31 Burst results for "Wonder Media Network"

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 6 d ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

"Hello for Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today. We're talking about a key figure in the civil rights movement who risked her life to lift her voice and the voices of other black. Americans. Through violence and abuse she campaigned for equality and became the first black woman to serve as mayor and Mississippi. This is the story of UNITA. UNITA Zelma Blackwell was born he uses brown on March Eighteenth Nineteen thirty three in Lula Mississippi. Her father was a sharecropper and you need a picked cotton in the field alongside her mother until her mother sent her to live with relatives in Arkansas to receive a better education. At that time in Mississippi, black children could only attend school for two years before they were forced to return to the fields. Though you need us mother couldn't read or write. She was determined to give her daughter a better life. You need a chose her own full name after her teacher told her. She couldn't just go by the initials UC. She decided to go with UNITA Zelma. At the age of twelve, you need a left school she returned to picking cotton until she was thirty one years old she married three times but kept the last name of her first husband Jeremiah Blackwell. It was with him. She had her only child Jeremiah Junior. The turning point of UNITA's life came in nineteen, sixty four during the freedom summer. The student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee or Snick was campaigning to raise awareness about registering black citizens to vote you need a signed up to help right away during her attempts to help register black voters across our community. She was arrested more than seventy times. She was also targeted by the K. K. K. members burned crosses in her yard. You need was one of only eight black people in her county who tried to register to vote armed white men threatened you need other brave people trying to vote outside the courthouse and nearly prevented them from entering when they were finally allowed to enter the building they were forced to undergo an unfair literacy tests which all of them failed. You need to realize that despite the fact voting was illegal right society still stacked all the odds against the black community. She was more determined than ever to make her voice heard. So she began to participate in one movement after another to fight the unjust system. In nineteen sixty five UNITA sued her county's board of Education for suspending three hundred students including her own son for wearing freedom pens. She also suit to desegregate the school district. These cases traveled all the way up to federal courts though the pins remained banned, the district was ordered to desegregate. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six UNITA was elected mayor of mayors spell. which reportedly made her the first black woman to serve as a mayor in Mississippi. When she took office, the five hundred person town had unpaved streets and no sewer system many residents lived in small tin roof shacks with no running water. UNITA immediately set to work on improving conditions serving the town for two decades from a one room. City Hall. She led the way for the town to pave a name. It's roads, install streetlights, built sewers, improve its housing, and even get its first fire truck. In nineteen eighty three UNITA earned a master's degree in regional planning from New Mass Amherst having never previously attended college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, she brought national attention to mayors, Ville, and all rural communities when she won three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollar Macarthur Genius Grant. Throughout her career you traveled internationally she gave speeches advised presidents like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton a never stopped fighting for civil rights. She was defeated for re election to her position in two thousand one by then she'd long made positive mark on the rural communities of Mississippi and beyond. You need. Blackwell passed away on May, Thirteenth Twenty nineteen she made an enormous difference in Marysville Mississippi enter influence extends far beyond her hometown. She fought for the rights of all Americans and brought attention too often forgotten areas of the country.

Unita Unita Zelma Blackwell Mississippi Unita Zelma Ville Jeremiah Blackwell School District Lula Mississippi Black Community Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Jeremiah Junior Arkansas Thirteenth Twenty K. K. K. Bill Clinton City Hall Marysville Jimmy Carter
Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:59 min | Last month

Elizabeth Fry, The Prison Angel

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Monica. Today's activist was a major proponent of prison reform in Britain. She's known as the Angel of prisons. Let's talk about Elizabeth Fry. Elizabeth Gurney was born in Norwich Norfolk in seventeen eighty to a wealthy quaker family. Her Father John was a successful banker and her mother Catherine was a member of the family that founded Barclays Bank which still operates is one of the largest banks in the world. Elizabeth was the odd one out amongst her siblings. She experienced mood swings and had difficulty learning which biographers attribute to her dyslexia. Elizabeth once said I was thought and called very stupid and obstinate I certainly did not like learning nor did I believe attend my lessons when Elizabeth was twelve years old her mother passed away and Elizabeth was left to care for her younger sisters and brothers. Eighteen hundred at the age of twenty. Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry London banker and quaker together. They had many children most sources say eleven, five sons and six daughters though some sources suggest that had even more kids. Elizabeth was an observant quaker and frequently worshipped at the Friends Meeting House. It was there the she heard Williams savory preach about the importance of altruism and philanthropy. His words inspired Elizabeth to help those in need. In eighteen thirteen elizabeth visited newgate prison, which was notorious for its filthy state and its dismal treatment of its prisoners. Elizabeth was appalled to see such harsh conditions. Women and children were tightly packed in small spaces with little room to wash themselves or cleaned their clothes, and while many of the newgate prisoners had committed severe crimes, some of them had not. And others hadn't even received a trial. Elizabeth was determined to act the next day she returned to the prison with fresh loaves of bread and clean clothes, but she had sewn herself. She distributed them to the prisoners and encourage them to keep their cells clean and find ways to be hygienic in the oppressive environment. Elizabeth didn't come back to newgate until eighteen sixteen due to financial difficulties within her family. But upon her return, she dove back into the Work Elizabeth educated the children of Newgate who were imprisoned with their parents teaching them practical skills like reading and selling. In eighteen seventeen, Elizabeth founded the Association for the improvement of female prisoners along with twelve other women she worked to advance prison reform and to provide female prisoners with education and tools for employment Elizabeth fought for the idea that prison should be based round rehabilitation rather than punishment she wrote it must indeed be acknowledged that many of our own penal provisions as they produced no effect appear to have no other end the punishment of the guilty. Eighteen nineteen Elizabeth wrote prisons and Scotland in the north of England and encouraged her society friends to visit newgate themselves. At. That time Britain was in the practice of sending prisoners to penal colonies in. North. America Australia and India. At newgate. Prisoners en route to be transferred to convict ships, rebound by chains and unable to move around and tiny carts people in the streets pelted them with garbage. Elizabeth convinced the governor of new gate to carry the women enclosed carriages rather than open ones and to ensure that all the women and children had enough food to eat on their voyage. Elizabeth also gave the prisoner sewing tools, bibles and other necessities to accompany them on their long journeys. With the help of her efforts, the act of transporting criminals so far away lands was prohibited in eighteen, thirty seven. Prior to that change in policy Elizabeth visited every convict ship bound for Australia for more than twenty five years. Throughout the eighteen twenties, Elizabeth inspected prison conditions and continued to advocate for the rights of prisoners. She presented her findings to the House of Commons committee in doing. So she became the first woman to present evidence to parliament. Elizabeth's ideas influenced the eighteen twenty three jails act which introduced a series of prison

Elizabeth Elizabeth Fry Elizabeth Mary Joseph Fry Work Elizabeth Newgate Britain Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network House Of Commons Committee Norwich Norfolk London Friends Meeting House Barclays Bank Australia Scotland England America John Williams Catherine
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | Last month

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

01:49 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"Try to get listeners and I think that's true like not just in terms of our podcast specific marketing like in a lot of the things that we do and just because I'm a first time founder and just because our team is small and like. All the time we have fewer resources like. The thing that's been surprising is like we're not doing any differently than the giants out there and nobody has figured out like this may sound cliche but I have been I have been surprised at the fact that like. I don't actually feel at a disadvantage. The only disadvantage is resource and that could be a confidence ego thing actually. Manage to right mean. I always say like you know you you don't have. You don't have like rope to hang yourself with because you can't. You can't lake do these pivots. Pivots to whatever Oh. Try this we'll try to sell the NETFLIX's of. It's forced focus. Yeah totally. The other thing in this is also may be like an ego thing or confidence thing but. Like I've emailed presidents of billion trillion dollar companies and they respond. Like you find someone's email, you send them a nice note it's well written. Dave respond like not always. Sent probably thousands of emails a week and the majority go unanswered but like. You just. Again, Cliche, but like you pull up a seat. You show it. You got to give and get a response, and that's been surprising and affirming and I think it's like how we've been successful. All. Right. We're going to leave it there. So we stick on the half. Hour Mark. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you, Brandon, and thank you offer listening. We will be back next week..

founder NETFLIX Brandon Mark Dave
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

05:04 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"One ad spot on one show like like What's the cost benefit and second of all like who who's going to be willing to do this? Is Really hard and. Nobody really knows how to track any of this stuff. So even brands that are looking to buy at scale The analytics are really poor and so. At this point still. It's still just downloads. And then. The AD system is so messed up and like. My favorite part of the AD system is if you go on like seller crowd, the fact that like people out there trying to sell advertising. Literally spend most of their time trying to figure out like who to contact even about lake because the turnover at agencies is so it's like, do you know who's doing gyco Now? Like nobody even knows so it's it's an uphill battle to be sure. So let's daily report from seller cod is like something I look for her Good Job Clinton. The let's talk about the pandemic a little bit. You know what has been obviously, it's impacted every business. But what has been the impact. For you guys. So at the beginning ad sales took a huge head. We had like a couple of deals that were basically done except for signed and they all disappeared So that was really hard. Switching to a remote workforce, we're only ten employees has been really hard. We have this beautiful, which was a big accomplishment big milestone in our in our business. And we're obviously not there right now. And just figuring out I, mean you're doing it to like remote recording while it can happen and it's less disruptive than other media. It's still no small thing especially when working with talent and guests and booking all these things. Also like audience has shifted we. So again, like I mentioned that we did this big activation in women's history women's history month is the moment for us. It's when all the platforms give us the love..

Clinton
"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:11 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"They were down from previous years increase in women's has now how much of your of your listener listening is commute driven because I wonder like when we come out of this in the new normal People are gonNA. Be Commuting as much for a long time about whether podcasts overall sector will sort of stagnate because of that. Yeah. The majority was commute. Now, it's all over the map. I would say that Manica still largely listen to in the morning. It's a ritual people. But. Yeah I mean I. Don't think like eventually when commutes come back. Totally like people are gonNA WANNA listen to podcasts the best place to listen to podcasts in the car on the subway. Are News shows have shifted a lot. So. The we have a couple of shows where like the audiences, the audience that watches MSNBC. So you have messing message on while you're eating your breakfast like why would you also listen to this podcast? It's forty minutes about the same exact topic. We're already getting so much news information elsewhere that I think committing time to a news podcast that might have been commute. It's hard like those audiences have suffered are narrative nonfiction work. It's just listened to at different times of the day. It's still entertainment happens on people's walks at happens near cooking dinner But we'll see we'll see like I think that that will come back come us come back. which I think they will. So. Yeah. I think so I hope so. So. Final thing is. Would love to hear some thoughts about being this your first time founder right and and you guys are bootstrapping. It's. The hardest of the heart of the hard and media's are. bootstrapping is hard. Talk to me about what has surprised you I mean that you didn't expect. Going into this that. That's been your experience. I guess what's been surprising that? Well, there's two things. One is podcast specific. I have the same exact marketing playbook as you sh-. We have the same exact marketing playbook as Michelle Obama podcast. They have a bigger budget than we do, but we're all doing the same stuff to try to get listeners and I think that's true. Not just in terms of our podcast Pacific Marketing in a lot of the things that we do and just because I'm a first time founder and just because our team is small and like. All the time we have fewer resources like. The thing that's been surprising. We're not doing things any differently than the giants out there and nobody has it figured out like this may sound cliche but I have been I have been surprised at the fact that like..

founder Michelle Obama MSNBC Pacific Marketing Manica
"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:24 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"On. This store which basically at five or had accomplished pay equity on their platform which they announced in March. You could sort of like hire some of their top freelancers. And there is a link to encyclopedia. Manica to learn about amazing women from history and profile some of the women on the platform. Okay. That's that's pre involved and I think you probably run into a lot of brand. Say you know are just like now? It's that this this is. Finn SPREADSHEET and. You're too small and you're like, this doesn't scale. Yeah. Absolutely I mean the biggest hurdle with podcast -tising I, mean I, try to I try to say that I'm not doing podcasts advertising I'm I'm giving marketing solutions but that aside like when you use the word audio, his word media placement or whatever like obviously I'm working with not only baritone an address volts. But I'm working with Keira I'm working with horizon and all these massive media organizations that like they care about scale like that is it they're just it might be that they have two hundred thousand dollars that they could play around with and just throw an don't have to track it but like the they're not interested in making their jobs harder than they are. Unless there's celebrity attached or some other like massive brand campaign and so terms of like the friction. That's big. It's also just understanding I. mean this May seem. Like I'm Newish to sales. I'd never done sales previously like just understanding what the cycles are for RFP's being put out from brands getting the RFP's from brands. Figuring out like should I sell them branded podcast? Should I saw them in integrated brand podcasts? Should I tell them about like one ad spot on one show like what's like what's first of all the cost benefit and second of all like who who's even going to be willing to do this like. is, really hard and also. Nobody really knows how to track any of this stuff..

RFP Finn Keira
"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:28 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Mean crooked media is I mean this is a I'm fascinated by cook media in that straddles the line of a complete political. in-space Clear Political Action Committee and Media Company and it's it's able to do it. Yeah and they've been super successful because like their call to actions are incredibly clear like it is awesome that leading up to the election like first of all, we really good relationship with crooked do a lot of stuff with them the leading up to the election the fact that they can send people to vote save America is really cool and like all of their stuff is under one umbrella talk having a brands like their brand is really pod save and everything else sorta falls under that but like the ethos is consistent across the board. And they're willing to take a very significant stand? We're more like the majority of our content. Is, more narrative style. It's more seasonal. It's not always on it's. We're trying to provide information, and so we hope that because of that. We can bring more diverse voices. We can like sort of we're not trying to compete with the daily or today explained why we're not creating news shows recreating like smart reported stories about things that are happening now from a perspective that's balanced and journalistic in its inception but. Like it's not like we haven't newsroom. Okay, let's talk about the money side. Because you came from throwing the brand strategy side. So how you GONNA I assume you're make money by by integrating the brands. In Air. Yes. Definitely sales of what's the? I. Assume it's not just like have like a podcast network. Yes it's not that. When we started the company Jenny was supposed to make this stuff and I was like, how do we get an audience and how do we sell this stuff and it was clear to me and continues to be clear to me that developing a podcast audience is like one of the hardest things. In media period. and the way that ads are sold in podcasting are sold against audience, which makes sense theoretically. But it just means that like you can't really viable unless you're getting at least fifty thousand downloads per episode and you can't scale that unless you're selling out every single one of your ads spots and you have repeat customers, your hosts, they're really good at doing average and all these things. and. So my thought was if we're creating mission driven content and there's all these organizations out there that say that they care about women say that they care about the same things that we say we care about like let's find those dollars. They may not come from marketing departments they may come from CSSR. or HR. Or other parts of organizations and. Let's tell their story integrated into our content like I. Love branded sometime, I think done well in the right place like it can be incredibly impactful and so if we have a rapt audience and if we can help big organizations, dip their toes into the audience space creating beautiful brand content that house like an integrated feel. That's awesome. The ideal scenario is Miss Microsoft to sponsor a podcast and also promote the podcast..

Clear Political Action Committ Microsoft America Jenny I. Love
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

04:46 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"Go check them out. So talk me about it being nonpartisan, right? I. Mean. So and we're in a very weird. Time right now. But you know women belong in the House. And then majority fifty four. No matter what you're going to put in the box of being liberal progressive. It's true. I mean maybe it shouldn't be that way but I just sort of the world we live. Yeah it is. I mean the business has evolved. Quite, a bit We also as I said previously, like we're trying to make money here in addition to everything else and proliferate good information and we know who our audiences. So we're not gonNA say like Oh for the sake of being nonpartisan, we're GONNA try to get a bunch of conservative women. House. I would love to have her as okay. There goes. Your you're not offering her show. That's true but she hasn't come to us and pitched show. Yeah chicken there. Yeah. So. I mean, in terms of hers I guess the The thing that I'll say is like. We. We talk a lot about like gender representation. Gender. Equity Equity should not be a partisan issue and yet unfortunately it is and so you're not like crooked media crooked media is I mean this is I really I'm fascinated by crooked media in that straddles the line of a complete political. in-space Clear Political Action Committee and Media Company and it's it's it's able to do it. Yeah. And they've been super successful because like their call to actions are incredibly clear like it is awesome that leading up to the election like first of all, we we've really relationship Kirk crooked do a lot of stuff with them the leading up to the election the. Fact that they can send people to vote save America is really cool. All of their stuff is under one umbrella talk about having brands like their brand is really pod safe and everything else falls under that. But like the ethos is consistent across the board out and they're willing to take a very significant stand, we're more like the majority of our content. Is More narrative style. It's more seasonal. It's not always on it's. We're trying to provide information. And so we hope that because of that..

Equity Equity Clear Political Action Committ Kirk America
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

02:14 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"It might not be a wonder meaning network. Right. So let's talk about some of this. Tell me about the brown girls guide to politics. broncos got politics. Is the. Third show that we ever made. The host is amazing. Woman Ashanti goal are she's the president of emerge America which snark position that helps progressive women run for. Office. and. She has a blocked by the same name. We met her because we interviewed her for the first season of women blocking the house, which was our first show and she said, you know I've always wanted to make a podcast and like, would you guys do that for me and we said we have money but we love you and will make this for you like maybe we can do a rev share shoes like great. Let's do it. And we're right now planning our fifth season. So we've managed to do for that show Basically entirely full season sponsorships. And so it's been one of our longest running and most profitable shows the audiences ever growing. It has picked up a lot of the momentum that the platforms are. Caring about the black lives matter movement. Since, gotten a lot of attention on the platforms which has been really helpful. It is an interview style show. We are starting to switch up the structure a little bit because. As I said previously like having interview based conversations only. If, the host is not a journalist can be really hard and can get tired and so we're switching. We're going to bring in co host for the next season and we're GONNA have it be a little bit more action oriented leading up to the election Again wondering media network is on partisan not show is partisan for sure. Yeah. We're GONNA take a quick break to hear from our sponsor. ooh. Email marketing channel providing the best or Roi but your team may not have the data you need to truly maximize its effectiveness to achieve your goals. You'll need everest the email success platform from validity with Everest. You'll get normal delivered and keep more customers engaged by increasing inbox.

president America
"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:55 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Across all of its representations so If you're listening to variety of different podcasts but that there is a thread like randomly like you the there, there's something that ties them together, and that's something is that it is giving voice to underrepresented voices in like what else it's more. I call US activists media, but like it takes point of view to area that. is almost like we are absolutely four. You know forcing change in some. Fair. Sell this is also like one of the fundamental questions that we have Jenny co-founders. Background is a Bloomberg as I said, and so she's a journalist like her training is to be nonpartisan. The one hand on the other hand to be Shand. And like old navy is also supposed to be nonpartisan and they're like paying people to work at the polls. Now I mean they're gonNA give off on election day so that people can work the polls. So like our mission, our full mission is to amplify underrepresented voices and to inspire. Action. And promote empathy justice like. We're excited about people opening their minds to the stories that they otherwise wouldn't here and giving a platform to people that like probably wouldn't be able to host a podcast with the ringer. So like all of our hosts are non celebrity today. that's kind of like a silly media strategy honestly like how are we supposed to build an audience with non celebrity but we're just testing to see if this is viable. The only thing is when we started the organization, we started the company people asked us why we weren't just a nonprofit. And all I have many friends these. Same people who were asking you if you're going to run out of women. Shock. This is commonplace. I mean, it doesn't usually complain about. Going to be like, why are you not a nonprofit? To The people nonprofit. But like I'm trying to make money here like, yeah I'm trying to do good and devout stories that are mission driven but we're trying to make money and we want to prove that you don't have to a pink politico using air quotes. Again, you can just be good media that happens to be led by women. So like I don't like identifying women's media company I like identifying as A. Mission Driven Media Company were everything that we do has to.

Bloomberg A. Mission Driven Media Compan US Shand
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

03:50 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"There are those like super super fans that are like all listen to anything that comes out of sleet but slate has like lots of different types of shows with lots of different types of listeners. And it also has all these other entities that people are following. So there's more brand loyalty there we started with nothing we started with no celebrity, no audience no podcasts in existence and no brandon existence like building all of that together at once was really hard continues to be really hard. So. We have much more brand recognition for our individual shows for our franchises but not lost sight of wonder media network as a brand, and I think the sloughing say on this, we're we also are to be organization, and so I've been a little bit more focused on brand building wonder media network in the brand podcast space or as a production studio, and that brand name feels household in a way that doesn't like the women who I think are podcast but I think the key is that there I mean the key behind a brand is is that there's an ethos in a point of view that that stretches. Across all of its representations. So if you're listening to you have different podcasts but that there is a thread like they're not just like randomly lake. There, there's something that ties them together, and that's something is that it is giving voice to underrepresented voices and like what else it's more I, call this like activists media but like takes point of view to to an area that. Is Honestly we are absolutely four. You know forcing change in some that fair. So, this is also like one of the fundamental questions that we have an Jenny. My Co founders background is a Bloomberg as I said, and so she's of journalists like her training to be nonpartisan. The one hand on the other hand to hand. Yeah, and like Old Navy, is also supposed to be nonpartisan and they're like tank people to work at the polls. Now I mean like they're going to give off on election day so that people work the pulse so like our mission, our full mission is to amplify underrepresented voices and to inspire action. Promote empathy justice like. We're excited about people opening their minds to the stories that they otherwise wouldn't here and giving a platform to people that probably wouldn't be able to host podcast with the ringer. So like all of our hosts are non celebrity today. That's kind of like a silly media strategy honestly, like Harry's supposed to build an audience with non celebrity but the testing to see if this is viable. The, other thing is when we started the organization started, the company people asked us why we weren't just a nonprofit. And I have many friends. Bases Saint people were asking you if you're going to run out of women. This is commonplace. It doesn't I do usually complain about. Will be like, why are you not a nonprofit? Well, it's like much love to the people a nonprofit like I'm trying to make money here like, yeah. I'm trying to do good and devout stories that are mission driven, but we're trying to make money and we want to prove that like you don't have to be pink politico using air quotes. Again, you can just be good media that happens to be led by women. So like I don't like identifying as women's media company, I like identifying a mission driven media company were everything that we do has to check the boxes of is this inspiring empathy in the world is driving people to take action. And if it does those things when people bring us pitches, it does some of those things we're excited to the next step if it doesn't maybe the IT brings other thanks to the business, but it but..

Bloomberg Old Navy brandon Harry
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

03:52 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"That's the main thing I, think they should get shorter and shorter. All. Well I'm with you on that one I find it intimidating. That's so try to keep these to a half hour because I find I it's like the average commute when people committed but I don't know too much of a commitment if you see like fifty four there. But let's talk about some of your podcasts because you've got a really short one with. Encyclopaedia Manica. Wasn't sure if I'd be able to pronounce that correctly. which is only five minutes, right? Yeah. It's a five minute daily podcast about women from history. and. We've been doing it for about a year and a half now. And you know people said to us at a certain point like are you going to run out of women feature? So we're going. We've kept it going for that reason. Yeah, five minutes is awesome. Five minutes is hard to sell to advertisers, but it's great for parents parents with kids and we've got a really big range of listeners for that show. which is really cool. It's become our basic it's become our flagship. So I mean, you wanted I want to get to the the AD side but. I'm interested in in this diversification of podcast I think one of the diversifications is is short, right? Yeah. There's more. I've noticed more of these like daily podcasts that are that are short and that are briefings that are you know five ten minutes rather than. The standard feels like a half a half hour to forty minutes, and then the bill, the Bill Simmons crooked media sort of the goes into like an hour plus. Yeah. Yeah I mean part of it is we want to figure out where we fit into someone's overall media diet when you're creating content like Encyclopedias Monica that's Evergreen and frankly ernest right? Like we're just trying to educate people about interesting women from history. Where does that fit and it could fit as a break in your day could fit in the morning after you listen to the daily, it can fit while you're making dinner, but it's not five minutes is like it's hard to know exactly where that fits because it fits in so many places. and. So we think of it is like, what can you do it in tandem with what other listening activities featured in tandem with and I think that's really interesting when I look at like all of these new date like daily briefings that are ten minutes I'm skeptical of those. I. Actually think that's harder to habituate because people are have already shown that they're willing to listen to the daily at twenty. Twenty, five minutes. Yeah So with these different podcasts you like, are you building a brand? Or you building franchises like I wonder like like like you guys describe yourselves as an audio I media company, which I think says we're not a podcast studio we're not just looking to not just I mean look what they sold for but I think the the ethos of a lot of these wonder re for example is we're just the studio and the brands are the shows. How are you looking at that? Is that the same approach different? This is a very good question is the question on my mind. We are trying to build a brand, but I would say as A. Media Company we sort of had to make some hard choices early on and if felt like a better use of money and resources to design beautiful podcast art than to create a gorgeous brand book, develop huge social media following for Wonder Media Network. Also like as you know, podcast followings ultimately are about the hosts and their about the content and the charisma particular show. They're much less about the fact that it comes from digital or it comes from crooked..

Wonder Media Network Bill Simmons A. Media Company Evergreen
"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:53 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Which is really cool. It's become our basic become our flagship. So I you want it, I want to get to the AD side but like. I'm interested in. In this diversification of podcasts, I think one of the diversifications is is short right? There's more I've noticed more of these like daily podcasts that are that are short and that are briefings. Five ten minutes round. The standard feels like a half a half hour to forty minutes, and then you had the bill, the Bill Simmons crooked media sort of that goes into like an hour plus. Yeah. Yeah I mean. Part of it is we want to figure out where we fit into someone's overall media diet and when you're creating content like encyclopedia manteca that's Evergreen and frankly ernest right like trying to educate people about interesting women from history where does that fit and it could fit as a break in your day could fit in the morning after you listen to the daily, it can set while you're making dinner, but it's not five minutes is like it's hard to know exactly where that fits because it fits in so many places. and. So we think of it as like, what can you do it in tandem with other listening activities you do it in tandem with I. think that's really interesting when I look at like all of these new date like daily briefings that are five to ten minutes I'm skeptical of those I actually think that's harder to habituate because people are have already shown that they're willing to listen to the daily at Twenty twenty five minutes. Yeah. So with these different podcasts you like, are you building a brand? Or you building franchises I wonder like do. You describe yourselves as an audio I media company, which I think says, we're not a podcast studio. We're not just looking to not just I, mean look at what they sold for but. I think the the of a lot of these. Wonder. If for example is we're just the studio and the brands are the shows. How are you looking at that is is that the same approach different? This is a very good question. It's the question on my mind. We are trying to build a brand, but I would say as a bootstrapped media company, we sort of had to make some hard choices early on and if felt like a better use of money and resources to design beautiful podcast art than to create a gorgeous brand book and develop a huge social media following for wonder media. Network. Also, like as you know podcast followings. Are about the hosts and their about the content and the charisma of a particular show. They're much less about the fact that it comes from digital or it comes from crooked. There are those like super super fans that are like all listen to anything that comes out of sleep but slate has like lots of different types of shows with of different types of listeners. And it also has all these other entities that people are following. So there's more brand loyalty there we started with nothing we started with no celebrity, no audience no podcasts in existence and no brandon existence like building all of that together at once was really hard continues to be really hard. So we have much more brand recognition for our individual shows for our franchises but I not lost sight of wonder media network as a brand and I think the sloughing say on this, we're we also her beauty organization, and so I've been a little bit more focused on brand building wondering media network in the Brandon podcast space or as production studio, and that brand name feels household in a way that it doesn't like the women who I think this year podcasts. The key is that there I mean the key behind a brand is is that there's an ethos in a point of view that that stretches..

Bill Simmons Twenty twenty brandon manteca Evergreen
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

02:51 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"There's so many reasons and many of them are structural right? Like who do we choose to listen to and and many of them are also just like podcasting now especially as just an offshoot of all the other media that exists. and. So whoever's dominant another media's GONNA come over into podcasting. But. Also, like podcasters love to say that they're such a low barrier to entry right like you and I are just chatting resume. You're holding a microphone up to your mouth. Many people do it in ways that are far less high tech than this, and this is not high-tech. Much love. And severances like there's this really low barrier to entry, but it's It's actually you have to have the time you have to have you feel like you have something to say like the world wants to listen to you and those are often like traits that are associated with. Pale mound sale. That said I don't think. I I mean we'll talk a little bit more about this later I'm sure but All the pack has platforms are in competition with one another right now, and so whomever they surface to the top. Of their page whether it's the apple carousel or trending on spotify or whatever. When somebody's deciding to go listen to a show on that particular platform. If they see well feral, they'll be psyched. If they see my face there'll be less psyched. They don't know who I am. So there's just a little bit of the you have to be bigger. She got big thing that happens. That has like dominant media and in podcasting. And I also wonder whether the sort of wave of podcasting was like it was kind of analogous to talk radio in some ways I feel like and like a lot of the podcasts are versions of Talkradio Radio Joe Rogan is a version of talk radio as far as I'm concerned. and. That is a that is a medium that is absolutely. By by white males. and I wonder as as podcast diverse as podcasts diversify particularly into more narrative. And other formats whether that will end up opening up. A lot more. Diversity of voices two. Yeah and it certainly already has. There's so many different types of podcasts. Now, many of the best podcasts are hosted by women and women of Color. All of our PODCASTS are that way and I think. As. The space gets bigger meeting as there are more listeners or people that are becoming listeners, they're going to want things that are other than white male stale. Talkradio Ram. Because, how many hours can you listen to somebody just like interview their friend about something cool. That happened in sports that week. I don't Bill Simmons some this podcast go for like an hour and a half so..

Bill Simmons Joe Rogan spotify apple
"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

05:26 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Welcome to the digital pack Brian. This week we are joined by share. Atkins Jarrett is the CO founder and the Chief Marketing Officer. At Wonder Media Network not to be confused with wondering. Share welcome to the PODCAST. I'm happy to be here. Okay. So for those do not no wonder. Media Network. Is We used to call them podcasting companies, but now's audio I media company. and. It's dedicated to to elevate the voices not just women but underrepresented groups that fair. That is fair. Stated, are stated mission is to amplify underrepresented voices. So hopefully, we do that with our audio media. So let's Talk I want to get into what auto audio I media means but let's start with you know what was the gap in the market you your founder? Jenny Jenny Kaplan. She came from from from Bloomberg right and and you're from the sort of brand strategy side. So explain how you got together and what was what was the genesis of this as far as what was the gap that you saw in the market? Absolutely so Jenny and I are good friends from college. After school, she joined Bloomberg News as a reporter, and she was there for a couple of years total rising star in the news room. I had a weird circuitous path worked at lots of different media entities another myself. and. Jenny. Hosted a podcast Bloomberg when I was working for myself I was consuming a lot of content and fell in love with podcasts. and. Jenny's mom in two thousand eighteen decided to run for Congress North Carolina along with many other women who ran in unprecedented numbers. And Johnny felt like the story was being told really poorly that it could be told really well over podcast that Bloomberg might not be the right place to tell that story and when she looked around and she saw all the other. Women centered I'm using air quotes for people that are listening F-. Women's Center. On the PODCASTS I mean it's Meta already right podcast. The podcast so airports quotes that media. She sort of felt like you know there's obviously tradition of women's lifestyle brands that are focused on fashion and beauty, and then there's political organizations that top political stories. That are all mostly helmed by men and the story women running for office is often the fact that their record number of women running and look at this pink wave and not what is the source of the gender disparity or the gender inequities. And so she felt like there was a gap in podcasting that had started to be filled in traditional digital media but wasn't yet filled in podcasting to create smart content focused on women and other underrepresented voices, but was not tied to fashion bedier lifestyle. Yeah and one of the things that we had Nicola from. A A month ago. But one of the things that we were talking about was podcasting has a little bit of a white male home tint to it like if you go down the most popular podcast. Yes. There a type. And it's usually middle age. Wait wait guys middle-age. Wick I am not wholly against them but. They're clearly suffers from a lack of diversity of voices and first of all, why do you think that is I mean Nick had some interesting theories. But why do you think that podcast scene is? Pale male details, the Brits. There's so many reasons and many of them are structural right? Like who do we choose to listen to? And many of them are also just like podcasting. Now especially is just an offshoot of all the other media that exists. And so whoever's dominant another media is going to come over into podcasting. But also like podcasters love to say that there's such a low barrier to entry, right like you and I are just chatting of resume..

Jenny Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network Bloomberg Atkins Jarrett Bloomberg News Jenny Brian CO founder founder Chief Marketing Officer North Carolina Nicola Johnny Congress Nick reporter
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

03:21 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"Be here. Okay. So for those do not no wonder media network. Is We used to call them podcasting companies, but now audio I media company. And it's dedicated to to elevating the voices, not just women but underrepresented groups fair. That is fair. Yeah. Stated are stated mission is to amplify underrepresented voices. So hopefully, we do that with our audio I media. So let's Talk I want to get into what auto audio I media means. But let's start with you know what was the gap in the market you your co founder? Jenny Jenny. Kaplan she came from from from Bloomberg right and and you're from the sort of brand strategy side. So explain how you got together and what was what was the genesis of this as far as what was the gap that you saw in the market? Absolutely. So Jenny and I are good friends from college. After school she joined Bloomberg News reporter and she was there for a couple of years total rising star in the newsroom. I had like a weird circuitous path worked at lots of different media entities another myself. And Jenny hosted a podcast at Bloomberg. When I was working for myself. I was consuming a lot of content. And fell in love with podcasts. And Janis mom in two thousand eighteen decided to run for Congress North Carolina along with many other women who ran an unprecedented numbers. And Jenny felt like the story was being told really poorly that it could be told really well over podcast that Bloomberg might not be the right place to tell that story and when she looked around and she saw all the other. Women centered I'm using air quotes for people that are listening. Women Center. On the PODCASTS I mean it's Meta already right podcast podcast. So Air Media. She sort of felt like you know there's obviously the tradition of women's lifestyle brands that are focused on fashion and beauty, and then there's political organizations that top political stories That are all mostly helmed by men and the story of women running for office is often the fact that their record number of women renting and look at this pink wave and not what is the source of the gender disparity or the gender inequities. And so she felt like there was a gap in podcasting that had started to be filled in traditional digital media but wasn't yet filled in podcasting to create smart content focused on women and other underrepresented voices but was not tied to fashion beauty and lifestyle. Yeah one of the things that we had nick KWA FROM POT ON A. Month, ago. But. One of the things that we were talking about was podcasting has a little bit of a white male. Tint to it like if you go down the most popular podcasts. Yes. There's hype. and. It's usually middle age. Wait wait guys middle-age. Wick I. Liga. Some but. They're clearly suffers from a lack of diversity of voices and first of all, why do you think that is I mean Nick had some interesting theories but why do you think that that podcasting is? Pale male and stale the Brits. Side..

Jenny Jenny Bloomberg Air Media Bloomberg News Women Center Nick North Carolina co founder Kaplan Janis reporter Congress
"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

The Digiday Podcast

02:06 min | Last month

"wonder media network" Discussed on The Digiday Podcast

"This episode of the digital podcast is sponsored by Everest. If you depend on email to reach your customers than you'll want Everest, it's an invaluable tool set for digital marketers who want to maximize the Roi from their email campaigns by getting more mail delivered and keeping more customers engaged reach peak email success with Everest from validity learn more at everest email dot com. This is a commercial for Japanese skin. Whitening. Apply it for a few weeks and must be whiter skin in fourteen days. And there's a lot more where that came from. The skin lightening industry is big business like nine billion dollars bag. That's why glossy is proud to present. Unfair. A podcast about this global segment of the beauty industry found in countries like India, the Philippines and even here in the US. In four episodes, we'll get into the industry's origins history of skin increases along and terrible. It starts to produce mercury and make you. is being.

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 2 months ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
Clara Schumann

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:02 min | 2 months ago

Clara Schumann

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca today's musician was a piano virtuoso and composer at a time when women rarely performed or wrote their own work although many of her compositions remain unknown her collaborations with her husband resulted in one of the most fruitful musical partnerships at the early nineteenth century. Let's talk about Clara Schumann. Clara Josephine was born in Eighteen nineteen in Leipzig Germany her father Frederik peak was a sought after piano instructor. Frederick married one of his students, Marianne and together they had five children, Clara and her four brothers. Is Five her parents divorced Clara, and her brothers became the legal property of their father. Clara's mother remarried and moved to Berlin which limited contact between them two letters, periodic visits. Frederick Recognize Clara's early musical talents and dedicated himself to her musical education. Under his tutelage she studied Violin Piano Music, theory, and business. Frederick even sent Clara around Germany to study with some of the finest composition teachers in Leipzig Dresden and Berlin. In eighteen twenty nine at the age of eleven, Clara made her performance debut in Leipzig Clara began touring in Germany France and Austria. She was one of the few pianists of her time who played by memory and she performed not only her own compositions but also those that were more well known by Johann Sebastian Bach Domenico Scarlatti. Ludwig. Van Beethoven and Robert Schumann. Robert Schumann due to a self inflicted injury to his right hand was the only composer among his contemporaries who did not play his own work. Clara took on his work for him. In nineteen thirty, one at the age of twelve she gave her first performance of his piano composition papillon. Over the course of the next five years, Clara, became wildly infatuated with Robert Schumann the match made her father very concerned at that point Clara was already famous and successful performer. Robert was a relatively unknown composer. Frederic. Saw The match as beneath Clara and so at the age of Seventeen Clara's father center to Dresden in hopes of severing ties between the two. But as is the case with many famed love stories. Parental intervention didn't go as planned. Despite, Clara's demanding performing and touring schedule. Clara and Robert wrote to each other in secret over many months using an intermediary to deliver their letters. When the two decided to wet. Strong resistance from Clara's father in nineteenth century Germany, a woman could not marry without her father's consent and Frederick refused to give it. Robert took Frederick to court over his refusal and Frederick countered with charges against Robert After nearly a year of legal battles the court finally sanctioned the marriage the couple married in September eighteen forty one day before Clare Clara's twenty first birthday and settled in Leipzig for years. Later, Robert suffered a severe breakdown and the couple relocated to Dresden at the recommendation of Roberts doctors. Over the course of their marriage Clara was pregnant ten times and had eight children despite having such a large family Clark continued to perform, compose, teach piano, and support Robert in his career. Despite Clare's existing professional success, it was Robert's career that was prioritized in the marriage nevertheless clar used the arrangement to her advantage. She performed her own arrangements of Roberts pieces during her concert tours and Robert in kind what insert phrases from Clarence compositions

Frederick Recognize Clara Clara Schumann Clara Josephine Leipzig Clara Robert Robert Schumann Leipzig Dresden And Berlin Germany Leipzig Robert After Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Frederik Peak Johann Sebastian Bach Domenico Berlin Van Beethoven Instructor Clare Ludwig Marianne
"wonder media network" Discussed on podnews

podnews

03:21 min | 2 months ago

"wonder media network" Discussed on podnews

"The latest from our newsletter part news dot net. Welcome to the New York Times Company Second Quarter Two thousand twenty earnings conference call. On the call today, we have married. It's cope it Levian executive vice president and chief. Operating Officer last. We acquired cereal production. We've also entered into an ongoing. Strategic Alliance with American light among other things will tell the American life podcast advertising. Next year New York Times CEO in waiting meredith cockpit. Hitlerian with the news of the company is to sell ads within this American lives podcast from next year. She also said that the daily has an average of three and a half million daily listeners few more than this podcast. The female founded and led podcast network. Wonder Media Network has signed with talent agency, w. m. e. to help the network expanded into books and television w emmy already represent pyrex rusty quill crooked media and Malcolm glad well answer Elton John. Lipton's CEO Chris Spencer has resigned. It worked at Lipson for fifteen years and we'll stay on as a senior advisor to the company. Last year bonus payments to spend. So was cited as one reason for a revolt by minority shareholders the settlements last October installed a number of new board members who's been publicly critical of the company and none of those are quoted in lip since release. Google. Play Music's podcast portal will no longer accepts new podcasts quote in the next few weeks according to an email from the company they'll be removing it entirely later in the year, you should be using Google podcasts manager instead the podcast academy holding August social a weak today via zoom, of course, meanwhile, new research into share of audio listening in Australia will be unveiled on August twenty sixth you'll find links. To both of those Paul's dot events and expanding yet further specify a hiring for a head of audio books. Is there anything that company won't touch a thank you to the podcast engineer for becoming our latest supporter based in Atlanta in Georgia the podcast engineer does podcast editing mixing and production so you can treat your listeners to quality audio you should be like them at hot news dot net slash support. And Impalas News Memory Lane with Kerry God limo interviews, different guest every week like Romesh Ranga Nathan Jo brand and. A Kosta talking about their five favorite photographs one. If you use the entail APP, you get to see the photographs as well. Also interactive with the tail APP is making the cuts with Davina McCall Michael Douglas. Not. That Michael Douglas presumably it's a podcast like trip advisor feel life apparently and just a little prick podcast with Pete Wiggs, it's all about two twos obviously and scientists using world of warcraft to learn how to fight covid nineteen that's according to wild wild tech which launched. Yes. Today these are the stories about your favorite tech companies that are seldom told they promise and that's the latest newsletter subscribe at Pod News Dot Net..

New York Times Company Google CEO Media Network Michael Douglas New York Times engineer Levian Pete Wiggs Davina McCall Strategic Alliance executive vice president Romesh Ranga senior advisor Chris Spencer Officer Lipson Lipton advisor Australia
Wonder Media Network signs with WME

podnews

03:11 min | 2 months ago

Wonder Media Network signs with WME

"Welcome to the New York Times Company Second Quarter Two thousand twenty earnings conference call. On the call today, we have married. It's cope it Levian executive vice president and chief. Operating Officer last. We acquired cereal production. We've also entered into an ongoing. Strategic Alliance with American light among other things will tell the American life podcast advertising. Next year New York Times CEO in waiting meredith cockpit. Hitlerian with the news of the company is to sell ads within this American lives podcast from next year. She also said that the daily has an average of three and a half million daily listeners few more than this podcast. The female founded and led podcast network. Wonder Media Network has signed with talent agency, w. m. e. to help the network expanded into books and television w emmy already represent pyrex rusty quill crooked media and Malcolm glad well answer Elton John. Lipton's CEO Chris Spencer has resigned. It worked at Lipson for fifteen years and we'll stay on as a senior advisor to the company. Last year bonus payments to spend. So was cited as one reason for a revolt by minority shareholders the settlements last October installed a number of new board members who's been publicly critical of the company and none of those are quoted in lip since release. Google. Play Music's podcast portal will no longer accepts new podcasts quote in the next few weeks according to an email from the company they'll be removing it entirely later in the year, you should be using Google podcasts manager instead the podcast academy holding August social a weak today via zoom, of course, meanwhile, new research into share of audio listening in Australia will be unveiled on August twenty sixth you'll find links. To both of those Paul's dot events and expanding yet further specify a hiring for a head of audio books. Is there anything that company won't touch a thank you to the podcast engineer for becoming our latest supporter based in Atlanta in Georgia the podcast engineer does podcast editing mixing and production so you can treat your listeners to quality audio you should be like them at hot news dot net slash support. And Impalas News Memory Lane with Kerry God limo interviews, different guest every week like Romesh Ranga Nathan Jo brand and. A Kosta talking about their five favorite photographs one. If you use the entail APP, you get to see the photographs as well. Also interactive with the tail APP is making the cuts with Davina McCall Michael Douglas. Not. That Michael Douglas presumably it's a podcast like trip advisor feel life apparently and just a little prick podcast with Pete Wiggs, it's all about two twos obviously and scientists using world of warcraft to learn how to fight covid nineteen that's according to wild wild tech which launched. Yes. Today these are the stories about your favorite tech companies that are seldom told they

New York Times Company CEO Google Media Network Michael Douglas New York Times Engineer Levian Executive Vice President Pete Wiggs Davina Mccall Strategic Alliance Romesh Ranga Senior Advisor Chris Spencer Officer Lipson Lipton Advisor Kosta
Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 3 months ago

Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

"Alot from wonder media. Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca. Today we're talking about the first major American movie star. She openly criticized racist typecasting her accomplishments were groundbreaking and many of her critiques still. Ring true today. Let's talk about the prolific Anna. May Wong. Anna was born in Los Angeles in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. Her birth name was Wong lead song. She initially attended a majority white school but transferred to Chinese school to. Escape racism she. From her classmates. Anna often skipped class to check out nearby film sets pushing her way to the front of the crowd to get closer to the cameras. She came up with Anna May Wong as her stage name by age eleven. And she was fourteen when she appeared in a silent picture, caught the red lantern. At Seventeen, Anna played the lead role in the toll of the sea one of the first movies and color. Anna's most notable early role was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, she played in the hit movie the thief of Bagdad. Though. This part was a stepping stone for her career. It's also emblematic of the problems with Hollywood casting that Anna would soon after vocally advocate against and interviews. In the thief of Bagdad, Anna played a treacherously in a subservient role wearing very little clothing. Anna appeared in more than fifty films throughout her life and she often struggled with subservient. typecasting Hollywood also repeatedly granted lead Asian roles to white actors and cast actual. Asian. Actors. As villains. After working in the United, states for several years, Anna had had enough of Hollywood's biased casting. So she moved to Europe. Europe was more receptive when it came to Anna's acting ability. She started films throughout the continent with reporters praising her transcendent talent. One notable appearance was in the British movie. Piccadilly in nineteen twenty. Nine After a few years in Europe and a decided to give Los. Angeles. Another shot she appeared in the famous nineteen thirty two movie. Shanghai Express opposite. Marlene Dietrich. I must confess I. Don't quite know standard respectability that you know newborn how But Hollywood hasn't really improved. It's racist casting methods. Anna, auditioned for the lead role in the gutter. A film based on the novel about a family of Chinese farmers despite Anna's film

Anna May Wong Hollywood Europe Jenny Kaplan Bagdad Marlene Dietrich Manteca Los Angeles Chinese School Shanghai United LOS
Ching Shih

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 4 months ago

Ching Shih

"Hello and welcome back for Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Manica today's villainous has a bloody rags to riches tale. Some consider her the most successful pirate in history, and she got away scot-free despite years of plunder. Let's talk about the pirate Queen Juncture. Chung show was born, should young in southeast China in Seventeen, seventy five. Historians don't know much about her early life, but she soon became a prostitute for a floating brothel in Guam Joe. A city also known by Westerners as Canton in eighteen o one when junk show was twenty six, she had her first run in with the pirate John G. He was the commander of the Red Flag. Fleet a horde of two hundred ships with thousands of pirate underlings. Junk says beauty struck the commander and he wanted her for himself. Some accounts say that he ordered his men to raid the brothel and kidnapped juncture to be his bride. Others say that he just asked juncture to marry him, and she agreed in exchange for sheriff his power and plunder. Together they ruled the red flag fleet and form the Cantonese pirate coalition. The fleet included more than seventeen hundred ships and more than fifty thousand pirates. The couple adopted junkies second command establishing an official Air John Shit also gave birth to two sons then in eighteen o seven just six years after they got married, chung-yee died in a rebellion. Junk, ship seized her opportunity. Rather than pass the power to the appointed air, she took over control of the red flag fleet and established the air as her own right hand man. She was a strict leader. She created a system of government with its own laws and taxes plunder had to be registered, and then the pirates keep twenty percent of what they stole. There were firm rules around captured women two. Girls, she deemed ugly were immediately released. Pirates take beautiful women as their wives, but they had to be faithful, reap or infidelity was punishable by death. Deserters from the fleet would also be hunted down and killed. Under junctures rule the red flag fleet captured villages for miles along the coast. She was called the terror of south China. And she took down Chinese Portuguese and British naval ships. The Chinese government was desperate to end junctions reign of terror. They offered amnesty of the pirate fleet if they ended their criminal activities. Around eighteen ten junctures, right hand man started negotiations with the government, but failed to make real headway. Juncture then took matters into her own hands. She marched unarm into the governor's office with seventeen women and children. Her negotiation was quite successful. Almost all of her thousands of underlings walked free without giving up any all they had to do. Kneel before the governor. Juncture herself refused that part of the deal. She demanded the government allow her to marry her right hand man they wed with the governor as a witness and finally Neil to thank him at the end of the ceremony. Junk ship successfully negotiated her way from pirate. Queen very wealthy free woman. She and her new husband even became members of the Chinese aristocracy by imperial decree. After junction second husband passed away. She returned to Joe and opened a gambling house. She remained there until her death in eighteen, forty four when she was sixty nine years old.

Queen Juncture Chinese Government Commander Cantonese Pirate Coalition Red Flag Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Manica China Guam Chung John Shit JOE Official Neil
The Story Of Ching Shih

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:41 min | 4 months ago

The Story Of Ching Shih

"Hello and welcome back for Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Manica today's villainous has a bloody rags to riches tale. Some consider her the most successful pirate in history, and she got away scot-free despite years of plunder. Let's talk about the pirate Queen Juncture. Chung show was born, should young in southeast China in Seventeen, seventy five. Historians don't know much about her early life, but she soon became a prostitute for a floating brothel in Guam Joe. A city also known by Westerners as Canton in eighteen o one when junk show was twenty six, she had her first run in with the pirate John G. He was the commander of the Red Flag. Fleet a horde of two hundred ships with thousands of pirate underlings. Junk says beauty struck the commander and he wanted her for himself. Some accounts say that he ordered his men to raid the brothel and kidnapped juncture to be his bride. Others say that he just asked juncture to marry him, and she agreed in exchange for sheriff his power and plunder. Together they ruled the red flag fleet and form the Cantonese pirate coalition. The fleet included more than seventeen hundred ships and more than fifty thousand pirates. The couple adopted junkies second command establishing an official Air John Shit also gave birth to two sons then in eighteen o seven just six years after they got married, chung-yee died in a rebellion. Junk, ship seized her opportunity. Rather than pass the power to the appointed air, she took over control of the red flag fleet and established the air as her own right hand man. She was a strict leader. She created a system of government with its own laws and taxes plunder had to be registered, and then the pirates keep twenty percent of what they stole. There were firm rules around captured women two. Girls, she deemed ugly were immediately released. Pirates take beautiful women as their wives, but they had to be faithful, reap or infidelity was punishable by death. Deserters from the fleet would also be hunted down and killed. Under junctures rule the red flag fleet captured villages for miles along the coast. She was called the terror of south China. And she took down Chinese Portuguese and British naval ships. The Chinese government was desperate to end junctions reign of terror. They offered amnesty of the pirate fleet if they ended their criminal activities. Around eighteen ten junctures, right hand man started negotiations with the government, but failed to make real headway. Juncture then took matters into her own hands. She marched unarm into the governor's office with seventeen women and children. Her negotiation was quite successful. Almost all of her thousands of underlings walked free without giving up any all they had to do. Kneel before the governor. Juncture herself refused that part of the deal. She demanded the government allow her to marry her right hand man they wed with the governor as a witness and finally Neil to thank him at the end of the ceremony.

Queen Juncture Chinese Government Commander Cantonese Pirate Coalition Red Flag Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Manica China Guam Chung John Shit Official Neil
"wonder media network" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | 4 months ago

"wonder media network" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"We wanted to revisit. Some of the outstanding women featured along the way today. The are looking back at Sally ride. This was actually one of my favorite episodes should produce. Sally broke so many barriers in so many ways first American woman in space, youngest American in space, one of the first queer woman in space, and I loved the opportunity to feature a bit of Sally story in her own voice. This episode initially aired of April. Aka are explorers and contenders months now here's host. Jenny Kaplan to tell you all about sally. Ride Sally you write. Those ratios e I feel like if this. Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Will Monica. Probably heard the name of today's explorer, but you surprised to learn that she was inspired to try making history after reading a simple ad in the newspaper..

Sally Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network
Moll Cutpurse

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:32 min | 4 months ago

Moll Cutpurse

"Teach along the way and today we're looking back a mile uppers, and the reason why malls supper stands out because she's literally a women that do not play by the, and as you know, women make history when you break some rules. This episode initially aired during our building necessarily. And here's Jenny Kaplan to tell you more about her. Hello for Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Lamonica. When you imagine England in the era of Shakespeare, you may think of a golden age with the booming economy, a rising interest in exploration and growing merchant middle class, but there was more to it than that. Today traveling to the underbelly of London home to thieves, jokers and tricksters who played both sides of the law are villainous at the day was the most infamous woman of that world. Let's talk about Mary. Frith better known as mall covers. Mary's legacy lies somewhere between truth and legend. Records from her time are often exaggerated, biased or made up. That said here's the story of the cutting mall. Cut Purse as we know it. Mary was born in London in about fifteen eighty four. Her father was an honest cobbler. Nonetheless, Mary's first brush with the law occurred when she was sixteen years old. She was prosecuted for sealing purses. Mary's family quickly grew frustrated with her unf- eminent behavior. Some accounts say that in sixteen o nine. They learned her out to the docks by telling her. There was a wrestling match, and then tricked her onto a ship headed for north. America Mary managed to arrange passage back to shore with betting money. She brought for the match. When she made it back to London she quickly joined a group of pickpockets, earning her name mall cut purse in reference to the way pickpockets cut the purses straight off of their victims hits. Mary also earned a name for herself. Her tavern performances. She would sing dance. Play her loot and crack jokes wall dressed in male clothing. That was quite shocking at the time. To win a bet mall wants gallivanting through the streets of London on the city's most famous performing horse. She wore men's clothing dramatically carried a banner and Blue Trumpet. As soon as the locals recognized her, a riot broke out. The fans and enemies went while some tried to pull her off her horse while others cheered her on mall, just barely managed to escape and collector winnings in the next furrow. Walk quickly grew infamous enough to have books and plays written about her. One play called. The roaring girl features a comedic matchmaking main character named Mall. She's Cold Mad Mall. Life these acts. Team. According to her own testimony, Mary performed at least one after piece for that show. That's short, lighthearted act that follows a theaters main event. In sixteen eleven mall was arrested and thrown in jail for a few months, possibly because of her seemingly inappropriate performance, the following year after pieces were outlawed in the country for their often vulgar nature and tendency to attract pickpockets. Very playhouse where mall performed was used as an example in the case mall was arrested once again a few months later in Saint Paul's Cathedral and she eventually confessed to being publicly drunk swearing, associating with criminals, and of course, flaunting her male clothing. She did Penance at Saint Paul's Cathedral Wall tearfully drunk. Malls. Illegal activities didn't stop there far from it. By sixteen fourteen, she was operating a brokerage of stolen goods out of her house on Fleet Street thieves came to her to sell their spoils and victims would have no choice but to try buying them back hoping to avoid a lengthy court case. Authorities didn't try to stop any of this. In fact, they sometimes came to mall for her expertise and familiarity with local feeds around that time mall also got married, though even that seemed like a means to a criminal end for her. She never actually lived with her husband, and didn't mention him in her. Will Mall continued her underground business as usual, but now at the elevated reputation given to married women, she could even defeat court cases brought against her maiden name by

America Mary Cold Mad Mall Will Mall London Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network Wrestling England Frith Saint Paul's Cathedral Wall Blue Trumpet Saint Paul's Cathedral
Healthcare Spotlight: Marie Colinet

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:13 min | 6 months ago

Healthcare Spotlight: Marie Colinet

"Maria stood out to me as a great example of a woman who succeeded despite the fact that society posed so many obstacles and in the process she thought outside. The box broke the mold and save lives. She came up with Sir really creative solutions this episode originally aired in September but just like lots of modern healthcare workers. Marie often doesn't get the credit. She deserves so she's perfect. Figure to highlight again in honor of the many people putting their lives on the line for us today during the Cova. Nineteen pandemic now. Here's host Jenny Kaplan to tell you all about Morocco high from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Romantika case you're just in welcome. Here's the deal every weekday for a year. We're taking five minutes to tell the stories of women from throughout history and around the world who you may not know about but definitely should each month is themed and this month as kids around the world or at least in the northern hemisphere head back to school. We're talking about stem inist at that. I mean women who did incredible things in the fields of science technology engineering or math. Today we're heading back to sixteenth century. Europe are seminar improved childbirth methods and was an incredibly talented surgeon. Let's talk about Marie Colonna. Marie was born in Geneva. Switzerland in fifteen sixty. Her father was a printer growing up. Marie wanted to become a midwife. She was interested in the field of medicine from an early age and sixteenth century woman. That was her only option for practicing medicine on July. Twenty fifth fifteen eighty seven. Maria married Wilhelm fabry. A brilliant surgeon often called the father German surgery. We'll homeless the top German surgeon of his and he taught me how to perform in the operating room. He said the student quickly outpaced master. Marie showed natural talent and surgery at a time when it was unthinkable for a woman to take part in session important masculine endeavor. The couple traveled and worked in Switzerland Holland and the Rhineland before settling in Bern during this period Marine Wilhelm had eight children though only one outlived their mother. Marie treated many patients on her own. And by her husband's side she regularly assisted her husband and performing minor surgeries. She pioneered the modern caesarian section which employed a new more medically sound method. Prior to Murray's work c-section techniques hadn't changed since the time of Julius Caesar. Marie also invented the practice of using heat for dilating and stimulating. The uterus childbirth that not only increased the ease of childbirth also lowered the risk of certain complications. It's important to note that childbirth is very dangerous proposition at the time. In addition to being an obstetrician Marie was well known for a new form of Treatment. In one particularly notable case in sixteen twenty four a patient had a piece of metal in his. I wilhelm had attempted to remove it and failed. Marie succeeded using a magnet ingenious noninvasive technique. That still practiced today. The will gave Marie full credit for her actions. He's often cited as the techniques inventor that unfortunately it happened to Maria. Walk on another case. Marie treated a man with two shattered rips by opening his chest and resetting the bones with wire she closed dressed the wound with herbal plasters. That effectively deterred infection. We'll Detailed the case in his medical writings and said Maria was the inventor of the treatment. Method still will often gets the credit. Marie went onto write two books before we'll home passed away after his death. Her whereabouts are relatively unknown. She died in sixteen forty. At the age of eighty Marie colonies insights forever. Change the science of delivering babies and her. Ill invalidated the view. That women didn't belong in

Marie Colonna Maria Marie Wilhelm Fabry Jenny Kaplan Cova Switzerland Europe Geneva Marine Wilhelm Switzerland Holland Bern Wonder Media Network Morocco Julius Caesar Murray
Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:36 min | 8 months ago

Feminists: Ella Fitzgerald

"Shining. Oh hello from wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia. Manica deemed the first lady of Song. Today's Dreamer was the most popular female jazz singer in the United States. For more than half a century. She went thirteen grammy awards and sold over forty million albums. Her voice was flexible. Wide-ranging accurate and ageless. Let's talk about Ella Fitzgerald Ella. Jane Fitzgerald was born on April twenty fifth nineteen seventeen in Newport News. Virginia to William Fitzgerald and Tempe Henry Ellis parents separated shortly after Ella's birth and she and her mother moved to Yonkers New York where they eventually moved in with Tempe longtime boyfriend. Joseph Dasilva three soon became four LS half-sister Francis was born in Nineteen twenty-three. The family struggled to make ends meet. Both parents worked multiple jobs. L. Occasionally took on work to their apartment was a mixed neighborhood. Where Ella made friends easily? She considered herself more of a Tomboy and often join neighborhood baseball games. Sports Aside Ella enjoy dancing and singing with friends and would perform at lunch and on her way to school in Nineteen. Thirty two ELLAS. Mom Tempe died from serious injury. She received in a car accident. Ella was devastated. She eventually moved in with her aunt Virginia and when her stepfather Joe died shortly thereafter. Ala stepsister. Francis came to live with them. To Ella was in a dark place. She started skipping school and her grades dropped. She got in trouble with the police and was sent to a reform school where she was subject to beatings by her caretakers. Eventually Ella escaped from the reformatory. She was fifteen years old broke and alone during the Great Depression. In nineteen thirty four Islas name was pulled in a weekly drawing the Apollo Theater for a chance to perform and compete an amateur night. Two sisters who the dance in the sisters in the world call the edgewood sisters and they closed the show about I when I saw those ladies. Dan I says no way. I'm going out there and try to dance. Because they stop the show. She was planning to dance but when the Edwards sisters closed the main show. She changed her mind fearing she couldn't compete with their moves. And when I got out there somebody follow up nobody else. What is she going to do? She made a last minute decision to sing and ask the band to play. Hoagy Carmichael Judy. Heavens hurt to me. By the end of the song the crowd demanded an encore and Ella had found her calling one of the people in the band. That night with saxophonist and Arranger Benny Carter wowed by her natural talent. Benny introduced a lot of people. Who could help launch your career? The era of big swing bands was coming to a close in favor of bebop. Ls successfully made the transition using her voice to sound like another horn in the band. She began to experiment with scat singing. Eventually turning it into an art in nineteen thirty eight Ella recorded a version of the nursery. Rhyme a-tisket a task it. A million copies of the album were sold it. Hit number one on the charts and it stayed on the pop charts for seventeen weeks. Ella was suddenly famous her wife. Changed Professionally and personally while on tour with Dizzy Gillespie's band in nineteen forty. Six Ella fell in love with bassist. Ray Brown the two got married and adopted a son Ray. Junior through the two later got divorced. They remained lifelong friends L. O. Worked with all the jazz greats including Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Nat King Cole Dizzy. Gillespie and Benny Goodman from nineteen fifty six to nineteen sixty. Four Ella recorded eight songbooks in which she covered other musicians songs. Including those by Cole Porter Duke. Ellington the Gershwin's Johnny Mercer Irving Berlin and Rodgers and Hart Ella continued to work throughout her life by the nineteen nineties. She had recorded more than two hundred albums she received the Kennedy Center honors the US National Medal of Arts and Francis Commander of Arts and letters award. Thank you and I'm so proud to be in class with all these younger ones coming up. Ain't gonNA leave me behind. I'm learning out a wrap in her later. Life Ella suffer from diabetes. She was hospitalized. Congestive heart failure in nineteen eighty six and for exhaustion in nineteen ninety. Nine hundred ninety three. She had to have both of her legs amputated below the knee due to complications from diabetes. She never fully recovered from the surgery. And on June fifteenth. Nineteen Ninety six at the age of seventy-nine Ella Fitzgerald died at her Beverly Hills. Home fans all over. The world mourned her death. A wreath of white flowers was placed next to her star on the Hollywood walk of fame and the Marquee outside the Hollywood bowl read. Lmu will miss you

Ella Fitzgerald Ella Ella Fitzgerald Ella Hart Ella Dizzy Gillespie Virginia Grammy United States Carmichael Judy Frank Sinatra Duke Ellington Francis Jane Fitzgerald Jenny Kaplan Benny Carter Mom Tempe Manica Diabetes Benny Baseball Cole Porter Duke
STEMinists: Mary Kenner

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:38 min | 1 year ago

STEMinists: Mary Kenner

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this encyclopedia will Manica in case. You're just tuning in. Here's the deal every weekday. We're telling the story of a woman who you may not know about the definitely should each month is themed in this month. Were talking about Stamina's. Women did incredible things in the fields of science technology engineering and mathematics. Today's stem was a prolific inventor created the first sanitary Napkin pioneering product for women's health. Let's talk about Mary Kenner. Mary was born in Monroe North Carolina a small town near Charlotte in one thousand nine hundred twelve father Sydney Nathaniel Davidson and is an incredibly inventive man who encouraged those same traits in Mary and her younger sister mildred. Sydney was an inventor himself and patented a pants pants presser in nineteen fourteen. Mary's maternal grandfather was also well known inventor his most important contributions attract color light signal for trains Though Mary received a good education she didn't have any formal scientific training instead with she and her sister were constantly encouraged courage to come up with creative solutions for problems. They saw in everyday life. Mary moved to Washington. DC got married and started her own Floral Laurel business that she ran throughout her life in her free time she kept inventing in Nineteen fifty-six. Mary put together a formal formal patent application for the first sanitary belt. She hit apparently invented while still in her teens. This was a major step forward forward in giving women a better way to handle their periods while tampons were available at the time they were considered. Indecent and pads wouldn't become available until nineteen sixty. Most women were still using cloth or rags and we're limited in their ability to leave the house while menstruating Mary. Sanitary sanitary belt was a major improvement. It was made of Elastic straps that held the patent place once the belt was secured by safety pins women could easily wear it under their clothing without feeling limited giving them back a significant amount of freedom a company interested in manufacturing this new invention had contacted Mary about purchasing it but as soon as a representative met her in person and realized that she was African American. The interests suddenly disappeared it took. Mary decades to file the patent on her own in the interim. Mary kept inventing things to help. In her everyday Friday life in nineteen eighty two she patented a toilet roll holder that easily provides the loose end of the role and in Nineteen eighty-seven patented an ingenious shower wall and bathtub mounted back scratcher. Mary also invented special attachment for a walker that included a hard surface office TRAE and a soft pocket for carrying items. Mary sister mildred with whom she remained. Very close throughout her life was also an inventor. Milton was a professional singer who eventually had to stop working when she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis mostly confined to her home in Washington. DC Z. Mildred invented a board game meant to teach family relationships and help children understand their place the extended family she called it family family traditions and received a patent for the game in one thousand nine hundred eighty neither military nor mary ever made much money from their inventions but but that didn't stop their desire to make the world around them a better and more convenient place before she passed away in two thousand six. Mary Kenner filed total of five patents. She's remembered not only for creative problem solving and entrepreneurial spirit but for stalwartly addressing a major women's health issue with intelligence and compassion even if abject racism meant. She never got to see her product on shelves as always we're taking a break for the weekend tune in on Monday for the story of another incredible stem inist special. Thanks to my favorite sister this your co-creator Lizzy Caplan talk to you on Monday.

Mary Kenner Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Sydney Z. Mildred DC Lizzy Caplan Washington Sydney Nathaniel Davidson Charlotte Co-Creator Monroe North Carolina Floral Laurel Representative Milton