18 Burst results for "Woodrow Cox"

What It Means When Children Are Under Fire

Red, Blue, and Brady

02:08 min | 2 months ago

What It Means When Children Are Under Fire

"We have a full house today though. Chris ted and john can you introduce yourself. Hi everyone. i'm chris brown. I'm the president of brady and hi everybody. My name is ted bonar. I'm a clinical psychologist and the director of an family fire and then sort of our man of the hour. Is it strange when you walk into a virtual meeting space and everyone just holds your book up with notes and says okay. Let's get started on delighted. Delighted actually see it in the world. I've been living with it for the weird thing about a book. You know you finish it so long ago and then you wait and you wait and you wait and then suddenly you actually see it out there so now it's it's always a thrill to see waved around admit meetings okay. That's that's a relief. I'm glad we didn't scare you. John and would you mind telling your listeners. A little bit about yourself as well as your great buck children under fire. Sure my name is john. Woodrow cox. I'm a staff writer at the washington post. And i'm the author of children under fire in american crisis. The sort of the short summary of the book is it's meant to be really an intimate account of the way that gun. Violence devastates this country and anna anna. Also a bit of a path forward in ways that we could make some small differences to help those kids both before and after they suffer trauma from gun wiles. I think intimate is a perfect word to describe this book as you detail. The ways in which children are impacted by gun violence through stories of a handful of children. What i'm wondering is what prompted you to write. Not just about the physical effects of gun violence in what that effect is on children but the psychological ex i think that so much of the coverage around the way that kids are impacted by gun. Violence focuses on the kids who get shot. We have such a narrow focus. And this really applies. I think to adults as well. There's this really narrow focus on and that's the headlines. I mean we can look at what happened yesterday. As an example. There's a school shooting all the cable news. Networks make a calculation to say. Let's wait and see how many people died right. One person died they move on. That's not an high enough death

Chris Ted Ted Bonar Woodrow Cox Chris Brown Anna Anna John Brady The Washington Post
"woodrow cox" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

06:06 min | 2 months ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Shootings in the US Gun violence and the impact it has on kids is the subject of a new book by Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox. It's called Children under Fire and American Crisis. John Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. I want you to start If you could telling me a little bit about Ty, Sean and Ava and how they came to be friends, so it was pretty remarkable. Actually back in early 2017. I had set off on a serious of stories for the post pursuing Kids have been impacted by gun violence, and Tai Shan's father had been shot to death in the middle of the day in Southeast D. C. So I wrote a story about the trauma that Tai Shan was dealing with. And by the time that story published, I had started reporting on a school shooting in South Carolina. There was a teenager of 14 year old boy who pulled up town Bill Elementary School and had opened fired on a group of first graders and he had killed a little boy named Jacob. And he was the best friend of a little girl named Eva. And Ava was dealing with really debilitating trump in the aftermath of that, So after I wrote the story on Ty Shine it published it was Mother was reading it one day. And her mother told her a little bit about Ty, Sean and Ava decided that she wanted to write in the letter. She thought he needed a friend. So she wrote him a letter and it began this pen pal relationship that then evolved into you know, the two of them, sending gifts back and forth to each other, and then often face times they would talk quite a bit, and they just This really, really unique relationship because they had shared trauma over gun violence. Why did you want to focus on these Children? Not those killed by gun violence, but those who survive those who have been affected by it. So you know the core of this book. Is what was for me the epiphany and that was that the scope Of gun violence and how it affects Children. America is so much broader. When people assume and Ava and tie Shawn to me, illustrated that Their lives have been profoundly affected, shaped forever by the losses that they have gone through and what they've witnessed. So you know, we think of gun violence often is the hundreds of thousands of kids who Die every year, but it's millions of Children who are impacted directly Ren directly by this plague and surviving gun violence. Doesn't just cause you know, loss in mental health issues. Which you chronicle in the book, but can also cause financial hardships for the families who tried to put the pieces back together. Can you talk about that? Absolutely. I mean, Eva has been to more than half a dozen different therapists before she found one who could really connect with it. She's been through multiple psychiatrist and anti Shawn's case. It was the same thing. You know, he was his mother was trying to find someone. And it was. It was a real struggle. Because you the insurance didn't cover it. Or she just couldn't pay for it. Or, you know somebody who is too young. They once tried toe, see if a student You know, going through psychology school could treat him and she just wasn't willing to do that. So these kids just don't get the services they need And if they do, it's you know, incredibly expensive for the families. Again and again in the book. A lot of this seems to come down to a research and the lack of evidence about what works. And that's partly because it's hard to fund research about gun violence. Can you talk a little bit about how gun violence research is funded now and what role it could play in the future? Yes. So that has set us back. More than any other individual problem is that in the 19 nineties, Congress passed what's called the Dickey Amendment. And it effectively banned the CDC from studying gun violence for two decades, just in the past couple of years. Was there. Finally, a push to spend some money. But frankly, the money that Congress has devoted to research has been symbolic. It's been, you know, in the few tens of millions of dollars when we should be devoting Hundreds of millions of dollars to this issue. We studied this issue at the same rate that we study similar causes of death. We'd be devoting hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars to this and would be able to say definitively. This law works, and this one doesn't work. So this is what we should pass. Of course, this conversation is all too relevant. Yet again. With the recent mass shootings, there's a new administration and a new Congress in town. Do you see the political will changing about specifically funding research into what works? I do think that we will see real progress with research and in part because the dam was sort of broken even before the change in administration. Passing some of these more sweeping laws, some of which, we know save lives. That could be harder to pass because you need the 60 votes. So you know, that is sort of the big question in these weeks to come. Can I get 60? John Woodrow Cox. He's the author of the new book, Children Under Fire. Thanks for Sharing it with us. Thanks so much for having me we've got an excerpt from the book online about the nearly $3 billion Market for school security. And the unproven products that industry is selling. You confined that at marketplace start orig. There is, you might have heard.

Sean South Carolina Eva Ava John Woodrow Cox Jacob Congress Tai Shan CDC 60 votes Bill Elementary School Ty hundreds early 2017 Southeast D. C. Children Under Fire John 14 year two Dickey Amendment
"woodrow cox" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:54 min | 2 months ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"I'm Amy Scott. Before we get into this next story, just a heads up. We'll be talking about a sensitive topic that may not be appropriate for Children. As the country moves closer to something like business is usual and all too familiar Story has re emerged. Over the past three weeks. 22 people have died in mass shootings in the US Gun violence and the impact it has on kids is the subject of a new book by Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox. It's called Children under Fire and American Crisis. John. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. I want you to start If you could telling me a little bit about Ty, Sean and Ava and how they came to be friends, so it was pretty remarkable. Actually back in early 2017 I had set off on a serious of stories for the Post's pursuing kids have been impacted by gun violence and Tai Shan's father. Had been shot to death in the middle of the day in Southeast D. C. So I wrote a story about the trauma that Tai Shan was dealing with. And by the time that story published, I had started reporting on a school shooting in South Carolina. There was a teenager of 14 year old boy who pulled up town Bill Elementary School and had opened fired on a group of first graders and he had killed a little boy named Jacob. And he was the best friend of a little girl named Eva. And Ava was dealing with really debilitating trump in the aftermath of that, So after I wrote the story on Ty Shine it published it was Mother was reading it one day. And her mother told her a little bit about Ty, Sean and Ava decided that she wanted to write him a letter. She thought he needed a friend. So she wrote him a letter and it began this pen pal relationship that then evolved into you know, the two of them, sending gifts back and forth to each other, and then often face times they would talk quite a bit, and they just This really, really unique relationship because they had shared trauma over gun violence. Why did you want to focus on these Children, not those killed by gun violence, but those who survive those who have been affected by it. So you know, the core of this book is what was for me the epiphany and that was that the scope Of gun violence and how it affects Children. America is so much broader. And people assume and Ava and tie Shawn to me, illustrated that Their lives have been profoundly affected, shaped forever by the losses that they have gone through and what they've witnessed. So you know, we think of gun violence often is the hundreds of thousands of kids who Die every year, but it's millions of Children who are impacted directly Ren directly by this plague and surviving gun violence. Doesn't just cause you know, loss in mental health issues. Which you chronicle in the book, but can also cause financial hardships for the families who tried to put the pieces back together. Can you talk about that? Absolutely. I mean, Ava has been to more than half a dozen different therapists before she found one who could really connect with it. She's been through multiple psychiatrist and anti Shawn's case. It was the same thing. You know, he was his mother was trying to find someone. And it was. It was a real struggle. Because you the insurance didn't cover it. Or she just couldn't pay for it. Or, you know somebody who is too young. They once tried toe, see if a student You know, going through psychology school could treat him and she just wasn't willing to do that. So these kids just don't get the services they need And if they do, it's you know, incredibly expensive for the families. Again and again in the book. A lot of this seems to come down to a research and the lack of evidence about what works. And that's partly because it's hard to fund research about gun violence. Can you talk a little bit about How gun violence research is funded now and what role it could play in the future. Yes, so that has set us back. More than any other individual problem is that in the 19 nineties, Congress passed what's called the Dickey Amendment. And it effectively banned the CDC from studying gun violence for two decades, just in the past couple of years. Was there. Finally, a push to spend some money. But frankly, the money that Congress has devoted to research has been symbolic. It's been, you know, in the few tens of millions of dollars when we should be devoting Hundreds of millions of dollars to this issue. If we studied this issue at the same rate that we study similar causes of death, we'd be devoting hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars to this and would be able to say definitively. This law works, and this one doesn't work. So this is what we should pass. Of course, this conversation is all too relevant. Yet again. With the recent mass shootings, there's a new administration and a new Congress in town. Do you see the political will changing about specifically funding research into what works? I do think that we will see real progress with research and in part because the dam was sort of broken even before the change in administration. Passing some of these more sweeping laws, some of which, we know save lives. That could be harder to pass because you need the 60 votes. So you know, that is sort of the big question in these weeks to come. Can I get 60? John Woodrow Cox. He's the author of The new book, Children Under Fire. Thanks for Sharing it with us. Thanks so much for having me We've got an excerpt from.

Amy Scott Sean South Carolina Eva John Woodrow Cox Jacob Ava Congress Tai Shan CDC 60 votes 60 hundreds 14 year Southeast D. C. early 2017 Bill Elementary School 22 people Ty Children Under Fire
"woodrow cox" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:25 min | 2 months ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Shootings in the US Gun violence and the impact it has on kids is the new subject is the subject of a new book by Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox. It's called Children under Fire and American Crisis. John Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. I want you to start If you could telling me a little bit about Ty, Sean and Ava and how they came to be friends, so it was pretty remarkable. Actually back in early 2017. I had set off on a serious of stories for the post pursuing Kids have been impacted by gun violence, and Tai Shan's father had been shot to death in the middle of the day in Southeast D. C. So I wrote a story about the trauma that Tai Shan was dealing with and In time. That story published I had started reporting on a school shooting in South Carolina. There was a teenager of 14 year old boy who pulled up town Bill Elementary School and had opened fired. On a group of first graders and he had killed a little boy named Jacob. And he was the best friend of a little girl named Eva and Ava was dealing with really debilitating trauma in the aftermath of that, so After I wrote the story on Ty Shine it published his mother was reading it one day. And her mother told her a little bit about Ty, Sean and Ava decided that she wanted to write in the letter. She thought he needed a friend. So she wrote him a letter and it began this pen pal relationship that then evolved into you know, the two of them, sending gifts back and forth to each other, and then often face times they would talk quite a bit, and they just This really, really unique relationship because they had shared trauma over gun violence. Why did you want to focus on these Children? Not those killed by gun violence, but those who survive those who have been affected by it. So you know the core of this book. Is what was for me the epiphany and that was that the scope Of gun violence and how it affects Children. America is so much broader than people assume and Ava and tie Shawn to me, illustrated that Their lives have been profoundly affected, shaped forever by the losses that they have gone through and what they've witnessed. So you know, we think of gun violence often is the hundreds of thousands of kids who Die every year, but it's millions of Children who are impacted directly Ren directly by this plague and surviving gun violence. Doesn't just cause you know, loss in mental health issues. Which you chronicle in the book, but can also cause financial hardships for the families who tried to put the pieces back together. Can you talk about that? Absolutely. I mean, Eva has been to more than half a dozen different therapists before she found one who could really connect with it. She's been through multiple psychiatrist and anti Shawn's case. It was the same thing. You know, he was his mother was trying to find someone. And it was. It was a real struggle. Because you the insurance didn't cover it. Or she just couldn't pay for it. Or, you know somebody who is too young. They once tried toe, see if a student You know, going through psychology school could treat him and she just wasn't willing to do that. So these kids just don't get the services they need And if they do, it's you know, incredibly expensive for the families. Again and again in the book. A lot of this seems to come down to a research and the lack of evidence about what works. And that's partly because it's hard to fund research about gun violence. Can you talk a little bit about How gun violence is funded now and what role it could play in the future. Yes, so that has set us back. More than any other individual problem is that in the 19 nineties, Congress passed what's called the Dickey Amendment. And it effectively banned the CDC from studying gun violence for two decades, just in the past couple of years. Was there. Finally, a push to spend some money. But frankly, the money that Congress has devoted to research has been symbolic. It's been, you know, in the few tens of millions of dollars when we should be devoting Hundreds of millions of dollars to this issue. If we studied this issue at the same rate that we study similar causes of death, we'd be devoting hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars to this and would be able to say definitively. This law works, and this one doesn't work. So this is what we should pass. Of course, this conversation is all too relevant. Yet again. With the recent mass shootings, there's a new administration and a new Congress in town. Do you see the political will changing about specifically funding research into what works? I do think that we will see real progress with research and in part because the dam was sort of broken even before the change in administration. Passing some of these more sweeping laws, some of which, we know save lives. That could be harder to pass because you need the 60 votes. So you know, that is sort of the big question in these weeks to come. Can I get 60? John Woodrow Cox. He's the author of The new book, Children Under Fire. Thanks.

Sean Eva South Carolina CDC Ava John Woodrow Cox Congress Tai Shan 60 votes Jacob Ty Bill Elementary School Shawn John hundreds Southeast D. C. early 2017 two 60 Dickey Amendment
"woodrow cox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:17 min | 2 months ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Texas Motorplex 40 miles outside of Dallas. For Safety s open all is promoting are reduced capacity. Partnering with a company cleared attract the health of audience members and is also requiring masks. But he admits with a crowd this size that will be a challenge to enforce. There's going to be a certain portion of the Crowd that you know, will not wear mask we and we already know about that. But we're gonna try, which is what worries Doctor Beetle Bala Super Mannion. She's an epidemiologist and dean of the Dallas campus of Beauty School of Public Health. It's a younger group. There's dancing the singing, There's probably gonna be some drinking involved. Those are the kinds of things where it's much harder to get people to follow the rules after a little while, Steve Edelman is vice president of the Event Safety Alliance, a trade group promoting safety at life events. He says. While April may be hasty, he understands the urge to get live events going. It's just in aggressive opening at a time when we know every event professional has been sidelined for at least a year. And we need to get back to work. But Adelman says the level of risk will depend on how many people going will be fully vaccinated. Come Showtime, which is something Chad Johnson is keeping an eye on. He's the co founder of Furnace Fest, a punk and hardcore festival set to take place in Alabama in September. He's banking that the CDC will give the go ahead for a large gatherings by then, and of course, we could be wrong, and so if we're wrong And we've already told all of our customers. This we will postpone again will offer you for refunds again. Yes, it would suck. We'd be disappointed We'd be discouraged, but we've overcome a lot more. It's been over a year without contents being back the way they used to be, much less the kind of shows I would inspire the type of dancing and marching that would normally go down at fest like Be doubIe or furnished fest. Jamie McMurray is chief marketing officer at Danny Women Presents, which runs a number of festivals throughout the country. Some have been postponed. Others are set to take place starting September two things that we think about constantly is number one. What is the consumers? Emotional state going to be in coming back to large scale events and number two? What is their financial state going to be? Will people be ready to throw down like they used to? Will they even be able to afford to considering? Most festivals are multi day affairs. You gotta travel. Get a hotel room. All that stuff. But it is something to look forward to. Angela Bang NPR news. This'll is NPR news. This is morning edition on W. N. Y. C later on morning edition. As the debate over reopening schools heats up, one expert in public health says it's time to re frame the way we talk about school. The conversation has to shift from this concept of is everything 100% safe or the right level of safety to our school's essential more on the idea of declaring in person school instruction essential coming up in about 15 minutes. Music you're hearing right now is from pianist or Ryan Weiss. He's one of the artists chosen by our sister station. W Q. X R for their new artist Propulsion Lab. That's to help support musicians during the pandemic. Will feature his music all morning long and will have an interview with him next hour. W N. Y C supporters include ECHO, publisher of Children Under Fire. By John WOODROW Cox, a new book about the effects of gun violence that weaves personal stories into a call to action for practical reform to protect our nation's Children available now on the next frame Layer show. We continue our series designed to help you get access to vaccines. This time, our main focus will.

Jamie McMurray Steve Edelman Chad Johnson Event Safety Alliance Alabama Ryan Weiss Dallas April September Beauty School of Public Health Adelman 40 miles Angela Bang NPR John WOODROW Cox 100% Furnace Fest CDC Be doubIe W N. Y C
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KQED Radio

"All the teachers got all the kids inside. They locked all the doors and the gunman who had a sort of a modified A or fifteen fired more than one hundred rounds into the buildings there any injured one student, but because they locked the doors, and he couldn't get inside there were dozens of lives saved, and it was because of preparation, which is really the thing that we heard over and over from schools said that the one thing that was most important was preparation. The kind of training. They just talked about in northern California has been commodities by an Ohio company that teaches people how to respond to active shooters, they call their training method Alice. You've found that to be controversial. Why was that? Controversial. Well, an aspect of their training teaches students in certain scenarios to essentially attack the gunman. And specifically what they're saying is arm yourself with any sort of objects you have and then just in case throw it at the gunman and then swarm the gunman students as young as elementary age our top that by their schools, and that's really controversial. Because you know, you see these videos online where people practice seem the Alice techniques and all the students attacked the gunman in the gunman just falls to the ground. Well, that's unlikely to go that way in a real life situation where somebody is there to kill you one more thing I wanted to take a step back for a moment statistically school shootings are still considered rare. But there there also seems to be this general feeling that mass shootings school shootings are tragically becoming the norm based on your reporting. Tell me about. How school systems are weighing statistics with public pressure when they decide where to spend their money and how I think that's really tough schools very consistently make these decisions on what to invest in based on politics or based on reaction. So we see things like parkland happen. And then we see big spending all over the country and often schools and school districts are not methodical in deciding. Okay. This is what is the smart thing for us. Because the reality is school shootings are quite rare. Maybe not compared to other developed nations. But certainly given how many schools we have in this country. It's very unlikely that a student is going to ever experience a school shooting. But I think that what is critically important is that schools take their time is they they shouldn't be investing millions of dollars into products. Because somebody said they were an expert, and this is the thing that work there should be stepping back and really studying what is our district need compared to that other district. That's Washington Post enterprise reporter, John Woodrow Cox joining us. Thank you very much. John. Thank you..

John Woodrow Cox Washington Post Alice California Ohio reporter
"woodrow cox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All the teachers got all the kids inside. They locked all the doors and the gunman who had a sort of a modified A or fifteen fired more than one hundred rounds into the buildings there any injured one student, but because they locked the doors, and he couldn't get inside there were dozens of lives saved, and it was because of preparation, which is really the thing that we heard over and over from schools. So that the one thing that was most important was preparation, the kind of training that you just talked about in northern California has been commodities by an Ohio company that teaches people how to respond to active shooters, they call their training method Alice you've found that to be controversial. Why was that? Controversial. Well. Well, an aspect of their training teaches students in certain scenarios to essentially attack the gunman. And specifically what they're saying is arm yourself with any sort of objects you have and then just in case throw it at the gunman and then swarm the gunman students as young as elementary age our top that by their schools, and that's really controversial. Because you know, you see these videos online where people are practicing seeing the Alice techniques and all the students attack the gunman in the gunman just falls to the ground. Well, that's unlikely to go that way in a real life situation where somebody is there to kill you one more thing I wanted to take a step back for a moment statistically school shootings are still considered rare. But there there also seems to be this general feeling that mass shooting school shootings are tragically becoming the norm based on your reporting. Tell me about how school systems are weighing statistics with public pressure. When the. Decide where to spend their money and how I think that's really tough schools very consistently make these decisions on what to invest in based on politics or based on reaction. So we see things like parkland happen. And then we see big spending all over the country and often schools and school districts are not methodical in deciding. Okay. This is what is the smart thing for us because the reality is that school shootings are quite rare. Maybe not compared to other developed nations. But certainly given how many schools we have in this country. It's very unlikely that a student is going to ever experience a school shooting. But I think that what is critically important is that schools take their time is they shouldn't be investing millions of dollars into products. Because somebody said they were expert, and this is the thing that work there should be stepping back and really studying what is our district need compared to that other district. That's Washington Post enterprise reporter, John Woodrow Cox joining us. Thank you very much. John. Thank you..

John Woodrow Cox Alice California Washington Post Ohio reporter
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"Five fifty four and Giacomo forecasts. We're gonna have a fifty percent chance of rain this evening. Fifty percent chance of rain tomorrow morning as well and should taper off to about. Let's see some scattered showers tomorrow afternoon may sneak in a sun break or two as well right now in Seattle, fifty one degrees. Stay connected. Stay informed. Seattle's only twenty four hour news station. Komo news one thousand FM ninety seven seven release Jaffe, I'm Tom glasco. Jeremy grater is at the editor's desk. As we take a look at some of the day's top stories. The US supreme court says it will hear a case that might impact how districts are drawn up around the country. The court is looking at Virginia case where civil rights backers claim the state packed African American voters into eleven house of delegates districts to reduce their influence in the rest of the state can county council is passed any eleven point seven billion dollar budget. The money will be spent over the next two years supporters point to money to restore the King County sheriff's gang task force one hundred million for affordable housing projects and two hundred and thirty million dollars to combat homelessness through shelter and housing services. Coming up. I'm herb Weisbaum. The latest airline satisfaction ratings from consumer reports Alaska. It. Well, but just missed the top spot from ballistic whiteboards to facial recognition software. School security is a big business a two point seven billion dollar market. According to an H study. But how do you know if any of that money is saving lives or preventing school shootings? Washington Post reporter, John Woodrow, Cox, surveyed schools were shooting took place since the twenty twelve Newtown mass shooting, and he spoke with komo's Tom hutler of the schools responding to the survey how many thought better technology such as facial recognition software would have prevented though shootings we serve a nearly eighty schools that are had some sort of incidents and sandy hook and thirty four the school responded and only one of them suggested any sort of school safety technology might have made any difference. And it was sort of one school at a long list of things they thought might be. Possible mentioned in passing that, you know, maybe metal detectors would have made a difference. But you know, by large the thing that schools are spending billions of dollars on that have actually gone through. This don't point to that is something that would have prevented the shootings that they experienced lots of money. Very little results are very little chance of the result that they desire what role did the school resource officers play in some of these shootings in a handful. They definitely made a difference either. By in a couple of cases, it's very very rare. This idea that a school resource officer guns down a school shooter. That is extremely rare. It happened once recently, but more often it's the resource officer responded to the scene, and maybe the shooter takes his own life for Gibbs up or the resource officer can help in some other way. But you know, we also know that in the idea that school resource officer is going to be a sure fire prevention. Meaning that a shooter knows a school resource officers at that schools. They don't go there. We know that that is not true that at least forty percents of the schools that have experienced some sort of gun violence incident on campus since nineteen ninety nine at least forty percent of them had a resource officer at the time. So it's not a surefire deterrent by any. So the businesses that are in the business of school safety are things like trade shows are making pitches. Do they use Newtown and parkland and Columbine and their sales pitches is that what they're what they're kind of trying to invoke a little bit of that fear and in their sales pitch. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, there's really a lot of effort to leverage the bloodshed spent a couple of days at a school safety conferences in toward a, and you know, constantly parking was being brought up. Well, don't you don't you want this product to keep your to say from another another parkland, but consistently when I would ask them what would this stop at shooting? They didn't know and and part of the problem here. It's true for all of gun violence in this country. Is there so little research being done on what works, and what does not work so schools are making decisions based on gut instinct and often what a so-called ex-. Expert or vendors telling them, we'll work, but you know, the truth is they don't know what will work. Well, it's very interesting story worth rating. Thank you John for being with us. John Woodrow Cox from the Washington Post read his.

officer Seattle John Woodrow Cox Washington Post US supreme court Komo King County herb Weisbaum Alaska Jeremy grater komo Virginia John editor John Woodrow Tom hutler Jaffe Tom glasco reporter
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"Chance of rain tomorrow. A mainly in the morning hours. We'll have a high tomorrow around fifty three currently in Seattle, mostly cloudy. Fifty five degrees. Komo news time three forty five. Stay connected. Stay informed. Seattle supposedly twenty four hour news station. Komo news one thousand FM ninety seven seven. With Elisa Jaffe, I'm Tom Glasgow. Jeremy grater is at the editor's desk. Nice to have you with us as we take a look at some of the day's top stories, Florida. Senator Bill Nelson campaign is suing to extend the deadline for the state's midterm election. Recount the Democrats lawyers claim election officials won't be able to meet a Thursday deadline to complete the recount a state judge is already extended the deadline in Palm Beach county to November twentieth Nelson's opponent Republican governor Rick Scott has a razor-thin lead over Nelson. Fire officials says crews have made a lot of progress in preventing a deadly northern California. Blaze from reaching Oroville town of nineteen thousand people still ahead. I'm herb Weisbaum with the latest airline satisfaction ratings from consumer reports Alaska did well, but just missed the top spot from ballistic whiteboards to facial recognition software. School security is big business a two point seven billion dollar market, according to an IHS steady. But how do you know if any of that money is saving lives or preventing school shootings? Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Koch surveyed schools were shooting happened in the time since the Newtown shooting in two thousand twelve and he spoke with komo's Tom hutler of the schools responding to the survey how many thought better technology such as facial recognition software would have prevented those shootings, you know, we serve a nearly eighty schools that had some sort of incidents and sandy hook and thirty four the school responded and only one of them. Them suggested any sort of school safety technology might have made any difference. And it was sort of one school in a long list of things they thought might be possible mentioned in passing that, you know, maybe metal detectors would have made a difference. But you know, by large thing that schools are spending billions of dollars on that have actually gone through. This don't point to that is something that would have prevented this shootings that they experience lots of money very little results or very little chance of the result that they desire what role did the school resource officers play in some of these shootings a handful. They definitely made a difference either. By in a couple of cases, very very rare. This idea that a school resource officer guns down a school shooter. That is extremely rare. It happened once recently, but more often it's a resource officer responded to the scene, and maybe the shooter takes his own life for Gibbs up or the resource off. Sir can help in some other way. But you know, we also know that in the idea that school resource officer is going to be a sure fire prevention, meaning that a shooter knows a school resource officers at that school schools. They don't go there. We know that that's not true that at least forty percents of the schools that have experienced some sort of gun violence incident on campus since nineteen ninety nine at least forty percent of them had a resource officer at the time. So it's not a surefire deterrent by any. So the businesses that are in the business of school safety are at things like trade shows are making pitches. Do they use Newtown and parkland Columbine and their sales pitches is that what they're what they're kind of trying to invoke a little bit of that fear and in their sales pitch. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, there's really a lot of effort to leverage the bloodshed spent a couple of days at a school safety conference in Florida, and you know. Constantly parking was being brought up. Well, don't you want this product to keep your kids safe from another another parkland, but consistently when I would ask them what would this stop at shooting? They didn't know, and and you know, part of the problem here, it's true for all of gun violence in this country. Is there so little research being done on what works, and what does not work so schools are making these decisions based on gut instinct and often what a so-called expert or vendors telling them, we'll work, but you know, the truth is they don't know what will work. Well, it's very interesting story worth reading. Thank you. John for being with us. John Woodrow Cox from the Washington Post read his piece at Washington Post dot com..

officer Komo Seattle Washington Post Senator Bill Nelson Florida Oroville komo John Woodrow Cox John Woodrow Koch herb Weisbaum California Jeremy grater Elisa Jaffe Rick Scott Alaska John Palm Beach county editor
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"The editor's desk. Taylor van Cise headlines. We're following today. The fires in California have now killed forty four people in around two hundred people are still listed as missing Cal fire. Estimates the fire to be nearly eight thousand acres larger than it was yesterday. Charring more than one hundred and twenty-five thousand acres up to this point containment at thirty percent. And opening statements delayed in the trial of Joaquin El Chapo Guzman. A judge reportedly excused juror shortly before proceedings began this morning, unprecedented. But apparently that juror had some sort of doctor's note from ballistic whiteboards to facial recognition software. School security is big business. Two point seven billion dollars for that industry Cording to an IHS study. But how do you know if any of that money is actually saving lives or preventing school? Shootings. Washington Post reporter John Woodrow, Cox surveyed schools, where a shooting happened in the time since the two thousand twelve Newtown shooting he spoke with komo's Tom hutler of the schools responding to the survey how many thought better technology such as facial recognition software would have prevented those shootings, you know, we serve a nearly eighty schools that have had some sort of incidents and sandy hook and thirty four the schools responded and only one of them suggested any sort of school safety technology might have made any difference. And it was sort of one school in a long list of things they thought might be possible mentioned in passing that, you know, maybe metal detectors would have made a difference. But by and large thing that schools are spending billions of dollars on that have actually gone through. This don't point to that is something that would have prevented the shootings that they experience lots of money. Very little results are very little chance of the result that they desire. What role did the school resource officers play in some of these shootings in a handful? They definitely made a difference either. By in a couple of cases, very very rare. This idea that a school resource officer guns down a school shooter. That is extremely rare. It happened once recently, but more often it's the research house to respond to the scene, and maybe the shooter takes his own life for gives up or the resource officer can help in some other way. But you know, we also know that the idea that a school resource officer is going to be a sure fire prevention, meaning that a shooter knows a school resource officers at that school. So they don't go there. We know that that's not true that at least forty percents of the schools that have experienced some sort of gun violence incident on campus since nineteen ninety nine at least forty percent of them had a resource officer at the time. So it's not a surefire deterrent by. Any anything? So the businesses that are in the business of school safety are things like trade shows are making pitches. Do they use Newtown and parkland and Columbine and their sales pitches is that what they're what they're kind of trying to invoke a little bit of that fear and in their sales pitch. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, there's really a lot of effort to leverage the bloodshed spend a couple of days at a school safety conference in Florida, and you know, constantly parking was being brought up, and well, don't you don't you want this product to keep your to say from another another parkland, but consistently when I would ask them what would this stop at shooting? They didn't know, and and you know, part of the problem here is true for all of gun violence in this country. Is there so little research being done on what works, and what does not work so schools are making these decisions based on gut instinct and often what a soak. Called expert or vendors telling them, we'll work, but you know, the truth is they don't know what will work. Well, it's very interesting story worth reading. Thank you. John for being with us. John Woodrow Cox from the Washington Post read his piece at Washington Post dot com. That's komo's Tom hutler. Komo news time one fifty time. Propel insurance money news today was today. We learned that Amazon's H Q to will. In fact, be h q two and three and kind of three and a half with new headquarters is being installed near Washington DC also in New York City and a new sort of operation center as they call it in Nashville, so what did that do to Amazon stock prices? Well, started out should be increasing the price of Amazon stock, but by the end of the day fell by about five dollars a share when you're Amazon and a share is worth sixteen hundred plus dollars. That's not much about a third of a percent in Las Boeing and Costco, lost a little bit of ground. Overall. On Wall Street, it was a mixed day. But just barely the Dow down by one hundred points the s&p down by. Four points. The NASDAQ up by one one hundredth of a point and we expect a new rideshare company Waymo not at new company, but a new service from them. They're going to launch the first commercial driverless car service in Arizona. Bloomberg reporting the Google subsidiary will launch that service as early as next month in about one hundred square miles around Phoenix. We check your money at twenty and fifty past the hour. We'll check on a crash in Everett causing some slowdowns in our AAA traffic. That's next if you buy the antioxidants welches, concord grape, juice aren't just anti oxidant. Nah, they hate oxidants welches antioxidants tracked down those nasty oxidants find their leader and beat it to a sniveling oxidant pulp in front of all the other oxidants. So they slink away like scared puppies. And you never have to worry about them ever again. That's a welches antioxidant, the world's toughest antioxidants welches toughest, grapes. Winging.

officer komo Washington Post Amazon John Woodrow Cox Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Tom hutler Taylor van Cise editor California IHS Everett Arizona John Woodrow Newtown John Washington
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"Quote than anybody would ever even think possible. Trump thank firefighters. First responders in the Federal Emergency Management agency for doing their jobs quote with courage in the face of very grave dangerous shortly after nine eleven the CIA considered using a drug thought might work like a truth serum to force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. A newly declassified CIA report being released today by the American Civil Liberties union says the agency settled on a certain sedative, but then decided against getting permission to use it the report addresses ethical issues. CIA medical personnel faced while working with detainees being harshly interrogated from ballistic whiteboards to facial recognition software. School security is big business a two point seven billion dollar market. According to an IHOP study. But how do you know if any of that money is saving lives or preventing school shootings? Washington Post reporter, John Woodrow, Cox surveyed schools. Where a shooting happened in the time since the two thousand twelve Newtown shooting and joins me on the KOMO news. I'm John thanks for being with us today. Thank you for having me of the schools responding to the survey how many thought better technology such as facial recognition software would have prevented those shootings. So know we serve a nearly eighty schools that had had some sort of incidents in Saint hook and thirty four the school responded and only one of them suggested any sort of school safety technology might have made any difference. And it was sort of one school at a long list of things they thought might be possible mentioned in passing that, you know, maybe metal detectors would have made a difference. But by and large the thing that schools are spending billions of dollars on that have actually gone through this. Don't point to that something that would have prevented the shootings that they they experience lots of money very little results or very little chance of the result that they desire what role did the school resource officers play in some of these shootings a handful. They definitely made a difference either. By in a couple of very very rare. This idea that a school resource officer guns down a school shooter. That is extremely rare. It happened once recently, but more often it's the resource officer responded to the scene, and maybe the shooter takes his own life for Gibbs up or the resource officer can help in some other way. But you know, we also know that the idea that a school resource officer is. Sure fire prevention, meaning that a shooter knows a school resource officers at that school. So they don't go there. We know that that's not true that at least forty percent of the schools that have experienced some sort of gun violence incident on campus since nineteen ninety nine at least forty percent of them had a resource officer at the time. So it's not a surefire deterrent by any. So the businesses that are in the business of school safety are at things like trade shows are making pitches. Do they use Newtown and parkland and Columbine and their sales pitches is that what they're what they're kind of trying to invoke a little bit of that fear and in their sales pitch. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, there's really a lot of effort to leverage the bloodshed. I spent a couple of days at a school safety conference in Florida, and you know, constantly parking was being brought up. Well, don't you? Don't you want this? Product to keep your to say from another another parkland, but consistently when I would ask them what would this stop at shooting? They didn't know, and and you know, part of the problem here is true for all of gun violence in this country. Is there so little research being done on what works, and what does not work so schools are making these decisions based on gut instinct and often what a so-called expert or a vendor is telling them, we'll work, but you know, the truth is they don't know what will work. Well, it's very interesting story worth rating. Thank you John for being with us. John Woodrow Cox from the Washington Post read his piece at Washington Post dot com. Propel insurance business update. Time now on your money now, Google plans to double its workforce in New York City to more than fourteen thousand employees over the next ten years setting up a battle for east coast talents with tech rival Amazon Google says adding talented a faster pace outside Silicon Valley. Then it's Mountain View California headquarters, including a new facilities in Detroit and Los Angeles, a cable industry trade group wants the Justice department to look into alleged antitrust practices at Comcast the American cable association, which represents small to medium size cable systems across the country sent a letter to the Justice department asking it to scrutinize Comcast business practices. Comcast says the allegations are without merit. I'm Jennifer Kushinka with your money. Now, we've dropped into negative territory across the board. The Dow's now down one hundred thirty and a third the NASDAQ down just a fraction of a point. And the s&p five.

officer CIA Washington Post Comcast John Woodrow Cox John American Civil Liberties union KOMO Federal Emergency Management IHOP Saint hook John Woodrow Justice department Jennifer Kushinka Google Florida American cable association Newtown
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"I'm Tom hutler. Stories we're following Palestinian, militant groups in Gaza. Strip say they've accepted an injection. Mediated a ceasefire amid a major flare up of violence with Israel, HAMAs and smaller armed groups announcing the ceasefire joint statement late today. Terms of the deal, not immediately known and there was no immediate comment from Israel, New York, governor Andrew Cuomo and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg lauding, Amazon's plans to open a new headquarters in the quickly developing Long Island city section of queens Cuomo had been pushing hard for the move joking about changing his first name to Amazon Bloomberg spent a large part of his tenure as mayor pushing for development of areas like Long Island city. Amazon also announcing plans for a new headquarters in Arlington Virginia. Komo news time nine forty six from ballistic whiteboards to facial recognition software. School security is big business. A two point seven billion dollar market. According to an IHOP study. But how any of that money is saving lives or preventing school shootings? Washington Post reporter John Woodrow, Cox, surveyed schools were shooting happened in the time since the two thousand twelve Newtown shooting and joins me on the KOMO news. I John thanks for being with us today. Thank you for having me of the schools responding to the survey. How many thought better technology such as facial recognition software would have prevented those shootings? So you know, we serve a nearly eighty schools that had had some sort of incidents and sandy hook and thirty four the school responded and only one of them suggested any sort of school safety technology might have made any difference. And it was sort of one school in a long list of things they thought might be possible mentioned in passing that, you know, maybe metal detectors would have made a difference. But you know, by and large the thing that schools are spending billions of dollars on that have actually gone through this. Don't point to that is something that would have prevented the shootings that they experience lots of money very little results or very little chance of the result that they desire what role did the school resource officers play in some of these shootings. A handful. They definitely made a difference either. By in a couple of very very rare to say that a school resource officer guns down a school shooter. That is extremely rare. It happened once recently, but more often it's the resource officer responded to the scene, and maybe the shooter takes his own life for Gibbs up or the resource officer can help in some other way. But you know, we also know that the idea that school resource officer is going to be sure fire prevention, meaning that a shooter knows school resource officers at that school. So they don't go there. We know that that is not true that at least. Percents of the schools that have experienced some sort of gun violence incident on campus since nineteen ninety nine at least forty percent of them had a resource officer at the time. So it's not a surefire deterrent by any. So the businesses that are in the business of school safety are at things like trade shows are making pitches. Do they use Newtown parkland Columbine and their sales pitches is that what they're what they're kind of trying to invoke a little bit of that fear and in their sales pitch. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, there's really a lot of effort to leverage the bloodshed. I spent a couple of days at a school safety conference in Florida. And you know, constantly apart was being brought up. Well, don't you? Don't you want this product to keep your kids safe from another another parkland, but consistently when I would ask them what would this? Stop at shooting. They didn't know, and you know, part of the problem here is true for all of gun violence in this country. Is there so little research being done on what works, and what does not work so schools are making decisions based on gut instinct and often what a so-called expert or vendor is telling them, we'll work, but you know, the truth is they don't know what will work. Well, it's a very interesting story worth reading. Thank you. John for being with us. John Woodrow Cox from the Washington Post read his piece at Washington Post dot com. Komo news time nine fifty propel insurance business update. Time of the day on Wall Street. Let's check it out right now as we had been in positive territory across the board right now, the Dow has slipped into negative territory. It's down ten the NASDAQ is up forty two and a third in the s&p five hundred is up eight and three quarters set. Your propel insurance business update. More money. News in thirty minutes in traffic and weather next. Komo news time nine fifty one. There. Whether it's our hearts lungs or other organs were diagnosis tends to make us uneasy.

officer Komo John Woodrow Cox Amazon Washington Post Long Island Israel Andrew Cuomo Gaza Amazon Bloomberg John Michael Bloomberg HAMAs Tom hutler New York Arlington Virginia Newtown parkland Columbine IHOP John Woodrow
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"Joining us in for Taylor van sice I'm Charlie harder Bill o.'neil our editors stories we're following President Trump says voters need to show photo ID at the polls because identification is required for everything else including buying groceries he made the false claim while addressing. Thousands of supporters last night in Florida, today spokesperson Sarah Sanders says the president, meant wind buying beer or wine, though he did not say that last night Peeves in Sweden walked into small towns medieval cathedral. In broad daylight yesterday making off with priceless crown jewels dating back to the early sixteen hundreds before escaping speedboat the items had. Been on display at an exhibition in the cathedral KOMO news time to forty seven Washington Post reports the majority of guns used. In school shootings belong to the young shooters parents with arguments over arming teachers and improving mental health. Treatment to curb. School shootings does the real remedy begin at home, Washington Post, reporter John Woodrow Cox spoke about. The findings with komo's Rick van sice and Carleen. Johnson John you came up. With some startling statistics that. Support this, argument, share some of that with us for the last year or so we've it really before, that we put. Together a database school shootings every school shooting that we could find dating back to, Columbine. This is catered twelve schools where we found that the majority of school shootings are committed by juveniles so If we can snap our fingers and have prevented, children from having access to weapons over. The last two decades and two-thirds of the school shootings that occurred would never have happened the mocking up guns is a big. Story in Seattle as you know John where the city dispatched to new restrictions and county voters are going to have their say. In November is that the best answer based on your research is there a national movement in this. Direction But you know really a lot of the discussion is often on other things it's on mental health it's arming teachers some things. That sort of beginning at the school but what we found is that simply people walked up their guns and kids do not have access to these. Weapons a huge, number school shootings would not happen and often the. Kids only have access to a weapon at home or, to to a. Single weapon at a neighbor's home so, it's not like they have multiple. Options if, they couldn't get that gun that, they would have the ability to go elsewhere so you know what I know a lot of responsible gun owners support this idea that you would punish someone criminally for being negligent with a weapon but you know we've found. That one hundred and forty five least there's been at, least one hundred, and forty five cases all juvenile shooters Vince four people criminally responsible for adults criminally responsible across all those. Cases John the we're talking to Washington Post reporter? John Woodrow Cox's done some statistics supporting the Argument that if if parents would just lock up their guns at home the kids wouldn't and we. Wouldn't have so many school shootings but what. About gun rights activists who worry you cannot force people to put a gun in a gun safe at home they have. The legal right to you know have it in the drawer and ready for self protection home protection the protection argument isn't a. Great one now because gun locks there a gun safes that can be accessed within two seconds either by fingerprint or quick code and they're inexpensive a. Couple of hundred, dollars they're less than the cost of that gun. So even if someone made the argument hey I want, my loaded gun. Next to my bed so that if, an intruder comes in tries to. Attack me, that I can shoot them you, can still do that so it's it's not In fact. You it's easier to leave your your gun loaded in. That scenario because, you can have it. Right next to your bed and, you can. Access it in two seconds you can read more. About this analysis. In the Washington Post online at Washington Post dot com by John Woodrow Cox, Rick van sice and Carleen Johnson KOMO news time to fifty. Resale has your propel insurance money update Wells Fargo and company agreed to pay nearly two point one billion dollars to settle. With the Justice department over the, sale of, toxic mortgage backed securities in the lead up to the financial crisis. The Justice department said it reached a civil settlement with the Bank to end the long-running probe into the matter Wells Fargo had already set aside funds to, cover the settlement in which it did not. Admit liability Wells Fargo shares gained more than. A half percent today the broader market, was, mixed at the close of trading the Dow Jones industrial average fell eighty one points the NASDAQ composite rose thirty five the s. and p., five hundred dropped two points. That's your money now Now the except aid in half an hour KOMO..

John Woodrow Cox Washington Post Wells Fargo Rick van sice Taylor van sice President Trump KOMO reporter komo Justice department Carleen John Florida Sarah Sanders president Sweden
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Willingly allow ourselves to be searched when we go through the airport even though there is now no probable cause for the individual screening of you asian of privacy of course but that's one of the trade offs you make in the interest of security neither of these are absolute is while why we willingly allow ourselves to be searched when we go through the airport even though is now no probable cause for the individual screening of you nonetheless it's a collective policy and that was in the wake of airline highlighting hijackings and explosions and things like that there's this notion that this would be too onerous because girls who are going through their menstrual cycle might have to carry tampax in their backpack i mean that's that's really reaching and if those girls and i've seen so many of them from park land and and at these demonstrations distraught and crying and scared well if they want to have less cost to be scared about getting shot in their school then this is one of the trade offs they would make secondly i went through some of this statistic that are thrown around by the liberal media and by anti gun activists i got a number of emails from people who want to be to be more specific about for example the assertion that there have been eighteen school shootings since the start of two thousand eighteen really and we're not even into april yet you've heard that's the testing it's bogus and let me explain why and i give credit to the washington post incidentally because to washington post reporters woodrow cox and stephen rich analyze this the tick and explained where it was from and why it is grossly exaggerated and misleading nonetheless the liberal media glommed onto this in that washington post piece john woodrow cox and stephen rich said news organizations including msnbc abc news nbc news cbs news time msn the bbc the new york daily news and the huffington post also used that number eighteen school shootings in two thousand eighteen in their coverage by wednesday night the top suggested search after eighteen into google was eighteen school shootings in two thousand eighteen the top suggested search all right well here's the fact of the matter every town is an organization it's called every town for gun safety every town for gun safety is.

john woodrow cox new york daily news google washington washington post woodrow cox stephen rich msnbc nbc cbs
"woodrow cox" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"Before you go i had a question wesley people people have been saying there were eighteen mass shootings this year but the washington post published in so that wasn't true i don't wanna put you in this black has been indicted with this but diva what's the away well it's it's so this is one of the weaknesses with i'm a huge advocate for media organizations track infants the government is not track obviously right but that but also of four nonprofit groups are activist groups tracking this the difficulty though in these spaces is everyone to find something a little bit differently and when you can call into question data that is being kept you could dismiss out of hand what people are using that data to argue so without shootings for example the number we saw after the parkland shooting was eighteen and that's every towns number right there but eighteen school shootings so far this year for us at the post and that piece was written by my colleague john woodrow cox and i would genuinely encourage everyone to go look at his work from the last year he did a project based on he did a project about the effect of gun violence on children tracked every mass shooting since columbine in a school did pieces about children who had family members killed or who witnessed killings right and it was really moving difficult work the very important but as part of this he built a database of every school shooting sense haolam by and what he found was that a lot of the nonprofit groups even the activist groups maybe sometimes takes some liberties with what they define as a school shooting right and so if i were to pull into an elementary school parking lot to night and kill myself in the parking lot according to every town that would be a school shooting and so what we see is that while yes that is technically a shooting that happened that a school for most viewers and listeners when you hear there have an eighteen school shootings us here you are thinking eighteen active shooters have opened fire inside of a school what john found in in that peace had of debunking the eighteen numberth there have been five or six maybe it was seven active school shootings so far in two thousand eighteen that number is enough we are six weeks into the year.

washington post john woodrow cox six weeks
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOIL

"And we hope to see out there i'm greg wagner newstalk twelve nutty no two i would like to take a moment to single out one of the many deception news that the pact cuba's on the left and their allies on the news media pedal it so that we all go around at the dinner table and it works saying yeah you're this big why it's terrible isn't it it's two thousand eighteen or we've already had eight in school shootings according to the news media and they they do it with uh with pay off furrowed brow when purse to lift sunday they're like they're genuinely affected by it they're not they're just wondering what they're going after lunch and and they and they repeated over and over and over again and this is the stat eighteen school shootings so far in two thousand eighteen only about six weeks sent there have been eighteen school shootings elsewhere in the world over the last two decades in our country alone urban eighteen school shootings in the last thirty five days sudan this here we have already had eighteen school shootings there have now been eighteen school shootings this year and it's only midfebruary we've had eighteen school shootings just since the first of the year this was an epidemic since january 1st of two thousand eighteen there have been a school shootings in this country 18th school shooting in this year eighteen school shootings in one and a half months teased move shootings this year in thirteen different states so yes no one is safe so no one is safe live in fear but don't arm yourselves just planned to hide in a closet if anything should happen because that's the demo you know they should pass a bill called the closet bill and they make it law but if anyone start shooting you should locate the nearest closet and go hide in it because that's the democrat party solution because that you there now let me share with you believe it or not in dr evil post this morning now it's buried of course it's on page twelve at the bottom of the page with no pictures to draw your attention to it or anything guncontrol groups widelyshared tally of two thousand eighteen school shootings misleads misleads as a generous euphemism and understatement this is typed by john woodrow cox john woodrow cox yeah that's his name apparently that's what his parents and.

cuba greg wagner sudan democrat party john woodrow john woodrow cox thirty five days two decades six weeks
"woodrow cox" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on WTMA

"Three i i would like to take a moment to single out one of the many deceptions that the pact give us on the left and their allies and the news media pedal it so that we all go around at the dinner table and it works saying yeah here this is the boy it's terrible isn't it it's two thousand eighteen or we've already had eight gene school shootings according to the news media and they they do it with uh with a our furrowed brow when purse to let sunday there are like they are genuinely affected by it they're not they're just wondering what they're going up for lunch and and they and they repeated over and over and over again and this is the stat eighteen school shootings so far in two thousand eighteen only about six weeks sent there have been eighteen school shootings elsewhere in the world over the last two decades in our country alone urban eighteen school shootings in the last thirty five days sudoku this year we have only had eighteen school shootings there have now been eighteen school shootings this year and it's only midfebruary we've had eighteen school shootings are just since the first of the year this is an epidemic since january 1st of two thousand eighteen there have been eighteen schools shootings in this country 18th skulls shooting near 18 schools shootings in one and a half months eighteen school shootings this year and thirteen different state so yes no one is safe so no one is safe live in fear but don't arm yourselves just planned to hide in a closet if anything should happen because that's the demo you know they should pass a bill called the closet bill and they make it law that if anyone start shooting you should locate the nearest closet and go hide in it because that's the democrat party solution because that's you there now let me share with you believe it or not in dr evils post this morning now it's buried of course it's on page twelve at the bottom of the page with no pictures to draw your attention to it or anything guncontrol groups widelyshared tally of two thousand eighteen school shootings miss leads misleads as a generous euphemism and understatement this is type by john woodrow cox john woodrow cox yeah that's his name apparently that's what his parents sandra and.

sandra democrat party john woodrow john woodrow cox thirty five days two decades six weeks
"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"woodrow cox" Discussed on KOMO

"The cassini spacecraft has disintegrated in the skies above saturn confirmation of the expected demise came about seven fifty five am eastern time this morning in radio signals with the spacecraft came to an abrupt halt cassini actually burned up like a media four eighty three minutes earlier as a dove through saturn's atmosphere becoming one of the one with the planet it set out in 1997 to explore the attorney for the family of the black man shot and killed by a white st louis police officer says they disagree with a judge's ruling that the state didn't meet its burden of proof for a finding that the officer was guilty of murder in radio station in st louis came lovie reports l watkin says he found the ruling appalling and contrary to the evidence presented as we've been reported here on coma one student died three others were injured this week after a shooting at freeman high school outside of spokane on wednesday but gun violence involving children is by no means could find do these high profile tragedies john woodrow cox has been examining the statistics for the washington post and is with me on the komo news i'm john thanks joining us today sure thanks for having me just how many kids are shot each day in the us and and how many of those are fatal uh so close to two dozen kids are shut every day and united state the most recent federal data through 2015 that showed that about twentythree kids were shot every day in the us and older fourteen under or killed that year at which is really a staggering number that number is greater than the entire number us military aladi in afghanistan that decade and that was just in a single year so it really is an enormous problem we're talking about intel digital shootings and accidental shootings would not suicides here that right no that includes suicide okay that's an executive act and gun violence committed by someone under the age of eighteen in interesting aspect to your pieces you take a 24hour period during which serves.

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