36 Burst results for "Wonder"

Cheney's Big Loss

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:16 min | 8 hrs ago

Cheney's Big Loss

"Does Liz Cheney know what is happening in our schools? It's just not a rhetorical question. I wondered do the people, what is it called the Lincoln, The Lincoln Project? Do they know what is happening to children? Because of the left and yet their whole raison d'etre is to fight Donald Trump. They're disappointed in the Republican Party for having nominated him? And in half this country and having elected him, Joe Biden is a finer human being, does Liz Cheney believe that? I assume there's no other possible read. Then her judgment of humans, in my opinion, is so flawed as to render her incapable of a leadership position. That you have so personalized what is an ideological battle. What would she have said in World War II when it was a real evil human being that America deeply supported named Joseph Stalin?

Liz Cheney Donald Trump Lincoln Republican Party Joe Biden America Joseph Stalin
Fresh update on "wonder" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

00:43 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "wonder" discussed on Mark Levin

"FM, Hampton bays. From around the world to a round the block, this is a WABC evening news brief. 77 WABC degrees mostly cloudy 77 WBC time check 7 o'clock at evening on bob Brown, anti semitic flyers found outside homes in Freeport, NASA county police commissioner Patrick Ryder says about wonder flyers were left around the community. Investigators say anti semitic flyers were also found in Rockville center oceanside and Long Beach in July, police releasing a video in July of a car dumping the flyers and driveways late at night. At least one person was hurt when a truck crashed into a scaffolding of midtown this afternoon, police say it happened near 38th and 8th avenue about noontime, Penske truck was backing up on a crashed into a UPS truck, which slammed into the scaffolding, investigators say in 27 year old man suffering a leg injury, the driver of the UPS truck treated for minor injuries, the victim listed in stable condition right now at the hospital. Not enough funding to keep it running in the 9 11 tribute museum on Lower Manhattan, closing its doors for good today after falling into the red and millions of dollars in debt

Flyers Nasa County Police Patrick Ryder Hampton Bays Wabc Bob Brown WBC Freeport Rockville Oceanside Long Beach Penske Tribute Museum Lower Manhattan
Amber Athey: Repulicans Made Local Races National

The Dan Bongino Show

01:23 min | 9 hrs ago

Amber Athey: Repulicans Made Local Races National

"And I'm just wondering what do you think is going on there Do you think the Democrats have just disconnected Biden from the rest of the party and been like okay this guy just uniquely sucks so bad but because he sucks so bad it's not a reflection on Democrats I mean what do you think is happening there That's part of it but I also think that some Republicans have fallen into the trap set by Democrats to make these races national and you see a lot of campaigning on social media You see a lot of TV ads but what are these campaigns actually doing on the ground Is there any grassroots work going on here And in Ohio I mean JD Vance ran a very Twitter centric campaign in the primary And if it weren't for president Trump's endorsement he would have had a really difficult time moving on to the general So I think there needs to be an attempt when moving into the general to make these races about the people that you're going to be representing and not just about these really national issues because there are a lot of voters to be captured in the center who maybe don't even identify with either party but really care about local issues and Republicans are doing themselves a disservice if they make the race all about the broader landscape when they could be focusing on things that do matter to these smaller segments of voters which can quickly add up in a race like this

Jd Vance Biden Donald Trump Ohio Twitter
Robert DeNiro to Play Two Separate Mafiosa in 'Wise Guys'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:27 min | 17 hrs ago

Robert DeNiro to Play Two Separate Mafiosa in 'Wise Guys'

"But wise guys, this movie is going to make De Niro. It's a period of peace. He's going to tell the story of Vito Genovese and Frank Costello. Who are a pair of Italians running two separate crime families during the mid 20th century, Genovese tried and failed to assassinate Costello in 1957. But then, well, it's a great story. The in Costello got his revenge. And De Niro, you ready for this? Is playing both roles? What are we doing? I love De Niro. In my mind, he can play anything. I'd watch De Niro play an Uber driver. I don't care. He's the best, and I know he's done some roles in the last 20 years, which are embarrassing. You know, yeah, I have to remember. When actors get to a certain age and their grandpas or daddies, they tend to do things that their kids are grandkids want to see. So you can't get up there and ask too much. De Niro did a rock in bullwinkle. He knows it was a piece of shit, but he wanted his grandkid to see him in the movie, or hear him in a movie. You know, you can't. But De Niro's playing both these roles, Genovese and Costello. Nick pileggi has written this script pileggi wrote Goodfellas. He's the best in the business. And he wrote the book wise guy, but that's not what this movie is based on. Unfortunately, the producers Irwin Winkler, he's the fuck face who keeps squeezing Sylvester Stallone, and won't give him a percentage point of the rocky movies, so Winkler is producing this which sucks. Barry Levinson is the best. He'd made movies toys, bugsy, rain man, good morning, Vietnam, ten men, and diner among others. He also did the HBO Emmy nominated series, the survivor, he did two episodes of dope sick with Michael Keaton. This guy, I mean, look, you can't get better people. But De Niro playing both roles, I wonder what that's gonna look like, you know?

De Niro Costello Vito Genovese Frank Costello Genovese Nick Pileggi Pileggi Irwin Winkler Goodfellas Sylvester Stallone Barry Levinson Winkler Vietnam Emmy HBO Michael Keaton
John Zmirak: Donald Trump Is the MLK of the Working Class & Christians

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 21 hrs ago

John Zmirak: Donald Trump Is the MLK of the Working Class & Christians

"I have a surprise for you. Token his name is John's mirac, release this merak. John, I always get happy talking to you, which is a good thing. I want to talk to you about two things which I know you want to talk about. Number one, you did a review of the film that I've been talking about so much. Mister Jones. Yeah. So I want to talk to you about that. I also want to talk to you about an article that you wrote for the stream, which you really going out on a limb by saying what you're saying. I think what you're saying in the article is deadly accurate, but it's still a bold thing. For you to say, so why don't we talk about this bold thing and we'll get to the fun movie review stuff in a moment, so you wrote an article at this stream talk about it. Yeah. The title is Donald Trump is the Martin Luther King of the working class and Christians. No wonder the FBI is persecuting it. Now, when you say Christians, obviously, Martin Luther King was reverend and many of the people following him were serious Christians. What you mean just because I want people to track. Christians were not singled out for being Christians and persecuted or discriminated against in 19 50s and 60s. It was black people, okay? Today, conservative Orthodox Christians are single that singled out and targeted. And disadvantaged by the government and spat upon by the official regime and its propaganda ministries. So today, conservatives and Christians and working class Americans are in a disadvantaged position are detested held in contempt by our elites who hold the power.

Mister Jones John Martin Luther King Donald Trump FBI
How Do We 'Lower the Temperature'?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | 1 d ago

How Do We 'Lower the Temperature'?

"People are wondering, how do we solve this? How do we lower the temperature? Even Donald Trump has come out and said, we need to lower the temperature right now. It's getting too crazy. The temperature is not going to lower itself. The other side, they are foaming at the mouth, just almost with strange possession. Wanting to remove anybody in the orbit of Donald Trump, the America first movement, whether it be Peter Navarro, Steve Bannon, raiding Rudy Giuliani, raiding James O'Keefe, it is a full out Soviet style purge. KGB style. Now, Republicans are quick to complain about it. Wow, this is terrible. This is really awful. Why are we letting this happen? Good question why are you letting this happen? People are kind of wondering what's the kind of the game plan forward? How do we go about solving it? Well, let's first broaden this. This is not just about the Department of Justice going after Donald Trump. No, you see Democrats, they know how to use power so appropriately. And they're not going to stop because of a bunch of Republican press releases. Look at all the different verticals they're using against Donald Trump. New York State civil inquiry. The Manhattan criminal case, the Georgia criminal inquiry. The Westchester county criminal investigation, the Washington D.C. lawsuit, January 6th inquiry, and also the Department of Justice investigation.

Donald Trump Peter Navarro Steve Bannon James O'keefe Rudy Giuliani KGB America Department Of Justice Washington D.C. Manhattan Westchester County New York Georgia
Republicans Will Follow Trump to Any Darkness Now Says Charlie Pierce

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:07 min | 1 d ago

Republicans Will Follow Trump to Any Darkness Now Says Charlie Pierce

"You wrote about you said, excuse me, the pardon me. Damn, espionage act, someone's playing for keeps here if we're talking about obstruction and about it. It has to be an Ajax. The stakes on this whole thing just went to the moon. And your whole other piece, there's no darkness Republicans won't follow Trump into now. I mean, we keep wondering where the line is and we just did a story about Sean Hannity talking about, oh no, no, you can run if you're a felon. Yeah. There's basically admitting that Trump's going to be found guilty. Right. Yes. You're going to go at it. You're going to go out on the road and seek the one armed man who stashed the documents. Yes, exactly. But I love the way you put it. You said one major crime against the republic at a time, please. I mean, the fact that this happened while we're still investigating sedition against the that to me is amazing that this is sort of that violations of the espionage act, which, by the way, is a terrible launch, should be changed. But violations of the espionage act are a sideshow to overthrowing the government. I'm sorry, I can't cope with this. Yes. Let's get one at a time here.

Sean Hannity Donald Trump
Donald Trump Claims FBI Seized Three Passports During Raid

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:33 min | 2 d ago

Donald Trump Claims FBI Seized Three Passports During Raid

"Few moments ago, the latest statement from the president, wow. In the raid by the FBI of Mar-a-Lago, they stole stole my three passports, one expired, along with everything else. If you're wondering why there's multiple passports, I had three passports, okay? You can have a regular one, a diplomatic one, an official one. They're all different colors, depending upon what role you're using when you're traveling. Are you going on a diplomatic mission or not? So there's nothing hinky or weird about that. This is an assault on a political opponent at a level, never seen before in our country. Third world, a Christina, I don't know what else is going to come out of this. I did that stealing the president's passports as if he's some kind of drug lord they want to prevent fleeing the country. Let's go back to the initial raid. How did it happen? Did you know about it in advance, they tell you some people say that the Secret Service was informed, was this a surprise to you? Yes, this was a surprise to me and to my knowledge. It was a surprise to everybody involved. We had been very cooperative, like I said, we had a meeting in June with the FBI and a member of the DoJ and gave them access to whatever they wanted. They wanted to see the storage unit, so we escorted them down and showed them the storage unit and turned over everything that we believed was responsive to their requests, then president Trump himself told them anything that they want, make sure make sure that the FBI and DoJ get access to anything they want. You know, we have nothing to hide. We're open, open doors, open books. So

FBI Christina Secret Service DOJ Donald Trump
We're in an Ideological War for All the Marbles

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:06 min | 2 d ago

We're in an Ideological War for All the Marbles

"In an ideological war for all the marbles? No, I couldn't agree with you more, Eric. And when you think about the difference with Donald Trump, putting China on notice, punishing them for intellectual theft property, getting into a trade war with them that we ended up winning and you figure out the difference between that and the guy that sits there now who has an office reserved for the big guy in a Beijing office tower somewhere because hunter has business connections there and all the things that are compromised by. It really is a stark contrast. And look, you say it'll be too late in the next election. There are a lot of us that are looking at the actual X's and O's and wondering if it isn't too late already. I mean, the amount of damage that could still be done if people don't show up this November and stop the Congress in the Senate from being allies to the current White House resident. It would be devastating. If we gave this crew another two years of unchecked power, we would never recover from it. And so we've got to speak up nice and loud in about 80 days and send these people home.

Donald Trump Eric China Beijing Hunter Senate Congress White House
Sales of Alex Jones Content Videos Surge in Wake of Trial

The Officer Tatum Show

01:25 min | 5 d ago

Sales of Alex Jones Content Videos Surge in Wake of Trial

"I got a funny update ladies and gentlemen, I was reading this article my man Sean sent it to me, it says that Alex Jones InfoWars sees sales surge since sandy hook defamation trial. You talked about the biggest troll on Planet Earth. I told people that this was going to happen because the left, I don't know what they're thinking. When you, they literally were playing his videos in the court hearing. And they have the audacity. To pump their chance and beat their chest and say, huh, look at him. Look at what he's saying about the judge. The judge is going to stick it to him. All that's so crazy stuff. And you playing his content and the people that have never heard of this guy. It's going to say, mmm. That's pretty interesting. I wonder how crazy this guy really is. According to this article from breitbart, let me see make sure his breitbart. Now New York Post. New York Post. According to the article of New York Post, it says attorneys from InfoWars, parent company, free speech systems LLC is on pace to record $800,000 in sales just this week alone. According to the filings to U.S. bankruptcy court in Houston, which was cited by The Wall Street Journal.

Alex Jones New York Post Sean Breitbart Free Speech Systems Llc Infowars U.S. Bankruptcy Court Houston The Wall Street Journal
Eric and Charlie Kirk Discuss His New Book 'The College Scam'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:12 min | 5 d ago

Eric and Charlie Kirk Discuss His New Book 'The College Scam'

"You have a brand new book out which ties in, I mean, it's so crazy. It ties into exactly what we're talking about. Yeah, so it's called the college scam, not all of us could go to Yale. Like Eric, you know, it's just, we're not all smart enough. So look, I argue in the book the college is a scam. It's a waste of time and money for most people. There is a place for higher education in our society for maybe doctors lawyers and accountants and engineers, but the vast majority of kids going to college are getting a garbage experience. They're going into debt to study things that don't matter to find jobs that don't exist. And I think 80% of the college population should not be there at all. It's a racket. It's a cartel. And it should be broken up. And Charlie, first of all, as somebody who went to Yale, I know better than almost anyone that what you said is true. And that it is only by God's grace that God delivered me from what I quote, unquote, learned at Yale. Yale, it's like going to jail. It's like going to prison and learning how to think like a criminal. And it's only by God's grace that when it got on the outside, God delivered me from a life of crime, effectively speaking, because you do definitely pick up anti American anti biblical thinking. And it is at the cost of your parents paying, but again, just like we have to wake people up to what's going on in the country. We have to wake people up. I know tons of people that are sucked into the garbage propaganda that I want to have a good life. So I'm going to send my kid to this great high school and then we're going to get into this college and then and then and then nothing ladies and gentlemen. And then absolutely not. Then you're going to lose your children to the utopian, madness of the Marxist zeitgeist. That's right. And look, so people are wondering, how could they possibly execute this rate on Trump? Where could they believe such a thing? Colleges would defend this. Colleges would argue that the state is the perfection of man, that if there's anyone that gets in the way, you must use the state as an instrument. It's very hegelian. So every bad idea, every use of force that is used by the state, these ideas come from colleges.

Yale Eric Charlie
Investigative Journalist Julie Kelly Sees the FBI Raid Backfiring

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:18 min | 6 d ago

Investigative Journalist Julie Kelly Sees the FBI Raid Backfiring

"Guys, I'm really delighted to welcome to the podcast. Well, welcome back to the podcast. The one and only Julie Kelly. She is the go to person on the issues that we're going to talk about, which is the FBI, the double standards of the Biden DoJ, what needs to be done, Julie, thank you for joining me, delighted to have you as always, it seems to me that this raid on Mar-a-Lago, which perhaps the Democrats thought would be a way to smear Trump has kind of backfired on them and I wonder if you agree with that assessment and how you think this is going to play out. Hi, dinesh. Thank you, as always, for having me on and for covering my work. I do think it's backfiring. I think even some Democrats and left wing pundits are recognizing that, look, this is an egregious, unprecedented move. And there needed to be some real salad justification for it. And some public explanation, but if we're being told in what is being reported by both Trump camp and even federal authorities taught leaking to news outlets, if he was indeed cooperating and they somehow thought he had classified material in his possession, they were already working with Trump and his lawyers to figure that out. So there's really nothing that justifies it seems this judge who we now know is tied to Clinton world and to raids presidents, former president and potential rival of Joe Biden, raid his house, FBI agents for hours asking apparently for the Mar-a-Lago people to shut off security cameras, not give them a copy of the warrant looking for some sort of classified documents that's the ruse anyway. I think this is really fired up, even people dinesh, who have been completely silent on the abuses of the FBI related to anyone. Any Trump supporter or the president himself.

Julie Kelly Donald Trump FBI Trump Camp DOJ Dinesh Lago Biden Julie Joe Biden Clinton
Biden's Response to Russia Is Historically Weak

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:26 min | Last week

Biden's Response to Russia Is Historically Weak

"Joe Biden suggested that we were pulling out of Afghanistan. This is going to free up our hands to deal with Russia. There's only one problem. The pullout from Afghanistan actually incentivized. The war between Russia and Ukraine because after all, where Joe Biden has been clear he has been wrong and where he has been unclear, he has provoked conflict. So no wonder Russia thought that Joe Biden was a weak horse. After all, Joe Biden had basically been a Russia defender in the 2012 election. You'll recall that he was ripping on Mitt Romney for suggesting that Russia was a geopolitical threat. Here's Joe Biden's circa 2012. Governor Romney's answer I thought was incredibly revealing. He acts like he thinks the Cold War is still on, Russia is still our major adversary. I don't know where he's been. I mean, we have disagreements with Russia, but they're united with us on Iran. The only way we're getting one of only two ways we're getting material into Afghanistan to our troops is through Russia. They are working closely with us. They've just said to Europe, if there is an oil shutdown in any way in the gulf, they'll consider increasing oil supplies to Europe. That's not this is not 1956. This is not 1956. It says Joe Biden. Don't worry. Rush will take care of the oil for the Europeans. Russia will help us with Afghanistan. And then of course, Russia helped us with Syria by basically taking Syria off the hands of president Obama to the wild cheers of people like Joe Biden. And in 2014, Russia invades Crimea. And Joe Biden has some words for Russia. That's pretty much all he has for Russia. So his vice president when that administration did nothing over the invasion of Crimea. Here was Joe Biden circa 2014. I want to make it clear. We stand resolutely with our Baltic allies and support of Ukrainian people and against Russian aggression. As long as Russia continues on this dark path, they will face increasing political and economic isolation. There are those who say that this action shows the old rules still apply. But Russia can not escape the fact that the world is changing and rejecting outright. Their behavior. Of course, that was a lie. It turns out that the steps that The White House pursued, under vice President Biden, were extraordinarily weak. And basically they announced a Visa ban on a couple of Russian and Ukrainian officials. And they canceled a couple of talks on trades and commercial ties. That was pretty much all of the things. And by the way, they then proceeded to deny lethal aid to Ukraine.

Russia Joe Biden Afghanistan Governor Romney Crimea Syria Mitt Romney Ukraine Europe Iran Rush Baltic Barack Obama Biden White House
John Solomon Unpacks the FBI's Horrific Raid of Trump's Mar-a-Lago

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:17 min | Last week

John Solomon Unpacks the FBI's Horrific Raid of Trump's Mar-a-Lago

"Us, that was John Solomon from just the news. John, welcome to this welcome back to the program. Hard to kind of comprehend all of this. Abuse of power. You've been in this space for quite a while. Have you ever seen anything like this? Listen, we've never had a former or sitting president raided by the FBI. And he was rated when he wasn't even at his home, which raises the question. What was the purpose of the raid? Because normally you do a search warrant. You do an urgent rate when you think there's a danger of evidence or documents being destroyed or hampered or hindered. The president was in New York. And he had been in Westminster bedminster before that. There are lots of questions among defense lawyers, legal experts, former and current FBI agents wondering what went on yesterday. And the fact of the matter is we don't have enough facts yet. I assume that the president will go to court and do a show cause and get the judge to segregate these documents and protect them for claims of privilege and other things. But we passed the threshold last night we've never passed an American politics American history before and the consequences. We won't know for sure for some time, but if you look at what Democrats are saying, people like Mark Elias, they're talking about using this event as a nullification to keep president Trump from running again.

John Solomon FBI Bedminster John Westminster United States New York Mark Elias President Trump
The Gas Price Increase Is All About Biden's Climate Change Plan

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:55 min | Last week

The Gas Price Increase Is All About Biden's Climate Change Plan

"Joe Biden and team they're out there bragging about what amounts to a somewhat minimal decrease in the price of gas over the course of the last 60 days or so. When I say somewhat minimal, I mean, compared to the rise in gas prices that we have seen thus far, gas is now decreased in price from somewhere around the $5 per gallon mark to somewhere closer to the $4 per gallon mark that is still way too high for the vast majority of Americans. And Joe Biden has suggested that this was all due to supply chain issues. It was all due to Vladimir Putin. But the reality is that the high gas prices that we have seen under Joe Biden are not a coincidence. In fact, if you look at the gas prices under Joe Biden, what you see is a consistent increase, month over month, pretty much the entire time up until the recent decrease in gas prices. And this is not any sort of wonder. The American action forum put out a chart showing exactly what gas prices have done under Joe Biden when Joe Biden took office. The gas prices were two 25 a gallon. So when you're talking about, oh wow, they've gone down a lot. Well, now that at $4 account, that's still almost twice as high as they were when Joe Biden took office. And he took a bunch of measures, almost immediately, that exacerbated the price of oil, that made it much, much higher. And to understand what exactly he did and why he did, you have to understand that this was all part of the plan. So one of the big things that the left has said for years and years and years and years is that carbon based fossil fuels are the worst thing in the world. They are just terrible. They're ruining everything. They're leaning to climate change and climate change is going to devastate the planet. It's going to lead to hundreds of millions of people dead. Billions of people displace it's going to be an absolute Al Gore like hellscape in which the polar bears are drowning in the oceans and all the rest of it. Now, all the predictions Al Gore made so far have been wrong. All of the talk about how the Arctic ice would just be gone, all the ice in Greenland would be melted. All of that is just untrue. The notion that tens and hundreds of thousands of people have been affected by predominantly climate change, that's not the reality.

Joe Biden American Action Forum Vladimir Putin Al Gore Greenland
The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

The Officer Tatum Show

00:54 sec | Last week

The Democrats Want You to Be Government Dependent

"They're evil, these who can defend the Democrats. Nobody. If there's a perspective here, they're not passing, they're not signing these bills into law and doing things like that. They're not doing this just for the heck of it. They have an agenda. They want to take over the country. They want you to be government dependent. That's why I was wondering the other day I said, why would they do this? This is like a death sentence for them. Well, because they're going to rig the election anyway. In their minds, they're going to rig the election, so they'll get who they want to get in there. And then they're going to force this down our throats, and they're going to turn into a totalitarian government. And I said this before, Elon Musk's girlfriend said it, that they're going to create AI to supplement the middle class. Now, it seems like a far stretch today. I don't think it's a stretch for the future. If you have electric cars, what do you need Uber for?

Elon Musk
Hulu Pisses Off Mike Tyson

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:25 min | Last week

Hulu Pisses Off Mike Tyson

"So here comes the streaming service, Hulu, who is now on Mike's bad side for pushing forward this upcoming series on Mike's life's in a series called Mike. Makes sense. And since they never asked Mike, there's no love lost between he and the streamer. So recently Hulu has this trailer for the upcoming mini series, which follows Mike's journey from troubled teen to a sports icon, but however what happens when Tyson himself hasn't granted his approval to the series, I just wonder why this streaming service did this. I admit, the whole list series was a welcome surprise. Most fans were expecting a Tyson related film in the future, but it was for the much anticipated Jamie Foxx movie. He's doing a biopic where he plays Mike, but I gotta tell ya. The whole series looks good. It looks very promising. Trevante Rhodes looks great in the promotional footage that was released the other day. But Mike himself made it known publicly for the first time since the launch of that trailer. That he in fact did not approve this series. And he did that by thanking one of his friends who refused to take money from Hulu and promote the series that friend being UFC president Dana White.

Mike Hulu Tyson Trevante Rhodes Jamie Foxx UFC Dana White
Noel Casler Explains How Trump Corrupts Everyone in His Orbit

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:58 min | Last week

Noel Casler Explains How Trump Corrupts Everyone in His Orbit

"People famously know that you worked on the apprentice with Donald Trump and, you know, started talking quite openly about a lot of things about him a long time ago, but you said what you're seeing from Trump's vast tentacles of corruption. Toadies on loan from Doug ducey acting sicko fans, you just said it should be very illuminating for those who wonder how Trump got away with so many crimes in his New York City days because people from New York are like, he's always been a crook. We've known that from day one, right? And you look right up through what's happening right now. You're like, oh, of course, he has somehow loyalists and people that are destroying evidence and God knows what, right? Absolutely. He's always had a skill, a 6th sense to attract men and some women around him that he could corrupt. You know, he can look into a crowd and see the kind of guys that are going to do his bidding. The dogs that hunt, so to speak. And that's what his security team was. You know, keep schiller was an NYPD sergeant rammer, who would knock down doors of drug dense in The Bronx, you know? He was the guy who knocked the door down. He went up to Trump in court and said, you need to hire me, right? And Trump hired him. And then when you're walking around with a detail of X NYPD cops, you get away with stuff in New York City, right? Because it's an impenetrable sort of wall of authority. And Trump knows that. And you know, we could probably get into it, but the Secret Service stuff seems very, I worked with a Secret Service ton tons. I did inaugurations. I did the tree lighting at The White House, all kinds of stuff, where the president was at. The Secret Service under Trump was a different Secret Service. You know, and I went to high school with Bobby engel, the guy he tried to choke in the back of the SUV, and he was like a marine kind of jarhead cop type. And that's the type that Trump will suck in. And it's almost like before they know it, they're doing his bidding. Do you know what I mean? Who is the guy? They all set out with the intention of being corrupted, but being in Trump's orbit will corrupt you by osmosis.

Donald Trump Doug Ducey Rammer Sicko Nypd New York City Secret Service Schiller New York Bobby Engel White House
Doug Dives Into Part 2 of His JFK Speech Series

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:45 min | Last week

Doug Dives Into Part 2 of His JFK Speech Series

"Want to do what we're going to call part two of the John Kennedy speech series. Just the other day we did a breakdown of his inauguration speech. One in which we broke it down and really in the comments that I've heard is that if read in isolation, it would be hard to realize that this was a Democrat giving that speech. This was, it was about what we can do for our country, not what the country simply does for us. Our standing in the world standing strong against enemies. Again, Kennedy put laid for what would become known as Camelot in that speech. Now, later on, the candidate administration, although there are many who look back on it as this idealistic time in which everything was good and everything was great. You know, the reality is it's not true. The reality is, a lot of things were brewing on the world stage. We had the Cold War was getting worse. You had the issue with the space race was developing. We're going to talk about that today. You had the fact that we suffered a military defeat in the bay of pigs in Cuba. We had the later on was going to have the same year we're going to have a standoff with Russia in Cuba over missiles. I mean, there was a lot going on during this time that, you know, you were not saying we're good. I mean, he was struggling with many of his legislative accomplishments or trying to get going. But there was still this sense of all. They were still the sense of hope. There was still this sense of a little bit of wonder, I guess, if you would, that Kennedy and his family, you know, just from their young and their energetic nature was presenting to the world.

John Kennedy Camelot Kennedy Cuba Russia
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

03:48 min | 11 months ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Your life helping people make behavior change to be healthier and here. Also it'd be the health of the planet of what do you think can be done to encourage people to eat a plant forward diet well. Not one thing. I've learned is that it's difficult to advise people to make global changes And when people try to do that they often don't stick with them. So i found it more useful to suggest simple steps that people can take and build on and i guess my main message to people recently has been to really try to reduce and possibly avoid beef consumption. You know that would be that one piece of it. I think would be extremely helpful especially in the us. In north american general mark needed is famously quoted for her saying it's easier to change a man's religion than his diet right. But i have to say my patients who show up in my integrated medicine. Practiced are often quite motivated and are often really impressed by how dramatically different meaning better. They feel when they go on an anti inflammatory diet. which would really limit the amount of beef consumption. I also think as a society were creating some interesting strategies like meatless. Mondays or there was a famous food writer who had vegan. Before phya for something like that and he suggested that your breakfast and lunch vegan and then you enjoy what you wanted for dinner. And i think brent your work has shown that if we were two-thirds vegan we would make a lot of progress in reducing greenhouse gas submissions. That's right more progress in fact than eliminating meat entirely at least under these models scenario. I'm with you both in that. I'm all for gradual reductions. I'm also in favor of interventions. That don't necessarily need to eliminate completely any particular food group. What was interesting when we found with the lactose ovo. Vegetarian diet is a diet in which you know someone eliminates all meet but they to compensate they might be increasing their dairy intake and there we also comes from ruin animals and it does have a significant greenhouse gas profile so the reason why. Adopting electoral vegetarian diet might not yield as strong of greenhouse. Gas reduction is because were offsetting some of the reductions of eliminating me by increasing dairy. Which is why are evidence suggests that it may be more beneficial for climate change rather than eliminating meat completely to adopt something like mark gibbons vegan before six where. You're still eating all the same foods but for two or three of those meals to be two out of three years we had a five whatever You having two out of three exclusively plant based meals and then for the land you eat. Whatever it is you would normally eat. Body of wonder is produced by the andrew wile center for integrative medicine at the university of arizona internationally recognized for innovative health and wellness programs evidence based research and clinical standards. The center offers listeners. A wide range of free resources to live and maintain a healthy lifestyle including online learning meditations and short videos to find out more. Go to see 'em dot org slash podcast that's see. Im dot org. slash podcast..

mark gibbons mark us andrew wile center for integra university of arizona
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

04:57 min | 11 months ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"And it gets to regulation you know who regulates a new food protein. That's unknown to humanity right right. A lot of amanda jones about how that's going to work. Is there a species. Or cultivar fungi. That you feel would be a particularly good candidate. I i think there's a lot out there you know. There are many of the food mushrooms edible mushrooms that the my sealion can be cultivated in quantity and converted into you know high quality proteins though. I think there's a lot of candidates out there. I'd be excited to try it. You raise a lot of good points and questions about know. I see all this research on the relative long term health benefits of a whole foods plant based and i'd like to hear your thoughts at least from my understanding. It's it's not clear how the research will play out for folks who may be adopted the plant based diet but what if a lot of their plant proteins are coming from these highly processed burden on taking. Some of them are very high in saturated fat from coconut oil. And so on. It's just not clear to me how the evidence is gonna play out in terms of when we say benefits of a plant based diet. What does that mean if you're plant based diet is beyond burgers or what about eating lower on the food chain. I've heard you talk about this. Especially eating more shellfish for example and possibly insects evans suggested a low food chain. I could be a very promising in sustainable way to go. Meet tends to be the elephant. The room we're talking about food and climate change gets a pretty bad rap. But i think it's important to take a more nuance look at different meats. Not on meats are created equal in particular One of our reviews of the evidence found that there are certain types of meat that are quite low in terms of their greenhouse gas ender freshwater footprint and those include what we Low food chain meets Which included a small fish at the bottom of the food chain. So you're sardines and you're in. There tends to be a little bit less concern for overfishing those particular species particularly at the moment at the moment..

amanda jones evans
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Podcast. Mike I have a practical question for you. What about the issue of intellectual property with regard to this kind of research? Because there's been a history in the past of pharmaceutical companies and others exploiting this indigenous knowledge and then developing products for profit and there's not been compensation either in terms of giving intellectual credit to or monetary credit to the people that they learned this from. Yeah that's a great question Andy. In the last 30 years really 40 years starting in the 1980s people's in our field in ethnobotany started saying wait a minute. If these contributors are intellectually deserving of authorship they're also in financially deserving of any benefits that come from this. And the first real push came from the national cancer institute. We had a collection contract to collect 1500 samples a year from around the new world tropics. And the person running that contract at the NCI at the time Gordon Craig said and I want to make this a model of benefit sharing. And this was again in the late 80s before people really thought about this. So the U.S. government actually pushed forward this idea that people were deserving of compensation. And so over time we developed short term compensation medium term long-term understanding that in a pharmaceutical research project 99.9% of the plants will not have an economic yield. So there were short term benefits. For example we worked with a company then titled shaman and pharmaceuticals now Jaguar pharmaceuticals Jaguar health. And they devoted a percentage of the cost of the field work to benefit the population and the short term. So Steve king one of my graduate students actually used funds and had funds available and would ask the communities where he was working. What they wanted sometimes it was an airstrip to bring people in and out in an emergency or barbed wire to keep their cattle from munching on the forest or a little museum that they could document their own culture. So these short term benefits turned out to be really significant. And over the long term in the case of Jaguar. Plant that they worked with called croat likely eye or sangria to Drago was approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic diarrhea and patients that couldn't tolerate their antiretroviral therapies. And benefit so from the sales are now going back to those communities in a lot of different ways. So but it's not just financial benefits. I think in many places people are non monetary. They value other things. So when I was working in Belize with the rosset R Vigo and her husband Greg shropshire one of the primary folks that was our teacher was done in the Pontiac Maya healer. And an early early paper that I authored in the co authored in the early I don't know 90s. Identifying a plant that had potential anti cancer value donor legio ponti was listed as one of the authors on that paper. And what he did with that paper was was nail it to the wall of his little house his modest little house in Belize and people would come in and he would show them. He had about I don't know 30 or 40 patients a day. He would show them he would say so he got into so I'm guaranteed. Look at this look at this paper. I'm a published scientist. You know you should pay attention to my wisdom on healing. So it's a lot of different things. Andy one of the things that we still hear sometimes from skeptics is there's no value whatsoever to botanicals. Now that we have the scientific methods to create pharmaceutical drugs and yet an integrative medicine we teach our fellows that there are medicinal plants that benefit human healing in areas where we have no medication. And I'm wondering if you could give an example or two. And then Michael I'd like to turn to you. Well Victoria first of all you know that for years I have argued that whole natural products with their complex mixtures of constituents have different and often better effects than isolated compounds. And for many years I was ridiculed for writing about that and saying that. That's really changed. I think there's been appreciation of the fact that complex natural mixtures are different and valuable and research has changed. One example of what you asked for is milk thistle saliva marianum. This is a nontoxic plant that has the remarkable ability to stimulate metabolism of hepatocytes liver cells and protect the liver from toxic injury. We don't have anything like that in conventional medicine. We know a lot of things that damage the liver including a lot of our medically use drugs. But we don't know anything that protects the liver. This has even been used intravenously as a treatment for deadly amity to mushroom poisoning. It's something you can take I know students to take this before they go out the drink on an evening. People take it who have or exposed to toxic volatile solvents but an extremely useful plant. And we have nothing like that in conventional medicine. You just mentioned that we're beginning to appreciate the value of whole plants and it seems like one of the places where that's coming through really strong ways cannabis because even the lay you know people see folks selling you know CBD and they're somehow reassured there's no THC. And yet you know we know that it's the complexity of all of these different cannabinoids and terpenoids and other chemicals in cannabis that gives it its remarkable healing properties. Yeah that's a particularly complex one with so many different active constituents but this is the general pattern that plants have mixtures often of related compounds. You know one might be there and the greatest amount and reproduce most of the interesting activity of the plant but it's modified by all these secondary constituents that we've ignored until very recently. But as I say there's really been a shift now in research I think also in the practical knowledge of practitioners. Yes. And Michael you're going to add well no I was wondering Andy can you get intravenous milk thistle extract in this country or? No not as far as I know..

Gordon Craig rosset R Vigo Greg shropshire legio ponti Andy Belize national cancer institute Steve king NCI chronic diarrhea Drago U.S. government Mike FDA cancer Victoria Michael
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Open a computer or you can open it up on your smartphone and start showing pictures of plants how they're pronounced in your ancient language the people know who the speakers are many of them are gone. This is their legacy. And the uses of the plant. So it's just much more integrated and I think there's a lot more respect also over the years for the value of the importance of the indigenous investigator such that starting in the 80s I would be including indigenous people as co authors on my paper. Certainly honored indigenous peoples in a way that most others had not at the time. One leap that we've made is giving them academic credit for their contributions. You know Michael earlier on you use the word primitive. And I think we have a certain hubris in the west about how evolved and intelligent we are. We've obviously made enormous scientific advances and created incredible microscopes and other tools to measure plants. And yet centuries ago indigenous people without access to any of this equipment learned which plants were good as medicine which ones were safe to eat in some cases how to detoxify things that weren't safe and they were using their senses in this incredibly rich way that perhaps you know we've lost the ability to use. Can you speak a little to that term that you've referred to indigenous science and what we can learn? Sure what I've found is that indigenous peoples use the western so called western scientific method of trial and error. But I add to it success. So trial error and success. You might taste that red berry because the red berry that you ate in your village across the mountain gave you a lot of energy and you taste this one that looks similar. Maybe it gives you a stomachache. So you spit it out. You don't eat it anymore. That's your trial and error or it's gives you powers that energy that you never thought you would have. So that's the success. As far as toxins go one example would be an endemic cinnamon tree cinema calorie Nancy on the island of porn pay. Now that has a compound in it called safrole which is a tumor promoter. And I wondered why people drank that as a healing tea and a tonic. And with all that saffron in it. And so what we did working with a group from Lehman college including a chemist Ed canelli and his student Kurt raynards and we looked at how indigenous people take the safrole out of that tea we reproduced the tea in the way they made it. And we found there was no saffron in it. While in the bark it was loaded with saffron. And the way they did it was to simply boil the water which degraded the safrole and titrate out the liquid and leave the bark behind. So I'm always just wondering how do people come up with this you know? Any thoughts on that Andy? Well you know one example is ayahuasca which has become such a prominent psychoactive substance these days I would never have thought that would happen. But you know they're advertising ayahuasca experiences on the streets of Tucson. At any rate it usually in the Amazon this is made it's an admixture of two plants one banisteriopsis copy the bark has a psychoactive substance called harme in it. But doesn't really cause any visual changes. And most of the native peoples combine it with some other plant often the leaves of a plant that has DMT in it. Dimethyltryptamine DMT is a very powerful vision inducing psychedelic but you can't take it by mouth because and enzyme in the stomach a monoamine oxidase degrades it. So when anthropologists first purported this and bought in this mixture they said well the DMT plant can't possibly have any effect. And the indigenous peoples always said that this was used to make the visions brighter. And I remember hearing and Shelby's this class that they found this by trial and error. But when I was in the Amazon cooking up ayahuasca with shamans this profusion of plants it's hard to imagine this thing. Well it's Tuesday. I'll try to leave today. And when I would ask shamans how they discovered that they could mix these two together. They all gave the same answer and it was that the that the plant that banisteriopsis showed them when they were intoxicated on it this other plant so that they found that through intuition stimulated by that natural experience. To me that makes that's more logical than the explanation that this was trial and error. So I think that people living close to nature their intuitive senses of things are much more developed. Body of wonder is produced by the Andrew Wilde center for integrative medicine at the university of Arizona..

Ed canelli Kurt raynards Lehman college Michael Amazon Tucson Andy Shelby Andrew Wilde center for integr university of Arizona
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Introduced meditations to help people go deeper or if they're experiencing a hard trip to help come out of that hard trip if they don't have a therapist or guide with them as well as structured reflection questions. So you can begin the process of integration. You know that's. Where a lot of the magic so to speak happens within psychedelic therapies. You have these intense transformative psychedelic experiences but without doing the work afterwards to really take those understandings and the awareness that comes out of it and turn it into your life and make it part of your attitude your mindset your ego. A lot of those benefits can dissipate. So starting the work of reflection trying to understand what happened what it meant to you and how you can take those experiences forward is a key component of what we're doing with trip as well. And we've designed it to be very beautiful. You know there's a lot of pushback initially being who wants their phone during a psychedelic experience and certainly we're the first advocate that's much better to have a qualified trained person with you for a psychedelic experience. But in the absence of that better to have some sort of tool that is responsive and effective. So you can have as good experience as possible. Ronan you were involved in the national legalization and regulation of cannabis in Canada. And I'm just curious what parallels you see if any between cannabis and psychedelics? You know on first blush it certainly when I learned about what was happening with psychedelics and this nascent renaissance that's still a very nascent breakdown a few years ago the immediate parallels seemed obvious but they're more superficial. You know these are both stigmatized medicines. These are both drugs or medicines depending on how you want to define it that were largely made illegal and stigmatized probably based more on political agenda than scientific fact that have had a renaissance recently. And that similarly. Require a new infrastructure. You know we're not really equipped right now or we weren't at least a few years ago to help bring cannabis medicine to the floor because there weren't you know the clinics or the physicians or the medical professionals who are really capable of helping people use cannabis medicine as effective based as possible. And certainly there wasn't the infrastructure. It's a cultivate high quality safe tested cannabis for the number of people who would be consuming it. And so similarly with psychedelics we're doing the same thing. We're trying to build the spaces where people can come to have the proper oversight of medical care and the psychedelic setting. We're also doing the work from both a cultivation and drug development perspective to help create safe access to these molecules as well. So you need that infrastructure. But the biggest difference I guess there's two big differences that I see. First is that I expect psychedelics to come as you think a bit from a business perspective as a service. You're not going to most likely go out and be able to buy mushrooms or LSD and take it home and have an experience which you'll be able to do is find a qualified professional to take you through a psychedelic experience. So it's going to be more service oriented than product oriented as cannabis is. And the other big consideration is that by and large cannabis is not curative in many respects it helps people manage symptoms certainly it can be curative but the evidence seems to suggest that cannabis is mostly symptom helps with symptomology. You know it helps with your pain and it helps with your anxiety but it doesn't necessarily help get at the underlying causes. With psychedelics particularly as it pertains to mental health conditions like depression and anxiety and PTSD the evidence seems to suggest and at least my understanding of the mechanism of action is that it helps you address the underlying causes. You're not just dealing with the symptoms of being depressed but you're actually healing the traumas and doing the works that may have caused you in part to become depressed in the first place. And so I think the potential of psychedelics to have a positive impact on people's lives is actually quite greater because it feels like it creates a stepping stone such that you don't necessarily need to access psychedelics to deal with your mental health conditions. You may choose to. But you can sort of start to step away. And yeah I'd be curious to know your thoughts on that actually. I agree with that. I think that's very well put that because it's something that people eat tend to use regularly to control symptoms and with psychedelic therapy there's at least the possibility which can be very good of getting to the root of a problem and changing it. And that of course is part of our goal and integrative medicine is can we get to the root and can we therefore pull that root out so to speak so that someone can heal? And yet Ronan you alluded to the stigma of psychedelics and there does seem to be maybe from years of social messaging negative social messaging. What do we do about the stigma? Tony one of our advisers recently said and I apologize for the plagiarizing your line but it was so good. She said I grew up thinking McDonald's was food and mushrooms were drugs. And I thought that was quite accurate. You know the stigma around psychedelics is something that doesn't cause me a lot of to be quite honest. When we started in the cannabis industry the stigma around cannabis particularly in the medical community was so severe. We launched that out of medical conference and doctors at the conference when they were walking down the aisle not only didn't engage with us at our booth which said medical marijuana starts here. They actually give us a wide burst. They would intentionally walk far away from us because they wanted nothing to do with us. And within about two years we had gone from a pariah to being one of the most popular booths at the conference because what had happened is in the intervening two years we had to focus on doing really good high quality medicine in trying to really good results. And the medical community in the areas where we were off reading saw their patients having positive experiences and getting better and the quality of their life encouraging and that triggered their curiosity they wanted to have more understanding. And so that's why I think there was you know a slow but building shift towards attitudes towards cannabis. With psychedelics we're operating from a much better platform. First of all I think cannabis has changed a lot of the attitudes and those ones strongly held beliefs or at least have softened if not changed towards stigmatized medicines. But more importantly there's just a great body of evidence a much more persuasive body of evidence around psychedelic therapies and there ever has been for cannabis both from the work and you know Harvard and all the academic institutions in the 50s at 60s. They're incredible amount of papers written about LSD back then. And then in this modern renaissance we see it coming from institutions like Johns Hopkins and New York University and imperial college. And it's being led by the scientists and the doctors and the physicians and the psychiatrists and the therapists who are really causing the current renaissance whereas with cannabis the shifted attitudes was driven much more at a political grassroots level less than medical community unless the scientific.

Ronan PTSD Canada anxiety depression McDonald Tony Johns Hopkins and New York Uni Harvard
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"And then when you get from the vegas into their brain stem where does it go. Would circuits in the brain become activated. And how you basically hijack them. And it's such an exciting area right now and it's really important and and vegas is definitely one of the main communication pathways and of course. This is the one that that is being used during meditation and mindfulness in various other things as well and if bi directional and i think that's the important parts of bus. But as i you know i neglect mentioned a lot of times. The vegas doesn't innovate the lower colo. So the it's not the whole story so goes on in the lower kula so so there are other dryer other pathways. I play and we're very interested in these metabolites right now. In these. What these microbes make Because i think it's going to be a lot of interesting things emerging from this. Have you studied the effects of these. Mindfulness practices meditation. yoga breathing. Other things so we by stereotypical but it's completed now. We're analyzing the microbiome in a the where. We looked at mindfulness training. There is the one thing that we're gels is all of our studies together and so this was an caregivers of people who have alzheimer's disease. We put them through mindfulness intervention. And we're now looking at their microbiome and so we'll be interested to see. I mean these. These are tough studies to do because these people have lost going on anyway and so adding to their burdened by getting them to you know take biological samples and things can be tricky so so But we have to. We have the data now. And we're beginning. We're reminding out see what exactly is going on. I'd love to see a lot more work in this field. I guess that's one of my take messages that we need to. i'm always encouraged. When when more and more people get interested in this field overall because the the more data we have the more evidence we can say about. You know what will work for. What person in what situation. So andy when you look into the future of medical practice where you see the individualized care of the gut going. I think it's gonna be huge especially really knowing what track advice we can give people or how to get and maintain a healthy gut microbiome How they use interventions directed at the Modify rain function and that motion. A mental wellness. How to use your mind ways to harmonize. Gut function and treat many of the common functional elements of the gut. I think we're at the beginning of this new kind of medicine. It's very exciting. Thank sandy don. Add to that. Yeah i agree is opening the door and there was a paper just published but all the confidence in microbiome science and some people see this negative. But it's actually really positive because we being able to see. How do we design these studies. Better how do we. What type of sample size we need and really to build up evidence. And i'm always about the evidence. So where is where is the evidence. But there's a on chips in thinking about the brain and the mind and how we behave in a different way one of the areas where. I'm really wondering about this. Kobe were older. You know with lockdowns and increased hygiene how much we're interfering with our everyday microbiomes..

vegas alzheimer's disease sandy don andy Kobe
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Minute foods at home might do that night. Tell other people do that. And there's a whole variety of them so it's not just You know it's not just pickles in sauerkraut minutes. Fermented dairy products from Foods and so forth. I think it is useful to eat. A variety of prebiotics moods foods that nourish the healthy organisms in the microbiome and to really reduce consumption of refining process than manufactured. So that's the basic advice. You so i want to just add that amazing list that get your mother to have you by vaginal c-section this advice. We should give to all our patient in an era where some c sections are elective. And where some might be avoided with different planning and different conversations. C-section can be life saving. So of course. We don't want to eliminate all c-section but sometimes it can be avoided. Have your mother breastfeed you. Because that's going to nourish the developing microbiome and then avoid artificial sweeteners. Avoid diet sodas and other things that are sweetened with artificial sweeteners because there are human studies to show that that can alter the microbiome in some dangerous ways. John would you add. Yup we coined the phrase psycho biotic and incorporated as a way of and to have a psychopathic lifestyle. That's exactly what we feel is really relevant. Sleep in the microbiome very closely intertwined. We're very. we're very excited about circadian rhythms and mike obama we've ongoing projects You get sleep disturbed. It will affect a so. You know when i was traveling all the time. I wasn't good for my microbiome and it was obvious. The other thing is it's known also having a pet especially dog dog is really good for your and and it's really great studies now on pet ownership in early airlines and allergy anathema. John help out kissing your dog or can't avoid that some one lights but but everything else is is what captured there and the early life. A priming is really important but but as adults we can still do a lot. We've just completed a short study here in court where we get people to change their diet for one month and these were stressed into the people were relatively diets. And we upped the fiber double their fiber intake and really opted fermented foods and giving mediterranean-style based diet too and their stress level. These were students coming through exams. Stress levels were much great greatly reduced. They had left signs of of depression. And so we think tire getting the microbiome is going to be billion park way of wellbeing. But what we don't know is what works for. You may not for the next person so you need to to try. I would encourage people also to to be somewhat skeptical of anything you see out there. That's that's being sold from a commercial point of view without having because there's a lot of There's a lot of snake oil out..

mike obama Foods John mediterranean depression
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Hi andy today. We are going to be speaking with an irish researcher. Dr john cryan about the microbiome and this is really a fascinating new field of medicine so for listeners. To our new. it's about the bacteria viruses and fungi. That live in an on our bodies with whom we have co evolved for millions of years and particularly off how they influenced brain function and mental and emotional wellness. In how the rain influences that and a you have talked about the mind body connection for so many years. How did you get it before. The microbiome research. The observations. That i made was i often tell people about and this is from my college days very interesting to go into a student health services couple of days before exams and see the numbers of people that come in with disturbed with diarrhea with lawyer with the stomach. Pain mitt. obvious you just hits you in the face. So that kind of playing alerted me early on to that connection..

Dr john cryan andy diarrhea
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"And they're certainly has incredible resurgence of interest in them everywhere that i have gone to speak in past. I'd say in the past three years no matter what the subject whether it's about nutrition healthy aging integrative medicine. I get questions from all sorts of audiences about suicide saban. And how can i do it. And what about microdosing. And what are the benefits and It's phenomenal to me. How has penetrated the culture. I assume that's the same in the uk and And in other countries now yet massive massive boom given in pop by these most studies into new phenomenon. tend to generate this much excitement in fascination. So there's something else to it as well. I think it is penetrating mainstream culture in a remarkable way. And i must say i feel very good about that. You know maybe this is specifically the antidote to the toxicity of the cult of the dominant culture may bring about you know very good change. I know you have a long history of mushroom hunting unfermented. What's your favorite way to to stay in contact with the fungal. Well right now. Well i'm a bit limited living in the sonoran desert. Just not the best ted. For mushrooms we get the good fruiting of mushrooms on top of the santa catalina mountains in summer rains and in when there very heavy rains which there have not been for a while the desert floor fruits with some very unusual species like stock falls. So whenever i can be in contact with those that makes me very happy. I've always loved mushroom hunting in the pacific northwest Which is a wonderful habitat. There are more and more people cultivating edible species which is a delight. I had some very good Fresh lines main mushrooms from a local cultivator a couple of nights ago. So i eat them. Whenever i can. I can soon medicinal mushrooms in various forms Because i think they're doing good things for my immunity and and body defenses and mental function. Andy you brought up lions maine. Which is a mushroom that you commonly recommend people who are worried about their brains. Can you maybe give an integrative medicine. listeners about the value of lions mushroom. Well it has a unique nerve growth factor in it and there is some good research Suggesting that this benefits Neurological health and cognitive function It is perfectly safe. It has no toxicity. It's also delicious. Edible.

saban santa catalina mountains sonoran desert uk pacific northwest Andy maine
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Particular place that almost all of us are familiar with. Fungi has to do with fermentation of yeast. And most of us enjoy an occasional alcoholic beverage or perhaps a piece of bread and those are really you know the the magic of Adding yeast to other substances. And i understand that you have been a a brewer enough for mentor. And you tell some wonderful stories and the you as well have been a bread baker. And i don't know as much about your brewing history but maybe speak to that use of fun guy bit while i make. I'm not so much of a brewer. But i have been making Tempe fairly regularly natto. Another Which actually merlin. I conferred on fermented beverages. Like fos made from beets. I'm a great fan of fermented foods and as you know victoria. We recommend them very frequently to our patients. Because i think this is one of the best things that you can do for your gut microbiome. It's amazing Commenting as well. i. I like doing it. Not for the flavors and fatigue the health benefits but but the experience of what shing and experiencing the i mean take tasting ecosystem arise and transform of a time when you have a bottle of features semantic fos for example in your kitchen workup as an ecological succession different waves of microbes. Taking over from the previous ones where they left off which is very much how ecosystems walk in the wild out in the big while outside and in the jaw. You can taste it happen it you can taste these chemical transformations if you taste the feminist. It goes along that you can really get the intuitive sense. How much of the wild really works in these big chemical weather systems that we live within but not for so notice. You one of my very early memories is i think it was quite young. Occasionally my mother and grandmother would make raised doughnuts and they used fresh cake yeast. And i remember the smell of that When it was dissolved and began to work. I found so attractive. It was one of the most alluring. Aromas i just completely drawn to that. It's it's also it's amazing the natural wealth how how east clay taught in pollination stories. There's a type of shrew will diminish intrigue shrew which is attracted to fermenting sugary nectar in palm flowers and. The smell of this feminization actually attracts the shoes Shoes have away of have drinking Out getting drunk have special. Toddler charged ends on but nonetheless. These these aromas produced by the east actually folded Cycles of of the organism so we are taping this during the pandemic and apparently there has been this enormous increase in interest in growing mushrooms and recently the new york times quoted a supplier in portland. Who said the demand had increased four hundred percent over the past year so perhaps the. Us is moving from being mica phobic. To michael phillip. What what would account for that. I think much having a moment. Incoming which generally and i think people have on all sorts of new projects like baking result. One of zongol another uncle enterprise. of course. i'm bats the mushroom growing is. It's amazing when you grow mushrooms you can grow in the groesbeck voss. I think that's a fantastic thrill that didn't seeing this transformation taking place from a block. My tedium umbrella waste material into these foams that just arise. You could almost see them cry. I remember growing mushrooms. Child analogous i go to bed. Net beats Doubled in size. And do you want you think. Funky having such amendments. Well it a one reason certainly has to do with tila simon mushrooms..

Tempe victoria michael phillip groesbeck voss new york times portland Us tila simon
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"I'd love to hear closing Said would help us with the grief. especially you know we we as you do train. A lot of healthcare professionals and While suffering may always be a part of life they are seeking more deaths than is At all common for a doctor's for doctors in training and they have been really brought to the brain. One of our faculty who works with residents patricia. Levinson told me recently that they're beyond burned-out They just have suffered and seen so much suffering. And i want to know what we can do of. I haven't been Providing hospital care. What can we do to help heal. Well this is really a powerful question. victorian you know one thing i want to say is that it is essential. I believe at this point to acknowledge the moral suffering that clinicians are experiencing including moral distress moral injury moral outrage and moral apathy or of the numbing out experience on and also Feeling experiencing moral disengagement and identifying You know These domains of Harm internal harm that arise from confronting dying magnitude that congess confronting and not having the internal resources or the extra resources to provide adequate care so violation. If you will of one's own vows as a clinician. And i believe that i'm we will be involved for a long time in repair in addressing these harms to one's sense of you know what ones very character now i. I know at a at your place that might place. There's a big emphasis on the value of contemporary practice in terms of engendering insight. But also most importantly on the the importance of compassion. And you know years ago. I did a heuristic map of compassionate and then developed a tool called kris which allows people in a very direct way to cultivate compassion while they're interacting with with others. These kinds of practices. I feel are really important to share with finishes on and fought for also for politicians to understand that compassion is a win. Win win situation. That is we know now. From the point of view of neuroscience and social psychology that experiencing compassionate has Interesting health benefits and also psychological benefits. We also know that people who receive compassion are benefited. And we also know that people who witnessed those who are compassionate feel morally elevated and want to engage in acts of altruism compassion. So i think one of the really important things for us to do in this Process confronting trauma that clinicians many commissions are experiencing and wall suffering that many clinicians are experiencing and naming it working with it skillfully on Is to actually provide the tools for finishes to go back into service on with more and those tools. I think many of them are not just in this simple algorithms giving care but they have to do with the development of eternal qualities related to attention and Intention inside and so forth. I think it is useful always to remind oneself and others that grief and grieving or warm wool processing they in fact healing processes. That is no way we come to terms with loss than suffering accept that and move on from them and it becomes the problem when people get stuck in some face grief and we can help them out of that but i think realizing that is absolutely normal reaction undesirable one and it is in fact that he lied cross and i think this point is really important. The normalization of grief into understand unit from the point of view of positive interpretation of trauma on that it it actually enhanced czar character. And i look on a grief experience of greeting so wanted to the most humanizing a are human experiences for example just the the blessing humility and to know that Loss is inevitable and the the cherishing of relationships and the development of moral character and the experiences you suggest and yvette. I'm spiritual transformation is often the outcome of grief. Well that seems like a very hopeful and beautiful note to end on that the grief can the to transformation of character. I wanna thank you so much for spending this time with us for she joan. We are deeply appreciative. Thank you is so great to see my old buddy role. Now thank you both with an honor. Not good to see you. I wanted just one last thing. I heard you say On something someplace. You were interviewed. That grief is loved. That has nowhere to go. And i want whether that's why so many people are reaching out to your center because if we can come together communally you know gives it a place to go. This is what i am experiencing now this Extraordinary intimacy even though We are physically distant one from another. But we're through this a fascinating technology Able to meet each other in ways that we never anticipated that we'd been driven together by the pandemic and the suffering in this world. And you think you stay tell you so much five listeners. This is dr victoria. Mazes we would love for you to send us your questions for andy myself or for our guests you can call us and leave a voicemail by dialing five two six two one three nine five zero again five zero six two one three nine five zero or you can submit a question by going to our website as the cia. Im dot org slash. Podcast again a z. See im dot org slash podcast. We will review your questions and try to answer as many as possible on our programs..

Levinson patricia kris yvette dr victoria andy cia
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Rusty joan halifax is a buddhist teacher. Sent priests anthropologist and author. She is founder. Abbot and head teacher of zen center a buddhist monastery in santa fe new mexico. Rosie jones received her phd in medical author. Apology in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy three from nine hundred seventy two tonight seventy five she worked with psychiatrists stand ross at the maryland psychiatric research center. We're they did pioneering work with dying cancer patients using lsd as an adjunct to psychotherapy rosie. Joan has continued to work with dying people and their families and to teach compassionate. Care of the dying. Her work in practice for more than four decades has focused on engaged. Buddhism welcome roshii joan. Thank you so much victoria. Very nice to be with you and and to save my old friend. And so i want to begin with quote from one of your books. Being with dying you wrote. I witnessed again and again how spiritual and psychological issues leap into sharp focus for those facing death i discovered caregiving as pass and as a school for unloading the patterns of resistance so embedded in may and in my culture so in addition to all your other qualities you are a wonderful storyteller and i'm wondering if you could begin to bring this into focus for us with story. I'm happy to try now. I remember when stan. I were working with dying people using lsd as an adjunct to psychotherapy There was an older woman who had metastatic breast cancer. We were very close. I i really felt so lined with her. And i think she felt that way toward me as well and at one point she looked at me really strongly just a right deepen divide is and she said you never know what it's like to die and i have to tell you it was one of those moments where i experienced a kind of It was like an arrow to the heart or sort of awakening. She was right. And my role was to come alongside her experience and to have the kind of Internal arms to hold whatever was present for her and i also realized that she was a teacher from me and she really opened the path of learning from dying people on that. I actually the only thing that i could bring to. People who dying wasn't good advice. It was presence. It was Presidents that may be was characterized by care and courage. So i will always feel a bit of love in a certain way for what she taught me and from that point on i felt i was a student to bore die. Rocha john i have to ask you what do you think. The renaissance of lsd in psychedelic. Some it's been a long time coming. And there's a lot of interest analysis the assisted psychotherapy. You still see this useful tool the woman who is the head of palliative care. the Said to me a short while your bet. It just killed her that she could not use that tool with dying patients because the laws prevented a moment. What do you think about. So it's very powerful substance. It's as you well. And they and. I think that i'm from the point of view of the work that stan and i did in the early nineteen seventies with great attention to set and setting also with Stands earlier work in using lsd in a psychoanalytic context with multiple doses of smaller amounts. But he learned so much about the human unconscious so that That was needless to say very important in the attitude that we brought into the interaction with a dying cancer patients. I think it's a powerful tool and as such every powerful tool has great benefits and also has enormous challenges. And so you know using lsd specifically as an adjunct to psychotherapy which was our approach at that time on was done with such Meticulousness such care and we kind of programmed the whole scene if you will for a positive outcome even if during the context of the lsd session itself the dying cancer patient you know encountered difficulties but we were able to text those experiences in a positive way to frame those experiences in a positive way. So i don't feel like the casual use of it with dying. People is recommended. Also i think that bill williams who is part of our project then who is now and has been part of the hopkins east bay project and continues the work Using not lsd but silla cyb cyber is a little more merciful than the quotes singer single overwhelming dose of six hundred micrograms of lsd which produced to a pretty overwhelming effect. So i have a feeling that Suicide been is a better medium and and it's something i think would be valuable to ask bill a his opinion. This is just my opinion drawn on my experience from.

Rusty joan halifax Rosie jones maryland psychiatric research roshii joan zen center Abbot Rocha john stan santa fe metastatic breast cancer rosie new mexico Joan ross cancer victoria dying cancer hopkins east bay bill williams
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"It out schedule. One at uc metal folding. We need more enlightened politicians. There's the obtain fun legal cases going before the supreme court. And if they i just filed an amicus curiae brief with colleagues on and It's possible something could happen there. But i think we need a political solution. Unfortunately this is one of those situations where the public gets it Recognition of the medicinal benefits of cannabis is about ninety percent proposition Almost anywhere you go in the us. politicians are not similarly on board with a aweso that needs to change and they want you to reflect on what ethan just shared his. You wrote a book called longtime ago from chocolate to morphine about why people might be attracted to mind altering substances so Do you think it's always a sign of a problem in the young person's life what do you think this is just part of what we do is developing humans while in my first flew the natural. Line the laws that you've been beings haven't in drives ultra-cautious and i think that makes evolutionary sense begins. I think these altered states potentially are doorways into fuller use of the nervous system and experiences that may be very positive substances are one way of satisfying at truck. There are many others And i've written about those everything from you know. Meditation world Infinite list and the basic point is that the experiences people seek our late within the nervous system and when drugs are used to to get to them. Bay act as triggers releases and people cannabis is one of the best example. This the people have to learn to get high on cannabis they have to learn to associate the relatively subtle effects of the drug with the state of For so i think that's my basic answer. There are lots of other reasons why people get attracted to the usa substances. A major one is is. They're illegal illegality. And that especially for young people. I think is a strong attraction and in countries. No probably the netherlands was the first country to do this. When they decriminalized cannabis they said their intention lists to make boring and it seems to work. That use went down in the duck population. They had a lot to coming in from other countries germany especially to us but i think that we often fail the recognize help. Making things prohibited and illegal old makes them so much more track the certain segments of the population especially young people here here that old adolescent rebellion. I i would just go on from that to say that Youth rates in states that have decriminalized or made it medically available of actually gone down There's a lesson the after. Remove the cachet and it will have less appeal. you know if dad needs to treat his arthritis citizen so cool body of wonder is produced by the andrew wile center for integrative medicine at the university of arizona internationally recognized for innovative health and wellness programs evidence based research and clinical standards during this unprecedented time managing the physical and emotional challenges of the corona virus. The andrew wile center is here to support you. The center offers listeners. A wide range of free resources to live and maintain a healthy lifestyle including online learning meditations and short videos to find out more go to as e. c. I am dot org slash. Podcast that's see. Im dot org slash podcast. Neither of you advocate smoking cannabis. How would you recommend it be taken. You know if if someone really has an acute need. Let's say that someone's having an aura of a migraine and they've got to get it on board fast they're not going to be able to Take anything early because the nausea vomiting then vapors asian as a great alternative. However for the vast majority of people using cannabis medicinally have chronic conditions with a need for ongoing dosing under those conditions. Really favor on tinctures Only coastal or oral preparations That are going to People get by with two or three doses a day. They'll be fewer peaks and valleys bacteria. tippety so less chance of intoxication with an appropriate dose. And beyond that. That would be my my response you know. I was very excited when i saw a pure insult. products that. You've been good advice. The company in the on that was a meter. Those oral spray and it looks like a medical preparation and for physicians. In this country to embrace cannabis. They need to have products that look light medical drugs. They're familiar with not like recreational drugs So that's i think a stumbling block among the vine good medical preparations Be administered orally or of or costa and. What about topical. Well that's a complicated. One cannabis is great for the skin off so intriguing inflammation itch any disorder of that type. The real controversy comes in bowed. Absorption and what else you can trade so the turpin. Oy if they're in the preparation get through the skin great but became avenue. It's hardly do at all. So i know innumerable people that swear by certain preparations to rub on their joints. But they say something funny and that that they get instant relief or within minutes and there's no way that a sufficient amount is getting in or into the joint to do that so you really have to look at the preparation. Maybe it's come menthol or other Agents in them that are affecting the cane fibers in the skin. There was a recent trial of a topical preparation to treat epilepsy. Which to me was the total laugher because there was no way that it could work. You cannot treat a systemic illness of by applying any amount of cannabis on the skin again great for the skin not good for internal conditions And i would just stay ahead of for the people using it on their joints They get relief and like it. Hey i think that's fine. But they shouldn't fool themselves about what's actually going on and to have you seen people who are addicted to cannabis. And what do you advise. I've seen people who are dependent on cannabis. But i think they're complex reasons for matt and if they're separated drug they don't have anything that a Classical signs or symptoms associated with fix. So i think people could become dependent on it but it is not a difficult one to break eighth. And you are one of the leading cannabis researchers and i'm wondering if you can share with our audience what you're excited about. What's coming next well. As touched on earlier. I really think it's going to be a tremendous roll off for cannabis based preparations in treating neurodegenerative diseases. I think this must have and we have an aging population on. We're gonna have a huge public health burden of people with alzheimer's as well as other degenerative diseases such as parkinson's that one's going to be a tough nut to crack. But i think that the promise of particularly nelson were disease is a very real just in management alone and again if we could hit the holy grail of slowing down of the progression of the disease or starting people early who are at risk genetically. I think it would be a major advance. Well as i said earlier Not what one might have expected. Twenty twenty. Five years ago that we would be Pointing people towards canvas way of preventing dementia. Thank you so very much for being our guest on this podcast.

andrew wile center for integra andrew wile center uc ethan supreme court usa university of arizona the netherlands arthritis germany migraine nausea turpin costa epilepsy neurodegenerative diseases alzheimer's parkinson's matt
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Ethan. Rousseau is a board certified neurologist psychopharmacology researcher and author. He's the founder and ceo of crato science. He graduated from the university of massachusetts medical school and then completed residencies in pediatric and in child and adult neurology. He was a clinical neurologist for twenty years where he often saw people who had chronic pain. He's the past president of the international cannabinoid research society and former chair of the international association for cannabinoid medicines. He's authored many books too many to list right now. But they include the handbook of psychotropic herbs. And the last sorcerer echoes of the rainforest ethan. Welcome to our podcast. Thank you for having me note. Medical marijuana is now legal in thirty three united states and also in the district of columbia. And i want to start with you. Why do you think that cannabis has been demonized in the united states in our culture and actually in medicine. Well i think the fear and hatred of that plants in our culture which is so irrational and and Completely incontinent with the chemical and pharmacological realities plan can only be explained by cannabis's associations rather than cannabis itself it has always been a associated with deviant subcultures with outsiders with people that the dominant culture is considered threatening the acknowledge that cannabis wasn't toxins like latkes drug traveled independently from Knowledge of uses the plant as fiber source medicine food and there were many cultures in europe for example the brew have for fiber but really didn't know it as the cycle activation and the knowledge of it as an intoxicant came to north america by way of african slaves who i it to brazil migrated doors and that established itself in the jazz culture around new orleans Which provoked i cultural reactions to the plan. In the nineteen twenties later bz associated with mexican migrant workers in the south and southwest and then in the sixties it became strongly associated with the counterculture movement with hippies and radicals. So i think it's always been these associations with minorities deviant subcultures at really has provoked. The kind of reaction eventually went to criminalization of it and kept it out of of Medical use so long and yet. It's an incredibly useful medicine ethan. I'm wondering if you can speak to. Why you believe cannabis is so very promising. Well i know people understand. The cannabis was a mainstream medicine. Even the united states saw between about eighteen fifty and nineteen forty div father years so Father were modern medicine. seraglio slur as late as nineteen fifteen said that it was the best treatment for migraine on it was also widely used in obstetrics and gynecology. Even children and dog. There really were no problems associated with. It's a abuse so given that foundation. We have to fast forward to the discovery of the endo cannabinoid system so we have within our bodies. Something called the acs. The ender cannabinoid system which means that we have innate chemicals that resemble the activity of teed state in fact the endo can avenue it system is the major homies static regulator of human physiology animal physiology in fact so it has a modulating affect on every physiological function but particularly in the brain. This helps to explain the versatility. We see for cannabis based medicines in trading of variety of conditions that are otherwise intractable. Where conventional medicine if you will has been poorly productive of benefit to patients. Tell us about some of the most promising areas that it's been used for care of patients. Sure well it's widely acknowledged that cannabinoid teats in particular have a role in trading crop on a pain. Not so much an acute pain. So if you have a tape fake or Have just had a tooth extraction. It's not what to use. But in chronic conditions particularly those with neuropathic pain the cabin which really shine in that context on it's been known for decades that cabinets avid strong role in treating nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy. That's wall established a synthetic. Thc has marinol was approved for that use in the us in nineteen eighty five although it never gained much traction because thc alone is a pretty lousy drug poorly tolerated and more likely to produce side effects than cannabis itself beyond that their myriad conditions. We have approval in thirty countries. Outside the us of cannabis based medicines specifically Malls for trading specificity associated with multiple sclerosis and more recently in the us fda approval of epi dial lights which is a ninety seven percent pure can nabet dial preparation cd for treatment of intractable epilepsy associated with javale syndrome lennox gusto syndrome and more recently for two berths fluorosis beyond that we believe bad cannabis will have a great deal to offer in treatment a variety of degenerative diseases those involving the central nervous to stone and should have a great role treatment of alzheimer's disease because of its ability to treat symptoms agitation sleep loss et cetera. But also the prospect if not proven yet that it could be neuro protective and perhaps or roused degeneration and the.

crato science international cannabinoid rese international association for university of massachusetts me us Rousseau Ethan columbia ethan north america brazil new orleans migraine europe nausea chemotherapy javale syndrome lennox gusto s multiple sclerosis fda
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Used to be for example in the plant i say on are both interesting. I mean i. I'd never thought about the last one. That's a great so magnesium for plants. That's interesting well. I mean there's a lot of that's one of the nutrients that thought to be deficient at this point but there are a lot of the of the nutrients that you would expect people to have adequate amounts from just a nutritious diet and now that's more questionable now i. I wasn't even aware that. That's that's really important. I mean that's very interesting. I have a vice question for you. We might task are gaffes. Here we are talking about health and healthy behaviors. We like to ask our guests. If there's one vice a secret vice that they'd be comfortable sharing with all of the listeners for this program close guilty pleasure. Well i don't know if it's advice or not but i'm a huge chocolate fanatic. We consider that a healthy pleasure. Not guilty pleasure. I love chocolate. While i while i probably in place of cotton. There's this great candy store. Ben bills that i keep going to and getting you know they have all these dark chocolate with maple creamer Craving i way to pay. There's no question chocolate chocolate candy. And ice cream would be to two vices in the gilbert nutrition. High and with anything will healthy ice cream. Took thank you very much for participating. The nicer the big virtually about your words thirty signing whilst mutual looks. Great talking to both of you. I mean really that you've done such amazing stopping. You know. just really appreciate your help. And every well i just have to second andy Clearly you have had an impact. Which was the goal you had setting out on the lives of so many people and my guesses generations and generations more So thank you for your work. We'll we'll try. We look forward to collaborating with you about saudi terrific. Thank you thank you. Bye-bye learn more about topics featured on the body of wonder podcast and how to apply them to your everyday health with my wellness coach. A free mobile app from andrew wile center for integrative medicine download today.

Ben andy saudi andrew wile center for integra
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"Ways aside from micronutrients the application fascinated me was using this Encapsulation living probiotics. Can you tell us about that. He absolutely again anna jack atlantic and others in the lab. We've put probiotics in and then giving it to animals and we cannot do that as well. I mean again. It's dif- different types of designs that we've used in terms of Of putting them in palm by the we've published all this stuff to we have patents on but we've published it all in journals like science translational medicine advanced materials. But but you're absolutely right. We can. I really feel like we you can i mean. I don't overstate. But i feel quite confident. That we can cap almost anything. And then and then deliver it. You know. And that goes from things like dna in our a which enabled mike madeira and other things to to to these nutrients that were talked about it and probiotics which by nikica do and you mentioned ability of the wound tree. You've been using topical capsulated probiotics. Yes you're absolutely right. You could do to any of those kinds of things. Theoretically i mean you have to make sure that your animal models are good. Certainly with things that you're already eating. I mean that badly be awaken. Just do better make them pay more stable and and things like that and and maybe do other things that would be useful. I give her a longer resting for a for example. You also are using this technique to address a really serious problem. Which are these resistant infections. That are resistant to many many of existing. Antibiotics said that has been something. You've used as well with wounds. That have mersa methyl. Methicillin-resistant staff orientation are you. Actually using. A combination of antibiotics are using it. Braxton probiotics are you using novel treatments how how are you approaching that. Yeah well we'll combination of using different substances used by hopefully delivering them better delivering the longer and in the in the best profile and making sure that they're stable or not destroyed right away. I know that some of the early thought process of these very targeted ways of delivering is When you give someone a medicine by mouth of course the liver has to break down and that means you usually have to use a higher dose because things are inactivated and maybe you can't really get the ideal dose to the particular place you want it because it could be toxic to the body in general so i think this very targeted delivery system is really fascinating. Thank you know. We're we're very excited about it. I hope but we'll do a lot of good. We've already tested on people. I mean we have done collaborative studies with itchy And everybody seemed to be very happy with the results and everybody did fine. Healthy wise body of wonder is produced by the andrew wile center for integrative medicine at the university of arizona internationally recognized for innovative health and wellness programs evidence based research and clinical standards during this unprecedented time managing the physical and emotional challenges of corona virus. The andrew wile center is here to support the center offers listeners. A wide range of free resources to live and maintain a healthy lifestyle including online learning meditations and short videos to find out more. Go to see 'em dot org slash podcast. That's see. I m dot org slash podcast. So i have a question really for both of you in many ways. You're both pioneers in your specific fields. And i know that people probably put energy into dissuading you from following. What you clearly believed was possible. I'm sure that some of the career steps you took people considered risky. I mean you could have gone into the oil field and dismayed billions of dollars for the companies and probably a good amount of money for yourself. What is it. Do you think that was innate in you that made you go in this different direction. Even in the face of a lot of dissuasion andy i. You're chev i i'll just bobble tell you. Stew worry about dutiful. He was inducted into the academy of achievement. That wayne and cathy ron and they asked me to present him with the award. Always and afterwards he says they you know at harvard medical school the faculty save. They tried to train students to think for themselves and now that they don't like a terrific. I think that's great. Right is right. Yeah that's a great story while he was a wonderful role model every every way. I mean it's related. You know to me i mean. I had the civil idea that i wanted to do. Some good i guess. And i didn't feel excited about going into the industry and i am doing things like teaching now. I couldn't get right away and and actually what you said is also right you know. Even after dr falcons labban we published the things which have turned out. Both the angiogenesis work in drug delivery work would have both turned out to have a big impact on the world. I you know. I wanted to get a faculty job so i applied to chemical engineering departments. And because that's what. I am and no chemical engineering department in the world would hire me. They kept saying this. Bios stuff you're doing doesn't make any sense. An chemical engineering department. So i didn't get any jobs there but then then what happened. Was you know i. I tried to get grants for what i did. Actually i nine dot rejected very badly. 'cause people said again how could it come as near to cancer research or anything and then i ended up getting a job at a nutrition department and the reason i got it was dr folkman. Knew a man named nevin scrimshaw who is a really well known nutritionist. And he was head of that department but he was the kind of department had. That was more what. I'll call a benevolent dictator in the sense. That like me so he hired me but he didn't ask the rest of the department what they thought which would have been on hand up for the fact that the year after i joined the department he left so putting the entire senior faculty gave me advice in their advice as i should leave to. Oh wow very discouraging and then and they kept saying this idea encapsulation and drug delivery. You know is ridiculous. You shouldn't bother doing it. You know what's better start looking for another job now. And yet i know in your lab at mit The language lab You really value diversity and it seems to be. The world has may become to value collaboration across fields. More i mean we had our center for. Integrative medicine do work with bio medical engineering to do projects around. 'em hell so. I think the world has caught.

anna jack atlantic mike madeira andrew wile center for integra andrew wile center Braxton academy of achievement cathy ron university of arizona dr falcons labban harvard medical school dr folkman nevin scrimshaw andy wayne cancer
"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

Body of Wonder

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"wonder" Discussed on Body of Wonder

"A warrior. I love to sandra. I'm so glad that you love it too. Yes to sandra is. That's the way i think of it. It really takes this kind of fretting type of anxiety and helps people regain a sense of control or what. I call agency in their life so that they have a little bit more grounded nece to move forward and kind of meet their anxiety head on or utilize the energy of anxiety in a productive way. Chace andras also unique in that. There are lignans in the plant which are very Protective so they actually are very good for supporting the liver in the context of environmental toxicity or If somebody's consuming amounts of alcohol or anything that could be otherwise inflammatory to the liver. Just andras very good at helping support. Deliver the just a nice secondary benefit to show sandra so and i want to pull a little bit on your Expertise an ethnobotanist. Least mentioned us a little bit about the discovery of these plants in siberia. But what else do we know about. The use of these plants from ethno botanical perspective will first of all the reason people look for things in siberia was there was the there was incentive of soviet scientists define substitutes for inside the van as long in history. The worldwide demand for ginseng has gravy seen the supply. And it's one of the most expensive herbs out there so there was a project to try and discover alternatives sources That closer to home and the explorers found this plant that looked like growing. It's libya i think china's most interesting place to look. Because you know you've heard me say this. The chinese medical philosophy divides drugs into his theory. Midland superior categories than the zero category of drugs that have specific actions of for specific ailments. And that's in western medicine. That's our highest ideal drug something that has a specific action and the superior category those that were generally good for everything and we don't take interest in them a in the western world because we think somebody something works for everything. It can't work by biochemical mechanism. So that really. I think limited our search for these non-toxic substances that bolster health and improve homies stasis. And and it's a remarkable his g. Sing is just fascinating. How long it was completely ignored in the western world and we let our own native form Thing american ginseng harvested almost extinction to be exploited the china and nobody bothered to study to see what properties it is fascinating. How still so many people don't know what you're talking about when you say something isn't adapted jin. it's not really in our lexicon. Body of wonder is produced by the andrew wile center for integrative medicine at the university of arizona internationally recognized for innovative health and wellness programs evidence based research and clinical standards during this unprecedented time. Managing the physical and emotional challenges of the corona virus. The andrew center is here to support you. The center offers listeners. A wide range of free resources to live and maintain a healthy lifestyle including online learning meditations and short videos to find out more go to as e cis dot org slash podcast. That's easy see. Im dot org slash podcast of lease. Tell us how these work. What's the mechanism. What is it doing to our physiology. That has this wonderful normalizing function so we are still learning about this from what we know so far to peers. That adapted agents have many different mechanisms of action which is one of the reasons why they have their fingers in so many different biochemical places. But one thing that we've long known about adapted agendas is that they helped normalize our stress response which sometimes practitioners refer to as the hypothermic pituitary adrenal axis. So this is a neuro endocrine response system that we are hardwired to react to perceive stress in a way that allows us the capacity to move away from that stress so if we see a tiger in the grass or hp or hypoplastic to dairy adrenal axis fires off and get more blood flowing into our muscles. We shut down our digestive system and were ready to run from the tiger in the modern world. We don't see tigers in the grass. Instead we have people cutting us off in traffic. We run out of half-and-half for a coffee. We have all these other little mild stressors but it triggers the same stress reaction and over time this stress reaction get stuck in the on position basically and it doesn't turn off so we don't kind of reestablish our homies stasis our baseline function and when that happens we develop high levels of one of the stress hormone called cortisol and with that ourselves in throughout her body become resistant to that cortisol so instead of the normal physiology taking place we get this kind of reverse response and under this constant barrage of cortisol we start to experience more inflammation we start to over decades actually degrade the quality of our tissues we can develop digestive issues joint disorders even cognitive issues mood disorders. So there's lots of ways in which chronic stress has very clear physiology and that's a very shortened version of complex concepts but to wrap that up the adapted in one of the things that they do is that they reset the hypothalamus. And the patou itary to the turnoff signal of cortisol so it helps our body to turn that system off so we were the standard research model for determining whether a natural product has stressed protective properties. or a drug. Is the rat swimming test. You drop a rat into a column of water and you see how long it swims will do a gibbs up and hopefully pull it out then. I don't know whether they do that. And then you give it actual gone the jinxiang a steroid and you see if that prolongs. The time that the rat women's gets exhausted and it prolongs the time it is considered pab a stress protective effect probably by working on Alantic the two-tier adrenal axis. That's the way we assist these things. Well there's now some human trials as well. So what do we do in humans. Lease well and i just want to mention one other thing. Which is that. In addition to that we also now know that the adapted jains improve on within our cells improve the ability of ourselves to make atp and to protect itself against a various stressors like oxidative stress. So that's important because that allow that also explains why those rats could swim longer because there have more endurance more physical endurance all the way down to a cellular lever are may work by different mechanisms. So mideast Some of them have a.

sandra nece Chace andras siberia andrew wile center for integra andras andrew center china Midland libya university of arizona swimming