the drug ecstasy. Right? It seems to make them like little more friendly and cuddly to. So you know it's it's just fascinating to look at these creatures that are on the one hand. So different and on the one hand similar and studying, them could help scientists see what's necessary and what's not for being able to perform you know amazing mental feats. Feats like the ones people can do, and apparently you know some cephalopods seem

Woods Hole Massachusetts Nell Spies Brett Grassy Marine Biological Laboratory Nicaragua Bret Australia Cephalopod California Is Manager DAN Official
"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

"Woods Hole, Massachusetts and presented by P R X Enroll now for fall classes at Santa Monica College. To ensure studentssafety SMC is fully online, including the teaching excellence program, student counseling services, financial aid and all of our renowned support programs. Find your future at snc dot edu I'm wearing helmet onto the point. If America ever used its thousands of nuclear weapons, it would be suicidal and a nuclear war. There'd be no winners. Everybody is a loser. All of civilization is at stake. We've known that for 75 years, but our weapons of mass destruction are still on hair trigger alert. And just one man. President Trump has the power to push the button. Is it finally time to make the world safer on are to the point podcast. It's Casey R W and this is moments of serenity with me. Garth Trinidad one Reliable way to feel good is taking three long, deep breaths, breathing. Breathe out. Breathe in. Read out. Breeding readout. Be well and stay tuned to K C. R W You're listening to the moth radio hour from P Rx. I'm Sarah Austin, Janice. This is an.

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

"Next on the moth radio hour. Moth radio hour is produced by Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and presented by the public radio exchange. PR ex dot org's You're listening to K C R W Now let's take it to the next level. Discover viper treatment curated invitations and special access to your favorite shows the benefits of membership just keep growing. So don't wait, go to case here w dot com slash join I'm wearing helmet onto the point. If America ever used its thousands of nuclear weapons, it would be suicidal and a nuclear war. There'd be no winners. Everybody is a loser. All of civilization is at stake. We've known that for 75 years, but our weapons of mass destruction are still on hair trigger alert. And just one man. President Trump has the power to push the button. Is it finally time to make the world safer on are to the point podcast. This is the mother radio Hour from P r X. I'm Catherine Burns. And now we're going to hear from Chinchar ICU, Monica He told the story Live in a show. We didn't partnership with the Blue Man Group. We actually performed a mosque show on their New York set, with the blumen themselves hosting silently. Here's Chenjerai. On December 21st.

The First Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

Environment: NPR

03:31 min | 2 years ago

The First Gene-Altered Squid Has Thrilled Biologists

"Some of the weirdest creatures on the planet are CEPHALOPODS, animals like squids and octopuses. Now, in the Journal current biology scientists say they've managed to tinker with the jeans of pod in the lab NPR's Nell. Greenfieldboyce, reports on why a gene-altered squid is such a big deal. Read Grassi's official job title is manager of Cephalopod Operations when I recently visited the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole Massachusetts, he showed me around a room full of burgling tanks. So we've got our beautiful flamboyant cuttlefish. We've got our straight pajamas squids. These ones are native to. Australia. We've got our. Church, which is the pygmies zero octopus, their native to Nicaragua very small octopus species that doesn't get much larger than a table grape. The work here involves everything from the very latest high tech gene editing tools to a bucket of rocks sitting on the floor the rocks are used to make habitats in the tanks and two way down the lids. So octopus are notorious for being able to escape out of their enclosures. These critters have sophisticated brains that look nothing like our own. They can solve puzzles, change their skin color in a flash and travel using jet propulsion Josh. Rosenthal is a researcher at the Marine Biological Laboratory. He says, these animals evolved completely independently from us, their relatives or. Things like clams in this provides an opportunity to compare them with us and see what elements are in common and what elements or you need. The problem is there's been no way to modify their genes and being able to do that is really important. Most lab biologists study just a few species like mice and fruit flies because the gene editing technologies for them have been all worked out. This makes it easy to study genes role in behavior, disease and treatments, but none of that was available for cephalopods. So Rosenthal and his colleagues have been building those tools I using a squid that lives in the waters around woods hole a researcher named Karen Crawford had figured out how to fertilize. Its eggs in the lab. So the team did that and then injected gene altering materials it wasn't easy. The fertilized egg is surrounded by a tough almost rubbery coating for months we have needles break. We couldn't figure out how they get it, but they finally did it and turned off a pigmentation gene that normally makes small dark spots on the squids skin. Those spots are missing on the altered baby squid pigment genes are easy because you can see them. Right. You can see if it's working as things develop Kerry Alberton is a member of the research team she says for her this is a game changer. This is something that honestly if you ask me five years ago if we'd. Be Able to do I would have just giggled and said I dream of it but you know I didn't think it would be possible and yet here we are other Squid Biologists or equally thrilled Sarah McNulty's with the University of Connecticut. She says, it's incredibly impressive that they've gotten this to work. This was like a huge advancement for staff upon researchers all over the wrong. We should all be pop bottles of Champagne. This is amazing. She says this particular squid can't live long term a lab it just gets too big but she says it's proof of what's possible and the researchers are already working with smaller creatures. They haven't those tanks to alter genes and them to Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR news.

Nell Greenfieldboyce Researcher Rosenthal Marine Biological Laboratory Kerry Alberton Sarah Mcnulty Woods Hole Massachusetts Grassi Journal Current Biology Cephalopod Operations Nicaragua Australia Official Karen Crawford Is Manager University Of Connecticut
Scientists Discover A New Material For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Environment: NPR

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Scientists Discover A New Material For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

"Soil spills are often sopped up with synthetic spongy materials, but researchers are looking to nature for more sustainable alternatives. NPR's Christopher Intel Yada has more. There's a good reason hair gets oily. It's because your hair follicles have little fat glance that use oil onto your hair and so hair oil kinda like peanut, butter and Jelly. Sandwich but they go together all the time. David, who is a biologist and engineer at Georgia Tech? He says that oil is a good thing because it coats and protects your hair, and it helps animals waterproof there for well now scientists Australia have taken a cue from nature to see how well hair and for can absorb a different kind of oil crude oil I keep looking at my cats in wondering if they can be more useful. Megan Murray and environmental scientist at the University of Technology Sydney. She says she's joking about the cats, but there is a whole lot of hair out there. As long as we get, had cats and dogs that need to be groomed. We're going to continue to generate this waste stream. Murray's team put dabs of crude oil in petri dishes, either straight on the glass on top of terra cotta tile, or on sand, then they took Matt's of human hair and dog fur, and pitted them against synthetic polypropylene fabric, which is commonly used to sop up oil spills. It was justice good We've done the science. We run the numbers and it performed just as well as polypropylene which is. Is Allocating Saban at the moment that we use in disaster management. The details are in the journal. Environments few county yachts, Hair, and I soaked up the oil well on glass and terra cotta, but not on sand, which suggests that Matt's of hair might work on factory, floors or roads, but not so much on a beach and previous work by Murray's team shows that Harris sinks in the water, so it's not ideal for cleanup at sea. Then there's the issue of reliability, says chemist Chris Ready in the middle of a battle like normal spill. You're GONNA have a very predictable material that is easily deployed increase. No uncertainty and these natural products carry just a lot more uncertainty. At, woods hole oceanographic, institution, and full disclosure the owner of a yellow lab. Despite this uncertainty, he says maybe hair can teach us how to make better materials and Georgia techs. David, who says the study made him look at hair differently as soon as I read this. The first thing I thought is hey. I've been throwing away these little hairy rings that appear in the bottom of my shower, but maybe I should just collect them in a jar and use it to clean my dishes, or maybe you'll just have a little more patients when Fido and fluffy shed their potentially valuable hair Christopher Intel Yata NPR news.

Megan Murray Georgia Tech NPR David Matt Christopher Intel Woods Hole Oceanographic Sandwich University Of Technology Sydne Saban Chris Ready Engineer Scientist Australia Fido Harris
"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is really bizarre well the flags at half mast hospital you're listening to pandemic your notes from a nurse in queens it's produced by Kate o'connell with me Samantha brown for the public radio website transcendental in woods hole Massachusetts will continue in a minute and and and you're listening to pandemic ER notes from a nurse in queens a series of audio letters from Kate o'connell a radio producer and a registered nurse working in New York City during the corona virus outbreak here's Kate's dispatch for mid April the same day New York state extended its stay at home orders for another month Hey Sam all my thoughts are dark today you can encouraging an open to receiving these dispatches and I have to tell you that there is a part of me that well I think every nurse or doctor or restore therapist or EMT these days is feeling this I just don't want to talk about the deaths more about the struggles right before the deaths more about the number of people who are dying in our presence because and I've seen it describing a patient dying I mean it just kind of stops conversation unless I'm with other health care workers who understand and abide that conversation because they've seen it too Wescott always says when he's in the presence of me and another nurse or doctor or god forbid a party of nurses which she has endured several times we talk about gross stuff.

half mast hospital Kate o'connell New York City outbreak Wescott Samantha brown woods hole Massachusetts producer New York
Making of a CRISPR Film: Behind the Scenes with Producers of Human Nature

CRISPR Cuts

09:19 min | 2 years ago

Making of a CRISPR Film: Behind the Scenes with Producers of Human Nature

"Highly one. Welcome to crisper cuts. I'm super excited about today's episode because today via celebrities on our show yesterday said I goodwin Elliott Kirschner their producers of the human nature. Movie for those of you. Who Don't know what this movie is about. It basically covers jody of crispell onto joining us today on. This show is given Holden head of science at San Diego. So this is GonNa be a great episode all adjoining Menu Today on the Chris Cast so as me as well food we get started. Can you just introduce yourself and give your background before you became producers of this movie? My name is Sara Goodwin producer at Pfizer. My background action is in Science. I teach the UCS and the I turned into a science communicator. Joining and leading an organization about project called I biology which has an initiative area cocoa butter collaborates at produced. This felt and so that's how I got. Involved Elliott leaks elected project to it which is great blog. Si- thank you. I'm Elliot Kirschner. So I came to this project after many years working in news and documentary film back shake round side poverty the scientists but I really sort of more general reporting but it was always interested in telling the stories of science while find ways those little bobble and interesting ways that could challenge conventional wisdom's sites. Could be and so. We were looking for a topic to really make a big film to just tell an important story in ways that we would be different end. Hopefully engage audiences in new ways. And so I've secret spurs such huge story touches almost every aspect of the biomedical sciences but also exchanging meaning Dmitri society all that so when we decided on this topic we really washed and built a team of filmmakers and scientists together to make a documentary. That sounds great. So basically you kind of briefly mentioned how the idea of doing a film on crisper about but still there seems to be a lot that needs to be figured out. Even you know what basic topic you're going far. So can you tell us a little bit about behind the scenes of how you decided you know right right makes off researchers and patients and how the story would flow and not just make it like a scientific presentation but more like a movie by itself that we knew going in we want it to be so and we know it to be a story that would appeal to a general audience so that was the directive from the very beginning. We didn't WANNA make quote unquote educational video. We also wanted to make something that felt cinematic. I mean there's a wonderful rich history. A science explainer television that kind of stuff that people any think tank stock entries the short length of one hour television affair with a heavy raider voice. That kind of thing as well. That wanted to do something that would play on a big screen. That would make the decision. We didn't want it narrator. We wanted to let the scientists speak for themselves. Who wanted to film this with a cinematic spoke? Mind musical score all that we WANNA make a film so that was sort of the original directive that we give to ourselves once we got there. The question was okay. What is a science film there if you go to sundance or we premiered at South by southwest or the major some festivals. It's not like there's a lot of science programming a lot of science documentary and so we sort of had a lot of leeway. What is modern science stone-built look like but that's when the decision making came in about what the style would be. But as for the substance we also knew we wanted to work with the very beginning to sort of develop a story line or story lines that were true to the Science. Not only the facts of the science but the ethos of science idea. What is scientific discovery? How how did serendipity and the search for knowledge or basic research play into the story and then what are. These are more broader societal issues so those are all pieces together but I think one of the key things early on we had a meeting at woods hole. Report the film team. And we brought in George Church George Staley Jennifer Dowd Or All your own rights leaders in this field and we just had the two days of brainstorming about what they thought the story was and where they thought the scientists building and that really sort of helped direct the editorial in obviously Sarah being trained scientists being on this very beginning really helped shape bet as iterative throughout the process and this this film many many different forms over the course of its production as we try to tease out what science metric would be. And I'd say one thing that was really. It's worked to us from the beginning to make sure we told the story of the discovery of crisper and turning crisper to technology which is a story. That's off the told when crisper is talked about because it's actually a fascinating basic science research story of we really wanted to show. Elliot said you know how the process of sites works. How knowledge is created. And so as a scientist you know is able to really go back to the literature. I read you know as much primary literature as I could around the crisper discovery. And he's together as best they could also used reviews that were out there. This summit really helped a lot but it really helped us kind of have a deep understanding of the steps that it took to really understand what crisper was and decide who we wanted to interview might actually ended up interviewing or people than even made it into the cell because they were hardest story. But you know at the end of the day we wanted to have a film that was around ninety minutes of you. Just can't include everything that you want to. And so that was interesting viewpoint. Make us a kind of behind the scenes. Look when we were editing as to what should be in on should be out especially for me coming more from the science side of things which dirt's look really vital to have Sarah's voice project I think that was one of the real unique elements that we we built into the production framework in that throughout the discussion of who'd interview with talk about what's the balanced bill. There was constant discussion between still making team and science group that were just challenging our own assumptions pushing in different ways and I think that dynamic process really led to its own that is it relates that scientists in a way that it's not just about what we say on exerts absolutely right. We tried to all the Discovery Story. But just the way the scientists are allowed to speak the decisions made about what to include what not to include. I mean this was really dictated throughout by I think very nuanced understanding of how science works and I think that that hopefully shines through that when scientists watch at the dotted understand world and. I think that that is is really important to try to convey in film the impression of Palestine Science work as well as the actual facts over trying to convey right. Yeah absolutely does shine through. I love the myself so they can thank you. I just wanted to ask you guys. So I'm sorry. You mentioned some of the people that you interviewed for the film curious. Do you have any particular anecdotes funny or like most surprising moments came out through so making process in the interviews. People talk about a great question. I mean I'd say the first thing that comes to mind is actually what a treat it was to be Cisco he goes. Who's early crisper researcher at the University Valid? Kante got to go to Spain and meet him and be in his lab and he showed us a lot of Israeli shells. Found THE REPEATS. A very special time to be serving. Someone who usually isn't spoken about when Christopher is talked about but in general like say what was a real treat for me as a scientist is a lot of the people he's interviewed. I L about their science at baby. Give a research talk. But I've never really got to hear them talk about kind of the more ethical. Societal implications of the crisper work and Atta did most interviewing I think did a wonderful job really probing people trying to get you know. They're on his thoughts on something as science discovery. That is really going to have an impact in so many different ways throughout the world to end the scientists were really wonderful in be sharing their thoughts with us. I think you know included a lot of that on. I think makes a lot richer because it shows how scientists are people to beat other families. They have a lot of thoughts about how science works and technology is used and it was really nice to be able to hear a lot of that and then of course you know getting these really wonderful. I mean so make it of course offered was a key researcher for comment DNA. Which is the topic we cut off. But you were going to go much forgotten. Just cut it Due to time and really trying to make the story as clear as possible but he's just just a wonderful person and getting to meet him was just a really special

Scientist Goodwin Elliott Kirschner Elliot Kirschner Palestine Science Researcher San Diego Sarah Sara Goodwin Pfizer Chris Cast Holden Producer Woods Hole George Staley Jennifer Dowd Dmitri Atta Spain Kante Cisco Christopher
Snapping Shrimp Make More Noise in Warmer Oceans

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Snapping Shrimp Make More Noise in Warmer Oceans

"Warm temperate and tropical coastal waters around. The world are teeming with these noisy little creatures. They snapped their clothes so fast that they produce a bubble bubble bursts. It makes a loud popping. Sound it's persistent background noise. These snap crackling Aaron Mooney a Marine biologist at woods hole oceanographic institution. The shrimp produced the loud sound to stun prey. So how with these shrimp effected by Oceans Getting Warmer in coming years to find out Mooney and his colleague Ashley? Lois analyzed audio recordings of the critters in their natural environment. They also performed lab experiments with snapping shrimp collected from the wild and water varying temperatures. And they found that when water heats up. The shrimp starts snapping more and the water soundscape gets louder. They shared their findings in February at the ocean. Sciences meeting twenty twenty in San Diego. The researchers aren't sure what's causing this change in shrimp behavior but they have an idea. We don't precisely know the mechanism why they're snapping more often. What we think is that these guys are basically just echo thermic animals. So that means that they're directly responding environmental conditions around them and so basically as you increase the water temperature increases their metabolic rates. Or they're just more metabolically active and so they're able or trying to snap more. If these shrimp do make the ocean noisier as the climate warms it could be a problem for both marine creatures and humans. Many Ocean animals. You sound to communicate and both the navy fishermen rely on marine acoustics to do their work. We'd never really thought about how that that ocean or its own background noise on Fox or naturally increasing in what we think is temperature driven climate change driven so as those levels are just harder kinda see the critic fog.

Aaron Mooney Woods Hole Oceanographic Lois San Diego Ashley
Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

Environment: NPR

02:54 min | 2 years ago

Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

"See if you can guess what this sound is Bacon frying. Maybe a crackling fire. Nope it is underwater snapping shrimp there only a few inches long but among the loudest animals in the ocean. Thanks to climate change. They are getting even louder. That's according to new research and that could affect a lot of other sea life as NPR's Lawrence Summer reports dive into tropical seas and that crackly sound is hard to miss them very easily. They tend to live in colonies or they're clustered closely together. So you hear this chorus of them Erin. Mooney is a scientist at the woods hole. Oceanographic institution whose steady some of the many snapping shrimp species around the world. He says that sound comes from their massive claw and they can really close that claw really really fast and it makes them bubble in the water and when that publ implodes that's what makes the popper the snap it even creates a tiny flash of light and it's surprisingly loud really similar to a large ship or large scale or even some sort of like Underwater HAMMERING DURING WORLD WAR. Two researchers were sent to investigate the noise because he was interfering with the Sonar Navy used to find submarines Mooney and his colleagues looked at snapping shrimp in a lab and the wild and found that the warmer gets the louder. The shrimp are and the more they snap. Warmer water makes them more active as Mooney recently presented to the American geophysical union and oceans are warming with climate. Change says Steve Simpson when we look at any type of global change. What we realize is that there will be winners and losers. Simpson is a professor of marine biology at the University of Exeter. He says sound is incredibly important underwater. Because it's hard to see very far and oceans are already getting noisier because of human impacts fifty thousand ships sailing around the world carrying ninety percent of world trade ad louder shrimp to that noise and it could further stress other animals that you sound like fish that grunt is a sergeant major a small Atlantic coral reef fish. It could mosque the ability of fish to be able to communicate because it will create a higher noise floor. Crackling sound then swamps. Any of the sounds that they might be wanting to listen out for. But there's also a chance that louder. Shrimp could help other organisms since then says when fish clams and coral are young larvae their free swimming floating in the ocean current. They're ready to find a reef to go and make their home and they use the sound. That's coming from that community as a cue to find a place to settle. The sound of snapping. Shrimp is an advertisement. That reef is a good place to live. Which is why Simpson and other. Scientists will be watching the oceans soundscape closely at a time when so many things are changing

Mooney Steve Simpson Scientist Oceanographic Institution NPR Sonar Navy American Geophysical Union Lawrence Summer University Of Exeter Professor
"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It was sunny guard so he lives in Chicago where he and his wife for a just thing to being empty nesters sunny work said in a a software firm he and his wife hold their two girls have attended colleges they dreamed of themselves more stories of the unexpected coming up when the Marth radio hour continues the most radio hours produced by Atlantic public media in woods hole Massachusetts and is presented by PRX and support for KQED comes from challenger school dedicated to inspiring children to embrace challenge and find joy and so forth through chief meant open houses this month open enrollment happening now details of challenger school dot com many kids have imaginary friends as we grow up we often set these relationships aside but what he has done to them she was as real to me as my friend next to me I couldn't see I could just hear her and then it was real it was it was her the thin line between the imaginary the real this week on hidden brain from NPR it's real hidden bring tomorrow night at eight here on KQED public radio.

Chicago PRX KQED woods hole Massachusetts
Social Intelligence with Blaise Aguera y Arcas

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:18 min | 2 years ago

Social Intelligence with Blaise Aguera y Arcas

"All right everyone still here in in Vancouver at Noor ups continuing our coverage of this incredible conference and I've got the pleasure of being seated with bless Aguado. yuccas blesses is a distinguished scientist with Google. Ai Bless welcome to the Tomo podcast. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me absolutely so you are doing an invited. Talk here at the conference tomorrow morning on Social Intelligence and we're going to dig into what exactly that means for you but before we do love to get a bit of your background sure sure so It's a little motley. I started off in physics undergraduate at Princeton and I studied physics and applied math. There I I took a year off between my third and fourth years because I was not a very good student and I really started to get into into biophysics this X.. Pretty heavily so you're euro for after during during a or a little bit a little bit before and then during I worked for for a little while while in there he was working on bacterial Metaxas. That actually gonNA figure a little bit into mytalk tomorrow morning. So it's the behaviors years of of the intelligent behaviors of bacteria. And how does that. They that they find food. There obviously a really small simple system but maybe not quite as simple as people think okay and end and then from there My my next adviser Bill Bialik is somebody with a physics background. As well but also computational neuroscientist. He ran this course in woods. Hole at the marine. Biological lab called methods and computational neuroscientists it methods and computational science I don't I don't know if you're familiar or how many of your listeners are with with with them deal with marine biological laboratory but it's this place where a lot of Princeton notes on Cape Cod. Okay and so. It's right on the elbow of Kit. Kat across from Martha's vineyard okay this this little tiny town. It's very cute. And there's this kind of ramshackle lab that's been there since the nineteenth century tree that That a lot of a lot of visiting Sort of neuroscientists and biologists have been going for many many years A lot of really basic basic discoveries in science where made their. Oh so it's kind of this cool place. And and at this. Course at nothing computational neuroscience I I met my now wife Adrian Hill. Oh so she also came up in physics and Studied originally chaos and turbulence and fluid dynamics comics and things like this and was making the switch to puck additional science so we met there and and then she ended up getting a faculty job at University of Washington which is how we ended up moving to Seattle and around that time I started a company And was no longer really sleep. Part of academia at that point and the company got acquired by Microsoft couple of years later and they come into doing computer vision type of work or a it's a somewhat somewhat doing sort of multi resolution representations of of documents of of various kinds. It was okay. It was a combination of wave. Latouche kind of tricks six and and you X.. If I think wave letters like Kryptonite for me that was the hardest thing that I studied in Grad School. For whatever reason it was very difficult to rock it was it was hard. Yeah my my advisor. In Grad School in applied math was ingrid do bitchy who was one of the inventors intercept wavelength. Yeah she was she was absolutely wonderful very very smart very kind and I think I think one of the greatest living mathematicians if I. I don't know maybe unbiased. But Anyway Yeah Microsoft acquired it and I did immediately turn the team toward more four kind of computer vision e things right after that so photosynthesis which started off the photo tourism project by University of Washington professor and Microsoft research scientists together. With with their Grad student snively was in three D. reconstructions environments from the images and that was really my introduction to computer vision Asian. That was pretty classical. Wasn't like deep nuts or anything like this geometric computer vision but I kind of fell in love with that with that field and ended up at Microsoft Echo soft. You know sort of doing a lot of leading teams doing that kind of work so Microsoft's OCR team and they're kind of photographic treat type teams the teams that ended up doing a lot of work for a hollow Lens tracking The head using our facing cameras. All that kind of stuff was okay was part of my team at the time so I was at Microsoft for seven years I also was the CTO of bing maps which also had some kind of computer vision? The are photographic tree kind of stuff going on and being mobile and then I am I went to Google. That was six years ago. I come across so many people that are in this field that have some connection to bang. Yeah I shouldn't I shouldn't Bad I mean it was it was it was creative and scrappy at the time You know whether whether Microsoft was really committed to running these things I guess it. It's anybody's guess right but but yeah. I mean one of the most one of the reasons that I ended up leaving Microsoft was because about six years ago they had just Kind of lost the phone phone war and it became clear that they were going to be moving away from being a consumer focused company. We're GONNA start working on just enterprise stuff and I wasn't that interesting to me and that was around the same time. I'm also that did the whole deep learning revolution was really getting into full. Swing and I was very excited about about some of machine learning and computational neuroscience verging and Google is the obvious place. where the kind of hotbed of of a lot of that so nice? So what do you research. Google well at Google I started a team. UNCALLED CEREBRAL. With is not a name that we've generally used in public but that's not at all heading. Thank you it's the plural of brain. So there was a brain team already that you know Jeff. Jeff Teens started years before and I went to Google to start a team that would take how much more decentralized approach so rather than one brain. It'd be many brains. Everybody would have a little brain and I had a very augmentation focused point of view. You know the rather than having one giant running in a data center these things would have to shrink to democratize. There would have to go into devices. Run locally I had a lot of reasons for wanting to push in that direction including privacy Which I will talk about a bit tomorrow so mobile nets and a lot of these kind of efficient ways of running neural nets locally came from From our team again. I'm running. The you know the the the groups At Google the two things like oh CR and face recognition and a bunch of other sort of image understanding Primitives but we also power a lot of a lot of a or features chores or whatever you WANNA call them in android and also on other kinds of devices include including these little coral boards which are sort of an Iot kit for doing taking local I think those are just well. I guess it's maybe half a year ago at the developer conference drink. I have one. That's that's right that's right so yeah we're very excited about those cool he you mentioned OCR and Of all the things that we've talked about I think of that or it's probably easy easy to think of that as a solved problem the problem. But there's probably a lot of Even saying it. There's probably like this last mile problem. Where in order to get to usable or better levels of Accuracy and performance kind of that those last few percentage points are are really hard to get to. So you say I mean it solves problem and yeah I mean. It's good enough for practical use engines. That are good enough for practical use but a of of course. Extra percentage points are always useful. A little bit more is always better but also a team that I run at Microsoft was still using a lot of these classical techniques that would I you know they'll have a whole pipeline of different stages first segmenting out letters and then you know doing template matching and then using language modeling all kinds of like this and the direction that that that I think in the end that the you know the people in the team believe are really the most fruitful now are much more and much more neural so imagine smoke scanner that scans the entire line maybe by directionally and emits a string of characters. Kind of like a speech engine. Might if you you do it that way then you know. Join join letters and ligature is. Don't matter right cursive doesn't matter handwriting. And you don't print could be the same Arabic and other languages. That don't have good distinctions between letters. I ain't going but rather that don't that don't distinguish clearly between letters in the more cursive sort of approach. All of those things work and that sort of general and also just weird funds. There are a lot of things that are easy for us to read that a classic engine right so thinking about it more like a real vision problem some of the brain behind it as opposed to just a classical kind of letter clustering problem with the language model talked on

Microsoft Google Grad School Jeff Teens Princeton University Of Washington Microsoft Research Cape Cod Adrian Hill Vancouver Bill Bialik Scientist Aguado. Seattle Advisor Bing KAT Ingrid
"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

"And it looks like snow thank she said that this year she's looking forward to Christmas in good old Houston Texas where there will be no snow and no birds that look like snow there will be family she can be found singing with their band and and the faith in New York City you're listening to their music now after a break we'll hear about a forest on west eighty ninth street involving his stay tuned you hours produced by implanting public media in woods hole Massachusetts and presented by PRX KCRW sponsors include universal pictures presenting us written and directed by Jordan Peele.

Texas New York City Jordan Peele Houston woods hole Massachusetts PRX KCRW
"woods hole" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Impact the stayed overnight easy TV meteorologist Derek Fisher looks for a widespread one to three inches of rain and as for the winds we have wind advisories up for much of the inland areas and I would warnings at the coastline some gusts up to sixty five for possible there thirty to fifty mile per hour winds will be expected for inland areas and a little bit of a difference in timing the strongest winds near the coast line will be overnight tonight in the heaviest of the rain fall mostly between midnight and six in the morning if you're inland some of the stronger Gus will be during the day tomorrow the winds of the more west southwesterly you'll see some cost about thirty five to fifty and those winds may create conditions for power outages the long awaited Cape Cod shark reporters out and there's no simple answer to the growing problem the woods hole group says shark detection and deterrent technologies need more testing forcible county commissioner Ron BT takes issue with the report basically what they're saying is continue to do exactly what has been done which is discount people not to swim at the beaches are or distilled and they're trying to change human behavior rather than protect us from the sharks do says something about the seals which are the the problem but that that can cause the problem and brought the sharks here on the site investigation on the Cape police say they responded to Yarmouth road in Hyannis early in the afternoon to reports of a fight and they found a man with a parent stab wounds he later died at a hospital in Boston federal court the owner of a California jewelry business gets three weeks in jail and the college admissions scandal Marjorie clapper paid fifteen thousand dollars to recur sons PC to test a bipartisan White House meeting to discuss Turkey and Syria breaks down Republicans blaming house speaker Nancy Pelosi for walking out of the meeting calling our actions on becoming Democrats say the president insulted policy calling her a third rate politician afterwards Pelosi said the president seems Arnold by the overwhelming vote in the house condemning the Syria pull up I think that both the size of the more than two to one of the Republicans voted to oppose what the president did probably got to the president of because he was shaken up by policy.

"woods hole" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"He health. easy busted W. X. K. S. F. MHD to bed and I heart radio station. it matters where you get your news WBZ newsradio. sixty eight degrees involved in a two o'clock a tropical storm watch from woods hole the Sagamore beach on Cape Cod the vineyard and Nantucket for late Friday night into early Saturday good afternoon I'm Laurie Kirby let's start with that rising water and pounding surf up and down the Carolinas this hour hurricane Joram a high end category two is already flooded parts of downtown Charleston with storm surge and rain runoff the hurricane right now the eyes spinning roughly fifty miles off shore WBZ TV meteorologist cerebral blood ski on Dorian's close pass to New England Friday night and Saturday expected to move northeastward and late Friday through Saturday pass just southeast of our area as a category one hurricane and despite the fact it's to ourselves the northern edge still going to impact parts of the region the Massachusetts emergency management agency or mima is out with its very latest situational awareness statement one to four inches of rain expected across the Cape and islands the heaviest rain Friday night into Saturday morning wind gusts up to sixty miles an hour across the Cape and islands and right now it looks like Nantucket is poised to take the brunt let's go back to Charleston South Carolina on the ground A. B. C.'s Alex down. this city church bells ring mixed with the sound of transformers blowing. the power is out in much of Charleston so far though no signs of any storm surge there is some street flooding around the city's famous open air market that area often floods until drains are cleared but at the sea wall along the battery the water remains well below the top of the wall Alex stone ABC news Charleston I will have a lot more on the storm it's track and its aftermath throughout the afternoon and of course in the coming days and hours here on WBZ newsradio and you can take this with you you don't have to leave the forecast take us on that smart phone in years little sure pocket there on the I heart radio app we are streaming all the time or two oh two and workers over battery wharf hotel in.

W. X. K. S. F. MHD Cape Cod Laurie Kirby Carolinas Charleston Dorian New England Nantucket A. B. C. WBZ newsradio Massachusetts mima Alex ABC sixty eight degrees four inches
"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We have known but the night in the library is what they both think about when they lie silently next to each other and listen to the wind it must be somewhere for them to think about it the children must be with their other parents and the rain must be falling on the cedar shingles overhead a candle must be burning on the mantle above the bad and the maple branches outside their window must be tossing against each other then they think of the story they know so well and never say a lout there was a huge storm three nights before that left the island the tail end of our hurricane passing farther out to sea the cedar trees creeped and swayed in the wind beyond the library windows the students had staggered off to bed after the visitor from woods hole had finished his lecture on the explorations of the album in the Cayman trough and Frank can garner and Carol had shrouded themselves in their rain gear and left as well sheltering the visitor between them really sat at one end of the long table preparing bottles of fix it for the expedition the following morning and Jonathan lay on the sofa writing notes the boat was leaving just after dawn and they knew they ought to go to bed the wind picked off down sign sweeping the branches against the walls the windows rattled Jonathan shivered in said do you suppose we could get a fire going in that old fireplace.

woods hole Frank Carol Jonathan
Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Florida Keys, Brian And Florida discussed on All Things Considered

"Coral reefs are dying around the world and a new study suggests a way to save them the study of the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources which means there are things local communities can do to help the corals NPR's pink Wong reports Brian the point has watched half of Florida's corals die off in the past twenty years watching the decline of court what we he has been heartbreaking I live in the Florida Keys and when I moved here in the early nineteen eighties I had no idea that we would be losing these corals the point a professor at Florida Atlantic University has spent his career studying corals at the leaky roof and the Florida Keys he's the lead author on any paper out in the journal marine biology it analyzes thirty years of data he's collected and its conclusion is actually hopeful you've got quite a story here would you put all this together that there actually is hope for coral reefs after all how does he figure a study which showed that warming temperatures were killing off corals but as data actually showed that the corals biggest problem was another human source too much nitrogen it comes from badly treated sewage as well as fertilizer and topsoil from people's yards and farms it feeds blooms of algae that block out the light and also throws off the nutrient balance in the water and make the calls more likely to catch disease to go through coral bleaching and to die Michael fox studies coral reefs at the woods hole oceanographic institution he wasn't involved in the study but he appreciates its long term view we're starting to have enough data to really track the impacts of local scale structures to quarrels over long enough time frames to understand how the communities are changing James Porter at the university of Georgia co authored the Florida study he says that in the past most scientists and the public figure that there was little we could do to help corals unless we fixed all of climate change what our study shows is that taking care of one off from the land which is a local phenomenon that can protect coral reefs to put this is our findings from Florida can apply to reefs around the world and that better sewage and storm water treatment might give corals a fighting chance at surviving climate change ping long NPR

Florida Keys Brian Florida Professor Florida Atlantic University Marine Biology James Porter NPR Pink Wong Michael Fox Woods Hole University Of Georgia Co Thirty Years Twenty Years
"woods hole" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Woods hole. Massachusetts and presented by PR. X. I'm Tobin low and I'm Cathy to we host the podcast Nancy, all about the LGBTQ experience. We hope you'll join us for our radio special filled with stories about a different kind of coming out. You'll hear from gay men talking about what it's like to disclose the HIV status a woman who tracks down her long lost queer role model and a son trying to save his father's life. Even painful confrontation. So tune in and celebrate pride with us today at three on WNYC and anytime at WNYC dot org slash stonewall fifty. Support for WNYC comes from New York Presbyterian, New York's top ranked hospital for eighteen years in a row, according to the twenty eighteen nineteen rankings by US news and World Report amazing, things are happening here. Learn more at N Y P dot org slash amazing facts. WNYC is a media partner of the food network and cooking channel New York City wine and food festival October tenth to thirteenth with more than eighty vents including five hundred chefs benefiting hunger relief. NYC W F, F dot org. You're listening to the moth radio hour from PR Rex, I'm Jay Allison and this time we are hearing about bravery. Breeze child can sometimes be sadness because the catalyst for bravery may be terrible and traumatic event or next storyteller is Michael McNamee who told us about such an event in Worcester, Massachusetts,.

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KCRW

"Support for the moth comes from Babbel, a language app that features real-life conversations in a new language, including Spanish, French, or German. Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons are available in the app store or online at Babbel. B B E, L dot com. The radio hour is produced by Atlantic public media in woods hole. Massachusetts and presented by the public radio exchange r x dot org. I'm happy to pledge for the young. Dr anti drive non drive on drive. I enjoy KCRW. Listen to you every day. That's what you call the drive whatever you want. Just don't forget to call your support is vital. Go to KCRW dot com slash joining give thirty dollars a month or more. But do it now. The drive ins tomorrow. Support for KCRW comes from KCET presenting to original series, broken bread features, chef ROY Choi on a journey through Los Angeles exploring complex social Justice issues and meeting heroes who use food as a catalyst for change, and art bound now in its tenth season returns to examine the arts and culture innovators who make an impact in southern California and beyond stream broken bread and art bound at KCET dot org. And the PBS app. I'm George does green the founder of them off. And you're listening to the moth radio hour from PR x this is a special..

california catalyst atlantic
"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"woods hole" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The nineteen sixties. The moth radio hour is brought to you by crown publishing presenting the moths new book occasional magic collection of unforgettable true stories drawn from some of the moths favorites storytellers heard on this show. Learn more at the moth dot org. Radio hour is produced by Atlantic public media woods hole Massachusetts and presented by p r x support for K. Q E comes from European sleep works. The store that basis is designs and materials on research factors affecting sleep, including comfort and support humidity levels, and ease breathing. Details. Online about their mattresses and bedding at sleepworks dot com. Total wine and more with more than eight thousand wines from around the world weekly tasting classes, special events now with nine bay area locations, including Stevens creek, total wine dot com. This is a moth radio hour from PR. I'm.

atlantic bay area
Hawaii braces for long upheaval from volcano as new vents open

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:55 min | 4 years ago

Hawaii braces for long upheaval from volcano as new vents open

"The second time in three months the same martha's vineyard ferry breaks down the ferry lost power as it left woods hole and route to vineyard haven last night with two hundred people aboard the steamship authority says it had to drop anchor because of a gas issue with the ferries generator it's the same ferry that had a similar problem in march as it made its way to woods hole from vineyard wbz news time three ten a man is dead after crashing his motorcycle on ninety three north in boston forty nine year old jose lopes of brockton lost control of the bike around two am state police are investigating the killer way of volcano continues to wreak havoc on the big island of hawaii to more events have crack the heated surface forcing out hundreds of residents reporter ben thomas says the number of vents now stands at twelve that's lava sizzling in the streets inside the evacuation zone on hawaii's big island we're more than seventeen hundred people have fled their homes the hawaii volcano observatory suspense each several hundred yards long have opened in the late lonnie estates neighborhood since thursday sam not is among those who stayed behind fuming roaring it was thundering rox refer flying out of the ground he spoke to k joanne acid cheryl griffith who says the eruptions caught many by surprise people's dash james they're not going to recruit scientists say kill away is likely to release more lava through more vents but they can't predict where i'm ben thomas wbz news time three eleven now wbz's doug cope in the ace hticket dot com sports studio and garo we are watching a couple of well pretty important games and sports this afternoon bruins enlightening of course game for the playoffs they are taking place in tampa bay that game just getting underway down in tampa bruins down three games to one they have.

Vineyard Haven Boston Brockton Hawaii SAM Cheryl Griffith Doug Cope Tampa Bay Woods Hole Jose Lopes Reporter Ben Thomas Hawaii Volcano Observatory Lonnie Estates Ben Thomas Wbz Tampa Forty Nine Year Hundred Yards Three Months