18 Burst results for "Women's Liberation Movement"

"women liberation movement" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:33 min | 10 months ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on KPCC

"Australian singer Helen Reddy, who died this week. Her biggest hit was I am Woman. They've reached the top spot on the charts. In 1972 it peaked is the women's liberation movement was making big headlines. It was the year the Senate passed the Equal Rights Amendment and saw Shirley Chisholm run for president. I'm Jen white. This is one woman here in numbers too big to signal No too much to go back. Is it all done up in down there on the floor? Yes drives can do. I am strong. On the next fresh air. Underwater explorer and photographer Jill Hein Earth has dived into underground waterways deep in the earth beneath a giant iceberg. She's seen hidden creatures as old as dinosaurs and witnessed scenes of surreal beauty. Her work is so dangerous 100 of our friends and colleagues have died in dives. Her book is into the Earth. Join us now on weeknights at eight on 89.3 kpcc..

Jill Hein Earth Helen Reddy Shirley Chisholm Jen white Senate president
Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

The Electorette Podcast

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode, have a conversation with the hogue, the president of Nero Pro, choice America, and he joins me to discuss her new book. The lie that binds it's really an incredible book and it chronicles how abortion rights of all from being a non-partisan backburner issue to a central 'cause champion by conservatives in the radical, right. This is really one of those books that I have to read twice. It's that informative. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Elise. Hogue. leasehold welcome to the cast. Thank you so much. You're. So before we jump into your book, I want us to talk about something because I recently learned that you were from Texas and that really my inches because I'm also from the South I'm from Memphis Tennessee, and I was reading one of your interviews where you'd said that you wanted to leave Texas because Uber afraid that you'd be bored and that was something like totally relate to. Manila it was sort of. Knew that there was a being rolled out there and I wanted to. It be challenged in You don't both my own horizons, but also different people different people think and act and. I am so privileged grateful to have been able to do that. You know I have to admit, and you may relate to this as being from a have A. Of defensiveness when it comes to people bashing Texas, they're such amazing people. They're they're such amazing within their and during such good work, and you can't judge inspired leaders. You have to judge us by Jordan Molly ivins in grammar yards and Janice Joplin for goodness. Sake. Now. There's just and that's true everywhere where there's adversity, there are amazing women trying to make a better future to Tennessee. It's true taxes in needs recognized. That is absolutely true. I FEEL DEFENSIVE ABOUT MEMPHIS TO MEMPHIS. Amazing. You know have Bill Street. Yeah. There's some things that I wanted to get to and that's where I connected with you because I was like, yes, I understand that needs to escape. But yet you know having these strong ties to my hometown It's. US You know and I always say at in calm from a reproductive rights background at came to it, and part of that is my experience in Texas in watching Texans in particularly poor people in taxes in rural people in Texas I'm being the canaries in coalmines of these rearrested policies that use reproductive oppression disenfranchise. So I really love this book because I've read some bit of this history in different books over time, and you just put it together into end. So well, right and I. I think one of the things about the Republican. Party. That happens I think we have these debates in the media when people talk about it as we just accept the Republican. Party. As is right without kind of thinking about how they got here or the illogic of their kind of overarching philosophy because a lot of it doesn't really make sense. Right. But you know when you read your book, the Republican Party today is not the way that it used to be like it's not recognisable from. Prior, to nineteen seventy right you at one Haley. How they kind of cobbled together this coalition of these disaffected smaller groups. You know these Democrats, who weren't happy with the passage of the Civil Rights Act and know some religious groups. So what were some of these initial groups in that coalition? Awkward it was a little bit. The opposite, right that every every political party has factions. There's no question about it, but you know as as the sort of book opens, you do see Jerry Falwell senior, who, subsequently passed and Paul and at small set a really fundamental as they call themselves dominion. It S, which means they believe God gave digging into white men over systems, elliptical, economic social systems, and. Our. Country, whereas before they had to do very much Mansi in short all the sudden is rich move mad. The Women's Liberation Movement is really challenging total control over power systems in the country and they mobilized to political action fighting school desegregation and. It's a long long story. You see throughout the book is that. An establishment GOP, which you still have any conservatives who still had social liberals in fiscal conservatives, they were not finding enough to hang together in related. People who hadn't been voting band goals were building over ten. Maybe we should add up and there was crew rate and they got more and more halt on a constituency within their electoral coalition that increasingly represented a small small action in the country in their views and they. Title, they were making deals with the devil and they. You know what? If anything can prince is that the artifice around abortion which seemed great to that at the time and I'm sure we'll discuss. Because one place where were toweling. Stream minority and they knew they didn't have public pain on their side. So it was a constant balancing act and what ended up happening is these radicals increasingly over to the party with each subsequent election, and trump is the ultimate manifestation of that.

Texas Memphis Tennessee Republican Party Hogue Jim Taylor Skinner Jordan Molly Ivins Elise Manila Nero Pro Janice Joplin Hogue. President Trump Jerry Falwell America GOP Haley Women's Liberation Movement Coalmines
"women liberation movement" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"High school I was running three miles a day and I wanted to nationally run a university as well but Syracuse University at the time had absolutely no inter collegiate sports for women if you can imagine that and I didn't know what to do so I decided that I would pass the men's track and cross country coach if I could come and run of the men's team I never would have had the courage to do that if I hadn't had that base all through high school of running what he did and he was very nice but you could see he was trying hard not to laugh at me he said he couldn't run officially on the team was against NCAA rules but he would welcome me if I wanted to come and work out with the team and I did and he was very very surprised that I showed up this is the on the eve of the women's liberation movement it was the autumn of nineteen sixty six and I thought when I went out to run with them and that they would think I was trying to be in their face and I was trying to you know show that I was tough and I deserve to be on the team and I wasn't that way at all and they didn't receive that they really encouraged and motivated me we're very happy to see me and very very welcoming one guy in particular was the volunteer coach for the team who is an expert on his fifty when I met him and I always joke that he was really H. you know fifty years old I was nineteen and he felt really sorry for me because all these boys are running.

Syracuse University NCAA
"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Because we have such fat phobic societies particularly in the west. And sadly, this idea of fat being terrible has been spreading throughout the world. Susie Orbach is a British psychotherapist and writer in the mid nineteen seventy she was studying in New York and involved in political activism. It was a time when the women's liberation movement was flourishing workshops and lectures on everything from globalism to environment and one day. There was little noticed that said group on women and self image next Tuesday. And I went to long to it. There was a motley group of women, and we began to talk about our relationship to our bodies the politics of what had we ourselves come to believe about our bodies. And I remember feeling some kind of shame or embarrassment about talking about women's bodies. Because wasn't that a bit trivial compared to napalm Vietnam? What was going on in the world? What was this focusing on the individual? It as the women began to share personal stories about their own relationships with food it uncovered some interesting for Susan. Consciousnesses a very strange thing. When you get political consciousness the penny. Suddenly drops the I grew up with a mother who dieted twice a year. She didn't eat any chocolate solo. Apparently she did in the middle of the night. So I just thought oh, well, that's what it means to be a woman, and when I grow that's what I will do to and here, I found myself as grown up going up and down the scale not seriously. But it disturbed me that there was something about eating and not feeling comfortable in my body that made me relate to the other women in the room and think about how this had come to be. So out of this group, we devised idea that really we should stop dicing. We should dare to eat what we will hungry for we should actually developed. The notion of identifying this thing called hunger. Those discussions inspired Suzy's. First book fat is a feminist issue exploring. Why we eat what we eat? And why we eat it. When we do how eating can be connected to emotions not all of them, positive and. How some women can feel disconnected from their own bodies viewing them as objects to look at rather than as a healthy place in which to.

Susie Orbach Vietnam New York Susan Suzy one day
"women liberation movement" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Captured where we're the two parties were moving and in some ways, you know, explains the past where we are right now, if Newt Gingrich was never born would we even be having this interview. We probably would look every issue has a certain person who embodies whether it's the divisions or the sentiment of an era and Gingrich was certainly not only someone who embodied it. But he was really a pioneer in the style of partisan warfare that we have. But but the partisanship really was rooted in in many things beyond a person it was rooted in the way districts were being drawn. It was rooted in the way parties reorganized their primary system and the way things worked in congress. It was rooted in the dramatic changes in the news media that take place. So I think that's part of what we're trying to say this is four decades in the making it has multiple factors. And that's in some ways, why the bitterness and the divisions are so intense right now, Kevin let's talk a little bit about gender sexuality because how I mean how much of. Of of of gender and sexuality is a function of what we I think we call in the sixties the women's liberation movement the divide there. I mean, how much what how does that play out in what events do you see because to me, it seems like a the the the the birth of the moral majority. Right. Like, the these things get weaponized in some way as opposed to just being out there. And that to me seems to a weaponized it in some fashion. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, a lot of ways you gotta even prayed the origins of these dividing lines to the new prominence of feminism that's not to blame a seminar some for for what we've seen, but but it sets up a pain of of it feminism itself at least in terms of its prominent role. Nineteen seventies isn't a large way reaction to how bad the economy by nineteen seventy six about forty percent of all jobs provide a salary. That's good enough to support a family. So you have a lot of simply of both the husband and wife or working over women move into the workplace they start to experience discrimination and sexual harassment. All that and semitism. Really ramped up in the in the in the nineteen seventies. And then reaction to that you have this new movement family values, and I it seems like the the drive preventative Madrid for equal rights. Gonna be a no brainer. If you look at of course, the equal rights amendment when it comes to congress. You know have been in the work since the nineteen twenties. But once it finally gets out of the congress in the in the early seventies. It seems like it's going to pass and get ratified immediately. You know, simple. Do it within the first day. What happens is that Phil schlafly Grace's the part of the cover of our book kind of ingeniously. A turns the issue around and says this is a measure of it's going to give equal rights to women. It's a measure of it's going to hurt families. And it's a brilliant bit of framing that she does. And so suddenly, you have you know, who could be against equal rights for women. Well, she framed it as it's going to be an attack on family gonna be attack on the rights of women to be cared for the rights of women to to have automatic child. Support have alimony have all these kind of things that will keep them alive. And well that women are to be graphic of the military God forbid, there's a whole host of is that she raises and so becomes about two competing visions of what America is all about. In the family becomes a microcosm of the nation. And that's that's up a fight that we're we're still we're having today talk a little bit about the the moral majority. 'cause it always strikes me is that morality became this sort of surrogate surrogate for religion in some way, and we see echoes that where people self identifies van Jellicoe they vote for Donald Trump. And it's almost as if like the, you know..

congress Newt Gingrich Phil schlafly Grace Kevin Madrid harassment van Jellicoe America Donald Trump forty percent four decades
"women liberation movement" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

Call Your Girlfriend

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

"Being raised in it i just didn't want anything to do with it mother's generation she's a little she was a little bit older than hillary clinton but the expectations placed on women who were born sort of babyboomer little before changed significantly decade by decade and i think as i've gotten older i have increasing sympathy for what it must have been like my mother be a child and teen in the fifties with all those expectations placed on her and then suddenly find yourself in the sixties not to mention the seventies with the women's liberation movement like it was just it was i'm sure overwhelming to have the definition of being a woman shift under your feet so significantly with each decade as a grownup i'm far more understanding of the choices she made in how she lived than i definitely was teen or in my twenties and thirties it was just got me away from this as quickly as possible i just i'm just thinking my poor mother and see like i have my mother shoes who's trying to get me to wear a slip or like dress nicely or say nice things like have anything to do with any of it okay real talking i love slip from eating dress that you're wearing that's why clip your slip instead the funny thing is is that this totally true but so stated everything she tried to get me to do with a very conservative life in the suburbs and i just projected all of it which could not have been very pleasant for her though she's very understanding about it i know that this is not an advice book this is a book about your own journey and experience but especially because it does begin with you at this like i don't want to call it a crisis point or a low point but the kind of like the mixed feelings that you have on your fortieth i guess maybe we can say that do you do you feel like you came to some general lake here's how to work through the feeling of not seeing your story reflected and your path for the future not laid out by like culture and social narratives like did you did you sort of come to a point where you're like okay like maybe maybe this is this is more this is this is a coping mechanism from being written out of that narrative i think my coping mechanism was probably writing this book to be honest and i think about that a lot in terms of if you're not a writer what is the coping mechanism because my response was literally like i'm gonna fill this void in demand to be recognized but i also think this is you know you hear this a lot but experiencing it is really enjoyable i stopped my concern for other people opinions and thoughts has just almost disintegrated like i just i am so disinterested in i mean give no fox i think is the the the phrase we like to put to that invested in that opinion at all anymore it's been an amazing experience but i i don't like it by spokes i'm not somebody who has ever been attracted to them and i think i really just wanted to say this is my experience it was almost like notes like dispatches from the land of forty that no one talks about like i just wanted to report back and say this has been my experience out here i should tell you about it as opposed to respondent space should approach it i don't actually i just hope women approach it with i just wanted to diminish the shame that seems to come around age for women and the older i get the more we talk about me two this real even i find myself overwhelmed by the awareness of what we've accepted in terms of magazine covers imagery and deep seated assumption that as you age you're worth diminishes and what that is rooted in i really just want to be like i feel great shit days like everyone else the world is not particularly wonderful because i was seeing that in so many women i knew too i just thought this is the secret did i was unaware and just sort of like declare it less than here's how you should do it if there's one piece of advice i would hope to commended this books that i do believe every american should drive across this country if you can it is a very i've driven across it for many years in you really if you have any awareness.

"women liberation movement" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

Call Your Girlfriend

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on Call Your Girlfriend

"Being raised in it i just didn't want anything to do with it mother's generation she's a little she was a little bit older than hillary clinton but the expectations placed on women who were born sort of babyboomer little before changed significantly decade by decade and i think as i've gotten older i have increasing sympathy for what it must have been like my mother be a child and teen in the fifties with all those expectations placed on her and then suddenly find yourself in the sixties not to mention the seventies with the women's liberation movement like it was just it was i'm sure overwhelming to have the definition of being a woman shift under your feet so significantly with each decade as a grownup i'm far more understanding of the choices she made in how she lived than i definitely was teen or in my twenties and thirties it was just got me away from this as quickly as possible i just i'm just thinking my poor mother and see like i have my mother shoes who's trying to get me to wear a slip or like dress nicely or say nice things like have anything to do with any of it okay real talking i love slip from eating dress that you're wearing that's why clip your slip instead the funny thing is is that this totally true but so stated everything she tried to get me to do with a very conservative life in the suburbs and i just projected all of it which could not have been very pleasant for her though she's very understanding about it i know that this is not an advice book this is a book about your own journey and experience but especially because it does begin with you at this like i don't want to call it a crisis point or a low point but the kind of like the mixed feelings that you have on your fortieth i guess maybe we can say that do you do you feel like you came to some general lake here's how to work through the feeling of not seeing your story reflected and your path for the future not laid out by like culture and social narratives like did you did you sort of come to a point where you're like okay like maybe maybe this is this is more this is this is a coping mechanism from being written out of that narrative i think my coping mechanism was probably writing this book to be honest and i think about that a lot in terms of if you're not a writer what is the coping mechanism because my response was literally like i'm gonna fill this void in demand to be recognized but i also think this is you know you hear this a lot but experiencing it is really enjoyable i stopped my concern for other people opinions and thoughts has just almost disintegrated like i just i am so disinterested in i mean give no fox i think is the the the phrase we like to put to that invested in that opinion at all anymore it's been an amazing experience but i i don't like it by spokes i'm not somebody who has ever been attracted to them and i think i really just wanted to say this is my experience it was almost like notes like dispatches from the land of forty that no one talks about like i just wanted to report back and say this has been my experience out here i should tell you about it as opposed to respondent space should approach it i don't actually i just hope women approach it with i just wanted to diminish the shame that seems to come around age for women and the older i get the more we talk about me two this real even i find myself overwhelmed by the awareness of what we've accepted in terms of magazine covers imagery and deep seated assumption that as you age you're worth diminishes and what that is rooted in i really just want to be like i feel great shit days like everyone else the world is not particularly wonderful because i was seeing that in so many women i knew too i just thought this is the secret did i was unaware and just sort of like declare it less than here's how you should do it if there's one piece of advice i would hope to commended this books that i do believe every american should drive across this country if you can it is a very i've driven across it for many years in you really if you have any awareness.

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ruth bader ginsburg graduated from law school she was tied for top of the class at columbia law school and yet when she went to look for a job she couldn't find one because in the early sixties law firms getting hire women eventually she became a professor and then she started to bring a series of cases to challenge the kind of discrimination against women that was widespread in this country i think people don't really recognize a remember how bad it was me you could be fired for being pregnant you could be denied a mortgage because your husband didn't want you to get one or you couldn't get a credit card and and men were never prosecuted for raping their wives women were second class citizens in this country and ruth bader ginsburg saw that and she brought a series of cases which really made the constitution apply equally to men and women at rutgers in she started class about the law and gender when she talked cars and some of her female students this was actually in the late sixties the women's liberation movement was starting to really pick up on the streets and some of her female students said hey like we'd love to hear more about the law and how it affects equal rights for women we read about civil rights cases and all the strides that have been made in not department she went to the library she started doing some research and she realized there wasn't a lot there there hadn't been much done to advance the rights of women under the law so she decided to take it upon herself she joined forces with the aclu started something called the women's rights project and under that umbrella she she brought a series of six cases before the supreme court one five of them arguing that under the equal protection clause of the us constitution men and women should have equal rights i am struck by a revelation i learned from your film that she was not the top pick when they were looking at supreme court justice that's true bill clinton it was his first opportunity to put someone on the supreme court that's a big deal he told us that he really wanted new york governor mario cuomo governor cuomo didn't wanna do it so then he started looking and.

Ruth bader ginsburg columbia law school rutgers aclu us governor cuomo bill clinton new york mario cuomo
"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ruth bader ginsburg graduated from law school she was tied for top of the class at columbia law school and yet when she went to look for a job she couldn't find one because in the early sixties law firms didn't hire women eventually she became a professor and then she started to bring a series of cases to challenge the kind of discrimination against women that was widespread in this country i i think people don't really recognize remember how bad it was i mean you could be fired for being pregnant you could be denied a mortgage because your husband didn't want you to get one or you couldn't get a credit card and and men were never prosecuted for raping their wives women were second class citizens in this country and ruth bader ginsburg saw that and she brought a series of cases which really made the constitution apply equally to men and women at rutgers and she started class about the law and gender when she talked to cars and some of her female students this was actually in the late sixties you know the women's liberation movement was starting to really pick up on the streets and some of our female students said hey like we'd love to hear more about the law and how it affects you know equal rights for women we read about civil rights cases and all the strides that have been made in that department she went to the library she started doing some research and she realized there wasn't a lot there there hadn't been much done to advance the rights of women under the law so she decided to take it upon herself she joined forces with the aclu started something called the women's rights project and under that umbrella she she brought a series of six cases before the supreme court one five of them arguing that under the equal protection clause of the us constitution men and women should have equal rights i am struck by a revelation i learned from your film that she.

Ruth bader ginsburg columbia law school rutgers aclu us
"women liberation movement" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"That a bit later in the show stay with us for that bill clinton now nineteen years ago bill clinton telling the nation nato had begun its bombing campaign against yugoslavia in a bid to end ethnic cleansing in kosovo today we and our nato allies agreed to do what we said we would do what we must do to restore the peace now birthday tribute apollo thirteen astronaut james level born march twentyfifth nineteen twenty eight ninety years ago oh wow what a powerful movie that became another birthday tribute activist and journalist glory steinmann born march twentyfifth nineteen thirty four eighty four years ago shake horse was a leader of the women's liberation movement in the late nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies here's an excerpt from an address to the women of america it really is a revolution we are talking about as in which there will be no roles other than those chosen or those earned we are really talking about humanism all right elton john born march twentyfifth nineteen forty seven seventy one years ago goodbye yellow brick road of course one of us many hits and also the title of one of us while more popular albums all right racing car drivers danika patrick of course one of the best born march twenty fifth nineteen eighty two thirty six years ago she is most successful women in indycar racing and the only lady driver in nascar this was a response to whether she felt alienated as a woman in the racing industry like i've been welcomed with open arms and ask her and i felt like that was the case back in the early days even have when i raised indycar and of course danika and aaron rodgers have been dating of late and we wish them well in their ongoing relationship now we're going to end with the big bang here one of my favorite alltime artists aretha franklin born march twentyfifth nineteen forty to seventy six years ago this is a version of hey what else can we play when we talk about aretha here we go.

bill clinton nato yugoslavia kosovo elton john danika patrick nascar america aaron rodgers aretha franklin twentyfifth nineteen forty seven seventy o nineteen thirty four eighty fo nineteen eighty two thirty six nineteen twenty eight ninety y seventy six years nineteen years twenty fifth
"women liberation movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the people who were there i'm lucy burns and today i'm taking you back to 1971 and an experiment and collective living by a group of women in washington dc they called themselves the fureys like many feminists at the time and since they were trying to work out how to live in what felt like a man's world and they're answer was to try and live without men altogether as lesbian separatists but they earlier eric frein resolve bone move the wvu wounded by well i was actually a heterosexual married woman and i was also one of the founders of the local d c women's liberation movement and 1968 this is feminist activist charlotte punch we were the young the young turks i guess i would say now sort of always grabbing onto new ideas and it was in that context that i first started you think about issues of lesbian rights and then came out as a lesbian because charlotte had also met someone a writer could reach tonight brown to was sort of o infamous as a a lesbian organizer and i was a fairly mainstream polite middleclass feminist leader in washington so here came this new york as beyond who swept me off my feet and then we became this powerful organizing team for at least about a year or two and saw we'd got no charlotte left her husband and she and rita along with fellow activist started a consciousnessraising great for lesbian feminists there was something about discovering myself as a lesbian discovering that site of myself like to understand the veges the end the extent to which in the 1970s women's movement period we were really very focused on how much we had not been centered on our cells as women how much we've been trained to focus on men and children and taking care of everybody else so the sense that as they say in the lesbian indentified woman statement that you don't even need men for sex was kind of like this well we we really could just be with each other we don't need we don't need them my turn.

lucy burns wvu charlotte punch writer washington new york eric frein brown rita
"women liberation movement" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Act passed before the women's liberation movement an officer played by an african american woman i think tim and i think i said something like a dr king i wish i could be out there marching with you he said no no no no you don't understand we don't need you on the to march you are marching you are reflecting what we are fighting for for the first time we are being seen the world over as we should be seen he says do you understand that this is the only show that my wife caretta and i will allow our little children to stay up and watch i was speechless dr king was not the last american leader to celebrate star trek's positive influence star trek and a good story says that we're all complicated and we all got a little bit of spock in the low bidder incurred in a little bit of scottie and maybe some cling on imminent swoon in his case by the way a lot of spock this hour in studio 360 we are looking back on the halfcenturylong legacy of star trek six different television series plus an animated spinoff plus the thirteen feature films so far it'd be hearing from cylinders various creators and talking about how it's influenced generations of fans from the science nerds who grew up to be engineers or astronauts to the dream of than stonings who grew up to write for tv and the move to start we will look at the newest tv adoration star trek discovery which started last fall to catch me up on the new series and explain how it fits within the whole star trek cannon i've asked thin meriva martinelli who is a culture writer for slate and a pretty serious star trek fan rissa welcomed listed a 360 thanks so much for having me so we're you a fan of star trek growing up ally started watching in college and i was a skeptic as star trek skeptic because i had only ever seen sort of bits and pieces of the original series and sort of the silly bits and pieces so that william shatner over acting or episodes where they try and steel spock sprain right sort of the worst of tracks i went in very skeptical but i started watching the next generation which is the one with the piccard and patrick stewart tmz '80s '90s.

officer tim dr king martinelli writer william shatner patrick stewart
"women liberation movement" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on Here & Now

"The industry but also connecting the industry to the community from the beginning of her career preston was recognized as a business trailblazer but she did not see herself is part of the women's liberation movement of the time in an interview from 1974 preston refused to believe women were limited by glass ceilings or closed executive doors i have not found that a door has been closed to me because i was a woman and i started at long before a lot of other people decided it doors were closed to them i think being a woman i got the door open but if i had not been a business person and had not know what i was doing kept the door open over her career pressed had would help turn royalty collection giant bmi it one of nashville's biggest employers she herself was inducted into the hall in 1992 and died a decade later walker went on to lead the country music association nearly thirty years later known as joe walker met her she is dabbash the amazed longrunning award show in help build the cma fest she passed away the summer at the age of ninety three on that opening night telecast nineteen sixty seven walker made what would turn out to be a modest prediction we expect thousands of people to come through the museum each year and one of the great last year at its current downtown location nearly one point two million people walk through the doors france's preston and joe walker met her helped open fifty years ago.

preston nashville country music association joe walker france executive thirty years fifty years
"women liberation movement" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Puts bob night on as if he's a political pundit that's not stick the sports because you're saying what we want to hear what lewis sports one you don't they had lou holtz on sure sure hey hey look if you can't get film warriors get lou holtz but but how i'm trying to think how if we've ever had anything that repeats remotely close to this past week and i went back to you know when kennedy was assassinated in bed the nfl didn't postpone games but you have this past weekend an and i said as soon as i saw it and then monday morning yes penal make that a thirty four thirty one day so there will where you just go round in kind of canvas the room ten years after five years after with what everything and i don't know if it changes anything but it may we may look back on that five or ten years from now in say activism in sports and what it was a springboard their short you know we did a thing on nbc csn on the fiftieth anniversary of the kennedy assassination about how it affected the dallas cowboys who were playing in cleveland on that sunday and they didn't cancel the game it was a different window win was at the most important when don't know but it was a very interesting story no no roger staubach was then playing it now the one the heisman trophy later the cowboy quarterback of course was on the cover of time magazine but they cancelled the cover and of course kennedy uh went on the cover instead of is that a roger staubach there are stories when sports just intersects with the real world a very good thirty for thirty that i think jim gray produced for espn was about george bush his first pitch at the world series in two thousand one was only a half hour thirty for thirty but regardless of your politics george bush lifted the nation that night so post nine eleven um what's happening now tommie smith and john carlos muhammed ali it's not just that sports sometimes intersects with social issues but sometimes it is the lace wasn't a deep place with jackie robinson was in the place with muhammad ali didn't billie jean king have something to do with the women's liberation movement i think she did.

jackie robinson billie jean king john carlos muhammed tommie smith george bush nbc lou holtz lewis bob muhammad ali kennedy world series espn jim gray time magazine roger staubach cleveland dallas cowboys nfl ten years thirty four thirty one day five years
"women liberation movement" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Loans poker caucus the fact that not very many let the has no is in this whole sort of kerfluffle at the beginning of the caucus that involves the election process because she is verse vicechair ugly row cologne who an african american republican women a second vicechairman so the political arm of the women's liberation movement how house as to significant members of the elected body women of color a story most young women do not know a new book from wisconsin historical society press is due out soon it will document the activism of latinos in the state as to setting us reminds us recovering our feminist past disney not mean idealising yet but it does mean respecting its complexities this is not met two essential lies any of these brown women as a strong brown one one at the expense of laugh by media every warm every interviewed when you add s than the definition of community activists set it some of whom worse with the community for the community is part of the community it was always in the context of community and finding media they were not forced as some of the second wei anglo feminists were to make a choice between politics activism and family they did it all tests saddle china's maria catanha and linda garcia merchant spoke at a plenary session last year at the university of wisconsin's four w summit and the topic of connecting a new western as he stood has stories of strengthened struggle across the generations for her turn i'm arlene south cia and.

disney maria catanha wisconsin historical society linda garcia university of wisconsin cia four w
"women liberation movement" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"In the annals of american academia few leaders have made a greater impact than father ted has spurt he was the president university of notre dame for more than a third of the twentieth century for thirty five years in fact from nineteen 52 to 1980 seven when so much in america life changed encompassing the cold war the civil rights hero the antiwar movement the women's liberation movement the age of reagan for the last sixteen years of his tenure has perks basketball coach was a gentleman by the name of digger phelps whose new book is titled father ted hesterberg he coached me i recently he spoke with digger about father hesterberg who died in two thousand fifteen at the age ninety seven but due to technical difficulties my side of the conversation has been lost here's digger phelps on father ted has spurred with my questions reconstructed to the best of my ability digger what made ted has spurred soul widely respected well he was more than just the pre soon have grip on our hearttoheart aimed at harvard or the product you're conservative one after left the port of cherbourg on twenty three in one year of coach and ma'am after they repented cookie near before i would cope three things car make sure your players graduate make sure you don't break and clear rules but also we will have to masturbate a game and at that mad we don't pray to win we prayed to our rare and marble level saying likely killed super carpenter look or kurd like him so that you're gonna empty eat game mentally physically and spiritually and upper schulte number there aren't a game or provocations were decided seven times in my twenty years but stood on the bench of the game pretty and he goes seven and oh bands he beat nineteen seventy seven bill cartwright number one sampras to it nineteen seventy a number one marquette in a nineteen she eighty a beat uh number one the problem we breathe among double overtime in a picture on the covered a book i've got my hand on the shoulder shaken as other an insane to him proud of our prayers from less when heated airdrie heroes run outta hail mary and i spent protests burt but what will you do jeremy a bunch of.

cold war reagan digger phelps harvard president america civil rights basketball ted hesterberg airdrie thirty five years sixteen years twenty years one year
"women liberation movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Doing the 1960s and '70s women in america had started to ask fundamental questions about their lives about equal pay equal opportunities and even abortion rights the women's liberation movement reached all kinds of women it seemed unstoppable it is is it absolutely exploding bit of women in america organizing for political power organizing of russell either democrat republican vice race lines generation class education women's liberation leader betty for dan felt hopeful that history was on her side she had good reason in nineteen 72 the cwu rights amendment to the us constitution was easily passed by congress it read equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the united states or any state on account of sex eight needed thirty eight states to ratify or approve it before becoming law was expected to go three without much question the not everyone was convinced i had ignored the rising women's liberation movement they were prasarana was straits and learning abrazos and things like that finnish lovely was a wealthy well educated mother of six and a champion of the traditional family a storm republican she was horrified by the way imagining future when laws protecting mothers and wives in areas like divorce and child custody will be swept away the really was a fraud it toll women we're going to put you on the constitution well all awards in the constitution are set slow throw lie servicea raza wave a papal and the feminists were never able to show any benefit that er i would give to women but i could show a lot of disadvantages chief among the disadvantages was the idea that women.

america russell us fraud dan congress
"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"women liberation movement" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"During the 1960s and '70s women in america had started to ask fundamental questions about their lives about equal pay equal opportunities and even abortion rights the women's liberation movement reached all kinds of women it seemed unstoppable it is it absolutely exploding lumina women in america organizing for political power organizing of russell either telegraph relegated rice race lines generation class education women's liberation leader betty free dan felt hopeful that history was on her side she had good reason in nineteen seventy two the cwu rights amendment to the us constitution was easily passed by congress it read equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the united states or any state on account of sex eight needed 38 states to ratify or approve it before becoming law was expected to go three without much question but not everyone was convinced i had ignored the rising women's liberation movement way were praise he ran on the streets and learning your bras and things like that finnish laughably was a wealthy well educated mother of six and a champion of the traditional family a staunch repub public and she was horrified by the e r a imagining future when laws protecting mothers and wives in areas like divorce and child custody will be swept away the really was a fraud it toll women we're gonna put you on the constitution well all the words in the constitution are sex notre roll like uh servicea raza way the papal and the feminists were never able to show any benefit that er.

america russell us fraud betty cwu congress